Podcasts about Bluebird

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Latest podcast episodes about Bluebird

Harold's Old Time Radio
Screen Guild Theater -1939-12-24 - Blue Bird

Harold's Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 24:20


Screen Guild Theater -1939-12-24 - Blue Bird

Crimson60620
It'sagundam cries about the Blue Bird || ft @ItsAGundam

Crimson60620

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:57


Join my Discord: https://discord.gg/PvyjjC4 You can support me on Paypal https://www.paypal.me/crimson60620 Patreon https://www.patreon.com/crimson60620ps4gaming Streamlabs https://www.streamlabs.com/crimson60620 You can purchase my artwork at https://www.etsy.com/shop/lonesageartor https://www.deviantart.com/crimson60620 You can watch me live on https://www.twich.tv/crimson60620Follow me on Twitter @ crimson60620 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/crimson60620/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crimson60620/support

You're On The Phone
ep. 207 Baxter's Bones For Dreams (You Gotta Give): Weed Up Wednesday

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 118:55


WEED UP EVERYONE! This was a great show, thank you to all of you who called and pitched your ideas! FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH TikTok @youreonthephone_ Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

Listen to the show - TennesseeFarmTable.com
Buck Dancing, square dance calling, Christmas Tree farming Leo Collins, owner of Blue Bird Christmas Tree Farm in Heiskell, Tennessee

Listen to the show - TennesseeFarmTable.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 18:20


Our featured guest is Buck Dancing, square dance calling, Christmas Tree farming Leo Collins, owner of Blue Bird Christmas Tree Farm in Heiskell, Tennessee, and Fred Sauceman's Potluck Radio series features Allan Benton and Allan Benton's Red Eye gravy recipe.

On the Same Page
Ep 57. Poetry Parely

On the Same Page

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 61:41


W.H. Auden & Charles Bukowski – In this episode of “On the Same Page” Blake and Seamus take a break from literary fiction to delve into literary truth, which is to say poetry. So put on your podcast seatbelts listeners, because we're about to hit bedrock!  Some of the books and authors discussed in this episode include:  "Bluebird" by Charles Bukowski    “The Shield of Achilles” by W. H. Auden  “The Passenger” by Cormack McCarthy  Additional segments throughout the podcast include:   Inner Shelf  Fact or fiction  What are you reading?  On that Quote Apple Podcast: https://lnkd.in/gF2zVhQT Spotify: https://lnkd.in/gTHtxVh5 Podbean: https://onthesamepagepodcast.podbean.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/thesamepagepod_ Email: seamusandblake@gmail.com  IG: https://www.instagram.com/on.the.same.page.podcast/  -------- #bookpodcast #podcast #book #novel #stories #shortstories #apassagenorth #anukaradpragasm #tolstoy #poetry #shortstoryskirmish #litfacts #paris #literature #books #novels #salmonrushdie #spotifypodcasts #applepodcasts #audible #samsungpodcasts #books #novels #audibleau #lit #onthesamepage #whatareyoureading #literaryfacts #podbean #whatareyoureading 

Green Connections Radio -  Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil

Famous Music Venue Goes Sustainable - Erika Wollam-Nichols, The Bluebird Café   “We have staff members who are very, very conscious of sustainability. One of our servers does our recycling…and we've had to really step into how can we find space for those kind of things, even composting…because obviously we have food waste, but our kitchen is not much bigger than the bathroom here.…I would also add that we…. found a local partner here in town (for the merchandise) who prints in town and buys local and buys national product so that we're able to feel like we're building community… with all of that too.” Erika Wollam-Nichols on Electric Ladies Podcast   As you venture out for live performances, including music, you might notice which ones are practicing sustainability, like the renowned Bluebird Café in Nashville, Tennessee. It's a woman-founded and women-led venue that has launched a who's-who of country music stars from Taylor Swift to Garth Brooks and beyond.   Listen to Bluebird Café president Erika Wollam-Nichols explain how they do sustainability – and the history of the club – in this live interview at the Bluebird on Electric Ladies Podcast with host Joan Michelson. You'll hear: How Erika brought her Massachusetts-born passion for sustainability to this landmark in Nashville. How they have solved a range of challenges in going green in such a small and historic venue. Who has played there over the years and why it's such a special place for songwriters. Plus, insightful career advice. And much more! “What I think about in those situations is listening and paying attention….When I came in here and, and just spent time looking around and talking to the staff and just seeing where are the holes, where are the opportunities?....I want to keep a positive attitude and be solution-based as opposed to victim-based….We were closed for 16 months for the pandemic…But that was like, okay. So what's our opportunity with the pandemic? And, and we found some, and we changed some of our operations that we would not have had an easy time changing.” Erika Wollam-Nichols on Electric Ladies podcast   Read Joan's Forbes articles here. You'll also want to listen to (some of these are under the name Green Connections Radio): Sandra Bargman & Chantal Bilodeau, The Climate Cabaret: on inspiring action through storytelling Ann Friedman, CEO/Founder of Planet Word Museum, on transforming an historic building sustainably with purpose. Deborah Rutter, President of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, on building a new arts facility sustainably and on managing creative people Tracy Edwards, Captain of Maiden and co-executive producer of the documentary “Maiden” about her historic voyage as the first all-female crew in the Whitbread Round the World Race. Subscribe to our newsletter to receive our podcasts, blog, events and special coaching offers.. Thanks for subscribing on Apple Podcasts or iHeartRadio and leaving us a review! Follow us on Twitter @joanmichelson   and @electricgalspod

Wilson County News
Emergency Care of Floresville offers sexual assault support

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 1:59


The Emergency Care of Floresville, a full-service emergency room capable of treating all emergencies, is partnering with Bluebird's Hope Inc., as the first Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) location in Wilson County. Bluebird's Hope is a community-based 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, offering forensic nursing examinations to those who have suffered sexual assault, strangulation, domestic violence, and/or human trafficking. Founded in 2020, the organization has been working diligently to provide education and forensic exam services to communities across Texas, focusing on rural and underserved areas. Bluebird's Hope offers comprehensive forensic medical exams for victims, 100-percent free of charge. The organization also: •Ensures...Article Link

You're On The Phone
ep. 206 Coach Get A New Job Ft. Ben Brandhorst: Freaky Friday

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 119:38


This was such a fun episode, thank you to my Twitch Coach (Ben Brandhorst) [Ghosts Of Glaciers] for joining me in trying to help callers find new jobs! Check out Ben's band Ghost's Of Glaciers! They're an instrumental band that writes SOME DAMN GOOD MUSIC, take the time and check em out! https://ghostsofglaciers.bandcamp.com/album/the-greatest-burden FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH TikTok @youreonthephone_ Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

The Steve Gruber Show
Troy Miller, Bluebird CFW Foundation Repair and Waterproofing, Steve's Story.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 7:30


Troy Miller is the Owner of Bluebird CFW Foundation Repair and Waterproofing.They also Repair Seawalls Service area is the entire State of Michigan including the U.P. Here is a link to the website https://www.bluebirdcfw.com. Steve's Story.

Retro Radio Podcast
Screen Guild Theater (CBS) Blue Bird (Shirley Temple). 391224

Retro Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 24:15


Featuring: Nelson Eddie, Shirley Temple, Some Day You'll Find Your Bluebird (Shirley Temple). The tale of two kids of about a hundred years earlier. Shirley narrates the scene at Christmas…

You're On The Phone
ep. 205 The Scottish Dog: Freaky Friday

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 113:12


Never did I expect to learn so much about one country in ONE show! DOG UP! FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH TikTok @youreonthephone_ Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

The Infinite Escape Room
Bigot in the Big Blue Bird

The Infinite Escape Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 40:38


aka Defeat MechaTrump This week's episode is made possible by our wonderful Patreons, including Tonje Beate Halvorsen and Ryann Sparrow This week Mike, Laura and Aled finish what they started all those weeks ago and come together to defeat the Trump Bot before he gets to Mars-A-Lago. QUIVER with horror at Trump's synthetic neck flap BE AMAZED at Laura's quick puzzling skills YELL AT YOUR PHONE when you realise your memory is better than theirs was Tune in and see how they got on! And as always, please reach out to us on Facebook and Twitter (we're not like, officially verified, but we basically are).

