Podcasts about issaquah

City in Washington, United States

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Latest podcast episodes about issaquah

Indy on Air
Back to School for Teachers

Indy on Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 16:38


It's no secret that there's a national teacher shortage right now, and that many teachers are not happy with the resources the district provides them inside and outside classrooms. With Seattle schools starting a week late from a teacher strike, we wondered how teachers in Sammamish feel about returning back to school this year. We talked to three teachers in the Lake Washington and Issaquah school districts to get insights on what our local teachers are faring as schools try to return to pre-pandemic life.

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

In every relationship our desire as humans is to know and be known by others. Our togetherness leads us toward God and toward one another. The post Known Community appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

We are all called together to be part of this beautiful thing called the body of Christ. We have been invited and reminded of our inherent value. So what does that teach us about living together? Come as we align ourselves with God’s conviction of being that body that belongs together. The post Belong Together appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Over the last 2,000 years, what has made the church a unique movement the world has never seen before? What makes us at Pine Lake Covenant Church unique? Come this weekend as we cast a vision for what will define us as a community who follows hard after Jesus. Come and hear how Jesus calls us to Together well. The post Together appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: September 9, 2022 - with Erica C. Barnett

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 45:53


On this Hacks & Wonks week-in-review, Crystal Fincher is joined by Seattle political reporter, editor of Publicla, co-host of the Seattle Nice podcast, and author of Quitter: A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse, and Recovery, Erica C. Barnett! They start the show discussing the teachers strikes happening across the state. Schools all over Washington are facing unreasonable class sizes and under-resourced necessary programs like special education and mental health assistance. Despite claims from districts that teachers are just fighting for better pay, educator's priorities for these strikes are securing the resources to lower class sizes and improve special ed resources. In a victory for teachers, Kent Educators successfully negotiated with the Kent School District after district negotiators were forced to come to the table when two Kent School Board members prevented an injunction from the district against the striking teachers - Lelsie Hamada and Joseph Bento voted against the injunction, while Awale Farah and Tim Clark voted for it. In other school news, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Chris Ryekdal, is submitting a proposal for the state to provide free lunch to all students. The proposal would cst the legislature $86 million a year, and would feed the over 300,000 students that don't currently qualify for free or reduced-priced lunches. Since we know that kids' education suffers if they don't get sufficient nutrition, this is an impactful proposal that we will be keeping an eye on. For elections, Erica breaks down the election reform and status quo campaigns in this year's general election. This November, voters will have the option to choose if they would like to change the way we vote, and whether we should adopt Ranked Choice Voting or Approval Voting for local primary elections. Recently, a campaign to maintain the status-quo is starting to take shape, funded primarily by local business leaders. Meanwhile, Ranked Choice Voting's formal campaign is just starting to raise money, while the Approval campaign has raised over $400,000.  While there will be a lot of different talking points shared around this vote, it's essential that the media frame this issue around what will help most people get involved and make their voices heard, and which system will help communities be accurately represented. We also need to ensure that there is a proper voter education rollout if our elections change. We saw in Pierce County the danger of what happens when you ask people to use a voting system hasn't been properly explained to them.  Catching up with Mayor Harrell's data dashboard, it's clear the data is incomplete, and the mayor's promise of an effective approach to homelessness is not being met. Sweeps have increased since the pandemic, we do not have the 1,000 pieces of "emergency shelter" that Harrell promised to build, and a surprisingly low number of people are being referred to shelter. And despite early vows to not play the blame game, he continues to point to past administrations, the King County Regional Homeless Authority, and the City Council as reasons he hasn't achieved his goals.  We've seen examples of cities and districts applying legitimate housing- and services-first models and finding measurable success, yet Harrell's administration continues to focus on sweeps as the answer to our homelessness crisis. Harrell's current approach runs against his promises during the election to prioritize housing and treatment, and aren't proving effective at actually reducing homelessness.  We wrap up the show looking at a recent press conference from Seattle-area law enforcement leaders, which, while advertised as an announcement of a crisis in the city's police force, was really an endorsement announcement for King County Prosecutor Candidate Jim Ferrell. While he's running as a Democrat, Ferrell's embracing an endorsement from SPOG and Mike Sloan, which represents a real divide between Ferrell's approach to police and public safety versus most Democrats' views. It's the latest in a line of moves and positions from Ferrell that run counter to his self-given Democrat label. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Erica C. Barnett, at @ericacbarnett. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Kent teachers strike ends as union ratifies contract; students head to class” by Daisy Zavala Magaña and Christine Clarridge from The Seattle Times:  https://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/kent-teachers-strike-could-end-soon-as-union-reaches-tentative-deal/   “Seattle Teachers Strike” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger:  https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/09/07/78442506/seattle-teachers-strike   “WA teachers strikes highlight school funding, staffing woes” by Venice Buhain from Crosscut:  https://crosscut.com/news/2022/09/wa-teachers-strikes-highlight-school-funding-staffing-woes   “Reykdal calls for WA Legislature to fund free school meals for all” by Jeanie Lindsay from The Seattle Times:  https://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/reykdal-calls-for-wa-legislature-to-fund-free-school-meals-for-all/   “Anti-Election Reform Campaign Emerges” by Erica C. Barnett from Publicola:  https://publicola.com/2022/09/06/anti-election-reform-campaign-emerges-next-years-election-starts-shaping-up-new-sdot-director-says-hell-take-vision-zero-down-to-the-studs/   City of Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission - 2022 Campaigns:  http://web6.seattle.gov/ethics/elections/campaigns.aspx?cycle=2022&type=contest&IDNum=201&leftmenu=expanded   “Harrell's Homelessness ‘Data Dashboard' Shows Plenty of Sweeps But Little Progress on Shelter, Housing” by Erica C. Barnett from Publicola:  https://publicola.com/2022/08/30/harrells-homelessness-data-dashboard-shows-plenty-of-sweeps-but-little-progress-on-shelter-housing/   "How would mayoral candidates Bruce Harrell and M. Lorena González tackle homelessness in Seattle?" by Scott Greenstone from The Seattle Times:  https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/how-would-mayoral-candidates-bruce-harrell-and-m-lorena-gonzalez-tackle-homelessness-in-seattle/   "Seattle Might Soon Defund a Promising Police Alternative" by Will Casey from