Podcasts about eastern europeans

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 858PODCASTS
  • 1,131EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 16, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about eastern europeans

Latest podcast episodes about eastern europeans

Resiliency
Episode 59- Life with Kids on the Streets in Romania with David Chronic

Resiliency

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:32


“The best thing we've done is…stay and provide a long-term presence.” And stay he has, as David has lived among, served, and loved the most vulnerable of the poor since 1998 in the Eastern European nation or Romania. Silas and Steve treasured every moment sitting and talking to this long-time friend of Silas's as he shared keys to his longevity and resilience in an extremely difficult - and rewarding - ministry. As you'll hear, paramount among those keys is commitment to relationships and messy, challenging, but beautiful life together in community. David says this is, “The core to being able to do this for such a long time.” Dive into the moving stories with us as David shares how those on the margins teach us how to survive in the context of poverty. “They teach us resiliency.” He tells short-termers and those who've joined him longer term, “Drink from the wells that the people that we're serving among drink from.” We loved how David helped us look at resiliency “as more of a collective and communal project, rather than just an individual one.” We hope you also love and glean some more keys to resiliency as David shares his story. Resource: Tender Care --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antioch-resiliency/message

Slate Daily Feed
Hi-Phi Nation: Vampires

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 41:37


The first in a three-part series on monsters in philosophy. We trace the cultural history of vampires from Eastern European folklore to Twilight, and even look at the practices of real vampires, people who seek out and consume blood or psychic energy. The vampire went from demon to attractive monster in the course of a few centuries and raises a deep question for us about how different we can be, the limits of human imagination, and whether we can ever reasonably choose to have a transformative experience. Guest speakers include Christina van Dyke (Columbia), Laurie Paul (Yale), and John Edgar Browning (Savannah College of Art and Design). Sign up for Slate Plus, with adfree podcasts, bonus content, and unlimited reading of Slate.com articles. Go to slate.com/hiphiplus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hi-Phi Nation
Vampires

Hi-Phi Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 41:37


The first in a three-part series on monsters in philosophy. We trace the cultural history of vampires from Eastern European folklore to Twilight, and even look at the practices of real vampires, people who seek out and consume blood or psychic energy. The vampire went from demon to attractive monster in the course of a few centuries and raises a deep question for us about how different we can be, the limits of human imagination, and whether we can ever reasonably choose to have a transformative experience. Guest speakers include Christina van Dyke (Columbia), Laurie Paul (Yale), and John Edgar Browning (Savannah College of Art and Design). Sign up for Slate Plus, with adfree podcasts, bonus content, and unlimited reading of Slate.com articles. Go to slate.com/hiphiplus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Attraction Japan Podcast
#8 - Theory - Gaming "Hired Guns" in Night Life

Attraction Japan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 74:44


Theory honed his particular set of skills - no, not tracking down Eastern European traffickers - but going into night worker establishments such as kyabas, girls bars, and hostess clubs, and gaming the very girls who are there to game guys out of their hard earned cash - and taking them home! He shares his experiences and tips for cracking into the hired gun scene and pulling these cream of the crop girls home using your wiles and charisma.

The Hartmann Report
IS SOMETHING WORSE THAN TRUMP COMING?

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 58:35


The GOP does have a vision for America and beyond, as does the media aligned with them -- If you want to see that vision, look no further than the Eastern European nation of Hungary. Can't You See that the Overthrow of the Entire Planet's “Liberal Order” is their Goal? Is Something Worse Than Trump Coming? See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio
Father Kubicki – Prayer Reflections January 5, 2022

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:00


In the Church’s Calendar, these are some days to honor some of the saints who lived and worked in the United States. Today we honor St. John Neumann, an Eastern European immigrant of the 19th century.

Night-Light Radio
A New Year, A New Portrait of Dracula with AP Sylvia - Host Mark Eddy

Night-Light Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 118:19


Paranormal researcher AP Sylvia kicks off the new year with a discussion of his new book "Vampires of Lore."  Much of the vampire lore seems to stem from Stoker's "Dracula," but is his information based on earlier ways to kill off these terrifying creatures?  AP looks at many legends from Greece, Serbia and other Eastern European countries.  We will look at earlier publications, "Nosferatu" and more recent movies to see the evolution of vampires.  AP has a fascinating study.  We will also cover his international research into paranormal sites.  We'll look at England's Warwick Castle and the infamous Tower of London and unique stories from US cemeteries.  Locations of Lore - Exploring the strange sites of New England and beyond with A. P. Sylvia.

NIGHT-LIGHT RADIO
A New Year, A New Portrait of Dracula with AP Sylvia - Host Mark Eddy

NIGHT-LIGHT RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 119:00


Paranormal researcher AP Sylvia kicks off the new year with a discussion of his new book "Vampires of Lore."  Much of the vampire lore seems to stem from Stoker's "Dracula," but is his information based on earlier ways to kill off these terrifying creatures?  AP looks at many legends from Greece, Serbia and other Eastern European countries.  We will look at earlier publications, "Nosferatu" and more recent movies to see the evolution of vampires.  AP has a fascinating study.  We will also cover his international research into paranormal sites.  We'll look at England's Warwick Castle and the infamous Tower of London and unique stories from US cemeteries.   Locations of Lore - Exploring the strange sites of New England and beyond with A. P. Sylvia.

New Books in Latino Studies
Ignacio M. Sanchez Prado, "Strategic Occidentalism: On Mexican Fiction, the Neoliberal Book Market, and the Question of World Literature" (Northwestern UP, 2018)

New Books in Latino Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 57:57


Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado is Professor of Spanish, Latin American Studies, and Film and Media Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. His areas of research include Latin American intellectual history, neoliberal culture, world literary theory, and Mexican cultural studies. He is the author and editor of several books, including Screening Neoliberalism: Mexican Cinema 1988-2012 and most recently Strategic Occidentalism: On Mexican Fiction, The Neoliberal Book Market, and the Question of World Literature (Northwestern UP, 2018). Strategic Occidentalism examines the transformation, in both aesthetics and infrastructure, of Mexican fiction since the late 1970s. During this time a framework has emerged characterized by the corporatization of publishing, a frictional relationship between Mexican literature and global book markets, and the desire of Mexican writers to break from dominant models of national culture. In the course of this analysis, engages with theories of world literature, proposing that “world literature” is a construction produced at various levels, including the national, that must be studied from its material conditions of production in specific sites. In particular, he argues that Mexican writers have engaged in a “strategic Occidentalism” in which their idiosyncratic connections with world literature have responded to dynamics different from those identified by world-systems or diffusionist theorists. Strategic Occidentalism identifies three scenes in which a cosmopolitan aesthetics in Mexican world literature has been produced: Sergio Pitol's translation of Eastern European and marginal British modernist literature; the emergence of the Crack group as a polemic against the legacies of magical realism; and the challenges of writers like Carmen Boullosa, Cristina Rivera Garza, and Ana García Bergua to the roles traditionally assigned to Latin American writers in world literature. Bryant Scott is a professor of English in the Liberal Arts Department at Texas A&M University at Qatar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latino-studies

SpongeBob SquareCast
S3E10a Wet Painters

SpongeBob SquareCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 38:49


This episode was previously released to our Patreon Subscribers. Join Stelly and Gavin as they discuss the first segment of the tenth episode of season three, Wet Painters. Confusion at the Krusty Krab leads SpongeBob and Patrick to decorate Mr Krabs house as punishment, but there's a catch: the paint is permanent, and there's scope for an awful lot to go wrong. Elsewhere, Stelly and Gavin chat through lockdown (dull), Lansing's downtown treats (none), and Biggby's mocha lattes (expensive), before Stella practices her pronunciation of Eastern European episode title alternatives (potentially problematic). Meanwhile, Gavin has devised a devilish character-based quiz for this month. How much will Stelly add to her college fund?  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/spongebobsquarecast)

The Business of Esports
Episode #176: 27 Nerds, Gaming Software Development, Esports Team Needs, Eastern European Gaming Programmers

The Business of Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 42:38


In this episode with special guest Yevgen Vershynin (Chief Operating Officer of 27 Nerds), we discuss Yevgen's background in research and software, outsourcing software development to 27 Nerds, the needs of esports teams in today's market, building software for the esports industry, esports software development talent exploding in Eastern Europe, and so much more!

Better Together with Maria Menounos
396. When Details Derail Dreams and New Year's Eve Manifestations

Better Together with Maria Menounos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 78:42


Why Thursdays you don't need make-up, just ask Jess Glynn. Why making a 'life annoyance list' is the most important New Year step toward a better you, just ask Maria. Why removing those items from your life is the second most important step, just listen to Maria. Why making a list of small, attainable goals is the third most important step, just ask Keven. Why making certain, specific life adjustments may help you find your ideal mate, just ask Kelsey. Why you may want to mesh your creative pursuits into your day job, just ask Pooja. Why it's still all about hard work and sacrifice to achieve success yet as much about detachment. Why the last two years may have set you back, yet also set you forward. Why Freeze remains the best underground nightclub in LA, why Komebacks are spelled with a 'K', why calling things 'Krisp' is huge with Eastern European teens. So Heal Squad, here's to our last BT show of '21 and to Krisp Kween Komebacks in '22. See you at Freeze. #Krisp #KomebackKweenz

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
Five Eastern European Countries We Didn't Hire In

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 11:27


Nomad Capitalist has team members from all around the world and one of the places we are well-known for hiring in is Eastern Europe. In this video, Andrew explains why we hire Eastern Europeans and shares five countries from that region we couldn't hire in.

