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CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

Carbon Capture and Storage: The What Why and When

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 61:45


As part of the 2022 Carbon Sequestration Symposium at California State University, Bakersfield, Climate Now founder and host James Lawler moderates a panel discussion on how to capture and store carbon dioxide in order to meet climate action goals. The panelists are Ken Haney, California Resources Corporation Bakersfield, Lorelei Oviatt, director of Kern County Planning and Natural Resources and Sarah Saltzer, Managing Director for Stanford Center for Carbon Storage and the Stanford Carbon Initiative. Series: "Sustainable California" [Science] [Show ID: 38158]

Reconstruction of Neural Circuit by Human Neurons with Su-Chun Zhang - Breaking News in Stem Cells

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 75:29


Su-Chun Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., shares how neural transplantation cell therapies can be used to treat neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38203]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet Altering Apes - Questions Answers and Closing Remarks (Margaret Schoeninger)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 75:56


This CARTA public symposia will address specific examples of how humans have drastically altered the planet. Acknowledged experts will discuss clearly defined global-scale negative impacts on planet earth, our life support system (other than climate change, population growth and infectious diseases, which are well-known). Each talk will succinctly describe a specific impact, the role that our species has played, and conclude with ongoing or potential approaches to mitigation. In the process, we are coming full circle to Anthropogeny, asking how a single species could have evolved the ability to so drastically alter the entire planet. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38009]

Design at Large: Future Prospects in Health Equity and Technological Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 58:42


There is increasing awareness that health disparities are largely a result of the socioeconomic position in which you are born, the housing and neighborhood where you reside, and the accessibility of educational and job opportunities. These are known as the social and structural determinants of health. By the time a person arrives at a hospital, their health outcome or their chance of survival may have already been pre-determined. Can technological advances in health devices and health-care delivery mitigate the social and structural determinants of health and eliminate disparities? Series: "Design at Large" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38222]

Triton Talks: How Extinct Cats Help Explain the World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 28:06


Why does history keep repeating itself? And what can cats tell us about this? Ashley Poust, Ph.D., is a paleontology researcher at the San Diego Natural History Museum. He focuses on vertebrates and evolutionary biology and explains how the study of extinct cats, like the sabertooth, can help us reconstruct ancient environments, gain a better understanding of our origins, see deeper into life's processes, and at the highest level, have a new view of the world. Series: "Triton Talks" [Science] [Show ID: 38073]

A Closer Look at….Aging

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 79:58


Can we leverage stem cells to help live longer, healthier lives? Robert A.J. Signer, Ph.D., and Shiri Gur-Cohen, Ph.D., examine the process of aging at the molecular and cellular level to show how stem cells may be the key to preventing age-related health problems. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37968]

Design at Large: Climate Risk Reduction and Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 58:57


Climate change is an existential threat. The U.S. will face more frequent and extreme disasters in the coming years due to climate change. How can we harness the power of technology and indigenous knowledge to reduce risks to save lives and property, especially for the most vulnerable communities? This program looks at wildfires, one of California's biggest climate threats, how to optimize the state for a transition to clean energy, and how we can be good stewards of our natural resources. Series: "Design at Large" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38124]

Ocean Exploration to Inform Climate Solutions and Biodiversity Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 37:32


The ocean is a critical component of climate solutions. Not only does the ocean have the potential to provide food security, but it can provide critical minerals for the energy transition, species with biopharmaceutical and biotechnology potential, a source of income through sustainable tourism, and innovation of renewable power technologies. Samantha Murray, Executive Director of the Marine Biodiversity and Conservation program at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Amanda Netburn, Assistant Director for Ocean, Science and Technology for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, discuss how further exploration of the ocean may help scientists learn more about future climate solutions and improve biodiversity conservation. Series: "Institute of the Americas" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 38165]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Large-scale Human Modification of the Planetary Microbiome with Rob Knight

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 23:36


Through the Earth Microbiome Program and complementary efforts, we have sampled a broad range of microbiomes from across the planet. All microbiomes that have been studied are impacted by human activity — the effects of industrialization on the human microbiome are best characterized, but capture of animals in zoos, domestication, modification of soils through agricultural practices, and modification of freshwater and marine microbiomes have also all been well characterized. Indeed, the pervasive role of environmental microbiomes in biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life led to a position paper entitled "Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change”, the title of which speaks for itself. However, there is hope. Efforts such as the Microbiota Vault will be especially important in this respect, but also new monitoring and modeling approaches will help us understand where to look globally for the best specimens and microbes to preserve. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37909]