The Stranger:  https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/23/75477450/seattle-might-soon-defund-a-promising-police-alternative   “Seattle-area law enforcement union chiefs push for Jim Ferrell in prosecutor race” by Mike Carter from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/law-justice/seattle-area-law-enforcement-union-chiefs-push-for-jim-ferrell-in-prosecutor-race/   “Slog AM: Mayor Announces SPD Chief Finalists, ‘Doomsday Glacier' Melting, Trum in More Trouble” by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/slog-am/2022/09/09/78452663/slog-am-mayor-announces-spd-chief-finalists-doomsday-glacier-melting-trump-in-more-trouble   "Misdemeanor Prosecution" by Amanda Y. Agan, Jennifer L. Doleac, & Anna Harvey from The National Bureau of Economic Research: https://www.nber.org/papers/w28600   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show were always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a co-host. Welcome back to the program, friend of the show and today's co-host, Seattle political reporter, editor of Publicola, co-host of the Seattle Nice podcast, and author of Quitter, A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse, and Recovery, Erica Barnett. [00:00:58] Erica C. Barnett: It's great to be here, Crystal. [00:00:59] Crystal Fincher: Great to have you back, lots to talk about this week. And I think we will start off talking about teachers striking, really across the state, and one strike that just ended in Kent. What is going on in the world of teacher strikes? [00:01:15] Erica C. Barnett: I'm gonna defer to you a little bit on the Kent strike, but this is, you mentioned, this is a statewide situation - it's really a national situation. Schools are having trouble keeping up enrollment across the country. People are moving away. People have enrolled, wealthier people have enrolled, their kids in private schools. And so that's creating, a financial crunch for a lot of school districts. And frankly teachers and parent educators and other school staff across the country are saying, "look, we're being asked to do more. We're not being compensated commensurate with inflation." Or the or cops, frankly, and we can talk more about that. But yeah, it's happening across the country and across the state. In Kent, you mentioned before we came on mic, Eatonville, seattle, lots and lots of places, we're seeing these school strikes. If you live in Seattle and you're reading the newspaper and you think that Seattle's the only district where this is happening, that is very much not the case. [00:02:29] Crystal Fincher: Very much not the case. And we are in a pretty precarious situation, to your point, nationwide. And education, a lot of districts are dealing with staffing issues, problems, and challenges, and sometimes the issue, like there is in Kent, where some schools have seen declines in enrollment where other schools, like here in Kent, Kent-Meridian is actually seeing a pretty dramatic increase. And what do you do with that? Having to shift staff? That's an issue that Seattle has had to deal with before. And just shortages across the board, especially in programs like special education, which seems to be an issue across the board. This is an issue that's under discussion in every strike that is happening, or that has been authorized in the state, where it seems like there has just been staffing losses, or increased need, a combination of the two in special education classes. And these classes are far beyond the staffing ratios originally intended for these. And that's on the list of things that teachers are striking for: to bring these classes back within the recommended ranges that they're supposed to be. In Seattle, one parent was talking about, they were looking at a class size of 30 to 40 kids for their special education student, which is far beyond what it should be. Another thing that was a big issue in Kent and also across the state and the country are mental health resources, school counselors. In Kent, it was an issue where the staffing ratio recommended pre pandemic was one counselor for every 250 students. As was frequently discussed throughout the pandemic, the needs that students have in terms of support have only grown since then. Yet, the current staffing ratios that were presented were one for every 500 students. I don't even know how that's manageable. Certainly doesn't meet the need, if anything, we needed to be moving towards even lower ratios than what was recommended before. So these are resources for students. These are the conditions for learning. These do dictate the types of outcomes that kids are going to be receiving through school, which dictates the rest of their life, really. You know, how someone performs in school does have a predictive measure on how things look for the rest of their life. Not absolutely determinative, but certainly influences it. So these are really serious discussions. This has to do with, the future. These are future residents and neighbors and employees and everything that we need to make our society work. We are planting these seeds right now in these classrooms. And if we make sure that they have what they need to succeed, we're all better off. [00:05:31] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah, I think, to, to your point about counselors, that is also an issue in Seattle. I think that there are, I'm not a parent, I don't have public school kids or anything like that, but but I believe I read that some schools don't have full-time counselors. And to your point about special education, that, is one of the major sticking points in the strike in Seattle. The teachers and the employees that are striking, want to have set staffing ratios for special education. And the district is essentially saying, "we'll deal with that later and trust us." And I think that there, there is not a lot of trust there between the district and educators. On that point, just because class sizes have grown so substantially, so you know, those are all really important issues. A lot of times people look at a strike and think, "they just want more money." And look at the the amount that teachers are making, which is still quite low compared to what a lot of other public servants make such as police. And in Seattle, it's low compared to some surrounding districts. And teachers can't afford to live in the city. And so those are all really important considerations, but there are also, real considerations that affect the education that kids are getting. If you're in a class with 30 or 40 students, you are not getting the kind of individualized attention that a lot of parents I think would hope their kids would have. So there's a lot of different issues at play in all of these strikes. And we're recording this on Friday morning. I don't know how long the strike is gonna go on, but but there's still quite a lot to be hammered out beyond just the issue of wages and benefits. [00:07:23] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And the issue of the negotiation, the bargaining is a big one, and whether or not the districts and the representatives are bargaining in good faith. There has been a lot of consternation in Seattle because the district's negotiators there have just not shown up on some days. And even in their announcement that was sent out to parents yesterday, heard a number of parents saying, "they're saying that if an agreement is not reached tomorrow, we'll get an update by Monday," which seems to indicate that they don't plan on meeting over the weekend, which the union negotiators are willing to do, were willing to do last weekend. And it just seems like the district negotiators are dragging their feet are hoping that some public pressure coalesces and maybe externally gets the teachers back. But I think negotiating in good faith is the best way to do that. But I think we just saw that in Kent, who just settled their strike - kids are back in classes now - where they actually considered suing the teacher's union to seek an injunction, to force them back to work, and it failed on a split vote in the council with, surprisingly, the former chair of the 33rd Democrats, who is now a school