New Books Network
Tomek Jankowski, "Eastern Europe! Everything You Need to Know" (New Europe Books, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 40:34


When the legendary Romulus killed his brother Remus and founded the city of Rome in 753 BCE, Plovdiv―today the second-largest city in Bulgaria―was thousands of years old. Indeed, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid, Brussels, Amsterdam are all are mere infants compared to Plovdiv. This is just one of the paradoxes that haunts and defines the New Europe, that part of Europe that was freed from Soviet bondage in 1989, and which is at once both much older than the modern Atlantic-facing power centers of Western Europe while also being much younger than them. Eastern Europe! (New Europe Books, 2021) is a brief and concise (but informative) introduction to Eastern Europe and its myriad customs and history. Even those knowledgeable about Western Europe often see Eastern Europe as terra incognito, with a sign on the border declaring “Here be monsters.” Tomek Jankowski's book is a gateway to understanding both what unites and separates Eastern Europeans from their Western brethren, and how this vital region has been shaped by but has also left its mark on Western Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. It is a reader-friendly guide to a region that is all too often mischaracterized as remote, insular, and superstitious. The book comprises three parts, The first sums up modern linguistic, geographic, and religious contours of Eastern Europe, while the second, main part delves into the region's history, from the earliest origins of Europe up to the end of the Cold War. Closing the book is a section that makes sense of geographical name references -- many cities, rivers, or regions have different names -- and also includes an "Eastern Europe by Numbers" feature that provides charts describing the populations, politics, and economies of the region today. Throughout are boxed-off anecdotes ("Useless Trivia") describing fascinating aspects of Eastern European history or culture. Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Indiana University Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Tomek Jankowski, "Eastern Europe! Everything You Need to Know" (New Europe Books, 2021)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 40:34


When the legendary Romulus killed his brother Remus and founded the city of Rome in 753 BCE, Plovdiv―today the second-largest city in Bulgaria―was thousands of years old. Indeed, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid, Brussels, Amsterdam are all are mere infants compared to Plovdiv. This is just one of the paradoxes that haunts and defines the New Europe, that part of Europe that was freed from Soviet bondage in 1989, and which is at once both much older than the modern Atlantic-facing power centers of Western Europe while also being much younger than them. Eastern Europe! (New Europe Books, 2021) is a brief and concise (but informative) introduction to Eastern Europe and its myriad customs and history. Even those knowledgeable about Western Europe often see Eastern Europe as terra incognito, with a sign on the border declaring “Here be monsters.” Tomek Jankowski's book is a gateway to understanding both what unites and separates Eastern Europeans from their Western brethren, and how this vital region has been shaped by but has also left its mark on Western Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. It is a reader-friendly guide to a region that is all too often mischaracterized as remote, insular, and superstitious. The book comprises three parts, The first sums up modern linguistic, geographic, and religious contours of Eastern Europe, while the second, main part delves into the region's history, from the earliest origins of Europe up to the end of the Cold War. Closing the book is a section that makes sense of geographical name references -- many cities, rivers, or regions have different names -- and also includes an "Eastern Europe by Numbers" feature that provides charts describing the populations, politics, and economies of the region today. Throughout are boxed-off anecdotes ("Useless Trivia") describing fascinating aspects of Eastern European history or culture. Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Indiana University Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in History
Tomek Jankowski, "Eastern Europe! Everything You Need to Know" (New Europe Books, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 40:34


When the legendary Romulus killed his brother Remus and founded the city of Rome in 753 BCE, Plovdiv―today the second-largest city in Bulgaria―was thousands of years old. Indeed, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid, Brussels, Amsterdam are all are mere infants compared to Plovdiv. This is just one of the paradoxes that haunts and defines the New Europe, that part of Europe that was freed from Soviet bondage in 1989, and which is at once both much older than the modern Atlantic-facing power centers of Western Europe while also being much younger than them. Eastern Europe! (New Europe Books, 2021) is a brief and concise (but informative) introduction to Eastern Europe and its myriad customs and history. Even those knowledgeable about Western Europe often see Eastern Europe as terra incognito, with a sign on the border declaring “Here be monsters.” Tomek Jankowski's book is a gateway to understanding both what unites and separates Eastern Europeans from their Western brethren, and how this vital region has been shaped by but has also left its mark on Western Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. It is a reader-friendly guide to a region that is all too often mischaracterized as remote, insular, and superstitious. The book comprises three parts, The first sums up modern linguistic, geographic, and religious contours of Eastern Europe, while the second, main part delves into the region's history, from the earliest origins of Europe up to the end of the Cold War. Closing the book is a section that makes sense of geographical name references -- many cities, rivers, or regions have different names -- and also includes an "Eastern Europe by Numbers" feature that provides charts describing the populations, politics, and economies of the region today. Throughout are boxed-off anecdotes ("Useless Trivia") describing fascinating aspects of Eastern European history or culture. Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Indiana University Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in European Studies
Tomek Jankowski, "Eastern Europe! Everything You Need to Know" (New Europe Books, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 40:34


When the legendary Romulus killed his brother Remus and founded the city of Rome in 753 BCE, Plovdiv―today the second-largest city in Bulgaria―was thousands of years old. Indeed, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid, Brussels, Amsterdam are all are mere infants compared to Plovdiv. This is just one of the paradoxes that haunts and defines the New Europe, that part of Europe that was freed from Soviet bondage in 1989, and which is at once both much older than the modern Atlantic-facing power centers of Western Europe while also being much younger than them. Eastern Europe! (New Europe Books, 2021) is a brief and concise (but informative) introduction to Eastern Europe and its myriad customs and history. Even those knowledgeable about Western Europe often see Eastern Europe as terra incognito, with a sign on the border declaring “Here be monsters.” Tomek Jankowski's book is a gateway to understanding both what unites and separates Eastern Europeans from their Western brethren, and how this vital region has been shaped by but has also left its mark on Western Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. It is a reader-friendly guide to a region that is all too often mischaracterized as remote, insular, and superstitious. The book comprises three parts, The first sums up modern linguistic, geographic, and religious contours of Eastern Europe, while the second, main part delves into the region's history, from the earliest origins of Europe up to the end of the Cold War. Closing the book is a section that makes sense of geographical name references -- many cities, rivers, or regions have different names -- and also includes an "Eastern Europe by Numbers" feature that provides charts describing the populations, politics, and economies of the region today. Throughout are boxed-off anecdotes ("Useless Trivia") describing fascinating aspects of Eastern European history or culture. Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Indiana University Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Tomek Jankowski, "Eastern Europe! Everything You Need to Know" (New Europe Books, 2021)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 40:34


When the legendary Romulus killed his brother Remus and founded the city of Rome in 753 BCE, Plovdiv―today the second-largest city in Bulgaria―was thousands of years old. Indeed, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid, Brussels, Amsterdam are all are mere infants compared to Plovdiv. This is just one of the paradoxes that haunts and defines the New Europe, that part of Europe that was freed from Soviet bondage in 1989, and which is at once both much older than the modern Atlantic-facing power centers of Western Europe while also being much younger than them. Eastern Europe! (New Europe Books, 2021) is a brief and concise (but informative) introduction to Eastern Europe and its myriad customs and history. Even those knowledgeable about Western Europe often see Eastern Europe as terra incognito, with a sign on the border declaring “Here be monsters.” Tomek Jankowski's book is a gateway to understanding both what unites and separates Eastern Europeans from their Western brethren, and how this vital region has been shaped by but has also left its mark on Western Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. It is a reader-friendly guide to a region that is all too often mischaracterized as remote, insular, and superstitious. The book comprises three parts, The first sums up modern linguistic, geographic, and religious contours of Eastern Europe, while the second, main part delves into the region's history, from the earliest origins of Europe up to the end of the Cold War. Closing the book is a section that makes sense of geographical name references -- many cities, rivers, or regions have different names -- and also includes an "Eastern Europe by Numbers" feature that provides charts describing the populations, politics, and economies of the region today. Throughout are boxed-off anecdotes ("Useless Trivia") describing fascinating aspects of Eastern European history or culture. Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Indiana University Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

The Critical Hour
Weekly News Wrap Up; OSCE Announces Ukraine Ceasefire; Russia & China Developing High Tech Weapons

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 117:20


Dr. Colin Campbell, DC senior news correspondent, joins us to discuss this week's stories. President Biden has said that he will run again in 2024 if he is in good health. Also, we discuss supply chain and inflation problems, the president's approval ratings, and Senator Joe Manchin's (D-WV) effect on Congress.John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss legal cases of note. Some states are acting to mitigate the issue of all-white juries when the defendants are minorities. Also, the high-profile case involving the killing of Daunte Wright may be coming to a close as the jury completes its third day of deliberation.Dr. Gigi El-Bayoumi, professor of medicine at the George Washington University Hospital and founding director at the Rodham Institute at GWU, joins us to discuss covid. Omicron is spreading amongst both the vaccinated and unvaccinated. Also, the FDA authorizes the first pill to address covid and the WHO is recommending caution and preparation due to the dominance of the Omicron variant.Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch, and Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," come together to talk foreign policy. The OSCE has come to another ceasefire agreement regarding Eastern Ukraine, but there are questions as to whether fascist elements in the unraveling Eastern European nation can be trusted to commit to such a thing. Also, Russia and China are working on high-tech weapons, the US and Ukraine opposed a UN condemnation of Nazis, President Putin spoke to the media, and President Biden's approval ratings are cratering.Ted Rall, political cartoonist and syndicated columnist, and Kathy Kelly, American peace activist, join us to discuss this week's important news stories. We discuss the US Pentagon's history of recklessly killing civilians. Also, Saudi Arabia may be building ballistic missiles, the White House is working with Israel to develop a common strategy regarding Iran, and the UN is going to cut food aid to Yemen.

Better Than Human
Krampus: He Knows If You've Been Bad

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 55:39


Krampus is a horned, anthropomorphic figure in Alpine folklore. On Christmas, he terrifies children who have misbehaved. Krampus has recently been introduced into North American culture, but has a rich history in Eastern European cultures, including pre-Christian pagan traditions where he has long been a companion of Saint Nicholas. Jennifer's good and bad news: Quantum entanglement is complicated, but we try to explain it in the most basic terms. Why? Because researchers from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have quantum entangled a Tardigrade. This is the first multicellular organism to be quantum entangled. Amber's bad news: The Guinea worm was almost eradicated, but is now making a comeback. (The worm Jennifer talks about is the guinea worm…) The good: Eastern mosquitofish are being scared into not mating by robot fish. Yes, we said robot fish. Krampus is a half-goat, half-demon monster. He has a long, pointed tongue that lolls around (like a snake), and fangs. He carries chains that sometimes have festive bells! Like a super creepy version of Santa's sleigh bells. Unlike North American versions of Santa Claus, Saint Nicholas concerns himself only with the good children, while Krampus is responsible for the bad children. Saint Nicholas gives gifts, while Krampus punishes bad children. Sometimes Krampus appears with a sack or a basket strapped to his back and he carts off evil children for transport to Hell. So you better watch out. You better not pout. Or Krampus will kidnap you! So grab your masks and let's go to a Krampus run, get shitfaced, and scare children. Happy Holidays Everyone!