Major's Mess Hall
Major's Mess Hall - Episode 178 - Blue Bird Down

Major's Mess Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 59:40


Is Twitter truly doomed for, or are people jumping the gun? Gavin and Kelly give their two cents worth, plus play a few new features, and talking about the hot topic of the month, the British tv show I'm A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here!

PEPPER FOR YOUR STEAK
P7E003 - "BlueBird" - DJ Mix - Maverick Matthews

PEPPER FOR YOUR STEAK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 30:01


Opening Poem: Bluebird - Charles Bukowski   Please visit MaverickMatthews.com and donate to support the show!   Follow me on Instagram: @the_real_MaverickMatthews There are several fake / bot profiles - beware and follow the original!   Thank you for your donations and your love and support!   M*.*M.*.

You're On The Phone
ep. 203 The Movement For A New Movement: FREAKY FRIDAY

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 112:11


This show was SUPER freaky! MANY FREAKY THINGS HAPPENED FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

You're On The Phone
ep. 204 The Hat-Tastrophe: Weed Up Wednesday

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 93:14


It wouldn't be a WEED UP WEDNESDAY if something ABSOLUTELY CATASTROPHIC, didn't happen. WHAT KIND OF APOCALYPTIC EVENT HAPPENED? FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH TikTok @youreonthephone_ Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

Chasing Tone - Guitar Podcast About Gear, Effects, Amps and Tone

Brian, Blake, and Richard are back for an all-new episode of the Chasing Tone Podcast!Blake is making content in a hotel room,  and it has come to pass that Brian is now indeed a Country and Western megastar. He may deny it but he has played at the legendary Bluebird cafe in Nashville, TN and the guys cannot fail to be impressed. Some heavy names were dropped, and some food talk also occurred. It was also livestreamed on Onlyfans of Electronics, no wait, the Wampler Metaverse, no wait, I forget...Anyhow, Bri gives us a great breakdown of his gig and a little bit of history as he tells us about the amazing acts that graced the stage before him.Eventide have brought out a rather special effects processor, the H90, and the guys cast their opinions over it and its predecessor, the mighty H9.  The guys have also been checking out the new Morley analogue flyrig board and thats definitely turned a few heads. But not Ranger Brian's. Richard has also been on the Fret Talk pedalboard so tells us a bit about that and why he love analog knobs. Spray yourself immediately! Brian has bought a new guitar and he tells us all about it despite the faux protestations from the crew - and it may surprise you. Well at least 50% of it will. It turns out the guys all have the same piece of gear and they all love it and talk about it in glowing terms.  There is almost total agreement here, its a bit disturbing.Peanut butter cheesecake, Pitchshifting mistakes, Forehead presence, The Shaggs Mk2, Free market research, You are a cheap no name wall wart...it's all in this week's Chasing Tone!We are on Patreon now too!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/chasingtonepodcast)Awesome Merch and DIY mods:https://modyourownpedal.com/collections/booksFind us at:https://www.wamplerpedals.com/https://www.instagram.com/WamplerPedals/https://www.facebook.com/groups/wamplerfanpage/Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdVrg4Wl3vjIxonABn6RfWwContact us at: podcast@wamplerpedals.comSupport the show

A Bit of Swazz: The Cardiff City Podcast
Bluebirds On The Big Stage

A Bit of Swazz: The Cardiff City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 72:42


Vincent Tan calling out fanbase, Bluebirds crazy last 5 games and World Cup build up, all in a episode of A Bit of Swazz! Host Brandon Richards and co-host William Cosh analyse all dramas surrounding the Bluebirds as well optimism about the future. Guess the Bluebird is back and of course the boys are joined by Bluebirds Women Defender Hannah Power as they thrill in regards to the CCFCW playing in front over 5,000 at the CCS!

AMK Morgon
AMK Morgon 14 november

AMK Morgon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 75:48


Gäster: Agnes Matsdotter, Christer Svensson, Viktor Carlsson Relevanta länkar: …Hytterna på Cinderella https://vikingline.visualizer360.com/sv/ms-cinderella#42865,42905,90.19,0 https://vikingline.visualizer360.com/sv/ms-cinderella#42865,45664,359.99,0 …Roger Stone https://www.netflix.com/se/title/80114666 …Mike Pence https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Mike_Pence_official_Vice_Presidential_port... https://i.pinimg.com/originals/11/43/f0/1143f02bff05cf5451dc5d51e3f00a09.jpg …Toy Story https://www.imdb.com/list/ls052584637/?sort=list_order,asc&st_dt=&mode=simple&page=1&... …Twitter https://twitter.com/rafaelshimunov/status/1591133819918114816 https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/c_fit,f_auto,g_center,pg_1,q_60,w_965/7c54361eff3f... https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/c_fit,f_auto,g_center,pg_1,q_60,w_965/610921363f05... https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/c_fit,f_auto,g_center,pg_1,q_60,w_965/a094664075b3... https://gizmodo.com/15-fake-twitter-accounts-elon-musk-chaos-verification-1849771209/slides/10 https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/c_fit,f_auto,g_center,pg_1,q_60,w_965/ca372e736762... https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/c_fit,f_auto,g_center,pg_1,q_60,w_965/c01db9b202fe... …Portugisiska fansen i Qatar https://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/fotboll/a/wAr89n/fejkade-fans-i-qatar-infor-vm-bilderna-som-v... https://twitter.com/nordkuurve/status/1591329101570183168 …Chiquita https://twitter.com/wallstreetsilv/status/1591253109447495680?s=46&t=mGfJqOHA627Ul2t2hiOHGQ …Sven-Bertil https://www.aftonbladet.se/nojesbladet/a/pQBAoV/sven-bertil-taube-dod …Jofis tweets https://twitter.com/johabbed/status/1591385046493331456 …den tyste Moderaten https://www.expressen.se/nyheter/efter-kritiserade-lonehojningarna-tjornhammar-avgar/?utm_campaign=E... https://www.aftonbladet.se/nyheter/a/q16RXw/tjornhammar-om-tystnaden-i-svt-intervjun-en-blackout …Bino Drummond https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bino_Drummond …Gary Neville https://twitter.com/emilyhewertson/status/1588672578595721217?s=46&t=mGfJqOHA627Ul2t2hiOHGQ …Salming https://www.nhl.com/sv/video/borje-salming-tribute-in-toronto/t-277542970/c-13714545 …Nilfisk https://www.nilfisk.com/sv-se/ …lastbilen med öl https://www.tv4.se/artikel/6rPFb7Ua0l9XMWpMmfgni1/tumult-naer-lastbil-full-med-oel-vaelte?utm_medium... Låtarna som spelades var: Got It - Misha, Jussi Halme BAYRAKTAR is Life - Taras Borovko feat. Ballad om briggen ”Blue Bird” av Hull - Sven-Bertil Taube Alla låtar finns i AMK Morgons spellista här: https://open.spotify.com/user/amk.morgon/playlist/6V9bgWnHJMh9c4iVHncF9j?si=so0WKn7sSpyufjg3olHYmg Stötta oss gärna på Swish, varje litet bidrag uppskattas enormt! 123 646 2006

Clare FM - Podcasts
Clare Woman Wins National Blue Bird Carer of the Year 2022

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 12:33


On Thursday's Morning Focus, Alan spoke to Joan O'Sullivan, Blue Bird 2022 Carer of the Year, Theresa Sexton, Manager of Bluebird Care and Kay Leahy, Managing Director of Blue Bird Care. Joan discussed her delight at winning the Blue Bird 2022 Carer of the Year Award and the work she carries out on a daily basis. Theresa and Kay praised Joan for her efforts and achieving the award along with highlighting the need for more healthcare assistants in the sector.