board member. Tim Clark voted in favor of suing the teacher's union as did Awale Farah, who had a lot of progressive endorsements. So certainly surprising to see those anti-union votes from those two people. But it did appear that, that the negotiators were dragging their feet saying, "maybe we won't have to do anything. We'll wait for the lawsuit to take place." But as soon as that was shot down, an agreement was reached pretty quickly thereafter. What the teachers are asking for wasn't out of bounds, it wasn't too much, it wasn't unreasonable. And once they started negotiating seriously, they reached an agreement pretty soon. I hope the Seattle district follows suit and really does start negotiating in good faith to end this because this is a hardship on parents and families. It is not easy to take care of kids when you weren't counting on that, when you have a job, when you have different things you need to do. So I hope they get this over with, get this done, settle with the teachers as quickly as possible. [00:09:48] Erica C. Barnett: Absolutely. [00:09:49] Crystal Fincher: With that, we will move on to another item that came out yesterday: the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the state, Chris Ryekdal, is calling for free school meals for everyone. What did he propose? [00:10:04] Erica C. Barnett: I think you said it. He's saying that the legislature needs to pass legislation to fund free school meals for the remaining, I believe it was 330,000, students who don't qualify. And I think my number may be off, I'm going for memory, but I think it was about $86 million a year to to pay for all these meals for kids. And I imagine, this was just announced. I imagine there will probably be some reaction from the right to this proposal, from the Republican saying that it is unnecessary or that we shouldn't be doing these giveaways to children or parents or whatever. But man, it just, it seems a no brainer in a lot of ways to make food available to all kids, particularly with rising food costs right now. If you've been to the grocery store lately, it is shocking. So yeah, this seems like a very timely announcement and a timely proposal to me. [00:11:16] Crystal Fincher: It does. And we would join a few other states like California, Vermont, and Massachusetts who are doing this. To your point right now, about half the school- half the kids in the school, are covered by free lunch. But like those requirements sometimes are- not everybody who qualifies actually seeks it and gets it. There is absolutely the issue of child hunger. It's getting worse. This is a plan that is interesting. Again, we know that kids not being hungry in school makes their ability to learn better that when they're not facing issues like hunger that they, their educational outcomes do improve. So we want to do everything to make that a possibility, and this seems like a good idea and interesting to see where it goes. He's asking for an appropriation from the legislature, so this would be something that would have to be taken up during the legislative session, and we'll see what the response to it is. [00:12:16] Erica C. Barnett: One thing that doesn't get talked about when all the time in these discussions about school, about school lunches and it's free food at schools is there is there's a real stigma, still, to being a kid who has a free lunch as opposed to kids who are able to purchase their lunches. And I think this will also even the playing field for parents and kids, too, if it's just universally, you go to school, you get a lunch. That's again, to me, that seems like a no brainer. I realize there is a cost associated with it, ultimately it's not millions of kids. It's hundreds of thousands of kids. And I do think that, anything that can reduce stigma for for lower income kids in school is also good for their education. [00:13:02] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Great point. Completely agree. I also wanna talk about a story you wrote this week about the election reform campaigns that are starting to develop. What's taken place? [00:13:15] Erica C. Barnett: So there is gonna be a measure on the ballot in November. It's a three part measure. It's one of those kind of confusing proposals where you can choose Yes or No on, "do you want to change the way that we elect local officials?" And whether you say Yes or No, you can then choose between two different options. One is Ranked Choice Voting where you, list you essentially rank, each person that you like in order of preference. And you don't have to rank everybody. If there's 20 people on the ballot, you can rank however many you want. And the second is Approval Voting, where you fill in the bubble for everybody that you approve of, and they're essentially ranked equally. And so these are both election reforms that their advocates say will, result in more representative people being on the city council. And they're just for primary elections - the general election would go on as it currently does. So yeah, so campaigns are shaping up. There's a Ranked Choice Voting campaign that does not have a lot of money yet that just formed. There is an Approval Voting campaign that has hundreds of thousands of dollars coming in from advocates for for that voting system, which is little tested and well funded. And then there is also, now, and this is what I reported this week, an emerging campaign against all of the above, "let's stick with the status quo." And that is funded by a bunch of local and quasi-local business interests. And I say quasi-local, because a lot of the folks who are funding it are from out of town, around Seattle, Issaquah, Bellevue, et cetera. So it's gonna be, I think, this is gonna be an incredibly heated campaign for something that is, essentially, a very nerdy debate over what kind of elections are most representative and are we getting the best candidates we can? Are we getting the best elected officials we can? And would changing the system change the results? [00:15:30] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, it's really interesting to see, especially this 'vote no on everything campaign.' From the political perspective, it's interesting. It will be interesting to see how this plays out, because when there's a choice between no change and some change, and you have choices on what kind of change, oftentimes just saying, "okay, just all those options are confusing. You have to learn about them. Just say no, and don't change anything," sometimes is the easiest. Not saying that it's right, but sometimes it's the easiest, argument to make and to have carry. And so it's interesting to see this take shape. To your point, you were talking about a number of local business leaders: the CEO of HomeStreet Bank, the Costco co-founder and former CEO, Mariners co-owner John Stanton, developers who are involved with that, starbucks president, a former Starbucks president. So it's a lot of entrenched interests who are lining up in funding this no campaign, which looks like it will have, based on the people involved with it, kind of bottomless resources and able to go up against the pretty formidable resources of the Approval Voting Campaign, which is new to our area. I have no idea how this is gonna play out, what's gonna happen, and how it's going to interface with the Rank Choice Voting campaign, which has a much longer grassroots history in our state, and has had a lot of advocates on the ground. It's actually on the ballot in Clark county and in San Juan County, I wanna say, this November. And so there've been lots of conversations about it. Lots of advocates who have been in favor of it over the past several years and more momentum growing, and we've seen examples of it across the country being implemented. But that the formal campaign for the city of Seattle ballot question is just forming and we'll see what shape that takes and what kind of resources they wind up with. [00:17:43] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah. I think Ranked Choice Voting has happened all across the country, and we saw, in Alaska, helped defeat Sara Palin. I will say one difference here is that we already have an election