The CGAI Podcast Network
The Global Exchange: An Update on Eastern Europe

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 53:56


In this episode of The Global Exchange, Colin Robertson speaks to H.E. Darius Skusevičius, Dr. Joan DeBardeleben, Andrew Rasiulis, and Marcus Kolga, about Easter Europe Participants' Biographies: H.E. Darius Skusevičius is Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Lithuania to Canada https://ca.mfa.lt/ca/en/about-us/the-embassy/ambassador Joan DeBardeleben (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1979) is a professor in the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, and in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University. She is founder, former Director, and currently Co-Director of Carleton's Centre for European Studies (CES), a Carleton University Research Centre focusing on European affairs. https://carleton.ca/eureast/people/joan-debardeleben/ Marcus Kolga is an international award winning documentary filmmaker, journalist, digital communications strategist, and a leading Canadian expert on Russian and Central and Eastern European issues. Marcus has a focus on communications and media strategies as tools of foreign policy and defence, and continues to write commentary for national and international media including the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star. He is the co-founder and publisher of UpNorth.eu, an online magazine that features analysis and political and cultural news from the Nordic and Baltic region. https://www.macdonaldlaurier.ca/experts/marcus-kolga/ Andrew P. Rasiulis is a former Department of National Defence official and now a fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute https://www.cgai.ca/andrew_rasiulis Host biography Colin Robertson is a former diplomat, and Vice President of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, https://www.cgai.ca/colin_robertson References: Read CGAI's Eastern Europe Series https://www.cgai.ca/the_european_union_s_eastern_partnership_bold_ambitions_in_a_troubled_region https://www.cgai.ca/ukraine_at_europes_strategic_crossroads https://www.cgai.ca/confusion_destabilization_and_chaos_russias_hybrid_warfare_against_canada_and_its_allies Disinfo Watch: https://disinfowatch.org R&R Putin's People by Catherine Belton – https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374712785/putinspeople Ravenna: Capital of Empire, Crucible of Europe by Judith Herrin – https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691153438/ravenna Sand in My Shoes by Albert Martens – https://www.amazon.com/Sand-My-Shoes-Albert-Martens/dp/0981198406 Recording Date: 8 Dec 2021. Give 'The Global Exchange' a review on Apple Podcast! Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website www.cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Charlotte Duval-Lantoine. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