BSC News Podcast
Binance Bluebird Index: $DOGE, $MASK and $BNB - Is Web3 Twitter Finally Upon Us?

BSC News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 10:26


In this special episode we take a deeper dive into the recently announced Bluebird Index from Binance. This index tracks three cryptocurrencies and could be hinting at a future of twitter a lot of the web3 crowd have been hoping for...

You're On The Phone
ep. 202 What's So Funny About My TromBoner? WEED UP WEDNESDAY

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 123:54


WEED UP YOU BEAUTIFUL FUCKERS! Man it's really fun to get to do this, AIN'T NO BRAGGONY WITHOUT AGONY, BROTHER I hope you enjoy this one! FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

The Steve Gruber Show
Troy Miller: Bluebird CFW Foundation Repair and Waterproofing. Steve's Story. Rainy Season.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 8:30


Troy Miller is the Owner of Bluebird CFW Foundation Repair and Waterproofing.They also Repair Seawalls Service area is the entire State of Michigan including the U.P. Here is a link to the website https://www.bluebirdcfw.com. Steve's Story.

Mission and Motherhood
Your Right Now Body is Worthy with Caroline Bower of The Bluebird Collective

Mission and Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 39:13


During the Mission and Motherhood Workshop several women listed their bodies as the obstacle between them and the life they dream of. Is your body in transition? Maybe not where it was before, but not exactly where you want it to be? Do you use clothing to hide behind instead of highlighting your favorite assets? This constant awareness of feeling out of sorts within your own skin can be exhausting and in this episode Caroline Bower, owner of The Bluebird Collective, reminds us our RIGHT NOW body is worthy!We go beyond positive thinking and dive into the practical side of dressing your current body type that's timeless. We also talk about the fast fashion industry and how clothing doesn't just show up on hangers, they are made by humans. How can we treat them with honor and respect through our purchases?Caroline is the honest friend you want with you in any dressing room! She will help you embrace the body you have and the life you desire. Download Caroline's Body Shape Guide: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/60758b2d1717a74c2a052723Mind the Gaps Guide: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/633b57c57a59217f23256a18Capsule Wardrobe Bundles: https://thebluebirdcollective.com/collections/capsule-wardrobe-bundles?view=boost-pfs-originalDid you listen to an episode and love it? Let me know! Tag me with your "aha" moments and Follow me on Instagram and Facebook!

Flower Power Garden Hour
Flower Power Garden Hour 161: Birds, with Tammy Poppie

Flower Power Garden Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 63:49


Watching birds go about their lives in your garden is one of the many benefits of gardening.  Besides the joy of watching them, they are also busy eating pests and helping to keep a balanced ecosystem.  I talk to bird expert Tammy Poppie about ways to create a healthy, safe and inviting environment for birds.  Tammy and additional information about birding and their interaction with plants can be found at: onthefeeder.com allaboutbirds.org audubon.org/native-plants To ask questions for future shows, submit them at: Facebook Instagram email Marlene at marlenetheplantlady@gmail.com Find Marlene over on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #102: Mount Bohemia Owner, Founder, & President Lonie Glieberman