reform, or what other places consider an election reform, in place, which is the top-two primary. And this would be Ranked Choice Voting or Approval Voting plus a top-two primary, which is a little confusing. Usually Ranked Choice Voting, it's essentially, like instant- it's also called instant runoff voting. And it's supposed to result in one winner. And here, we would be doing it in a weird, and I don't know if it's unprecedented, but highly unusual way of using it for the primary, and then the top two go through and we vote on them three months later in the normal way. So anyway, it'll it'll be interesting, if we do adopt it, to see how it works and in what ways it is compatible and incompatible with the way that we already do our elections, which have, been reformed pretty recently with the top-two primary. [00:18:48] Crystal Fincher: I hope, as we continue these discussions, that we really do focus on voter turnout and what gets more people involved and not necessarily what is going to achieve the desired result, but what gets more people engaged and able to vote, engaged in voting, and having a voice in shaping their own community and in choosing their own leaders. That to me should be the goal, and so I hope that we focus on that, as well as making sure that no matter what is implemented - regardless of this vote, I think it is pretty apparent that we're gonna see voting reforms implemented with more frequency across this state and country - that we do invest the appropriate resources in educating the public about what's gonna happen. We saw in Pierce County the failure to do that had bad consequences and lead to a backlash. If people aren't prepared for this change, then it's going to disenfranchise people. It's gonna confuse people. When people are confused, they frequently don't vote. They get really cranky. And sometimes I see dismissive statements, especially online, with this may be hard for people to understand and being like, "no, it's really easy to understand. You just rank the people." And that is, is such an oversight and really dismissive. Lots of people do have challenge. Look at the amount of people who have, who don't realize that they need to sign their ballot right now with our current system. So just even changes that seems simple and obvious to some just are not to everyone. And we need to do reaching out in person. We need to do reaching out in all of the languages that people vote in, in all areas of community, different income levels, whether people are online or offline, really make a concerted effort to do that. So that's, if you know me and we have talked about this, you have heard this from me before. I'm most interested in making sure people have the information they need to vote and that we do what makes it easiest for them to do that and don't risk disenfranchising people. So we'll see how this plays out. We'll link, but you can see the filings and how these continue to shape up on the Seattle Ethics and Elections website. I think some people may not realize, who are used to now, got used to looking up on the PDC for a lot of other races across the country: in Seattle races, there is- Seattle has its own regulations, its own authority, and so you can look up all of the Seattle election information on Seattle's Ethics and Election website. You can see all of the disclosures filings, all of that, there. So very useful. We'll link that and continue to follow along with those races. Also this week, you did some great reporting on the state of mayor Harrell's homelessness data dashboard. What's up with it? [00:21:56] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah, the mayor has, three months ago, he announced with a lot of fanfare, that he was gonna be tracking data on homelessness, and specifically on homeless encampments in a more or less live fashion on this data dashboard. And the dashboard has not been updated for three months. I think they're gonna be, I think realistically, they have said it's gonna be every three months. If you look at the the dashboard itself, it's not really a dashboard. It's really more of a static website that has a couple of elements that change a little bit, including a map that's intended to show, essentially progress on closing encampments. And, Harrell has said, and for some reason he's adopted this as a motto, he said, "we don't do sweeps. We treat and we house." And that is, that statement, is false in a lot of different respects. The city has really ramped up sweeps even from, previous mayor, Jenny Durkan. And and they're happening nonstop across the city. Both planned sweeps and and unplanned sweeps. Both sweeps where people are engaged and connected to shelter, and those that are done at the last minute because the city decides there's an obstruction or a danger. And so, that's false. We're also not providing treatment to anybody. The city doesn't do that. And the city also doesn't house people directly from encampments except in exceptional circumstances. So this dashboard is also very incomplete, doesn't really provide a lot of information, but if you look at it without, if you squint your eyes and don't look at the data, you can see a lot of dots on the map that make it look like the city's really doing a lot to address unsheltered homelessness, which, frankly, it is not. We don't have more money for that, the city has relinquished a lot of control to the King County Regional Homelessness Authority which also doesn't have a lot of money for that. And so we're at the same point that we were at any point during the homelessness crisis except that sweeps have ramped up since the pandemic emergency ended and since Harrell came into office. [00:24:32] Crystal Fincher: Yeah it's really interesting, and it looks like they really tried to make it look like they were doing stuff but as you broke down the numbers the city said they counted 814 tents and 426 RVs citywide, made a total of 191 offers of shelter in June out of 616 in the second quarter in 2022. And so based on how it looks like the numbers are calculated, estimating that 30% of shelter offers during the same period resulted in a person enrolling in a shelter for at least one night - we could have a long conversation about how one night of shelter after removing the place where they were leaving is insufficient - but really what that means is that about only 72 people from those 814 tents and 426 RVs spent any time at all in a shelter bed. And what just such an insufficient number and completely opposite to what he said. It just- we just don't appear to be making progress, and even making progress according to the goals that Mayor Harrell set for himself and what he said he was gonna do. And so measuring by his own stick, he's failing and he's not taking the action that he said he would be doing. Which is really interesting because he seems to be saying, "none of this is my fault and I have no nothing to do with any of this. And, I'd rather change the council than, acknowledge that there's anything that I have control of to do in this situation." [00:26:21] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah. There are caveats to to all of these numbers and I do think that the the baseline number of tents and RVs is probably very much underestimated. The number of people who went to shelter may also be slightly underestimated just because of how they calculate and how they gather information. But I think that Harrell, and maybe this is a successful tactic because people don't dig into the numbers and they pay attention to the top lines, to use poll speak, but, I mean, his insistence, his mantra, that we treat and we house, it just, it drives me a little bonkers. I don't think that Bruce Harrell is an uncompassionate person, but I also think that, when you say that we are giving people treatment and we are giving people housing and it is not true, it's incumbent on people like, like me and you, Crystal, to, to point out this is not true. This is not what's happening. What's happening is they're offering people shelter when tiny house villages become available. They're offering people those. Mostly they're saying here, you can go across town, and relinquish all your