Congressional Dish
CD244: Keeping Ukraine

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 118:53


Since the beginning of December, news outlets around the world have been covering a possible Russian invasion of Ukraine. In this episode, get the full back story on the civil war that has been raging in Ukraine since 2014, learn what role our government has played in the conflict, and hear Victoria Nuland - one of the highest ranking officials in the Biden administration's State Department - testify to the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee about the Biden administration's plans if Russia decides to use its military to invade Ukraine. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD231: Lights Out: What Happened in Texas? CD229: Target Belarus CD206: Impeachment: The Evidence CD186: National Endowment for Democracy CD167: Combating Russia (NDAA 2018) LIVE CD156: Sanctions – Russia, North Korea & Iran CD068: Ukraine Aid Bill CD067: What Do We Want In Ukraine? CD024: Let's Gut the STOCK Act Articles, Documents, and Websites Conflicted Congress. Insider. TurkStream. “Project: The Turkstream Pipeline.” Western Balkans Investment Framework. “Ionian-Adriatic Pipeline (IAP) Project Financing.” Amber Infrastructure Group. “About Us: Our People.” Three Seas. “Three Seas Story.” Three Seas. “Priority Projects.” State Property Fund of Ukraine. “Large Privatization.” State Property Fund of Ukraine. “How to buy.” State Property Fund of Ukraine. “Ukrainian Government Assets for Sale.” Stephanie. December 14, 2021. “Kiev mayor Klitschko warns of Russian invasion.” News in 24. Kenny Stancil. December 13, 2021. “Groups Move to Uncover Why Biden Held Huge Drilling Sale That DOJ Said Was Not Required.” Common Dreams. The Kremlin. December 7, 2021. “Meeting with US President Joseph Biden.” Maxine Joselow and Alexandra Ellerbeck. December 6, 2021. “Biden is approving more oil and gas drilling permits on public lands than Trump, analysis finds.” The Washington Post. Medea Benjamin and Nicolas J. S. Davies. November 23, 2021. “The US-Russia Confrontation Over Ukraine.” Consortium News. International Monetary Fund (IMF). November 22, 2021. “IMF Executive Board Completes First Review Under Stand-By Arrangement for Ukraine, Approves Extension of the Arrangement, Press Release No. 21/342.” Nathan Rott. November 17, 2021. “The Biden administration sold oil and gas leases days after the climate summit.” NPR. Anatol Lieven. November 15, 2021. “Ukraine: The Most Dangerous Problem in the World.” The Nation. John Vandiver and Alison Bath. November 12, 2021. “US Actions in Ukraine Backfiring as Risk of Russian Invasion Grows, Analysts Say.” Military.com Andrew E. Kramer. November 3, 2021. “Weapons Tracing Study Implicates Russia in Ukraine Conflict.” The New York Times. Anton Troianovski and Julian E. Barnes. November 2, 2021. “U.S.-Russia Engagement Deepens as C.I.A. Head Travels to Moscow.” The New York Times. Anton Troianovski and David E. Sanger. October 31, 2021. “Rivals on World Stage, Russia and U.S. Quietly Seek Areas of Accord.” The New York Times. David E. Sanger. October 25, 2021. “Ignoring Sanctions, Russia Renews Broad Cybersurveillance Operation.” The New York Times. Artin DerSimonian. October 19, 2021. “Ice breaking? Russia waives ban on Victoria Nuland.” Responsible Statecraft. Andrew E. Kramer. October 18, 2021. “Russia Breaks Diplomatic Ties With NATO.” The New York Times. Mark Episkopos. October 16, 2021. “Victoria Nuland's Mission to Moscow.” The National Interest. Reuters. September 10, 2021. “Russia and Belarus launch 'hot phase' of huge war games.” Antony Blinken. August 20, 2021. “Imposition of Sanctions in Connection with Nord Stream 2.” U.S. Department of State.](https://www.state.gov/imposition-of-sanctions-in-connection-with-nord-stream-2/) Paul Belkin and Hibbah Kaileh. July 1, 2021. “In Focus: The European Deterrence Initiative: A Budgetary Overview, IF10946.” Congressional Research Service. Henrik B. L. Larsen. June 8, 2021. “Why NATO Should Not Offer Ukraine and Georgia Membership Action Plans. War on the Rocks. NATO. April 26, 2021. “Boosting NATO's presence in the east and southeast.” David E. Sanger and Andrew E. Kramer. April 15, 2021. “U.S. Imposes Stiff Sanctions on Russia, Blaming It for Major Hacking Operation.” The New York Times. The White House. April 15, 2021. “FACT SHEET: Imposing Costs for Harmful Foreign Activities by the Russian Government.” The White House. April 15, 2021. “Executive Order on Blocking Property with Respect to Specified Harmful Foreign Activities of the Government of the Russian Federation.” Reutuers. April 13, 2021. “NATO, not Russia, will decide if Ukraine joins, Stoltenberg says.” Vladimir Isachenkov. April 9, 2021. “Kremlin says it fears full-scale fighting in Ukraine's east.” AP News. Civil.ge. January 20, 2021. “Secretary-designate Blinken Says NATO Door Shall Remain Open to Georgia.” Hans M. Kristensen and Matt Korda. January 12, 2021. “Nuclear Notebook: United States nuclear weapons, 2021.” The Bulletin. Andrew Feinberg. January 9, 2021. “Two years after his infamous phone call with Trump, Zelensky comes to Washington.” The Independent. David E. Sanger, Nicole Perlroth and Julian E. Barnes. January 2, 2021. “As Understanding of Russian Hacking Grows, So Does Alarm.” The New York Times. David E. Sanger, Nicole Perlroth and Eric Schmitt. December 14, 2020. “Scope of Russian Hacking Becomes Clear: Multiple U.S. Agencies Were Hit”. The New York Times. Mark Episkopos. November 11, 2020. “Ukraine's Power Play on Minsk.” The National Interest. Government Accountability Office. October 21, 2020. “Crude Oil Markets: Effects of the Repeal of the Crude Oil Export Ban, GAO-21-118.” Anthony B. Cavender, Thomas A. Campbell, Dan LeFort, Paul S. Marston. December 23, 2015. “U.S. Repeals Longstanding Ban on Export of Crude Oil.” Pillsbury Law. Robert Parry. July 15, 2015. “The Ukraine Mess That Nuland Made.” Truthout. Robert Parry. March 19, 2015. “Ukraine's Poison Pill for Peace Talks.” Consortium News. “Full text of the Minsk agreement” February 12, 2015. Financial Times. NATO. May 8, 2014. “Article 23.” Bucharest Summit Declaration Seumas Milne. April 30, 2014. “It's not Russia that's pushed Ukraine to the brink of war.” The Guardian. David Morrison. Updated May 9, 2014. “How William Hague Deceived the House of Commons on Ukraine.” HuffPost. US Energy Information Administration. March 15, 2014. “16% of Natural Gas Consumed in Europe Flows Through Ukraine.” Energy Central. Robert Parry. February 27, 2014. “Cheering a ‘Democratic' Coup in Ukraine.” Common Dreams. “Ukraine crisis: Transcript of leaked Nuland-Pyatt call.” February 7, 2014. BBC News. Adam Taylor. December 16, 2013. “John McCain Went To Ukraine And Stood On Stage With A Man Accused Of Being An Anti-Semitic Neo-Nazi.” Insider. Brian Whelan. December 16, 2013. “Far-right group at heart of Ukraine protests meet US senator.” Channel 4 News. Guardian staff and agencies. December 15, 2013. “John McCain tells Ukraine protesters: 'We are here to support your just cause.'” The Guardian. International Monetary Fund (IMF). October 31, 2013. “Statement by IMF Mission to Ukraine, Press Release No. 13/419.” Carl Gershman. September 26, 2013. “Former Soviet States Stand Up to Russia. Will the U.S.?” The Washington Post. Amanda Winkler. November 14, 2011. “'60 Minutes' Exposes Congressional Insider Trading.” The Christian Post. Images USAID and Ukraine Privatization Fund Bills S.1605 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 Sponsor: Sen. Scott, Rick [R-FL] Audio Sources President Biden White House Departure December 8, 2021 President Biden briefly stopped and spoke with reporters as he departed the White House for an event in Kansas City, Missouri. He began by addressing the Omicron variant, saying that the Pfizer vaccine is showing encouraging results against the COVID-19 variant. When asked about Russian President Putin and Ukraine, President Biden said if Putin were to invade Ukraine, there “will be severe consequences.” He went on to say that putting U.S. troops on the ground in Ukraine is currently “not in the cards.” close Report Video Issue Clips Biden: We hope by Friday, we're going to be able to say and announce to you that we're having meetings at a higher level, not just with us, but with at least four of our major NATO allies and Russia to discuss the future of Russia's concerns relative to NATO writ large. And whether or not we can work out any accommodations as it relates to bringing down the temperature along the eastern front. Biden: We have a moral obligation and a legal obligation to our NATO allies if they were to attack under Article Five, it's a sacred obligation. That obligation does not extend to NATO, I mean to Ukraine, but it would depend upon what the rest of the NATO countries were willing to do as well. But the idea of the United States is going to unilaterally use force to confront Russia invading Ukraine is not in the cards right now. Biden: Meeting with Putin. I was very straightforward. There were no minced words. It was polite, but I made it very clear, if in fact, he invades Ukraine, there will be severe consequences, severe consequences. Economic consequences, like none he's ever seen or ever had been seen in terms of ease and flows. He knows his immediate response was he understood that and I indicated I knew he would respond. But beyond that, if in fact, we would probably also be required to reinforce our presence in NATO countries to reassure particularly those on the Eastern Front. In addition to that, I made it clear that we would provide the defensive capability to the Ukrainians as well. Hearing on U.S. Policy Toward Russia Senate Committee on Foreign Relations December 7, 2021 Victoria Nuland, the undersecretary of state for political affairs, testified at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on U.S. policy toward Russia. She addressed President Biden's earlier call with Russian President Vladimir Putin and said that Russia would suffer severe consequences if it attacked Ukraine. Other topics included the use of sanctions if Russia invades Ukraine, the cooperation of NATO and U.S. allies, Russia's use of energy during conflict, and the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline 00:20 Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): As we meet here today Russia is engaged in one of the most significant troop buildups that we have seen along Ukraine's border. To nyone paying attention, this looks like more than posturing, more than attention seeking. The Kremlin's actions clearly pose a real threat of war. 00:40 Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): I want to be crystal clear to those listening to this hearing in Moscow, Kiev and other capitals around the world. A Russian invasion will trigger devastating economic sanctions the likes of which we have never seen before. 00:59 Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): I proposed a suite of options last month in an amendment to the NDA. The Russian banking sector would be wiped out, sovereign debt would be blocked, Russia would be removed from the Swift payment system, sectoral sanctions would cripple the Russian economy. Putin himself as well as his inner circle would lose access to bank accounts in the West. Russia would effectively be cut off and isolated from the international economic system. Let me be clear, these are not run of the mill sanctions. What is being discussed is at the maximum end of the spectrum, or as I have called it the mother of all sanctions, and I hope that we can come together in a bipartisan way to find a legislative path forward soon, so that we can achieve that. 1:51 Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): If Putin invades Ukraine the implications will be devastating for the Russian economy but also for the Russian people. 2:24 Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): But is the Kremlin really ready to face a bloody, persistent and drawn out insurgency? How many body bags is Putin willing to accept? 6:03 Sen James Risch (R-ID): This is a clearly clearly bipartisan matter. 7:40 Victoria Nuland: First, let me review what we are seeing. Over the past six weeks, Russia has stepped up planning for potential further military action in Ukraine, positioning close to 100,000 troops around Ukraine's eastern and northern borders and from the south via the Crimean peninsula. Russian plans and positioning of assets also include the means to destabilize Ukraine from within, and an aggressive information operation and an attempt to undermine Ukrainian stability and social cohesion and to pin the blame for any potential escalation on Kiev, and on NATO nations including the United States. Russia's military and intelligence services are continuing to develop the capability to act decisively in Ukraine when ordered to do so, potentially in early 2022. The intended force, if fully mobilized, would be twice the size of what we saw last spring, including approximately 100 battalion tactical groups, or nearly all of Russia's ready ground forces based west of the Urals. We don't know whether President Putin has made a decision to attack Ukraine or to overthrow its government. But we do know he's building the capacity to do so. 10:42 Victoria Nuland: Since 2014 The United States has provided Ukraine with $2.4 billion in security assistance including $450 million this year alone 12:00 Victoria Nuland: Diplomacy remains the best route to settle the conflict in Donbas and address any other problems or grievances. The Minsk agreements offer the best basis for negotiations and the US is prepared to support a revived effort if the parties welcome that. 15:16 Victoria Nuland: You might have seen a press conference today that commission Chairwoman van der Laan gave in Brussels in which she made absolutely clear that the EU would also join in very consequential economic measures of the kind that they have not employed before. 23:26 Victoria Nuland: It's also important, I think, for President Putin to understand as the President conveyed to him today, that this will be different than it was in 2014. If he goes in you will recall then that our sanctions escalated somewhat gradually as he didn't stop moving. This time the intent is to make clear that the initial sanctions in response to any further aggressive moves in Ukraine will be extremely significant and isolating for Russia and for Russian business and for the Russian people. 24:51 Victoria Nuland: As you know, energy is the cash cow that enables these kinds of military deployments. So Putin needs the energy to flow as as much as the consumers need it. But more broadly, we have been counseling Europe for almost a decade now to reduce its dependence on Russian energy, including our opposition to Nord Stream 2 and our opposition to Nord Stream 1 and our opposition to to TurkStream and TurkStream 2 and to have come to find alternative sources of hydrocarbons but also to continue their efforts to go green and end their dependencies. 30:55 Sen. Todd Young (R-IN): President Putin and Foreign Minister Lavrov have repeatedly indicated that they seek to deny any potential path to NATO membership for Ukraine and other Eastern European countries. Does the administration view this demand is a valid issue for negotiation? Victoria Nuland: No we do not and President Biden made that point crystal clear to President Putin today that the issue of who joins NATO is an issue for NATO to decide it's an issue for applicant countries to decide that no other outside power will or may have a veto or a vote in those decisions. 32:22 Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH): Senator Portman and I offered an amendment to this year's NDAA in that vein to increase military assistance and raise the amount of assistance that could go to lethal weapons. 33:21 Victoria Nuland: But we will not be shy about coming to you as we as we need support and the bipartisan spirit here is really gratifying. 34:08 Victoria Nuland: At the NATO ministerial last week, there was a commitment among allies that we needed more advice and more options from our NATO military authorities with regard to the consequences of any move by Russia deeper into Ukraine and what that would mean for the eastern edge of the alliance and what it would mean about our need to be more forward deployed in the east. 34:44 Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH): Belarus now that it is seems to be totally within Russia's control also presents another front for the potential for Russia to invade Ukraine. Can you speak to whether we view what's happening in Belarus in that way? I know that Ukrainians view it that way because we heard that when we were in Halifax for the international security forum and met with some Ukrainian officials. Victoria Nuland: Well, as as you know, Senator, the situation in Belarus is just tragic and really concerning in many, many ways, which is why the administration along with the European Union in a multilateral way increased sanctions just last week, including blocking the sale to us or to Europe of one of the great sources of Lukashenko has money potash, etc, and sanction some dozens more Belarusians responsible for the violence and intimidation there and particularly now for the weaponization of migrants pushing you know, accepting them from third countries and then pushing them against the EU's border in a very cynical and dangerous way. But I think you're talking about the potential as Lukashenko becomes more and more dependent on the Kremlin and gives up more and more of Belarus is sovereignty, something that he told his people he would never do that Russia could actually use Belarusian territory to march on Ukraine and or mask, its forces as Belarusian forces. All of those -- Those are both things that that we are watching, and it was particularly concerning to see President Lukashenko would make a change in his own posture with regard to Crimea. He had long declined to recognize Russia Russia's claim on Crimea, but he changed tack a week ago which is concerning. 39:08 Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI): If there's one thing that Vladimir Putin aught to understand is how unified we are. I mean, there are many things that divide us politically in this country. But when it comes to pushing back on Russian aggression, supporting countries like Ukraine that are trying to develop their freedom, free themselves from their legacy of corruption from their former involvement with the Soviet Union, we are very strongly united. 39:56 Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI): What we impose on them and how and how harmful it would be to Russia, you know, unfortunately to Russian people. 40:36 Victoria Nuland: What we're talking about would amount to essentially isolating Russia completely from the global financial system with all of the fallout that that would entail for Russian business, for the Russian people, for their ability to, to work and travel and trade. 41:41 Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI): I can't think of a more powerful way to punish Russian aggression than by rolling back what progress has been made, and if at all possible, prevent the Nord Stream 2 from ever being completed. Is that something that is being discussed with allies is that something's being contemplated? Victoria Nuland: Absolutely. And as if, as you recall from the July U.S.-German statement that was very much in that statement that if that any moves, Russian aggression against Ukraine would have a direct impact on the pipeline, and that is our expectation and the conversation that we're having. Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI): So again, direct impact is one thing, but I'm literally talking about rolling back the pipeline. Loosely define that but I mean, taking action that will prevent it from ever becoming operational. Victoria Nuland: I think if President Putin moves on Ukraine, our expectation is that the pipeline will be suspended. Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI): Well, I certainly hope that the Senate Foreign Relations Committee would take up legislation to go beyond just suspending it but from ending it permanently. 44:28 Victoria Nuland: I think we can, and I know this is close to your heart as well, need to do better in our Global Engagement Center and in the way we speak to audiences around the world and particularly on these kinds of subjects. 55:04 Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT): But something different has happened in that country since what has been referred to as the Revolution of Dignity. I got the chance to be there on the Maidan during the midst of that revolution with you and Senator McCain. 58:56 Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT): The Three Seas Initiative is a really important initiative linking essentially the ring of countries that are either former republics or satellite states of the Soviet Union together. They're begging for US participation in their projects necessary to make them more energy independent of Russia. Isn't this an opportunity for the United States to step up and take some of these customers away from Russia's gas station? Victoria Nuland: Absolutely, as we have been doing with our support for more LNG terminals around Europe for many years, as we are doing now in our support for, you know, green alternatives, not just in the United States, but in Europe as well. And many, many US companies are involved with that. But that particular belt of three C's countries is absolutely crucial, as you've said. 1:11:19 Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH): I visited to Maidan in 2014. The tires were still smoldering and the Revolution of Dignity changed everything. You know, Ukraine decided to turn to us and to the West, and to freedom and democracy. And it was a momentous decision. They chose to stand with us. And now it's our turn to stand with them. And we've done that over the years. I mean, if you look at what happened with regard to the Ukraine security assistance initiative, which I co authored. Over the past six years, the United States has transferred defense articles, conducted training with Ukrainian military. We have been very engaged. 1:12:05 Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH): This week we have the NDAA likely to be voted on and likely it will include an increase in that lethal defensive funding. 1:12:14 Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH): What defensive weapons has Ukraine ask for and what is the State Department willing to provide them under an expedited process? 1:18:44 Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA): My concern is this: if the United States and the West's response to a military invasion is sanctions, but no military response, obviously, we're providing military aid to Ukraine. And we've been generous in that way. But if we are not willing to help a Ukrainian military, that's 50,000 people matched up against Russia, I would think that China would conclude, boy, the West sure, I'm going to come to the aid of Taiwan, if we were to do something on Taiwan. Because China would conclude, we're much more militarily powerful than Russia is. And the status questions about Taiwan and sovereignty are a little bit murkier than those about Ukraine. And there's no NATO in the Indo Pacific, we have allies in the Indo Pacific but we don't have a NATO with a charter, with a self defense article. I think China would determine, if the West responds to a military invasion went as far as sanctions but no further, that the United States and other nations would be extremely unlikely to use military force to counter a military invasion of Taiwan. And I think Taiwan would likely conclude the same thing. So I'm very concerned about that. And I wonder, is that a fair concern that I have about how the Chinese and the Taiwanese would view the West's unwillingness to provide more significant military support to stop an invasion by Russia? Is my concern a fair one? Or is my concern overwrought? Victoria Nuland: Senator, in this setting, I would simply say that this is a moment of testing. And I believe that both autocrats around the world and our friends around the world will watch extremely carefully what we do, and it will have implications for generations. Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA): And those and those implications could go far beyond Ukraine. Victoria Nuland: They could go well beyond Europe. Yes. 1:22:00 Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL): Then I would imagine that he's already been publicly messaging what his asks are. The first is that we would pull back NATO forces from anywhere near their western border. The second is to completely rule out the admission probably not just of Ukraine, but Georgia as a member of NATO. And the third is to stop arming Ukraine. Of those three conditions that he's publicly messaged already, would the United States agreed to any of those three? Victoria Nuland: All of those would be unacceptable. 1:41:11 Victoria Nuland: And in fact you could argue that in the Donbas he did take control of some 40% of Ukraine's coal reserves which were a major energy input 1:42:04 Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): I hope the one thing that anyone in the world who is watching this hearing today takes away is that even on some of the most contentious issues of the day, on this one, there is overwhelming, broad, bipartisan support for Ukraine there is overwhelming bipartisan support for its territorial integrity, there is overwhelming bipartisan support for swift and robust action. And after conversations with some of the members of the committee, I look to galvanize that in some tangible way legislatively as we wait for the days ahead as to what may or may not happen. Ukrainian President Zelensky Meeting with Secretary Austin at the Pentagon August 31, 2021 Secretary Lloyd Austin: As you know sir, President Biden has approved a new $60 million security assistance package including Javelin anti-armor systems and more to enable Ukraine to better defend itself against Russian aggression. Secretary Lloyd Austin: Now this department is committed to strengthening our Strategic Defense Partnership. The US Ukraine strategic defense framework that Minister Tehran and I will sign today enhances our cooperation and advances our shared priorities, such as ensuring that our bilateral security cooperation continues to help Ukraine countering Russian aggression and implementing defense and defense industry reforms in support of Ukraine's NATO membership aspirations, and deepening our cooperation in such areas as Black Sea security, cyber defense and intel sharing. Russian President Putin Annual Call-In Program June 30, 2021 Russian President Vladimir Putin held his annual call-in question and answer session with citizens from around the country. During this 70-minute portion, he answered questions on relations with Ukraine, the European Union, and the United States, reiterating that whatever sanctions are imposed against Russia, his country's economy will prevail. Clips Putin: I have already said that it is impossible and it makes no sense to try to restore the Soviet Union by a number of reasons and looking at the demographic processes in a number of former Soviet republic, so it's unreasonable effort to do because we can face a lot of social problems that will be possible to resolve and some issues like the ethnic groups, in various regions, but what should we do about Russia itself without the geopolitical realities and about our internal development? Putin: Why is Ukraine not on the list of countries who are Russia's adversaries? Another question: are you going to meet with Zelensky? Well, why Ukriane is not on the list of adversaries? That's because I do not think that the Ukrainian people are our adversaries. I said it many times and I will say it again. The Ukrainians and Russians, that's one people, one nation. Putin: What I'm worried about is a fundamental thing. They are trying to open up military bases near or inside Ukraine. Making the territory of Ukraine, the territory that's close on the border with Russia a military platform for other countries is a threat to the security of Russia. And this is what worries us. This is what we have to think about. Discussion: Foreign Affairs Issue Launch with Former Vice President Joe Biden Council on Foreign Affairs January 23, 2018 Clips 00:06:15 Joe Biden: They cannot compete against a unified West. I think that is Putin's judgment. And so everything he can do to dismantle the post-World War II liberal world order, including NATO and the EU, I think, is viewed as in their immediate self-interest. 00:24:15 Haass: In the piece, the two of you say that there's no truth that the United States—unlike what Putin seems to believe or say, that the U.S. is seeking regime change in Russia. So the question I have is, should we be? And if not, if we shouldn't be seeking regime change, what should we be seeking in the way of political change inside Russia? What's an appropriate agenda for the United States vis-à-vis Russia, internally? 00:24:30 Biden: I'll give you one concrete example. I was—not I, but it just happened to be that was the assignment I got. I got all the good ones. And so I got Ukraine. And I remember going over, convincing our team, our leaders to—convincing that we should be providing for loan guarantees. And I went over, I guess, the 12th, 13th time to Kiev. And I was supposed to announce that there was another billion-dollar loan guarantee. And I had gotten a commitment from Poroshenko and from Yatsenyuk that they would take action against the state prosecutor. And they didn't. So they said they had—they were walking out to a press conference. I said, nah, I'm not going to—or, we're not going to give you the billion dollars. They said, you have no authority. You're not the president. The president said—I said, call him. (Laughter.) I said, I'm telling you, you're not getting the billion dollars. I said, you're not getting the billion. I'm going to be leaving here in, I think it was about six hours. I looked at them and said: I'm leaving in six hours. If the prosecutor is not fired, you're not getting the money. Well, son of a bitch. (Laughter.) He got fired. And they put in place someone who was solid at the time. Confirmation Hearing: Defense Secretary Confirmation Hearing Senate Armed Services Committee January 12, 2017 00:20:15 Sen. McCain: For seven decades, the United States has played a unique role in the world. We've not only put America first, but we've done so by maintaining and advancing a world order that has expanded security, prosperity, and freedom. This has required our alliances, our trade, our diplomacy, our values, but most of all, our military for when would-be aggressors aspire to threaten world order. It's the global striking power of America's armed forces that must deter or thwart their ambitions. Too many Americans, too many Americans seem to have forgotten this in recent years. Too many have forgotten that our world order is not self-sustaining. Too many have forgotten that while the threats we face may not have purely military solutions, they all have military dimensions. In short, too many have forgotten that hard power matters—having it, threatening it, leveraging it for diplomacy, and, at times, using it. Fairly or not, there is a perception around the world that America is weak and distracted, and that has only emboldened our adversaries to challenge the current world order. Daily Briefing: Nuland Tape Press Conference February 6, 2014. Jen Psaki, State Department Spokesperson 0:19 Reporter: Can you say whether you—if this call is a recording of an authentic conversation between Assistant Secretary Nuland and Ambassador Pyatt? Jen Psaki: Well, I'm not going to confirm or outline details. I understand there are a lot of reports out there, and there's a recording out there, but I'm not going to confirm a private diplomatic conversation. Reporter: So you are not saying that you believe this is a—you think this is not authentic? You think this is a— Psaki: It's not an accusation I'm making. I'm just not going to confirm the specifics of it. Reporter: Well, you can't even say whether there was a—that this call—you believe that this call, you believe that this recording is a recording of a real telephone call? Psaki: I didn't say it was inauthentic. I think we can leave it at that. Reporter: Okay, so, you're allowing the fact that it is authentic. Psaki: Yes. Reporter: “Yes,” okay. Psaki: Do you have a question about it? Phone Conversation: Nuland-Pyatt Leaked Phone Conversation February 4, 2014 Nuland: Good. So I don't think Klitsch [Vitali Klitschko] should go into the government. I don't think it's necessary, I don't think it's a good idea. Pyatt: Yeah, I mean I guess, in terms of him not going into the government, just sort of letting him stay out and do his political homework and stuff. I'm just thinking in terms of, sort of, the process moving ahead, we want to keep the moderate Democrats together. The problem is going to be Tyahnybok and his guys and I'm sure that's part of what Yanukovych is calculating on all this. Nuland: I think Yatz [Arseniy Yatsenyuk] is the guy with the economic experience, the governing experience. He's the guy. What he needs is Klitsch [Vitali Klitschko] And Tyahnybok On the outside, he needs to be talking to them four times a week. You know, I just think Klitsch [Vitali Klitschko] Going in he's going to be at that level working for Yatsenyuk it's just not gonna work. Pyatt: We want to get someone out here with and international personality to come out here and help to midwife this thing. And then the other issue is some kind of outreach to Yanukovych. We'll probably regroup on that tomorrow as we see how things fall into place. Nuland: So on that piece, Jeff, I wrote the note, Sullivan's come back to me saying “you need Biden,” and I said probably tomorrow for an attaboy and get the deeds to stick, Biden's willing. Pyatt Great. Press Conference: Senator John McCain on Ukraine at the Atlantic Council C-SPAN December 19, 2013. 00:16:45 McCain: If Ukraine's political crisis persists or deepens, which is a real possibility, we must support creative Ukrainian efforts to resolve it. Senator Murphy and I heard a few such ideas last weekend—from holding early elections, as the opposition is now demanding, to the institution of a technocratic government with a mandate to make the difficult reforms required for Ukraine's long-term economic health and sustainable development. Decisions such as these are for Ukrainians to make—no one else—and if they request our assistance, we should provide it where possible. Finally, we must encourage the European Union and the IMF to keep their doors open to Ukraine. Ultimately, the support of both institutions is indispensable for Ukraine's future. And eventually, a Ukrainian President, either this one or a future one, will be prepared to accept the fundamental choice facing the country, which is this: While there are real short-term costs to the political and economic reforms required for IMF assistance and EU integration, and while President Putin will likely add to these costs by retaliating against Ukraine's economy, the long-term benefits for Ukraine in taking these tough steps are far greater and almost limitless. This decision cannot be borne by one person alone in Ukraine. Nor should it be. It must be shared—both the risks and the rewards—by all Ukrainians, especially the opposition and business elite. It must also be shared by the EU, the IMF and the United States. All of us in the West should be prepared to help Ukraine, financially and otherwise, to overcome the short-term pain that reforms will require and Russia may inflict. Discussion: Beyond NAFTA and GATT C-SPAN April 20, 1994 Arthur Dunkel, Director General of the UN 26:00:00 Dunkel: If I look back at the last 25 years, what did we have? We had two worlds: The so-called Market Economy world and the centrally planned world; the centrally planned world disappeared. One of the main challenges of the Uruguay round has been to create a world wide system. I think we have to think of that. Secondly, why a world wide system? Because, basically, I consider that if governments cooperate in trade policy field, you reduce the risks of tension – political tension and even worse than that.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