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 104:05 Very Popular


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Oct. 26. It dropped for free subscribers on Oct. 29. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoLonie Glieberman, President of Mount Bohemia, MichiganRecorded onOctober 21, 2022About Mount BohemiaClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: Lonie GliebermanPass affiliations: NoneReciprocal pass partners (view full list here):* 3 days each at Bogus Basin, Mission Ridge, Great Divide, Lee Canyon, Pine Creek, White Pine, Sleeping Giant, Mt. Spokane, Eaglecrest, Eagle Point* 2 days each at Porcupine Mountains; Crystal Mountain, Michigan; Giants Ridge; Hurricane Ridge* 1 day each at Brundage, Treetops, Whitecap Mountains, Ski Brule, Snowstar* Free midweek skiing March 1-2, 5-9, 12-16, and 24-25 at Caberfae when staying at slopeside MacKenzie LodgeLocated in: Mohawk, MichiganClosest neighboring ski areas: Mont Ripley (46 minutes), Porcupine Mountains (2 hours), Ski Brule (2 hours, 34 minutes), Snowriver (2 hours, 35 minutes), Keyes Peak (2 hours, 36 minutes), Marquette Mountain (2 hours, 40 minutes), Big Powderhorn (2 hours, 43 minutes), Mt. Zion (2 hours, 45 minutes), Pine Mountain (2 hours, 49 minutes), Whitecap (3 hours, 8 minutes).Base elevation: 600 feetSummit elevation: 1,500 feetVertical drop: 900 feetSkiable Acres: 585Average annual snowfall: 273 inchesTrail count: 147 (24% double-black, 49% black, 20% intermediate, 7% beginner)Lift count: 2 lifts, 4 buses (1 double, 1 triple - view Lift Blog's of inventory of Mount Bohemia's lift fleet)Bohemia has one of the most confusing trailmaps in America, so here's an overhead view by Mapsynergy. This displays the main mountain only, and does not include Little Boho, but you can clearly see where Haunted Valley sits in relation to the lifts:Here's an older version, from 2014, that does not include Little Boho or the newer Middle Earth section, but has the various zones clearly labelled:Why I interviewed himImagine: America's wild north. Hours past everything you've ever heard of. Then hours past that. A peninsula hanging off a peninsula in the middle of the largest lake on Earth. There, a bump on the topo map. Nine hundred feet straight up. The most vert in the 1,300-mile span between Bristol and Terry Peak. At the base a few buildings, a cluster of yurts, a green triple chair crawling up the incline.Here, at the end of everything, skiers find almost nothing. As though the voyage to road's end had cut backward through time. No snowguns. No groomers. No rental shop. No ski school. No Magic Carpet. No beginner runs. No beginners. A lift and a mountain, and nothing more.Nothing but raw and relentless terrain. All things tucked away at the flash-and-bling modern resort made obvious. Glades everywhere, top to bottom, labyrinthian and endless, hundreds of acres deep. Chutes. Cliffs. Bumps. Terrain technical and twisting. No ease in. No run out. All fall line.To the masses this is nightmare skiing, the sort of stacked-obstacle elevator shaft observed from the flat shelf of green-circle groomers. To the rest of us – the few of us – smiling wanly from the eighth seat of a gondola car as ya'lling tourists yuck about the black diamonds they just windshield-wipered back to Corpus Christi – arrival at Mount Bohemia is a sort of surrealist dream. It can't be real. This place. Everything grand about skiing multiplied. Everything extraneous removed. Like waking up and discovering all food except tacos and pizza had gone away. Delicious entrees for life.And the snow. The freeze-thaws, the rain, the surly guttings of New England winters barely touch Boho. The lake-effect snowtrain – two to eight inches, nearly every day from December to March – erases these wicked spells soon after their rare castings. And the snow piles up: 273 inches on average, and more than 300 inches in three of the past five seasons. In 2022, Boho skied into May for the third time in the past decade.There is no better ski area. For skiers whose lifequest is to roll as one with the mountain as the mountain was formed. Those weary of cat-tracks and Rangers coats splaying wobbly across the corduroy and bunched human bowling pins and the spectacular price of everything. Boho's season pass is $109. Ninety-nine dollars if you can do without Saturdays. It's loaded with reciprocal days at nearly two dozen partners. It's a spectacular bargain and a spectacular find. At once dramatic and understated, wide-open and closely kept, rowdy and sublime, Mount Bohemia is the ski area that skiers deserve. And it is the ski area that the Midwest – one of the world's great ski cultures – deserves. There is nothing else like Mount Bohemia in America, and there's really nothing else like it anywhere.What we talked aboutOctober snow in the UP; how much snow Boho needs to open; “we can get five feet in December in a matter of days”; why the great Sugar Loaf, Michigan ski area failed and why it's likely never coming back; a journey through the Canadian Football League; what running a football team and running a ski area have in common; “Narrow the focus, strengthen the brand”; wild rumors of a never-developed ski area in the Keweenaw Peninsula overheard on a Colorado chairlift; sleuthing pre-Google; the business case for a ski area with no beginner terrain; “it's not just the size, it's the pitch”; bringing Bohemia to improbable life; the most important element to Bohemia as a viable business; how to open a ski area when you've never worked at a ski area; community opposition materializes – “I still to this day don't know why they were mad”; winning the referendum to build the resort; how locals feel about Boho today; industry reaction to a ski area with no grooming, no snowmaking, and no beginner terrain; “you actually have created the stupidest ski resort of all time”; the long history of established companies missing revolutionary products; dead-boring 1990s Michigan skiing; the slow early days with empty lifts spinning all day long; learning from failure to push through to success; the business turning point; Bohemia's $99 season pass; the kingmaking power of the lost ski media; the state of Boho 22 years in; “nothing is ever as important as adding more and new terrain”; why Bohemia raised the price of its season pass by $10 for 2022-23; breaking down Boho's pass fees; the two-year and lifetime passes; why the one-day annual season pass sale is now a 10-day annual season pass sale; why the ski area no longer sells season passes outside of its $99 pass sales window; protecting the Saturday experience; could we see a future with no lift tickets?; the potential of a Bohemia single-day lift ticket costing more than a season pass; “reward your season ticket holders”; the mountain's massive reciprocal ticket network; the Indy Pass and why it wouldn't work for Bohemia; the return of Fast Pass lanes; “we have to be very careful that Bohemia is a place for all people that are advanced or expert skiers”; why Bohemia's frontside triple functions as a double; what could replace the triple and when it could happen; considering the carpet-load; what sort of lift we could see in Haunted Valley; whether we could ever see a lift in Outer Limits; a possible second frontside lift; where a lift would go on Little Boho and how it could connect to and from the parking lot; why surface lifts probably wouldn't work at Bohemia; what sort of lift could replace the double; whether the current lifts could be repurposed elsewhere on the mountain; what Bohemia could look like at full terrain build-out; the potential of Voodoo Mountain and what it would take to see a lift over there; whether Voodoo could become a Bluebird Backcountry-style uphill-only ski area; why it will likely remain a Cat-skiing hill for the foreseeable future; sizing up the terrain between Bohemia and Voodoo; where to find the new glades coming to Bohemia this season; the art of glading; breaking down the triple-black-diamond Extreme Backcountry; why serious injuries have been rare in Bohemia's rowdiest terrain; the extreme power of the Lake Superior snowbelt; Bohemia's magical snow patterns; why the Bohemia business model couldn't work in most places; whether Bohemia could ever install limited snowmaking and why it may never need it; how a mountain in Michigan without snowmaking can consistently push the season into May; “Bohemia is a community first and a ski area second”; why Bohemia is more like a 1960s European ski resort than anything in North America; and Bohemia's stint running the Porcupine Mountains ski area and why it ultimately pulled out of the arrangement.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewIt may be the most-repeated trope on The Storm Skiing Podcast: “skiing is a capital-intensive business.” It's true. Scope the battle corps of snow cannons lined hundreds deep along resort greens and blues, the miles of subsurface piping that feed them, the pump houses, the acres-big manmade ponds that anchor the whole system. The frantic rental centers with gear racked high and deep like a snowy Costco. The battalions of Snowcats, each costing more than a house. The snowmobiles. The cavernous day lodges. The shacks and Centers and chalets. And the chairlifts. How much does a chairlift cost? The price seems to increase daily. Operators generally guard these numbers, but Windham told me in March that their new 389-vertical-foot D-line detachable quad will cost $5 million. Again: more than a house. More than a neighborhood. And that's before you turn the thing on.But what if you get rid of the, um, capital? What if you build a ski resort like Old Man MacGregor did in 19-aught-7? Find a snowy hill and point to it and say, “there's my ski area, Sonny, go do yourself some ski'in. Just gimme a nickel and get the hell out of my face so's I can kill me a chicken for supper.”OK, so Boho stood up a pair of modern (used) chairlifts instead of MacGregor's ropetow slung through a Model-T engine, but its essential concept echoes that brash and freewheeling bygone America: A lift and a mountain. Go skiing.This isn't supposed to be good enough. You need Magic Carpets and vast lineups of matching-jacket ski instructors and “impeccably groomed” trails. A place where Grandpa Earl and Earl Jr. and Earl Jr. Jr. can bond over the amazing logistical hassles of family skiing and enjoy $150 cups of chili together in the baselodge.But over the past two decades, the minimalist ski area has emerged as one of skiing's best ideas. It can't work everywhere, of course, and it can't work for everyone. This is a complement to, and not a replacement for, the full-service ski resort. If you've never skied and you show up at Bohemia to go skiing, you're either going to end up disappointed or hospitalized, and perhaps both. This is a ski area for skiers, for the ones who spend all day at Boyne peaking off the groomers into the trees, looking for lines.There is a market for this. Look west, to Silverton, Colorado, where an antique Yan double – Mammoth's old Chair 15 – rises 1,900 vertical feet and drops skiers onto a 26,000-acre mecca of endless untracked pow. Or Bluebird Backcountry, also in Colorado, which has no chairlifts but marked runs rising off a minimalist base area, a launch point for Uphill Bro's bearded adventures. Neither pull the sorts of Holy Calamity mobs that increasingly define I-70 skiing, but both appear to be sustainable niche businesses.Of the three, Bohemia appeals the most to the traditional resort skier. Silverton is big and exposed and scary, a beacon-and-shovel-required-at-all-times kind of place. Bluebird is a zone in which to revel and to ponder, as much a shuffling hike as it is a day on skis. Boho skis a lot like the vast off-piste zones of Alta and Snowbird, with their infinite choose-your-own-adventure lines, entire acres-wide faces and twisting forests all ungroomed. Both offer a resort experience: high-speed lifts, (a few) groomed boulevards, snowguns blasting near the base. But that's not the point of Little Cottonwood Canyon. I skied Chip's Run once. It sucks. I can't imagine the person who shows up at Snowbird and laps this packed boulevard of milquetoast skiing. This is where you go for raw, unhinged skiing on bountiful and ever-refilling natural snow. For decades this was Utah-special, or Western-special, the sort of experience that was impossible to find in the Midwest. Then came Bohemia, with a different story to tell, a version of the Out West wild-nasty in the least likely place imaginable.What I got wrongIn discussing a possible skin/ski between Mount Bohemia and Voodoo Mountain – where Boho runs a small Cat-skiing operation – I compared the four-mile trek between them to the oft-skied route between Bolton Valley and Stowe, which sit five miles apart in the Vermont wilderness. The drive, I noted, was “about an hour.” In optimal conditions, it's actually right around 40 minutes. With wintertime traffic and weather, it can be double that or longer.I also accidentally said that the new name for the ski area formerly known as Big Snow, Michigan was “Snowbasin.” Which was kinda dumb of me. But then like 30 seconds later I said the actual name, “Snowriver,” so you're just gonna have to let that one go.Why you should ski Mount BohemiaMidwest skiing in the ‘90s was defined largely by what it wasn't. And what it wasn't was interesting in any way. I use this word a lot: “interesting” terrain. What I mean by that is anything other than wide-open groomed runs. And in mid-90s Michigan, that's all there was. Bumps were rare. Glades, nonexistent. Powder unceremoniously chewed up in the groom. The nascent terrain parks were branded as “snowboard parks,” no skiers allowed. A few ski areas actively ignored skiers poaching these early ramps and halfpipes – Nub's Nob was especially generous. But many more chased us away, leaving us to hunt the trail's edge in search of the tiniest knolls and drop-offs to carry us airborne.It didn't have to be this way. As often as I could, I would wake up at 4 and drive north across the border into Ontario. There lay Searchmont, a natural terrain park, a whole side of the mountain ungroomed and wild, dips and drops and mandatory 10-foot airs midtrial. Why had no one in Michigan hacked off even a portion of their Groomeramas for this sort of freeride skiing?In those years I visited friends at Michigan Tech, forty-five minutes south of where Bohemia now stands, each January. Snow always hip-high along the sidewalks, more falling every day. One afternoon we drove north out of Houghton, along US 41, into the hills rising along the Keweenaw Peninsula. Somewhere in the wilderness, we stopped. Climbed. Unimaginable quantities of snow devouring us like quicksand at every step. In descent, leaping off cliffs and rocks, sliding down small, steep chutes.We did not bring skis that day. But the terrain, I thought, would have been wildly appropriate for a certain sort of unhinged ski experience. Like a super-Searchmont. Wilder and bigger and rowdier. We could call it “The Realm of Stu's Extreme Ski Resort,” I joked with my friend on the long drive home.But I didn't think anyone would actually do it. The ski areas of Michigan seemed impossibly devoted to the lifeless version of skiing that catered to the intermediate masses. When Boho opened in 2000, I couldn't believe it was real. I still barely do. Live through a generation or two, and you begin to appreciate impermanence, and how names carry through time but what they mean evolves. The Michigan ski areas that once offered one and only one specific type of skiing have, as I noted in my podcast conversation with Nub's Nob General Manager Ben Doornbos a couple weeks ago, gotten much more adept at creating what I call a balanced mountain. Boyne, The Highlands, Caberfae – all deliver a far more satisfying product than they did 25 years ago.Boho drove at least some of this change. Suddenly, an expert skier had real options in the Midwest. Not that they new it at first – Glieberman recalls the dead, dark days of the ski area's first few seasons. But that's over. Bohemia is, on certain days, maxed out, in desperate need of more lifts and a touch fewer skiers – the famous $99 pass will increase to $109 this season for anyone who wants to ski Saturdays. The place works, as a concept, as a culture, as a magnet for expert skiers.Most ski areas, if you look closely enough, exist to serve some nearby population center. There are only a few that are good enough that they thrive in spite of their location, that skiers will drive past a dozen other ski areas to hit. Telluride. Taos. Jay Peak. Sugarloaf. Add Bohemia to this category. And add it to your list. No matter where you ski, this one is worth the pilgrimage.Podcast Notes* Glieberman references the book 22 Immutable Laws of Branding  - specifically its calls to “narrow your focus, strengthen your brand.” Here's the Amazon listing.* We don't get into this extensively, but Lonie mentions Mount Bohemia TV. This is an amazing series of shorts exploring Boho life and culture. Here's a sampling, but you can watch them all here.More Bohemia* A Vermonter visits Boho* A Ski magazine visit to Porcupine Mountains – a state-owned ski area – when Glieberman ran it in the mid-2000s.* A Powder Q&A with Glieberman.* I'm not the only one who's amazed with this place. Paddy O'Connell, writing in Powder seven years ago:Midwestern powder skiing is alive and real. The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the home of the greatest grassroots ski resort in North America, Mount Bohemia. Storms swell over Lake Superior and slam their leeward winds on to the UP all winter long. Endless exploration is waiting up north through the treed ruggedness of Haunted Valley and the triple black Extreme Backcountry. The resort prides itself on being almost 100 percent unmarked and nearly devoid of ropes. The terrain is fun and adventurous and the bounty of snow is remarkable. Keweenaw County uses a 30-foot snow stake to measure season totals, and is currently measuring just under 25 feet. While my friends out West have been mountain biking and crack climbing, I have been slashing creek beds and frozen waterfalls, chomping on frosty Midwestern face shots. Yes, they exist here and in abundance in Michigan. The folklore is factual—all true skiers need to ski Mount Bohemia.* Boho was, amazingly, once part of the Freedom Pass reciprocal lift-ticket coalition, which grants season pass holders three days each at partner resorts. These days, Boho manages its own corps of reciprocals. This is an incredible list for a $99 ($133 with fees) season pass:Voodoo MountainPerhaps the most compelling piece of the Bohemia story is that the ski area is nowhere near built out. The mountain adds new terrain pretty much every year - Glieberman details the locations of three new glade runs in the podcast. But four miles due north through the wilderness - or 16 miles and 30 minutes by car - sits Voodoo Mountain, a three-mile-wide snowtrap that currently hosts Boho's catskiing operation. They even have a trailmap:Those cut runs occupy just 125 acres, but Voodoo encompasses 1,800 acres across four peaks on a 700-foot vertical drop. Glieberman tells me on the podcast that a 1970s concept scoped out a sprawling resort with 22 chairlifts (if anyone is in possession of this concept map, please email me a copy). The terrain, Glieberman says, is not as rowdy or as singular as Boho's, but Voodoo averages more annual snowfall - 300-plus inches - and its terrain faces north, meaning it holds snow deep into spring. Here's another map, currently posted at the resort, showing conceptual future build-outs at Voodoo:The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 117/100 in 2022, and number 363 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, or, more likely, I just get busy). You can also email skiing@substack.com.The Storm is exploring the world of lift-served skiing year-round. Join us. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