stuff, give up your spot, give up the people that you know, and stay in a mass shelter. It may not be a quote unquote mat on the floor, but these are still mass shelters and that is your choice. And people don't stay in those shelters for very long because they don't offer hope for housing and they're crowded and you don't have a lot of privacy or rights. I just think we need to hammer home that this shelter, this we house and we treat stuff, is that's not what's happening. [00:28:10] Crystal Fincher: It's not what's happening, and it flies in the face of what evidence does show works, which is giving people support and housing. Sweeping people moves people from one location to another. It doesn't solve the issue of homelessness. And really it doesn't even solve the issue of visible homelessness, which some people view as being the problem. Not that people are outside, but "I have to look at people who are outside and that makes me uncomfortable without engaging with how uncomfortable it is to be living without shelter." And there's been a lot of local reporting even on, "hey, people swept from one location, wind up at another location. And hey, we've tracked people from this sweep location, then they move over here, and then they move over there." And so we're just playing this really twisted and dark game of musical chairs and expecting some kind of result. And he seems to just be doubling down on what's happening, especially when considering his leaked comments in the SPD roll call meeting. It seems like there's no consideration of anything different. And we see in Houston that, hey, people are making more progress when they take a housing-first issue. Yesterday, Mike Bonin, who is from the city of LA, just announced in his district they made the most progress in the city, and he is someone who has taken big heat for really going all-in on a housing-first model, focusing on services and housing. The one thing that everyone who is homeless has an in common is that they don't have shelter. Housing is a necessary component to solving homelessness. You can't only focus on, hey, treatment. Lots of people wanna think about "people did something to deserve being outside. They made bad decisions and they are dealing with addiction. And so we don't need to help them or they need to figure out how to get it together before they're worthy of help." And that's just not how it works and it's expensive and inhumane to expect that to work and to continue to force that on people. When we allow people to stabilize in secure housing, the rest of the stuff becomes much more easy to do, and not easy, but easier, to deal with. And to help people get into a place where they can find permanent housing and really get off the streets for good. You have to do that work. And it seems like there's just a lot of cosmetic and really shallow sweeping going on and we're waiting for a real plan to address homelessness. We're still waiting for this plan. And man, do we need it. [00:31:06] Erica C. Barnett: Absolutely. [00:31:07] Crystal Fincher: This is an issue that is a source of frustration for me if you can't tell. Like my- [00:31:13] Erica C. Barnett: Oh, me too. Me too. It's, you know... [00:31:15] Crystal Fincher: We are spending so much money doing these sweeps. And if we put this money in a different direction, we could be making more progress than we are making. And all of us wanna see it. [00:31:25] Erica C. Barnett: And yeah, not just doing the sweeps, but also staffing the sweeps with police officers, who have become a really dominant presence at sweeps again for a while. Before before this mayor, they were part of a navigation team, which meant that they act actively, did sweeps along with workers from the city. And now, they faded into the background for a while, and now they are a very active presence at the larger removals. Actually at every removal. But I was reading in a records request last night that I filed on a different subject, that there were, there was something like, or they were, the SPD requested something like 50 police officers to be at the the Woodland Park removal earlier this year. And that was not all of Woodland Park, it was a small part of Woodland park, and there were, maybe 30 people left by the time they they actually showed up to remove the last people. So it's just just a tremendous amount of resources go into moving people around and around the city and occasionally doing it a better way and actually getting people into shelter that they want to be in like tiny houses. [00:32:42] Crystal Fincher: And again, just to point out, Bruce set this bar. Sometimes I get frustrated because there seems to be, just, collective amnesia about what Bruce Harrell said as he was running for election and what he said early in office. And these aren't external expectations being placed on him. Voters voted for him based on what he said and how he was gonna handle it. And he previously said that he didn't want police on the outreach teams that go into encampments, but he would staff it with more social workers and behavioral health clinicians. When he was running for office and when he first took office talked about this. He did talk about housing and services and leaning in hard to that. And he is doing the opposite of what he said he would do. People are not getting what they bargained for here and he seems to be doubling down on it. And I would just like, at least- And it's not like people never, ever change their mind either, but then explain it. Then explain how you decided, "you know what? We are not gonna take an approach where we involve clinicians and support staff and people who can help with services. We are going to staff it with police." Be publicly accountable for the choices that you make and how you're leading the city, and say, "I decided not to do that for this reason." He should have to explain that. Especially with a lack of progress being made. It seems like if he were to stick with his original plan, we would be making more progress. So why did he change it and why is he sticking with that direction? I would love to hear him answer those questions. I would love to hear people ask him why he is deviating from the plan that voters voted for. That to me is an important question. [00:34:33] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah. I think Harrell would, I think a lot of people who voted for Harrell, frankly, voted for him on the assumption that he would be sweeping encampments and that he is doing exactly what he said he would do. But I agree with you that he certainly paid lip service to a more compassionate approach. And I do think, in fairness, there are things that are happening, like JustCARE is actively working - it's a program from the Public Defender Association - is actively working to put people in, in hotels and and get them into housing. Good things are happening. It's not all sweeps, but the problem is that sweeps have ramped up to such an extent that it is making hard for the good things to happen, because it's hard to find people because people are traumatized because they don't trust the city to act in their best interest. And it's all it's very counterproductive to do a little bit of the social work, healthcare-oriented, housing-oriented stuff and then do a whole lot of, the sort of compassionless, cruel sweep. Because there, it's not just mixed messages, it's mixed practices that make- the bad stuff makes the good stuff harder to do. [00:35:50] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. And I do think you're absolutely right. There have been excellent programs, especially through JustCARE, about helping people through that. And even in the realm of public safety. The challenge is some of those programs have been defunded by Mayor Harrell and he's indicated, and his deputy mayor for public safety has indicated, that more of that should be expected. And as they, perhaps, stand up their internal department, public safety department, and internal supports, but it is just- it just seems like we're moving in this opposite direction. I would love to see more programs like that funded, them accelerate and ex and expand that. There's lots of evidence