news europe russian china chinese america americans german ice statement rocks npr north war world war ii state democrats military new york times swift campbell world house mission west texas president scope donald trump democratic united states vladimir putin russia white house washington government taiwan mccain civil ukraine missouri revolution secretary washington post decisions sale crimea donations barnes risk moscow european union independent davies ukrainian sen soviet soviet union brussels financial times hearing senators kansas city marston joe biden guardian laughter nda respect kramer clips john mccain kiev economic halifax larsen reuters cheering pfizer insider taiwanese commons export chairwoman rivals power plays gut nato loosely uruguay coup accord hwy belarusian director general transcript belarus dignity documents pipeline pauls davide music alley kremlin fairly huffpost state department stoltenberg imf sanctions sanger black sea bulletin bbc news arrangement omicron repeal truthout crimean klitschko imposition peace talks javelin indo pacific eastern front executive orders lukashenko david morrison gao lng fiscal year global engagement center laan hans m russian government ap news nicole perlroth kristensen national defense authorization act ndaa russia russia market economy minsk nicolas j crude oil urals congressional research service senate foreign relations committee russian federation congressional dish brian whelan world stage nord stream adam taylor poroshenko zelensky government accountability office eastern europeans ukrainian president robert parry christian post henrik b donbas common dreams maidan anthony b medea benjamin international monetary fund imf updated may russian president putin national interest andrew e foreign minister lavrov belarusians article five cover art design yanukovych david ippolito yatsenyuk nuland pyatt jen psaki antony blinken three seas consortium news victoria nuland eric schmitt crestview covid-19
True Myths, One Lie with Culter35
Krampus AKA Evil Santa ft. Ryan McCauley, Seth Colon, and Christopher Mennella

True Myths, One Lie with Culter35

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 34:11


We all love jolly ole Santa Claus, the chubby red-suited hero who brings us presents ever year on Christmas. Well, the guy we're talking about today ain't him. Krampus is an Eastern European legend that will haunt your holiday nightmares. This week, Culter and crew discuss 3 stories of run-ins with the giant horned demon-like creature, just in time for the holiday season. So which one of the three is NOT Krampus canon? Tune in to find out! Take advantage of SimpliSafe's Holiday deals and get 40% off your new home security system by visiting SIMPLISAFE.com/culter  Get 10% off your first month by visiting BetterHelp.com/culter35 Want to submit a truth or a lie? Send in your submission to truemythsonelie@gmail.com! Watch the podcast on YouTube: https://bit.ly/TrueMythsOneLieYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/TrueMythsOneLiePodcast Follow Culter35 on IG   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Novant Health Mosaic
What is Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Novant Health Mosaic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 11:31