You're On The Phone
ep. 201 Why Be Blue When You Can Be Yellow: WEED UP WEDNESDAY

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 111:08


WEED UP NERDS!!! This was a fun show, thank you for supporting this show, you listening, sharing and being there in the chat means the world to me. I hope you enjoy this start of the next 100 episodes GOTTA START SOMEWHERE Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-) 

Backstage Pass Radio
S3: E:13 - Kirstie Kraus - Flowers Bloom Where They Are Planted

Backstage Pass Radio

Play Episode Play 26 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 57:56 Transcription Available


Date: October 19, 2022Name of podcast: Backstage Pass RadioEpisode title and number:  S3: E13: Kirstie Kraus - Flowers Bloom Where They Are PlantedArtist Bio -She's thirsty for love and magic, for joy and sunshine. She's thirsty for compassion and authenticity. And more than anything, she's thirsty for anything that sets her soul on fire.Kirstie Kraus carries her thirst in her songwriting, in her live shows, and in her everyday connection with other kindred spirits. Nowhere is her appetite more quenched than on a stage in front of her fans, appropriately named “Thirsties”. Her confidence naturally shines under the bright lights, taking concertgoers on a well-defined path of self-discovery and bliss. Her writing infuses her own transparent journey with others' experiences to create sustainable lyrics and catchy melodies.The result is a perfect blend of country, funk, blues, and rock because, with Kirstie, there are no boundaries. There's only the process of “letting go” and letting the song tell you what it wants to be. ​It will also tell you WHERE it wants to be and for an intuitive deep thinker like Kirstie, that place is Nashville. Three years ago, the Wisconsin native made the move to Music City and having heavily toured the summer before with her Midwest band, Thirsty Jones, Kirstie made the decision to really focus on honing her craft in town. She immediately began demoing out songs for her upcoming full-length record and playing established Nashville venues, like the Listening Room Café and the Bluebird. She also leaned into the production side of her album, gaining great insight from her then producer about arrangements, vocal styling, and mixing. Her first Nashville based single, “Delusional” (2018) fancies a sassy 80s funk groove while 2019's “Gotta Do” pulls in early 2000s Shania vibes. “Silver”, her July 2020 release, possesses the licks of Joan Jett and attitude of Avril Lavigne, proving that she's not a one lane roadmap.Sponsor Link:WWW.ECOTRIC.COMBackstage Pass Radio Social Media Handles:Facebook - @backstagepassradiopodcast @randyhulseymusicInstagram - @Backstagepassradio @randyhulseymusicTwitter - @backstagepassPC @rhulseymusicWebsite - backstagepassradio.com and randyhulsey.comArtist Media Handles:Website - www.kirstiekraus.comInstagram  - https://www.instagram.com/kirstiekrausFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/kirstiekrausTwitter - https://twitter.com/kirstiekrausCall to actionWe ask our listeners to like, share, and subscribe to the show and the artist's social media pages. This enables us to continue pushing great content to the consumer. Thank you for being a part of Backstage Pass RadioYour Host,Randy Hulsey 