Climate Adaptation and Action – Lessons Learned from the State of California

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 51:01


The State of California has been steadfast in battling climate change having passed several pieces of legislation including the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 which established a comprehensive program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from all sources throughout the state. California is at the forefront of working towards 100-percent renewable energy by 2045. Siva Gunda, the Vice Chair of the California Energy Commission and Wade Crowfoot, the Secretary of California Natural Resources Agency discuss lessons learned from the state's adaptation to the growing threat of climate change and the action policymakers are taking to prevent that threat from continuing to grow. Series: "Institute of the Americas" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 38164]

Carbon Dioxide at Scale: Working Fast for an Equitable Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 37:28


The 2022 Carbon Sequestration Symposium at California State University, Bakersfield, focuses on engaging the community, industry, policymakers and academia in the topic of carbon sequestration. According to several studies, Kern County has been identified as a prime location for the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Roger Aines, Ph.D., and Kim Mayfield, Ph.D., discuss efforts underway to capture and store carbon dioxide as a viable option to mitigate climate change. Series: "Climate Solutions " [Science] [Show ID: 38157]

Climate Action Regional Security and the Road to the Summit of the Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 41:30


The United States Southern Command's (USSOUTHCOM) is responsible for providing contingency planning, operations, and security cooperation for Central and South America, and the Caribbean. USSOUTHCOM is one of the eleven unified combatant commands in the Department of Defense. While regional security is an important aspect of its mission, climate change is having an affect on its area of responsibility. Climate change is impacting our national security and the security of our partners and allies. USSOUTHCOM's area of responsibility faces increased demand for humanitarian and disaster relief assistance during a hurricane season that could see a record number of storms. This comes as several Central and South American countries face a drought. Former U.S. Ambassador to Paraguay, Leslie Bassett moderates a discussion with the commander of USSOUTHCOM, GEN. Laura Richardson who underlines the effort being made to help combat climate change in the region. Series: "Institute of the Americas" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 38163]

The Journey of the Little Blue Penguins

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 58:39


Join Birch Aquarium's Senior Director of Animal Care, Science and Conservation, Jenn Moffatt, for a first-hand account of how our new exhibit went from concept to reality. Get an inside look at the Little Blues' journey, from the arrival of the birds from Australia, to a time lapse record of the construction of the penguin habitat over the last 9 months. Learn how the Birch husbandry team cares for these charismatic birds, Scripps researchers study penguins and how we're working to establish a successful breeding colony to responsibly support and sustain Little Blue Penguin populations within the accredited zoos and aquariums community. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Science] [Show ID: 37916]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Accumulating Space Debris and the Risk of Kessler Syndrome with Alice Gorman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:43


In 1957, the USSR launched Sputnik 1, the first human object to leave Earth. In the 65 years since then the region of Earth orbit has become filled with satellites and space junk. The proliferation of debris has led to the prediction of Kessler Syndrome, a state where a never-ending cascade of collisions between orbital objects renders parts of space unusable for human purposes. However, there are many different ways to look at the space junk surrounding Earth. For example, it is also an archaeological record of humanity's first steps into outer space, a cultural landscape created by the combined effects of natural and cultural processes, and a technological signature of the same kind that SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) researchers are looking for around exoplanets in other solar systems. It's unclear when or whether the tipping point into Kessler Syndrome might be reached, but if humanity is confined to Earth in the future, what will this mean? Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37913]

The State of the Pacific Ocean: Climate Change and the Case for Expanded Hemispheric Cooperation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 82:54


Spanning nearly 63 million square miles from California to China, the Pacific Ocean is by the far the largest of the world's ocean basins. The Pacific contains more than half of the free water on the planet and is the deepest ocean on Earth. Climate change impacts are being felt around the globe, but what do we do about it. Much of the ocean is still waiting to be explored, but human activities like industrial fishing, deep-sea mining, and fossil-fuel burning are already changing it in significant ways. Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor Brice Semmens moderators a discussion with NOAA Administrator, Richard Spinrad and State Department Deputy Assistant Secretary of Ocean, Fisheries and Polar Affairs, Maxine Burkett on the State of the Pacific Ocean and how the hemisphere can work together to combat the growing effects of climate change. Series: "Institute of the Americas" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 38162]

Our Oceans: Key To Storing Carbon?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 15:59