Ashleigh Hargrave  00:05Welcome to mosaic, your Novant Health podcast for diversity, inclusion and equity. You'll learn more about the mosaic of similarities and differences that make us stronger, and how health equity benefits us all. Piece by piece, we're telling the stories of the beautiful mosaic of Novant Health. Becky Knight  00:51Hello again, this is Becky Knight. On this episode we'll be sharing excerpts from the webinar our Native American BRG presented on Indigenous People's Day 2021. The BRGs mission is to educate, collaborate and communicate with people throughout Novant Health and surrounding communities, with a focus on understanding and improving the health of Native Americans, as well as bridging gaps of misconceptions and challenges among the Native American population. Rebecca Souza is the leader of this BRG, and her voice is the one you'll hear on this episode. We begin with a history lesson.   Rebecca Souza  01:31Before Columbus, there already were people here in America, all throughout the Americas, north and south. We know they were here at least 17,000 years ago, but actually, they probably were here as far back as you know, more than 40,000 years ago. They migrated to this continent from Asia via the Bering Land Bridge, which connects Mongolia to what is now Alaska. These early people were nomadic and they were hunter gatherers. They didn't live in one place, they moved around. Here in North Carolina and Wilson County we know that around 8000 BC, they started to develop more permanent sites where they would come in seasonally like for hunting. And then when winter came they might move to another site. And between 212 100 BC they started to develop more permanent locations. East of the Mississippi. This is mostly true for all tribes. Villages started to crop up and people might move from village to village depending on the season. But they were more permanent. And they were like still relied heavily on hunting, hunting, wild game and fishing and also gathering but they had started to develop agriculture. They were developing pottery and cultural traditions like mound building. And mound building is one of the only permanent types of structures that we have of Native American people in the past. Since most of what they use wood, animal hides, mud dobbing, that stuff doesn't last after people stop using it but the mounds, the mounds did last. And east of the Mississippi and all along the Mississippi River. There was many there were many mounds built and there are some actually still standing here in North Carolina in the town of Town Creek. You can go it is in a state park and you can go visit there. I'm actually going to visit there this month. Hopefully. The baseline of Native American agriculture was corn, squash, and beans. And those all start to be traded all around the continent and grown even here in North Carolina. It's important to recognize and appreciate that these people did create complex cultures and traditions. Becky Knight  03:59So how did Columbus State come to be recognized in the United States? Rebecca Souza  04:04Columbus Day was first recognized in 1892 by Italian Americans to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the voyage. Then in 1937, it was sort of established unofficially as the second Monday in October and then many decades later, it was set up as a national federal holiday. Because throughout the 19th and early 20th century, Roman Catholic Italian Americans were members of a stigmatized ethnic and religious group, as were many Southern Europeans and Eastern Europeans. They campaigned for Columbus Day in order to place Catholic Italians into American history where they weren't really allowed to be before. Christopher Columbus sailed under the Spanish flag, but he actually was Italian. You have to you would have to understand that white was not a fixed term throughout much of the history of America. And many Southern Europeans and Eastern Europeans were not considered white, by the dominant group of the time, they were all Northern Europeans, English, Scottish, German, French, you know that that's the background of the people that were considered white and so it changed. And at this time, Italian Americans did have a problem with discrimination and prejudice in this country. So they were trying to celebrate a famous Italian American history. Becky Knight  05:37That was a big aha moment for me. Learning that Columbus Day began as a way for one marginalized group to elevate their standing in America. But honoring their own struggle and resilience came at the cost of honoring someone who not only never stepped foot on American soil, he was instead in the Caribbean and Central and South America, but who directly and indirectly led to the enslavement and slaughter of millions of indigenous people. Rebecca Souza  06:01Part of the agreement of his voyages with the Spanish king and queen was that he would send gold and slaves to Spain. And he did. He didn't find a lot of gold, but he sent a lot of slaves. There's an estimated 5 million died within the first years of Columbus landing on one of the Caribbean islands. And that began the subjugation of the native people, the Americas that has continued for five centuries and so in many ways continues today. Millions have died from the disease or violence committed by European colonizers, and entire tribes and cultures were wiped out completely. As you can see, for many Native Americans, recognizing Columbus with this holiday, relives the trauma of violence and loss associated with European colonization of the American continent. They have continued to suffer great loss. Even today, Indian reservations are some of the poorest counties in the country. And treaties have been broken as late as the last 40 years, land has continued to be stolen for treaties. And even their children are being stolen still. When there are issues that require a child to be removed from the home of a native person. In many parts of this country, they will be put into the foster care system and then can be adopted out to white parents away from their native families. So they have continued to lose their cultural heritage. Becky Knight  07:38So now that we've learned more about the origins of Columbus Day, and the impact of colonization on indigenous people, what's the history on Indigenous People's Day? Let's hear again from Rebecca Souza. Rebecca Souza  07:51The first day of this type was celebrated in Berkeley, California in 1992. In recognition of the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus voyage, it was actually a counter to Columbus Day, they were recognizing the inherent problems with recognizing Columbus. In 1994, the United Nations declared an international day of the world's indigenous people. So that became the first holiday to recognize indigenous people. And let me back up a little bit and talk about the word indigenous. Some people believe that indigenous or Aboriginal are derogatory terms, synonymous with savage or barbaric, and that's not what it means at all. According to Merriam Webster Dictionary, indigenous means relating to the earliest known inhabitants of a land, especially if that place was colonized by the now dominant group. So it's just recognizing that these people were here first.  Becky Knight  08:51So the word indigenous acknowledges that they were here first, is that what the day is meant to do? Rebecca Souza  08:58Well, it celebrates the history and contributions of Native Americans, as well as other indigenous people throughout the world. And it calls attention to the need to put diversity, inclusion and equity into history. To make sure our histories are inclusive of the facts, and all peoples. It reclaims the sense of culture and heritage for Native Americans and refutes the erasure of indigenous people. By recognizing a colonizer you have erased all the people that were there first. And we found this quote from a native person and it is “We are here, we are resilient. Our stories, people and land are important and worth preserving.” And that is truly what they what they feel, and what we feel is that this is something that needs to be preserved. Becky Knight  09:53In conclusion, Rebecca shared ways we can support Native American stories, people and land. Rebecca Souza  09:59You can shop native owned businesses. You can attend Native American cultural events to powwows.com, where you can find pow-wows throughout the country, including locally or you can go to any of the local tribes' websites if they have one, and they usually have a listing of any events they have going on. Research Native Americans of the past, educate yourself on pre contact and the history of the United States and native people. There's a lot we were not taught in school. There's a whole lot we were not taught in school. Educate yourself on the current trends and policies and initiatives that are important to Native American groups, such as the pipeline protests, water conservation, domestic violence, the missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. These are all ongoing issues and you can find out a lot of information about them. Becky Knight  10:56What I'm not able to include in this episode is the robust discussion that took place following the full length presentation. We all learned so much and are indebted to Rebecca and the Native American BRG for correcting our misconceptions, and inspiring us to better honor the contributions of America's indigenous people. Ashleigh Hargrave  11:18Thanks for listening to mosaic, your podcast for diversity, inclusion and equity and Novant Health. Stay tuned for our next exciting episode.

ABL Live!
ABL Live! (12.11.21) Be Yourself!

ABL Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 189:35


In this episode of ABL Live, we covered a variety of topics including Jussie Smollett being found guilty on five of six charges related to staging a fate hate crime in Chicago back in January 2019, the Arizona GOP Candidate Alex Stovall being exposed by Project Veritas for not being truthful, 650 black women in Georgia becoming eligible for an $850 dollar per month UBI payment for two years, SATC rebooting then embracing cringe woke culture, Canadian Elizabeth Warren exposed as Eastern European then fired, and much more!

Monocle 24: The Briefing
Friday 10 December

Monocle 24: The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 30:00


Joe Biden tells Eastern European allies that the US will help to defend Ukraine. Plus: Tory MPs turn on Boris Johnson, Emmanuel Macron drums up support and Andrew Mueller rounds up the week's stranger stories.

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 12/9/21

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 107:33


On Thursday's Mark Levin Show, the media is focused on Jussie Smollett being found guilty on five out of six charges for staging his own hate crime instead of focusing on how President Biden is about to give away a piece of Ukraine. Should Smollett be charged with extra time for committing a hate crime against himself? America deserves an honest discussion on race in America, but Joy Reid, "The View," "Good Morning America" and others don't want to have that conversation. The left within the media would just rather call it racist, blame our country, and move on. Then, Biden is infuriating America's Eastern European allies over his weak rhetoric on Russia's aggression toward annexing Ukraine. Allies reject the notion that Russia should have any say on who joins NATO. Jen Psaki even went as far as saying that whether Russia invades Ukraine is entirely up to Putin, essentially abdicating the U.S's role and giving the green light to Putin. Later, a federal appeals court decided that Biden will have the final say on former President Trump's executive privilege and will likely make its way to the Supreme Court. Democrats in the House want to obliterate executive privilege so they can have their political way. They don't care about the Constitution as long as they can stop Trump in the future. This happens because the Democrat Party controls all branches, packed the court during the Obama years, and is only interested in political power, not in the people. Afterward, Adam Carolla calls in to discuss his new show "The Daily Yeller" on the "Daily Wire" and how a close-knit group of newspaper owners, a small minority, agree to see things as racially oppressed while a large silent majority of Americans see things as they really are as a meritocracy of hard-working Americans. Finally, Brent Bozell joins the show to discuss his new book, "Stops Along the Way: A Catholic Soul, a Conservative Heart, an Irish Temper, and a Love of Life." https://www.amazon.com/Stops-Along-Way-Catholic-Conservative/dp/1642939242/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=brent+bozell&qid=1638916874&sr=8-1 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tech.eu
Inside the Eastern European startup ecosystem — with Ihar Mahaniok, Geek Ventures

Tech.eu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 20:57


In today's episode, listen to an interview with Ihar Mahaniok, managing partner at Geek Ventures, an active investor and startup adviser. The conversation with Robin Wauters took place in Lviv, at the IT Arena conference a few months ago. We've discussed the main challenges and opportunities for CEE tech companies, the importance of storytelling and communication skills for startup pitching and much more. We hope you enjoy(ed) the podcast! Please feel free to email us with any questions, suggestions, and opinions to podcast@tech.eu or tweet at us @tech_eu.