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Brian Lesage: There's a Bluebird in My Heart

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 26:36 Very Popular


(Flagstaff Insight Meditation Community)

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Brian Lesage: There's a Bluebird in My Heart

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 26:36


(Flagstaff Insight Meditation Community)

Zero Duck:30 Podcast
George Parker | Blue Bird Waterfowl | The Animator

Zero Duck:30 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 59:42


Today we have on George Parker the owner of  Blue Bird Waterfowl. The Animator from Blue Bird Waterfowl is going to absolutely change the motion decoy game! The Animator™ is the world's first spinning wing decoy attachment. It connects to the spinning-wing decoy you already own. It is packable, lightweight and is designed to be used when you need it- not when you don't.The Animator is a kit that includes carbon fiber rods, a decoy-specific camshaft and a splash plate.Simply attach the rods to the cam, attach the cam to the decoy and add the splash plate on the rod just under the waterline. This product is designed to adjust to your decoy height, so you do not have to set the decoy to the splash plate height.George was kind enough to extend a discount to our listeners, use code zeroduck30 for 20 percent off! https://bluebirdwaterfowl.com/Thank you guys for tuning in and we hope you enjoy the episode! Code Duck30 for 20 percent off Huntwise!https://huntwise.com/pro/checkout?code=DUCK30Code ZeroDuck30 for 20 percent off all products at https://ackleyoutdoors.com/Code Zeroduck15 for 15 percent off https://dirtyduckcoffee.com/Special shout out to  @Gavin Powell for letting us use his song "The End" in our videos!

TBH: An Anime Podcast
Episode 28 - Happy Ice Cream

TBH: An Anime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 84:38


Seneschal and I are joined by Grace once again to discuss the Sound! Euphonium spin-off/side story film Liz and the Blue Bird, the best thing we've watched for the podcast to date! We also open up the episode with a freewheeling discussion of Smile, Andor, the original Halloween I/II, Edgerunners, Singing in the Rain, and Dr. No!TwittersLiv - @GhostGirlMusicSeneschal - @SomberAzaleasGrace - @grace_machineSend any questions to tbhanimepodcast@outlook.com

You're On The Phone
ep. 200 THE 200TH EPISODE SPECTACULAR ft. Nick Crawford

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 134:21


WEED THE FUCK UP!!! Big number you got yourself there, 200 episodes huh? Goddamn it's cool hit a milestone like this, I REALLY CANNOT STATE IT ENOUGH, how grateful I am that you're evening reading this, it means the world to me that you support me and all the dumbshit that my friends and I want to do! WEED UP TO NICK CRAWFORD aka Gary “Jerry” Cooper (My Body Sings Electric, Neon Cooper, Kid Astronaut, Try Harder and the YOTP Live Band) joined me for a fucking wonderful show! Gary brought some excerpts from his new book and we had a good time! FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: BOOMER ENTOMBER! Check out Axeslasher's newest song NOW! DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! “HAIRY” Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

Land Speed Legends
BONUS EPISODE!!! The Legendary Jim Burkdoll

Land Speed Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 24:05


BONUS EPISODE!!! This week we have another Burkdoll, the legendary Jim Burkdoll! Jim was first introduced to land speed racing in the 50's. He was just a kid when his dad, Keith, would take him out to Speed Week for the day. They caught the racing bug and began building a streamliner when Jim was still in elementary school! The streamliner took longer than anticipated to build but by the 80's they were racing the Blue Bird. They eventually retired that car but Jim was not finished and he built another streamliner, named Pink Thunder! Unfortunately, that car crashed in 2003 while is son Bo was driving it. Although Bo survived the crash it would be 19 years before they built another streamliner which is the one, they currently race. In between building streamliners Jim served as USFRA president for over 10 years. Hang on this is going to be as incredible as a thunder storm on the salt!

Wisconsin Music Podcast
Episode 087: Janesville native 70's and 80's rock influence with a Country topline Artist KIRSTIE KRAUS

Wisconsin Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 48:11


WISCONSIN MUSIC PODCAST AMPLIFYING WISCONSIN MUSICIANS EPISODE 87 KIRSTIE KRAUS   https://www.kirstiekraus.com/ Kirstie Kraus carries her thirst in her songwriting, in her live shows, and in her everyday connection with other kindred spirits. Nowhere is her appetite more quenched than on a stage in front of her fans, appropriately named “Thirsties”. Her confidence naturally shines under the bright lights, taking concert goers on a well-defined path of self-discovery and bliss. Her writing infuses her own transparent journey with others' experiences to create sustainable lyrics and catchy melodies.  The result is a perfect blend of country, funk, blues, and rock because with Kirstie, there are no boundaries. There's only the process of “letting go” and letting the song tell you what it wants to be.    It will also tell you WHERE it wants to be and for an intuitive deep thinker like Kirstie, that place is Nashville. Three years ago, the Wisconsin native made the move to Music City and having heavily toured the summer before with her Midwest band, Thirsty Jones, Kirstie made the decision to really focus on honing her craft in town. She immediately began demoing out songs for her upcoming full length record and playing established Nashville venues, like the Listening Room Café and the Bluebird. She also leaned into the production side of her album, gaining great insight from her then producer about arrangements, vocal styling, and mixing. Her first Nashville based single, “Delusional” (2018) fancies a sassy 80s funk groove while 2019's “Gotta Do” pulls in early 2000s Shania vibes. “Silver”, her July 2020 release, possesses the licks of Joan Jett and attitude of Avril Lavigne, proving that she's not a one lane roadmap. ​ In fact, the roadmap has always been paved with perseverance and unwavering support of her close knit family back home. Her strong Catholic upbringing relayed the importance of a greater plan from early on. Growing up in an industrial, blue collar area instilled hard work, community involvement, and social interaction. The popular powerhouse vocals of Mariah, Celine, Gloria Estefan, and Amy Grant nudged the precocious six year old to declare that she too wanted to be a singer, in the form of a homework drawing. Her mother then enrolled her ambitious daughter into every opportunity and outlet she could find. By 12, she was writing songs and by the age of 15, she had picked up a guitar and joined NSAI, which meant frequent trips to Nashville for the next several years to be mentored by the best in the business. Kirstie did what most successful artists of longevity will tell you to do: she built her fan base and relationships back home AND in Nashville before making the big leap. https://www.kirstiekraus.com/   Wisconsin Music Podcast Link tree : linktr.ee/WI_Music_Podcast ZTF Studio: www.ztfStudio.com