Using carbon dioxide removal (CDR) strategies to mitigate climate change is a land-intensive endeavor. To capture one gigatonne of CO2 through direct air capture requires a facility & energy production footprint of at least hundreds, but potentially tens of thousands of square kilometers. To capture one gigatonne of CO2 via reforestation requires about 862,000 square kilometers of arable land (nearly the size of the Kalahari Desert). We currently release about 40 gigatonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere every year, so…do the math. And land that is allocated for CDR must compete with other land use claims: for urbanization, agriculture, biodiversity, and renewable energy technologies. But what if our perspective was slightly… more aqueous? Oceans, which make up 70% of the Earth's surface, already absorb more than 10 billion tonnes of CO2 annually. Would it be more effective to sequester CO2 in the oceans, rather than on land? If so, how would we facilitate increased ocean CO2 uptake safely? What processes and technologies exist today, and how well do we understand them? Series: "Climate Solutions " [Science] [Show ID: 38190]

The Data Science Librarian: Steward of Information

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 17:27


Data is everywhere but how can it be effectively harnessed to answer questions and guide meaningful research? Cue the data science librarian! With a skill set that includes sourcing and vetting data as well as the ethical implications, the librarian is a key resource to researchers and students alike. UC San Diego's Stephanie Labou shares what it is like to be one of the first data science librarians and how data is changing our world. Series: "Data Science Channel" [Science] [Show ID: 37196]

From First Gen Student to a Career in Structural Engineering with Gilberto Mosqueda

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 14:43


Gilberto Mosqueda, PhD, is a professor of structural engineering at UC San Diego. His work focuses on protecting buildings from earthquake damage. How did he find is way to such an interesting and rewarding career? A first gen college student, his parents instilled a strong work ethic and an understanding of the value of education. He shares how finding mentors and connecting with other students in STEM fields helped motivate him to pursue advanced degrees and a career focused on research and innovation. Series: "Education Channel" [Science] [Education] [Show ID: 37899]

Teaching Data Science: Access Ethics and Inclusion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 19:03


Who has access to data and what can be done with that data? Shannon Ellis, Ph.D., shares how she is training undergraduate students to be effective, inclusive and ethical data scientists. She discusses how data can be used, the limits of data science, and the barriers and biases that may shape data sets and potential conclusions. Series: "Data Science Channel" [Science] [Education] [Show ID: 37838]

Engineering on Tap: The Future of Engineering Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 51:28


What's the future of engineering education look like? This discussion by three engineers from UC Davis - Chancellor Gary May, Dean Richard Corsi, and Vice Provost Jean-Pierre Delplanque - focuses on the latest in educating the next generation of engineers. [Science] [Education] [Show ID: 38000]

Buried Treasure: Unearthing the Power of the Soil Carbon Bank

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 29:53


Soil - that mixture of degraded bedrock, decomposing organic matter, and microorganisms that nourish the root systems of plants and trees - holds 4x more carbon than vegetation. By changing how we manage our soils, we can increase the rate of CO2 trapping from the atmosphere into the soil carbon bank, while at the same time enhancing the agricultural productivity of a region. Dr. Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, Professor of Soil Biogeochemistry at University of California, Merced, is a global leader in the carbon storage potential of soils. She sat down with Climate Now to explain why soils are so good at trapping carbon, how much they could hold, and what we can do to increase soil carbon storage. Series: "Climate Now Conversation" [Science] [Show ID: 38057]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Understanding Human Pluripotent Stem Cell States and Their Applications with Thorold Theunissen - Breaking News in Stem Cells

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 58:10


Thorold Theunissen, Ph.D., of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shares his work using naive stem cells to model trophoblast development, Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37674]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Global Alteration of the Nitrogen Cycles by Humans with David Tilman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 17:10


Humans now annually add more biologically available nitrogen to the Earth's land surfaces than do all natural processes. For 3 billion years, available nitrogen had been the major limiting currency for life on Earth. The recent human disruption of the global nitrogen cycle is causing major environmental harm, including water and air pollution, marine dead zones, 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions, and species extinctions. Three major ways to solve this nitrogen problem are: (1) much more efficient global use of nitrogen fertilizers; (2) shifts to lower-meat and healthier diets; and (3) halting the conversion of food crops into biofuels, such as US corn ethanol used for transport. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37910]

Triton Talks: Solving Our Plastic Problem With Algae

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 22:42


Plastic is everywhere. There are 17 trillion tons of the stuff on the planet. While plastic is convenient and cheap, it can take hundreds of years to decompose. Michael Burkart, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UC San Diego, works on inventing new types of renewable, biodegradable plastic made from algae, including the world's first algae surfboard as well as flip flops and sneakers. Burkart is a founder and has an equity position in Algenesis Materials. Series: "Triton Talks" [Science] [Show ID: 38075]