Crosstalk America
Remembering Pearl Harbor: 80 Years Later

Crosstalk America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 53:00


William Federer is a nationally known speaker, historian, author, and president of Amerisearch, Inc, a publishing company dedicated to researching America's noble heritage. He's the speaker on The American Minute daily broadcast. He has authored numerous books including, America's God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations, Who is the King in America-, Socialism- The Real History From Plato to the Present, and The Faith of FDR.--In WWII there were 2 fronts. One front had Hitler's Germany, who made alliances with Italy and Japan, while also invading Poland and other Eastern European nations. The Soviets became involved in 1939 and the list of nations pulled in grew from there to include Albania, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Australia, New Zealand, Lithuania, etc.--The sides grew larger in 1940 and '41 but with all that activity, America remained on the sidelines.--Some American politicians thought that if we didn't get involved and Hitler wins, we'd be isolated with no friends. FDR had made numerous promises not to get involved but eventually began to communicate that we wouldn't, unless we were attacked.--Eventually, Japan did attack America at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. 2,403 people were killed. Of that number, 68 were civilians. Another 1,178 were wounded, including 35 civilians. The National World War II Museum reports that 2 battleships and over 160 aircraft were destroyed and more were damaged.

Opening Soon
Dacha 46- A Pop Up That Is Here to Stay

Opening Soon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 39:13


Are pop-ups here to stay? According to our guests today, YES! They are doing just that with their Eastern European cuisine, and building their pop-up and frozen Pelmeni business, Dacha 46, from the ground up after a successful run of pop-ups, including a term at our previous guest, Libby Lark's community space, KIT. Excited to welcome chefs Jessica and Trina Quinn to the show. Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Opening Soon by becoming a member!Opening Soon is Powered by Simplecast.

Crosstalk America from VCY America
Remembering Pearl Harbor: 80 Years Later

Crosstalk America from VCY America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 53:00


William Federer is a nationally known speaker, historian, author, and president of Amerisearch, Inc, a publishing company dedicated to researching America's noble heritage. He's the speaker on The American Minute daily broadcast. He has authored numerous books including, America's God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations, Who is the King in America-, Socialism- The Real History From Plato to the Present, and The Faith of FDR.--In WWII there were 2 fronts. One front had Hitler's Germany, who made alliances with Italy and Japan, while also invading Poland and other Eastern European nations. The Soviets became involved in 1939 and the list of nations pulled in grew from there to include Albania, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Australia, New Zealand, Lithuania, etc.--The sides grew larger in 1940 and '41 but with all that activity, America remained on the sidelines.--Some American politicians thought that if we didn't get involved and Hitler wins, we'd be isolated with no friends. FDR had made numerous promises not to get involved but eventually began to communicate that we wouldn't, unless we were attacked.--Eventually, Japan did attack America at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. 2,403 people were killed. Of that number, 68 were civilians. Another 1,178 were wounded, including 35 civilians. The National World War II Museum reports that 2 battleships and over 160 aircraft were destroyed and more were damaged.

Brains Byte Back
Finding Solutions to the Challenges of the New Decentralized Workforce

Brains Byte Back

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 21:43


Episode Description below⬇️ Leave an iTunes review here - https://apple.co/3i60XWu Subscribe on Youtube here - https://bit.ly/3o1M4Z3 Follow us on your favorite podcast platform here - https://bit.ly/3kTfNkY Find out more about our sponsor Publicize here - https://bit.ly/3BqDUxc The pandemic was unquestionably a very difficult time for many around the world. However, if the pandemic had any silver lining, it is the increased acceptance of working remotely, for those whose jobs allow it. This has paved the way for more international teams and organizations. But with this new decentralized workforce, there are a number of challenges we face. To discuss these challenges and their solutions, we speak with Sergiu Matei, Founder of Index, a London-based platform helping enterprises like Vodafone and Twilio find and hire world-class remote software developers, and be globally compliant from the get-go. In this episode we discuss the cultural nuances of hiring developers Matei has experienced, and why, for example, hiring in Germany might be extremely different from hiring in Colombia. On this topic, Matei explains why understanding the humble nature of Central and Eastern European culture is important to consider when hiring talent from that part of the world. Matei also shares the difficulties when it comes to teams working in different time zones and how these issues can be overcome. We also explore the logistics of paying salaries and paying employees in crypto. Additionally, we learn why referrals are the best sources for finding talent. On top of this, Matei opens up about the company he founded before Index called Travod. And finally, Matei shares his predictions of how the hiring of developers and talent across the globe stands to change over the next five years, and you'll hear why he believes that decentralized work stands to reduce employment inequality.

Have Guitar Will Travel Podcast

061 - Tim SparksIn episode 61 of “Have Guitar Will Travel,” host James Patrick Regan speaks with world-renowed guitarist Tim Sparks, a National Fingerstyle champion, performer, and online instructor. Tim talks about growing up in North Carolina, where he studied under Segovia protégée Jesus Silva and developed a love of Eastern European music. They dig into the state of the music industry, and Tim shares stories of opening for Dolly Parton, playing on “Prairie Home Companion,” and much more. Please like, comment, and share this podcast! Download Link

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, November 28, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFirst Sunday of Advent Lectionary: 3All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint James of the MarcheMeet one of the fathers of the modern pawnshop! James was born in the Marche of Ancona, in central Italy along the Adriatic Sea. After earning doctorates in canon and civil law at the University of Perugia, he joined the Friars Minor and began a very austere life. He fasted nine months of the year; he slept three hours a night. Saint Bernardine of Siena told him to moderate his penances. James studied theology with Saint John of Capistrano. Ordained in 1420, James began a preaching career that took him all over Italy and through 13 Central and Eastern European countries. This extremely popular preacher converted many people–250,000 at one estimate–and helped spread devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus. His sermons prompted numerous Catholics to reform their lives, and many men joined the Franciscans under his influence. With John of Capistrano, Albert of Sarteano, and Bernardine of Siena, James is considered one of the “four pillars” of the Observant movement among the Franciscans. These friars became known especially for their preaching. To combat extremely high interest rates, James established montes pietatis—literally, mountains of charity—nonprofit credit organizations that lent money on pawned objects at very low rates. Not everyone was happy with the work James did. Twice assassins lost their nerve when they came face to face with him. James died in 1476, and was canonized in 1726. Reflection James wanted the word of God to take root in the hearts of his listeners. His preaching was directed to preparing the soil, so to speak, by removing any rocks and softening up lives hardened by sin. God's intention is that his word take root in our lives, but for that we need both prayerful preachers and cooperative listeners. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Stripped by SIA
#96 - Human Trafficking: What It Can Really Look Like w/ Brandi Wood

Stripped by SIA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 69:35


***TRIGGER WARNING: Human trafficking*** This week, I sit down with full service sex worker, Brandi Wood, whom I connected with recently to touch base on the topic of human trafficking. Often times, when we think of somebody being trafficked, images of children in Southeast Asian with older men might come to mind, or perhaps images of Eastern European or Asian women may flash through your head. These are images that are fed to us through mass media. I, too, fell prey to this and I am still working on unwiring my brain to think differently because I was able to sit down with someone who was trafficked as a teen. My guest this week, Brandi Wood, was trafficked as a teenager. She was introduced to an opportunity "to make some money" by one of her family members, another victim of trafficking, and it wasn't until very recently that Brandi even realized that she was trafficked. She was made to work in a massage parlour in Buffalo, NY. Although the working conditions were described as safe, Brandi had no idea that she was being trafficked into the sex trade. Human trafficking can take form in many different ways and this is just one of them. Thank you so much, Brandi, for coming out the show and sharing your story. https://www.twitter.com/theebrandiwood https://gofund.me/d870ef71 Brandi's recommended resources: Sex Worker AID Vegas People Against Trafficking Humans NY International Institute of Buffalo Don't forget to LIKE, RATE, SHARE, REVIEW and SUBSCRIBE!!! @strippedbysia @siasteph https://www.twitter.com/strippedbysia www.stephsia.com

Quarantined Comics
HAWKEYE (RE-Fraction) ...bros, Bed-Stuy, and boomerang arrows? 

Quarantined Comics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 46:18


Since Ryan's still MIA, and the new HAWKEYE TV show just dropped on Disney+, we thought we'd revisit an oldie but a goodie - our 2020 episode covering Matt Fraction & David Aha's HAWKEYE run from 2015 is a fun - often funny - character-driven romp, with beautiful, minimalist sepia art - and features more than just a LOT of Eastern European gangsters saying BRO. It features not one, but TWO Hawkeyes. Are there spoilers for the TV show? Who knows, probably / not, but because we read this COMIC way back when and never really talk about things like "plot" or "characters" - you should be good to go on this trip down memory lane. Hell, it's already Black Friday, so you should just go on and buy it already so you can be a cranky old man like us and watch the show comparing it to the comic, which you totally will have finished reading first. You're welcome SO - you may  know Hawkeye, aka Clint Barton, as the avenging archer from some very popular movies. But while this is just about a guy with a bow and arrows - it's anything BUT the stuff of Hollywood blockbusters. Often described as "Hawkeye's day off" - this series makes it painfully obvious that Clint's just a flawed dude just trying to do the right thing, with varying degrees of success. Basically, his life is a mess. Clint is joined by his newfound pal Kate Bishop - a young whippersnapper who's now also assumed the mantle of  Hawkeye - and his newly adopted dog Arrow. He's also supported by a who's who of ex-lady friends, a cast of working class neighbors who like their rooftop grill-outs, and more than a few lady frinds (a work-wife AND an ex-wife). Throw in the occasional super-criminals and evil spies, and you've got a real FUN romp across Brookyln, Madripoor, and Los Angeles.

Jewish Ancestral Healing Podcast
Episode 2.5: Ashkenazi Herbalism with Deatra Cohen and Adam Siegel

Jewish Ancestral Healing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 61:05


Deatra Cohen & Adam Siegel, authors of the acclaimed book Ashkenazi Herbalism, bring us on a journey into Eastern European plant remedies and the world of traditional Ashkenazi Jewish healers. They offer wisdom on building relationships with ancestral plants, and share candidly about the gifts and challenges of their journey into rediscovering the herbal medicines of their people.

News Du Jour
Tuesday, November 23rd 2021

News Du Jour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:57


Today on News Du Jour, we cover Eastern European conflicts from Ukraine / Russia to Belarus / Poland to Romania's governmental collapse. Reach out to our sponsor, Bolt investments! Be sure to tell them we sent you: https://www.boltig.com — BECOME A PATRON OF OUR PODCAST: www.patreon.com/sugarfreemedia Wear our merch! www.sugarfreemedia.co/shop Connect with us: + EMAIL: team@sugarfreemedia.co + WEBSITE + SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER: www.sugarfreemedia.co + INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/sugarfreemedia.co + TIKTOK: www.TikTok.com/@sugarfreemedia + TWITTER: www.twitter.com/sugarfree_media ☕️ News Du Jour is a short daily news recap. We condense each day's stories into a 10-15 minute format and always relay the stories in a calm, digestible format. We cover everything from politics, to fashion, to art, to business, to tech, to celebrity, to world news and more. Be sure to subscribe so you to stay up to date with day-to-day unfolding news stories. ☕️ If you enjoy the News Du Jour, be sure to leave us a review/rating! We would also REALLY appreciate you sharing our podcast with your friends/ family/ colleagues or via all your favorite social media platforms.You can also always READ the News Du Jour on our website at: https://sugarfreemedia.co/category/news-du-jour/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsdujour/support

The Slavic Connexion
Nord Stream 2 and You: More Than A European Problem

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:27


Mark Temnycky, a Ukrainian-American journalist, breaks down the Nord Stream 2 issue, its timeline, and its relation to the energy situation in Europe. He expounds on the Biden administration's reversal on its position concerning the pipeline, and explains the security concerns that a working Nord Stream 2 that bypasses Belarus and Ukraine creates for America, NATO, and Europe in general. Thanks for listening! ABOUT THE GUEST https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1298811942015045632/s4KAE6n__400x400.jpg Mark Temnycky is an accredited freelance journalist covering Eastern Europe, and has been published widely. Mark also guest lectures on Eastern European affairs to various U.S. universities. He was a recipient of the Ukrainian World Congress' inaugural "Ukrainian Diaspora 30 Under 30" award. His full portfolio can be found on his website https://wakelet.com/@MTemnycky or Twitter page https://twitter.com/MTemnycky. Mark has a Master's Degree in Public Administration and a Master of Arts Degree in International Relations from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in History, with Departmental Honors, from Le Moyne College. Mark works and resides in Washington, DC. PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on October 8th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer/Host: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Assistant Producer/Host: Katherine Birch Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes, Kevin MacLeod, Anthem of Rain) Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Mark Temnycky.