that we have from that program to show that it is effective, and I would love to see an expansion of that rather than an expansion of these sweeps. We will continue to keep our eyes on how this turns out. You've, for years and years, have done an excellent job reporting on this and have had some of the best information available in the city, which lots of other reporters rely on for their work also, so appreciate your continued coverage of this. And as we wrap up, I just wanted to also talk about public safety and law enforcement lining up and expressing their support in another race for the county prosecutor. What happened this week? [00:37:16] Erica C. Barnett: It will not surprise you to hear that I was not invited to this press conference. But the TV news and The Seattle Times reported on a press conference by the Seattle Police Officers Guild, which is headed up by an incredibly controversial figure, Mike Solan. And the press conference was apparently billed as, "we're gonna have a major announcement of some sort. We're gonna inform you of this dire situation that's going on." And, in fact, what it appears to have been was a fullthroated endorsement of Jim Ferrell for King County Prosecuting Attorney. I suspect that it's not so much that there was a nefarious bait and switch or anything like that, I just think that SPOG is not great at media relations, and why blame- when incompetence will do, why look for other motivations? But in any case, Ferrell accepted their endorsement, and I think this is really interesting because Jim Ferrell has been torn in two directions. Earlier this year, the state Democrat's leader, Tina Paul Ladowski, said that he was not a Democrat. He has been very insistent that he is. If you go to endorsement meetings by Democrats and progressive groups, the first thing he says is, "I'm know a lifelong Democrat." But, in aligning himself with SPOG, he is sending a very different message. SPOG has been associated with defending cops who participated in the January 6th riots. Mike Solan has made some incredibly controversial statements, let's say, in the past. [00:39:02] Crystal Fincher: And straight up false. [00:39:03] Erica C. Barnett: What's that? [00:39:04] Crystal Fincher: I said, "and straight up false." [00:39:06] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah. And false, sure. [00:39:07] Crystal Fincher: He's bit of source of misinformation also. [00:39:09] Erica C. Barnett: Of course, of course. He's not universally popular among cops because he is so far to the right. This is a real statement, I think, by Jim Ferrell, that these are his people and he's he's gonna try to take down Dan Satterberg, the current prosecutor's Chief of Staff, Lisl Mann, who is running for this position as well, by coming at her from the right and painting her as some kind of radical wildlife leftist, which she is not. [00:39:41] Crystal Fincher: She definitely is not. This is a really interesting race and you're absolutely right. This does send a message accepting this endorsement from the Seattle Police Officers Guild. There are other candidates who will accept endorsements from guilds sometimes excepting the Seattle Police Officers Guild, because they have been, and their leader has been so extreme, and, to your point, even controversial within police circles and with the rank and file because they've attracted negative attention and maybe you're not completely aligned with what they feel is the core of what they're trying to do. But Jim Ferrell has insisted he's a Democrat, but the reason why Tina pad Ladowski was like, "yeah, but you're not," is because local Republicans are also touting him and appearing at events for them and, being someone who was aligned with their values which they posted about, they publicly did so. And frankly, you can say you are whatever you want in our state, but there have been- lots of people have not necessarily viewed Jim Ferrell as a Democrat for several years. He self-identifies as whatever he wants. But I think in looking at the substance of who is supporting him, who his donors are, who his endorsements are, a lot of them align with Republican candidates. And, he even tried to use his consultant before, as, "I even have a democratic consultant," and the most recent thing that democratic consultant did was elect Republican City Attorney, Ann Davison. So it's an interesting thing to see, and, when party resources are at stake. And you have to prove yourself to be a Democrat, it does take more than just saying it yourself. You do have to show receipts and his are lacking. [00:41:45] Erica C. Barnett: Yeah. And he's, I, that's interesting about- I didn't actually know that about his consultant, but I was gonna say he's running a very Ann Davison-style campaign. He's claiming that Satterberg and, by association, Manion, left this huge backlog of felony cases on the table, which is exactly what Ann Davison accused her predecessor, Pete Holmes, of doing. And I think that in the case of Davison and Holmes, she had more of a case to make that Holmes had let a lot of stuff fall by the wayside. With Satterberg, I don't think that it's gonna work quite as effectively because Satterberg has receipts and is not, could not, be accused of being lazy. He is, he used to be, a Republican himself, and there's a time when you could say you're Republican and that's just a difference of opinion, but since Trump, you are aligning yourself with with Republicans or Republican consultants is a very different thing than it was when Berg was first elected, and of course he changed parties to the Democrats, in part because of what the Republican party means now. [00:42:50] Crystal Fincher: You know, you certainly cannot, in any kind of good faith or with any kind of credibility, paint Lisa Manion, as this super leftist, super abolitionist. She is continuing in, basically, the style of Dan Satterberg, endorsed by Dan Satterberg, is not taking the hardcore, purely punitive, fill up the jails approach as Jim Ferrell is. But there's also- that approach has failed. That approach is not working, and all of the available data from criminologists and people who study this and who have all of the evidence say that is actually harmful and not the way to go and that does not decrease crime and more likely increases it. So we will see how this race shapes out. We'll see how much of a voice these endorsements carry and how he continues to proceed. But, one thing that I do notice is that Republicans, overall in the primary, Republican candidates for the legislature tried to hit Democrats hard on some of these same issues and saying, "public safety is a real problem and it's Democrat's fault, and these policies are not working." And voters seem to pretty soundly reject that. Those did not land and produced worse results than Republicans were bargaining for. And so it'll be interesting to see if this continues in that vein or not, but this'll be an interesting one to continue to pay attention to. And with that, we thank you for listening to Hacks and Wonks on this Friday, September 9th, 2022. The Producer of Hacks and Wonks is Lisl Stadler. Our Assistant Producer is Shannon Cheng and our Post-Production assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. Our insightful co-host today with Seattle political reporter, editor of Publicola, co-host of the Seattle Nice podcast, and author of Quitter: A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse, and Recovery, Erica Barnett. You can find Erica on Twitter at @ericacbarnett, that's Erica with a C also, and on publicola.com. And you can buy her book, Quitter: A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse, and Recovery. You can find me on Twitter at @finchfrii, and you can follow Hacks and Wonks on Twitter at @HacksWonks. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere where you get your podcasts. Just type Hacks & Wonks into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe, to get our full versions of our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full text transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. Talk to you next time.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