Down Home Cajun Music
Down Home Cajun Music- Bosco Stomp

Down Home Cajun Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 50:24


Down Home Cajun Music- Bosco StompIsom Fontenot- "La Bataille Dans Le Petit Abre" (Rounder 6002)Sidney Brown- "Highball Two Step" (Goldband 1046)Happy, Doc and the Boys- "Dans La Platin" (Fais Do-Do 1005)Joe Falcon- "Poche Town" (Columbia 40506)Nathan Abshire- "Kaplan Waltz" (O.T. 102)Adam et Cyprien Landreneau- "Danse De Limonade" (Rounder 6002)Hackberry Ramblers- "Louisiana Breakdown" (Bluebird 2011)Iry Lejeune- "Te Mone" (Folk-Star 101)Lawrence Walker- "Bosco Stomp" (Khoury's 616)Blind Uncle Gaspard- "Cher Ami Ma Vie Est Ruin" (Vocalion 5302)Falcon Trio- "Raise Your Window" (Bluebird 2183)Bois Sec Ardoin et Canray Fontenot- "Quo Fa're" (Rounder 6002)Amar Devillier- "Durald Two Step" (Lyric 1-B)Cleveland Mire- "Prison Waltz" (Feature 1033)Harry Choates- "Mari Jole Blon" (Gold Star 1350)Rayne Bo Ramblers- "Mabelle Tete Catin" (Bluebird 2087)Nathan Abshire et The Rayne Bo Ramblers- "Gueydan Breakdown" (Bluebird 2177)Amadie, Ophy et Cleoma Breaux- "Ma Blonde Est Partie" (Columbia 40510)*All selections from the original 78 rpm records and Lp's.

The Quack Shack
The Animator by Blue Bird Waterfowl

The Quack Shack

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:43


On this episode we sit down with the owner of Bluebird Waterfowl to talk about his amazing new product Get your Animator Here> https://bluebirdwaterfowl.com/Follow them here> https://m.facebook.com/BlueBirdWaterfowl/Huge thanks to our sponsors be sure to check them out and take advantage of the discount codes!sponsors:www.gatorwaders.com Quackshack10 at check out.www.retayusa.com www.retaynation.comwww.slayercalls.com Quackshack25 at check out.Wesley Vaughan 919 NC (@vpclanyards) • Instagram photos and videos on Instagram and mention The Quack Shack for a discount.check out all of our socials here > linktr.ee/Takeemfowlco

El Siglo 21 es Hoy
El satélite más brillante ✨ 🛰️

El Siglo 21 es Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 34:40


Episodio 1490: El satélite más brillanteLa compañía AST SpaceMobile busca crear una red de 5G satelital con una constelación de satélites llamada BlueBird y su primer satélite, el BlueWalker-3, tiene unos 64 metros cuadrados al tener sus antenas expandidas y se convierte en el cuerpo artificial más brillante en la órbita baja de la tierra. La parte buena es que promete mejorar las posibilidades de conectar teléfonos móviles vía satélite directamente a modelos como el iPhone 14, sin necesidad de antenas parabólicas (como las que necesitan las conexiones de SatarLink o de DirecTV).

• El siglo 21 es hoy •
El satélite más brillante ✨

• El siglo 21 es hoy •

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 34:40


Episodio 1490: El satélite más brillanteLa compañía AST SpaceMobile busca crear una red de 5G satelital con una constelación de satélites llamada BlueBird y su primer satélite, el BlueWalker-3, tiene unos 64 metros cuadrados al tener sus antenas expandidas y se convierte en el cuerpo artificial más brillante en la órbita baja de la tierra. La parte buena es que promete mejorar las posibilidades de conectar teléfonos móviles vía satélite directamente a modelos como el iPhone 14, sin necesidad de antenas parabólicas (como las que necesitan las conexiones de SatarLink o de DirecTV).

A Bit of Swazz: The Cardiff City Podcast

Never a dull moment being a Cardiff City fan! Host Brandon Richards and co-host William Cosh delve deep into all issues surrounding Cardiff City in Recent Times. The Sacking, New appointments and the future of our wonderful yet rollercoaster of a football club. Guess the Bluebird is back along with brand new Cardiff City Women's Section including Bluebirds defender Hannah Power!

The Steve Gruber Show
Troy Miller, Bluebird CFW Foundation Repair and Waterproofing

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 7:30


Troy Miller is the Owner of Bluebird CFW Foundation Repair and Waterproofing. They also Repair Seawalls Service area is the entire State of Michigan including the U.P. Here is a link to the website https://www.bluebirdcfw.com. Steve's basement problem and how great it was to finally get it fixed

The Top Line
September 23rd, 2022

The Top Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 16:09 Very Popular


Two Big Pharma companies, GSK and Takeda, made moves this week to bolster their environmental sustainability efforts. GSK is focusing on its supply chain and Takeda on its electrical sources in the U.S. In GSK's case, the development is part of a larger trend of companies focusing on emissions from outside of their direct operations. Fierce's Fraiser Kansteiner and Eric Sagonowsky will discuss what we can expect on environmental sustainability at Big Pharmas. To learn more about topics in this episode:  GSK puts suppliers on the hook as it amps up sustainability crusade  A $3M gene therapy: Bluebird bio breaks its own pricing record with FDA approval of Skysona Merck finally gets FDA nod to relaunch HIV trials, but drops preventive therapy plans FDA plans advisory committee meeting to discuss racial bias built into pulse oximeters Smartphone cameras could replace pulse oximeters to measure blood oxygen at home: study Rise of the machines: Novo Nordisk pledges $200M to create first quantum computer for life sciences The Top Line is produced by senior multimedia producer Teresa Carey with managing editor Querida Anderson and senior editors Annalee Armstrong, Ben Adams, Conor Hale and Eric Sagonowsky. The sound engineer is Caleb Hodgson. The stories are by all our “Fierce” journalists. Like and subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Freeheel Life Podcast
#147 - Jeff Cox Inventor/Engineer & Freeheel Life Industries Acquires Bluebird Day Gear

The Freeheel Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 82:32


Jeff Cox always wanted to be an inventor. Even at the youngest ages, living on the east coast, he wanted to create things. As an adult he would become a chemical engineer, but never gave up on his interest to create new ideas. In fact, he kept lists and lists of inventions that he thought he could possibly create one day.  His father was the first person he knew that Telemarked – which also sparked his interest later in life to try it himself. But it wasn't until he saw his mom, who was also a Telemark skier, try to put on a leash with her mittens on that he thought about creating a better leash.  Bluebird Day Gear was born some time around 2011 and started with his newly designed leashes. Through feedback over the following years from some of his first retail shops, he added two other products: Smile Plates and Heel Levers.  In 2019 Jeff approached Freeheel Life Industries to acquire the small but successful brand. Although there were some delays in moving the operation to Salt Lake City because of Covid in 2020, BBDG is now back in full production and housed in the Freeheel Life HQ in SLC, UT.  Bluebird Day Gear: bluebirddaygear.com Instagram: HERE Sign-up for the mailing list: https://bit.ly/FHLMailingList Connect with Josh and the Freeheel Life Family  Josh on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter  Telemark Skier Magazine on Instagram, Twitter and YouTube Freeheel Life on Instagram and Twitter Shop The Freeheel Life Telemark Shop  How You Can Support Us: Shop Telemark at  FREEHEELLIFE.COM Subscribe & Become a Supporter of TelemarkSkier.com for articles, gear reviews, & more! Email Podcast@freeheellife.com

Evoke Greatness Podcast
Rebecca Woods: Triathlete, CIO & Founder of Bluebird Tech Solutions/Bluebird Leaders

Evoke Greatness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 34:17


In this episode Rebecca shares:How the experience of being mistaken for a staff member by men at a tech conference. when she was a young female CIO ultimately put her on the path to starting up Bluebird Tech Solutions.Why providing guidance and mentorship to other women is important to her.Powerful lessons she has learned along the way.What has fundamentally changed in her leadership over the yearsHow she is setting an example for her daughters by what she is doing in her career.How she combats the impact of the great resignation and keeps her team happy and engaged.What she sees as the biggest challenge the industry is facing today in healthcare tech.The exciting conference she is putting on in NovemberRebecca is a fellow CHIEF and a dynamic woman with a clear vision. She is committed to moving the dial for women in leadership. Make sure to connect with her on LinkedIn. Check out Bluebird Tech Solutions and the Bluebird Leaders November conference details. IDEAL for Healthcare is excited for our budding partnership with Rebecca and Bluebird Leaders.https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebecca-woods-mha-pm-923095a/https://www.bluebirdtechsolutions.com/https://www.bluebirdleaders.org/2022-conference/

The Gardenangelists
After Listening or While Listening, Go Outside!