Overwatch
E59: Belarusian President Escalates Ongoing Migrant Crisis on Polish Border to Undermine the European Union

Overwatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:35


Thousands of migrants from the Middle East have become stranded on the border between Belarus and Poland, creating a dangerous stand-off between the two countries. With the European Union behind Poland and Russia supporting Belarus's authoritarian president, Alexander Lukashenko, the situation has ramifications for stability far beyond the frigid forests of this Eastern European border region. On this episode of Overwatch, ISW Lead Russia Analyst Mason Clark discusses the origins of this crisis and its ramifications for the European Union, Russia, and beyond.

West Virginia Morning
'Mexilachian' Music And Climate Change Education Through Storytelling, On This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:33


On this West Virginia Morning, the Lua Project calls their music "Mexilachian.” It's a blend of Appalachian old-time and Mexican folk songs. But members of the band say their music also draws on Jewish and Eastern European traditions. The Inside Appalachia Folkways Project caught up with a couple members of the band at their home in Charlottesville, Virginia.

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Kalani Pickhart

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 60:08


Kalani Pickhart is the recipient of research fellowships from the Virginia G. Piper Center and the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Intelligence for Eastern European and Eurasian Studies.  I Will Die in A Foreign Land is her first novel. Kalani currently lives and writes in Phoenix, Arizona.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Suplex City Limits
Suplex City Limits Ep. 344 - An Eastern European Cabbage Based Soup

Suplex City Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 99:01


Join us this week as we chat AEW Full Gear and the crowning of Adam Page as AEW World Champion, the week in wrestling news, the show falls apart and much more!

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 519: Directing Hitchcock and Writing for Spielberg with Sasha Gervasi

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 83:08


Being a podcaster now for over 600 episodes I've heard all sorts of stories on how people make it in the film business. From Sundance darlings to blind luck. Now today's guest story is easily one of the most incredible and entertaining origin stories I've ever heard. We have on the show today award-winning director, producer, and screenwriter, Sacha Gervasi.Sacha won the screenwriter lottery with his first-ever screenplay, which was a un-produceable short film script, caught the eye of the legendary Steven Spielberg. That script, My Dinner with Herve would eventually be expanded and released in 2018 by HBO. The film stars the incomparable, Peter Dinklage.  Unlike most writers/directors who go on to produce their debut films, Gervasi's 1993 entry project wasn't made until just three years ago. I promise you, Sacha spills every detail of the fascinating story of his encounter with Hervé Villechaize, the famous little person from shows like Fantasy Island and films like James Bond's The Man with the Golden Gun. Hervé was arguably one of the most famous people in the world in the late '70s and early 80's. Sacha sat with Herve in a marathon interview, and the connection they forge during their brief, yet impactful meet.After his life-changing encounter with the Fantasy Island star, which followed Hervé's abrupt and unfortunate suicide, Sacha was determined to get his story told in its entirety and justifiably.  He ditched his mid-level journalism job in England and moved to Los Angeles to attend film school at UCLA after developing the script for My Dinner with Herve. While on the climb-up, Sacha wrote screenplays for The Big Tease (1999) and The Terminal (2004) which was directed by Steven Spielberg and starred Tom Hanks. The comedy-drama film grossed $219.4 million at the Box office with a $60 million budget and has become a holiday classic in the UK.Tom Hanks played an Eastern European tourist who unexpectedly finds himself stranded in JFK airport, and must take up temporary residence there because he is denied entry into the United States and at the same time is unable to return to his native country because of a military coup.In 2008, Sacha made his documentary directorial debut and executive produced Anvil! The Story of Anvil. The amazing documentary premiered at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival about a heavy metal band that never gave up on their dreams of being a successful band. Anvil was established in 1978 and became one of the most influential yet commercially unsuccessful acts with thirteen albums. The documentary ranks at 98% on Rotten Tomatoes.He also directed the 2012 film Hitchcock, a story about the relationship between Alfred Hitchcock and his wife, Alma Reville during the filming of Psycho (1969). It starred Anthony Hopkins, Helen Mirren, and Scarlet Johansson. Sasha is such an interesting human being, I had such a ball talking with him.  We talk about the film business, his origin stories, his screenwriting craft, what he's doing now, and so much more.Enjoy my entertaining conversation with Sacha Gervasi.

The Marketing Book Podcast
356 Positioning For Advantage by Kim Whitler

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 88:16


Positioning for Advantage: Techniques and Strategies to Grow Brand Value by Kimberly Whitler About the Book: Most of us have an intuitive sense of superior branding. We prefer to purchase brands we find distinctive―that deliver on some important, relevant dimension better than other brands. These brands have typically achieved positional advantage. Yet few professionals have had the formal training that goes beyond marketing theory to bridge the “theory-doing gap”―understanding the specific techniques and strategies that can be used to create brands that attain positional advantage in the marketplace. Positioning for Advantage is a comprehensive how-to guide for creating, building, and executing effective brand strategies. Kimberly A. Whitler identifies essential marketing strategy techniques and moves through the major stages of positioning a brand to achieve in-market advantage. Introducing seven tools―from strategic positioning concepts to strategy mapping to influencer maps―Whitler provides templates, frameworks, and step-by-step processes to build and manage growth brands that achieve positional advantage. This book presents real-world scenarios, helping readers activate tools to increase skill in creating brands that achieve positional advantage. Brimming with insights for students and professionals alike, Positioning for Advantage helps aspiring C-level leaders understand not only what superior branding looks like but also how to make it come to life. About the Author: Dr. Kimberly A. Whitler is currently the Frank M. Sands Sr. Associate Professor of Business Administration at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business.  Previously, she spent nearly 20 years in general management, strategy, and marketing roles within the consumer packaged goods and retailing industries, managing global, U.S., and Eastern European-based businesses. She spent most of her career at Procter & Gamble and more recently served as the general manager of the Breakfast Division for Aurora Foods, the CMO of David's Bridal, the country's leading bridal apparel retailer, and as an officer of PetSmart, the U.S.' largest pet specialty retailer. She has written over 350 articles as a Forbes senior contributor and has published in Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, The Washington Post, Ad Age, and numerous academic journals and other publications.  Her Forbes articles have garnered over 3,500,000 views, and she has been ranked as a Top Five influencer of CMOs, a Top 10 influencer of Tech B2B CMOs, and a Top 100 MarTech influencer. She has been interviewed, cited, or quoted over 2,100 times, including The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, The Washington Post, New York Times, NBC, ABC, USA Today, Entrepreneur, Fox Sports, Huffington Post, and a variety of international media outlets. And, interesting fact – she is an avid UVA men's basketball fan! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/positioning-advantage-kim-whitler

The Artist Business Plan
Take The Risk with Bunnie Reiss

The Artist Business Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 28:51


In this episode of The Artist Business Plan we sit down with artist Bunnie Reiss for an amazing masterclass on taking risks, embracing your roots, and much more. Sometimes the best advic is that things can change so quickly so embrace what you have and go for it! “You can travel with paints in your backpack.”- Bunnie Reiss Guest: Bunnie 'Bonnie' Reiss studied literature, and worked for NPR and other various publications, while quietly painting on the side. Bunnie relocated to Los Angeles several years ago to pursue larger mural and installation based projects and is now based in the Joshua Tree area. Her work is heavily influenced by her Eastern European background, with its tradition of folk art, bright colors and community engagement. She has shown extensively in both the United States and around the world, in galleries, alternative spaces, bookstores, abandoned buildings, fields and forests, or any place that seems to need a little extra magic. http://www.bunniereiss.com/ (http://www.bunniereiss.com/) For more information on applying to Superfine Art Fair as well as recordings of this and all of our past podcasts, just visit http://www.superfine.world/ (www.superfine.world ) IG: https://www.instagram.com/superfineartfair/?hl=en (@superfineartfair) IG: https://www.instagram.com/bunnieluvrocks/ (@bunnieluvrocks) If you want to submit a listener question you can email it to kelsey@superfine.world for a chance of it being answered by Alex, James, and our guest! Hosted and Executive Produced by James Miille and Alexander Mitow Executive Producer/Producer : Kelsey Susino Written by: Kelsey Susino, Alexander Mitow, and James Miille

I'm A Muslim (And That's Okay!)
Halloween Episode: Spooky Story Anyone?!

I'm A Muslim (And That's Okay!)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 16:29


This year, I decided to do a re-telling of one of my favorite spooky stories from my childhood, "Wolf Castle",  a Eastern European folk tale that I saw an animated short of as a kid. So, sit back and enjoy this spooky tale of  haunted statues, curses and stolen children!I unfortunately, could not find the animated short anywhere on the internet or the folk tale it was based on, but if after listening to this episode, if you can recognize the story and know a source for it, do send it to me at shehla.faizi01@gmail.com and I can share with all my listeners!Support the show (https://paypal.me/creativecookiejar?locale.x=en_US)

Sew What?
That's All, Folk: Eastern European Folk Dress Traditions

Sew What?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:36


In the first mini episode of season 3, Isabella explores traditional Eastern European needlework. She examines the stitched aspects of folk dress from Albania to Ukraine and everywhere in between. Images and sources are available at @sewwhatpodcast on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. The podcast has a website, sewwhatpodcast.com, and a Patreon, patreon.com/sewwhatpodcast.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Many Jews fleeing Nazi rule spent years hiding in forests. A new book tells their stories

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 7:46


During the early Nazi occupation of Europe, they forced more than a million Jews to live and work in ghettos. Most were killed in a brutal process called liquidation, or sent to concentration camps. Some 25,000 Jews escaped the ghettos and hid in Eastern European forests. The members of one family that survived years in the woods tell their story in Rebecca Frankel's new book, "Into the Forest." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Eastern Border
Sheriff Tiraspol

The Eastern Border

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 21:43


Greetings, Comrades! Ohboy. After this utterly bizzare Eastern European team from literally the weirdest country in Europe managed to beat Real Madrid at home…yeah, had to provide some explanation of why you should absolutely care about Sheriff! Soviet Schools next. Enjoy!Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theeasternborder. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.