So what is the point of bumper stickers? Have we decided they are worthless and have bad theology? Come as we consider how God calls us all to be a bumper sticker, as His witness to the world! The post Can I Get a Witness? appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church
In Case of Rapture, This Car Will Be Unmanned

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022


Could you imagine a day when people just disappear? What a scary thought for those “left behind.” So what do we do with this knowledge? Come and hear how we are so much more than a bumper sticker. The post In Case of Rapture, This Car Will Be Unmanned appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

AARP Washington State Podcast
Get That Job Pt. 2 with Hiring Expert Whitney Richardson

AARP Washington State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 37:17


We talk with a hiring manager in a different industry, Whitney Richardson, who is Director of Employee Experience at SanMar. SanMar is a national supplier of custom logowear clothing based in Issaquah and has both corporate and warehouse operations in our area. Whitney talks about what it takes to get hired in both environments. We get into the specifics of today's resume and cover letter, how to approach an interview and more. We also discuss advice for the young people in our lives who are starting their careers. It's everything you need to know to get hired today.

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church
No Jesus, No Peace; Know Jesus, Know Peace

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022


Does your life feel like at any moment chaos could ensue? What does peace look like in the midst of chaos, or to move us out of chaos? This weekend we will seek to understand the bumper sticker, “No Jesus, no peace. Know Jesus, know peace”! The post No Jesus, No Peace; Know Jesus, Know Peace appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Singletrack
Kaytlyn Gerbin | 2022 UTMB Pre-Race Interview

Singletrack

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 13:03 Very Popular


Kaytlyn Gerbin is a professional trail runner for the North Face based in Issaquah, WA preparing for the 2022 UTMB.Sponsors:This episode is brought to you by Gnarly Nutrition. Use code Singletrack20 at checkout to get 20% off your next order.Timestamps:(1:17) - delaying UTMB race plans in 2021 due to injury, current status(3:58) - whether the formal racing scene feels less challenging than the FKT scene(6:09) - structuring training and enthusiasm around two major summer objectives(10:03) - expectations for this year's UTMB(12:08) - race day gear plansLinks:Follow Kaytlyn on InstagramHeilo - North Face FilmAdditional Episodes You May Enjoy:#111 - Tim Tollefson | 2022 UTMB Pre-Race Interview#110 - David Laney | 2022 UTMB Pre-Race Interview#109 - Jim Walmsley | 2022 UTMB Pre-Race InterviewSupport the show