The Gardenangelists

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 43:17 Very Popular


Dee and Carol talk about stalwart flowers, recap their tomato season, talk about going outside, milkweed and monarchs, and more on this week's episode.Go to our Substack newsletter with more information about this week's episode. Be sure and subscribe to get the newsletter directly in your email inbox!Links:Some of the flowers we mentioned:Aster 'Bluebird' (American Meadows has it)Atomic glass  (American Meadows also has it)Phlox 'Bright Eyes' (an American Meadows has it too)Some of the tomato varieties we mentioned:Purple Zebra, an All-America Selections winner for 2022, and in our gardens too.Black CherrySun DipperMissouri Love Apple Brad's Atomic Grape Pink Berkley Tie Dye Sunrise Bumblebee.A book, Epic Tomatoes: How To Select and Grow the Best Varieties of All Time by Craig LeHoullier  (Amazon Link)  On the Bookshelf:  Outdoor Kids in an Inside World by Steven Rinella (Amazon Link)1,000 Hours Outdoors project websiteCal Newport's blog post: Whitman in the Knapsack...For our dirt, check out our substack newsletter for details of what we talked about!Monarch websites:  Monarch Watch, Journey North, A book: Bees in Your Backyard by Olivia Messinger Carril and Joseph S. Wilson (Amazon Link)) Carol's Rabbit hole:  What Do We Know About Crop Circles by Ben Hubbard. (Amazon Link) and  Circular Evidence: A Detailed Investigation of the Flattened Swirled Crops Phenomenon by Pat Delgado and Colin AndrewsAffiliate link to Botanical Interest Seeds. (If you buy something from them after using this link, we earn a small commission at no cost to you. This helps us continue to bring this podcast to you ad-free!)  Book links are also affiliate links.Email us anytime at TheGardenangelists@gmail.com  For more info on Carol and her books, visit her website.  Visit her blog May Dreams Gardens.For more info on Dee and her book, visit her website.  Visit her blog Red Dirt Ramblings.Don't forget to sign up for our newsletters, via our websites!

Organic Gardener Podcast
426. Bluebird Gardens | CHARLOTTE EKKER WIGGINS | Missouri

Organic Gardener Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 58:44


Tuesday • March 15, 2022 Here from Missouri is an amazing beekeeper, gardener, and author, CHARLOTTE EKKER WIGGINS! https://amzn.to/3wWX6lR ()https://amzn.to/3wWX6lR (Bee Club Basics: How to Start a Bee Club)https://amzn.to/3CW0KjI ()https://amzn.to/3CW0KjI (A Beekeeper's Diary: Self Guide to Keeping Bees)Has lots of checklists to help you get started. Master Beekeeper class is using her next book Bees Need Flowers, Planting for Pollinators coming out soon. Tips include: reading a lot.  Join a bee club because it's like learning a new language. Beekeeping is very local Need to know bee biology to work with bees not tell them what to do Spend a year learning about beekeeping by taking 1 or more classes, reading, meeting other beekeepers. Bees are colony based, not self centered like humans. Bees sometimes leave because they don't want to spread disease to the hive. Jackie asks what if you can't find a club?  Thanks to the pandemic lots of clubs are meeting on Zoom like https://beesbeyondborders.com/ (Bees Beyond Borders) in Florida have guest speakers from leading bee experts in the country. What works and what doesn't in a gardenThe critical part of providing bees is your SOIL HAS TO BE HEALTHY! Need to keep soil healthy which will keep plants healthy and then bees will be healthy and food we eat will be healthy. One out of every 3 bites of food we eat is from bee pollination.Composting is the easiest thing to do. Mulch with compost. Lots of bird houses for natural pest control I'm the same way. There's so many garden chores I don't want to do but compost is so easy! I don't understand people who say it's too hard, messy or complicated. Charlotte adds we need to move away from perfection. In the old days, magazines used to really focus on green lawns. Common sense says it's expensive to put in, you need to put in high expensive fertilizers, the minute it grows you cut it down and it doesn't really add anything to the environment. A bug bite on a rose leaf is exciting it means there's a relationship between ladybugs and praying mantis etc who are eating the pests in the garden because they need food so a whole in a leaf is important for the rose to grow. What grew well?  Catnip What's something new or different your excited to try? Some https://www.rareseeds.com/ (Baker Creek Co Seeds).https://www.rareseeds.com/ (https://www.rareseeds.com/) Some flowers and peppers that were ordered. I like the tried and true.  Do you save your own seeds? I just tried spaghetti squash and loved it so I saved those. I also do companion planting. I plant onions around my roses to deter bugs and if I need an onion. I mix my vegetables and flowers, I don't have them in rows, I plant them in with my flowers because I can move them around each year so they're not planted in the same soil and using up all the nutrients and the pollinators are attracted by the flowers.  How about something that didn't go the way you thought is was going to? My least favorite thing is to dig holes, I didn't get as much mulch as I would have liked in some new flower beds, and I planted some zinnias in a bed that wasn't quite ready for planting. They didn't do as well as they should have.  Getting to the Root of Things What's your favorite activity in the garden? Play with my bees. How do you play with your bees? Follow them and observe where they're going. Are they on fruit trees or flowers? Are the mason bees out of their houses? Things I do to keep the veroa mites low. Want to monitor and keep hives small.  What's big and small? A nucleus hive is about 5-8000 bees. A full colony is 60-80,000 bees. Pollen for the queen and nectar is flight fuel. Mutual relationship between bees and flowers. If you have good forage through growing season April through October. 2,000,000 flowers to make a pound of honey.  Best advice? Soil section of the master gardener classes. I will take a...

Novel Pairings
98. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry and stories as big as Texas

Novel Pairings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 89:48 Very Popular


Today, Sara and Chelsey discuss Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry. This novel surprised us in the best ways, and we loved reading along with you all summer. Tune in to hear us talk about the fantastic characters and McMurtry's narrative style in this sweeping tome, drawing surprising similarities with Jane Austen. This novel touches on themes of love, family, masculinity, and so much more. If you're looking for a fantastic book club selection with more to discuss than could possibly fit in an hour, consider this novel along with some of our pairings.  This episode is mostly spoiler free, with warnings included before we share important plot details. To support Novel Pairings: Write a review in Apple Podcasts.  Subscribe to our newsletter at novelpairings.substack.com Join our Patreon community at patreon.com/novelpairings. Follow Novel Pairings on Instagram or Twitter.  Send this episode to a bookish friend! Books Mentioned  Some links are affiliate links. Every time you make a purchase through one of these links, it helps us keep the podcast running. Thank you!  Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry  Listen to our pairings: [56:15] Chelsey: Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke  Olympus, Texas by Stacey Swann Montana 1948 by Larry Watson Sara:  Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin  The Sun by Philipp Meyer  The River by Peter Heller A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza  Pick of the Week: Chelsey: The Harder They Fall (Netflix) Sara: The Watch: Lonesome Dove

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch

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A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022