Sea Urchins and Sea Slugs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 51:24


Amazing new technologies in developmental biology and genetics research are allowing scientists to begin to answer long standing questions such as – how does a single fertilized egg cell transform into a complex animal? Why does the embryo of a marine organism like a sea slug develop differently from that of a sea urchin? Join Scripps Developmental Biologist Deirdre Lyons as she describes how she and her colleagues are pushing the limits of our knowledge to understand these intriguing questions and the long history and diversity of life on our planet. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Science] [Show ID: 37915]

Social Cost of Carbon

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 8:56


Climate economists have created a value called the "social cost of carbon" in order to better understand the cost/benefit relationship of climate policies and regulations. The social cost of carbon is the cost to society from damages caused by a ton of CO2 emissions. This value is difficult to quantify, with factors such as future societal wealth and global climate damages (such as species extinction) that are impossible to know. Series: "Sustainable California" [Science] [Show ID: 38046]

Carbon Dioxide Removal

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 13:53


In order to reach global net-zero emissions by 2050, we must remove CO2 from the atmosphere as well as prevent further emissions. Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) can be accomplished naturally -- through forests, soil sequestration, or mineralization -- and technologically. In fact, we will need both natural and technological CDR methods to get to net-zero. So what methods exist that remove carbon from the atmosphere? What are their respective costs, how do they compare, and which are already on the market? Series: "Sustainable California" [Science] [Show ID: 38045]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Sixth Mass Extinction the Tree of Life and the Future of Humanity with Gerardo Ceballos

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 28:47


We are losing species much more rapidly now than in the last two million years! At that pace, we may lose a large proportion of vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fishes, in the next two to three decades. Modern extinctions caused by human activities is higher that the normal or natural extinction rate. This is important because it would let us understand if we are causing a mass extinction. In the history of life on Earth, there have been five mass extinctions – episodes where large numbers of species became extinct in a short period of time. All mass extinctions have been caused by natural catastrophes, such as the impact of a meteorite. We are the only species that has the capability to save all endangered animals. Paradoxically, saving them is the only way to save humanity. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37904]

Telling the Story of Science: Creatively Countering Environmental Despair - Exploring Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 22:44


The field of performance studies is interested in not just performance but how it intertwines with social and cultural contexts. It sees value in taking a scholar practitioner approach. Monica Stufft, PhD, shares how she uses performance to tackle issues surrounding the climate crisis and science communication. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37318]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Human Introduction and Dissemination of Invasive Species with David Holway

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 16:12


The introduction of species into new environments has occurred throughout human history. While most introductions fail and most of those few that establish remain environmentally innocuous, a notable minority wildly proliferates in their new ranges. These invaders disrupt ecosystems and burden economies. Environmental impacts associated with invasions are hard to predict and vary in space and time but include ecosystem-level disruptions, species extinctions, and the homogenization of biodiversity. Economic costs, while challenging to quantify, are enormous and growing. Given that established invaders are difficult to eradicate, let alone manage, stopping invasions before they start remains the most effective strategy to limit further costs resulting from invasions. Challenges to implementing this approach include regulating trade and coordinating rapid governmental responses to emerging threats. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37905]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Human Transformation From Environmental Managers to Ecosystem Damagers with Jessica Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 20:45


Beginning with Homo erectus at least a million years ago, hominins have used fire to engineer the world around them. The earliest uses of fire surely included cooking, changing the energy yields of foods. Such innovations altered the course of our evolution, facilitating the evolution of species that could adapt quickly using tools and social ingenuity. After 200,000 years ago, hominins also used fire to change the material properties of stone, pigments, sap, and wood. Although these changes represent a fundamental shift in the role of humans as dominant shapers of their environments, ecosystems adjusted as early humans remained embedded within them. Although we built our ability to bend environments to our needs on millions of years of evolution and innovation, humans are not now simply shifting to another sustainable balance. Rather, we continue to push environmental thresholds across one tipping point after the next. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37907]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet Altering Apes - Symposium Welcome and Opening Remarks (Ajit Varki)

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 6:21


This CARTA public symposia will address specific examples of how humans have drastically altered the planet. Acknowledged experts will discuss clearly defined global-scale negative impacts on planet earth, our life support system (other than climate change, population growth and infectious diseases, which are well-known). Each talk will succinctly describe a specific impact, the role that our species has played, and conclude with ongoing or potential approaches to mitigation. In the process, we are coming full circle to Anthropogeny, asking how a single species could have evolved the ability to so drastically alter the entire planet. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38008]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Anthropogenic Global Water Insecurity with Asher Rosinger

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 14:38


Humans have adapted to meet their water needs across disparate environments over time using behavioral adaptations. Yet, as temperatures rise and freshwater sources become depleted, it is critical to understand 1) how populations modify their environments to meet their water needs, and 2) the consequences of these anthropogenic - or human caused changes - on the environment and further on human health. This talk will provide an overview of different global water challenges and focus on a couple of case studies to highlight how development projects in remote areas that provide easier access to water, which may be high in salt or other contaminants, can unintentionally worsen health outcomes and hasten water depletion. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37908]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Humans vs. Humankind: Are Human-Made Chemical Pollutants Impacting Global Fertility? with Patricia Hunt

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:04


Human-made chemicals with the unexpected ability to interfere with our body's endocrine system have become prominent contaminants in daily life. Because the hormones produced by our endocrine system create complex signaling networks that control our growth, maturation, fertility, immunity, behavior, and sleep, these endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs, can exert powerful biological effects. Declines in human fertility evidenced by falling sperm counts and increases in the incidence of infertility raise concern that daily exposure to EDC contaminants already is impacting human fertility. By design, all species are responsive to their environment. In humans, this responsiveness means that changes in our environment can affect the production of eggs and sperm, the growth and development of the fetus, and adult susceptibility to disease. Thus, in a 21st century world characterized by environmental crises, EDCs represent a planetary health problem with the potential to affect future generations. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37912]

CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - How to Feed 10 Billion People with Walter Willett

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 17:50


The world is facing a health crisis due to increasing rates of obesity and diabetes, and the consequences of this pandemic will accumulate over the coming decades. Simultaneously, climate change is accelerating and is already having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. In turn, our food systems contribute importantly to greenhouse gas emissions, water and land use, and multiple forms of pollution. Thus, a solution to feeding what will be about 10 billion people by 2050 diets that are both healthy and environmentally sustainable presents an opportunity to mitigate many global challenges. The EAT-Lancet commission addressed this challenge by defining healthy diets quantitatively, determining whether these can be produced within planetary boundaries for greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental factors, and identifying strategies to achieve these goals. Any solution must assume that we rapidly shift from fossil fuels to green energy. The commission found that global adoption of a flexitarian dietary pattern that could include up to about two servings per day of animal sourced foods, together with improvements in agricultural practices and reductions in food waste, would have major benefits for human health and allow us to stay within planetary boundaries. Achieving this will require the engagement of governments at all levels, civil society, and individuals. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37911]

Astrocyte Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) with Dilek Colak - Breaking News in Stem Cells

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 62:55


Dilek Colak, PhD, shares the results of recent work identifying aberrant Ca2+ signaling in ASD astrocytes as a mechanism that contributes to specific behavioral and neuronal deficits. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37673]

California's Path to Carbon Neutral

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 28:27


California is a pioneer in researching the impacts of and solutions to climate change. Getting to carbon neutral - or net zero carbon emissions - is key to curbing our increasingly warming planet. Dr. Roger Aines of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory talks with Climate Now's James Lawler about the latest research on ways to capture carbon. Series: "Sustainable California" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 37993]

Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

The Mysterious Pacific Footballfish

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 56:59


The Pacific footballfish is a large but rarely encountered deep-sea anglerfish known from only 31 specimens recovered worldwide. Strangely, over the course of last year (2021), three footballfish were found washed up on beaches in San Diego and Orange Counties. Scripps scientists aren't quite sure why these rare creatures are suddenly showing up on our beaches, but were lucky enough to collect, preserve and archive one of these unusual animals in Scripps world class oceanographic collections. This specimen, a true oddity, is now on display for a very limited time at Birch Aquarium. To see the footballfish and learn more about it, join us and Scripps Collections Manager, Ben Frable, for a deep dive into the fascinating story of this mysterious fish, where and how it lives, the biology of anglerfishes, and how Scripps scientists are preserving this animal for future research. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Science] [Show ID: 37914]

CARTA: Human Origins and Humanity's Future: Past Present and Future of the Anthropocene - Questions Answers and Closing Remarks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 72:09


This CARTA public symposia will focus on the long and short-term impact of humans on the planet that we inhabit, and the consequences for the future of our species. This also gives us the opportunity to celebrate the memory of the late Paul Crutzen, who coined the term “Anthropocene”. It is relevant to ask how a single species evolved the capacity to completely alter the surface of an entire planet and dominate its governing environmental and ecological processes. This symposium will bring together experts regarding human impact on the planet and also address the current and future implications for our species. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37937]

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