Hacks & Wonks
2022 Post-Primary Election Recap Part 1

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 45:45


On this midweek show, we present Part 1 of the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Post-Primary Election Recap which was live-streamed on August 9, 2022 with special guests EJ Juárez and Doug Trumm. In Part 1, the panel breaks down primary election results in the 3rd and 8th Congressional Districts before moving on to battleground districts for State Legislature seats in the 26th and 30th LDs. Stay tuned for Part 2 of the recap releasing this Friday for more primary analysis! As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-hosts, EJ Juárez at @EliseoJJuarez and Doug Trumm at @dmtrumm. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Election Recap Livestream | August 9th, 2022: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/august-2022-postprimary-recap   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show we talk with Policy Wonks and Political Hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work, with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening and what you can do about it. You're listening to part 1 of our 2022 Post-Primary Election Recap, with special guests EJ Juárez and Doug Trumm, which we live-streamed on August 9th, 2022. You'll get part 2 in your feed this Friday, August 19th, in place of our regular week-in-review episode. You can find the audio and full transcript for this recap on our website, officialhacksandwonks.com. Thank you for listening! Good evening, and welcome to the Hacks & Wonks Post-Primary Election Recap. I'm Crystal Fincher - I'm a political consultant and the host of the Hacks & Wonks podcast. And today I'm thrilled to be joined by three of my favorite Hacks and Wonks to break down what happened in last week's primary election. Before we begin tonight, I'd like to do a land acknowledgement. I'd like to acknowledge that we are on the traditional land of the first people of Seattle, the Coast-Salish peoples, specifically the Duwamish People, past and present. I would like to honor with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe. We're excited to be able to live stream this recap on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. Additionally, we're recording this recap for broadcast on KODX and KVRU radio, podcast, and it will be available with a full text transcript at officialhacksandwonks.com. We invite our audience to ask questions of our panelists. If you're watching a live stream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will scroll at the bottom of the screen. Our esteemed panelists for the evening are EJ Juárez. EJ is a public servant who remains involved in numerous political efforts across Washington. In his day job, he's the Director of Equity and Environmental Justice for the Department of Natural Resources. He leads that agency's work to reduce health and economic disparities through environmental justice practices. He previously served as the first Public Policy Manager for the Group Health Foundation, where he led the work to create that organization's political and legislative portfolio after serving in leadership posts at the Seattle Library and as the Executive Director at Progressive Majority and ColorPAC, organizations dedicated to recruiting, training, and electing progressive champions in Washington and Oregon. Thank you so much - welcome. [00:03:01] EJ Juárez: Thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here. [00:03:03] Crystal Fincher: Excellent. And next we have Doug Trumm. Doug is the Executive Editor of The Urbanist and serves on The Urbanist Elections Committee, which crafts the organization's endorsements. An Urbanist writer since 2015, he dreams of pedestrianizing streets, blanketing the city in bus lanes, and unleashing an eco-friendly mass timber building spree to end the affordable housing shortage and avert our coming climate catastrophe. He graduated from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington. He lives in East Fremont and loves to explore the city by bike, foot, or bus. Welcome, Doug Trumm. Great to have you - so we are having a little bit of technical difficulties with Doug, he will join us back again as soon as he's able, but we'll get started with EJ Juárez. Starting off - I think we can start with the Congressional races, where just yesterday - in the 3rd Congressional District, which is in Southwest Washington - we saw Jaime Herrera Beutler concede. And so Joe Kent, the Republican, is finishing in second place in the primary - proceeding to go to the general election against Marie Gluesenkamp Perez, who is the Democrat in that race and finished first. What did you see happening in this? Did you expect Joe Kent to make it through? And what does this mean for what this race is gonna look like in the general election? [00:04:37] EJ Juárez: So I'll be honest and say no - I did not expect Joe Kemp to make it through. I think I had more faith in Southwest Washington, honestly. This is a situation where - I think conventional wisdom had most of the energy focused on Jaime - how were folks going to make the case that Jaime needed to be replaced? And unfortunately for Jaime, that meant everybody was really against her and the results prove that. My big concern moving forward - and I think things that I'm gonna be watching for is - is this a Democratic operation in that district that can pull through and actually deliver a field strategy, that can deliver on the fundraising and the hopes of the strategy of what the national Democrats have been doing - is supporting these Trump conspiracy theorists over more moderate candidates in the hopes that Democrats pull through and take them out in the general. This is one where it's really gonna be - is Nancy Pelosi's strategy gonna play out the way they hope. [00:05:42] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, this is gonna be really interesting. There was a lot of late money that came in in support of Jaime Herrera Beutler. There was a lot of talk that she wasn't very visible throughout the end of that campaign and so it - that may have had something to do with it. But I think the GOP electorate is pretty fractured. And this is one - we'll talk about several others coming up - but one of a number of races where the party establishment made it known what their preference was, put resources and a big push behind their candidates, and it actually didn't quite land. Their voters said that's actually not our choice and went a different direction and Jaime Herrera Beutler has been known as - it's interesting to say "moderate Republican," but more moderate than her counterparts, I think is fair. She had that reputation, but had been pushed further to the right kind of in response to where the base is this time, but not far enough. Joe Kent is in the race, he's Trump-endorsed, he is a frequent guest on the Sean Hannity program, he thinks that Jim Jordan should take over as leader of the party in place of Kevin McCarthy, he said that he's going to immediately call for Joe Biden's impeachment and investigate the 2020 election, he does not believe in support for Ukraine, defended calling President Zelenskyy a thug - just has a number of beliefs that seem like they aren't in line with where the GOP has traditionally been, certainly different than where the majority of residents in the state are if you look at all available polling. But he cobbled together a coalition that made it through the primary. Do you think that Republicans are going to coalesce behind him, Doug? [00:07:40] Doug Trumm: I think ultimately they will. And I guess it depends how many people are dyed-in-the-wool Republicans in that district, because I think the sort of structural problem maybe that the state GOP is running into is just that the more they make their brand true to that base that elected Joe Kent, the less that they're appealing to the swing independent voters. So I don't know what to make - I think Republicans ultimately might come home, but they might lose a few folks who just - disgusted about the whole thing about her losing her seat. But it seems like there's been an incredible amount of brand loyalty throughout a near coup, so I don't know when to expect a huge exodus, but just a little bit of bleeding in that district would - could end up being costly. [00:08:35] Crystal Fincher: Do you think they're gonna be able to effectively moderate, EJ? [00:08:42] EJ Juárez: I'm gonna go with no. I'm sitting here thinking of what it must be like to be a Republican who shows up to your county Republican meeting in this moment where you have such dissatisfaction - both with your options, your party apparatus and strategy - where literally, there is no consensus. And when we talk about - how are Republicans gonna activate their base, I'm not convinced Republicans know who their base are in this moment. And it shifts in every district based on every candidate and the lack of consistency there - one, makes their money less effective, right? You're not operating in scale and you're not operating with the mass kind of penetration that you can get when you have a consistent messaging strategy that is born out of multiple cycles of races. So I think it's messy, and I think that this race in particular really is a great illustrative moment for what happened in the legislative races and what we're seeing across Washington State right now - where you cannot get Republicans on-brand, which is so wild to me given the past 30 years of rigid brand management. [00:09:54] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, definitely. It's going to be very interesting to see just how that turns out. And I've certainly been asked recently - well, Joe Kent is a different kind of Republican, not the traditional kind of Republican we've seen elected here in Washington State. Does that mean that Marie Gluesenkamp Perez has a chance to win this race? This is a district where Jaime Herrera Beutler previously won it with 56% of the vote, I believe it was. Donald Trump won it with just under 51% to Joe Biden's around 48%. So this is certainly a district that at least leans Republicans if not more. Does the Democrat have a shot, do you think, Doug? [00:10:42] Doug Trumm: Absolutely. A lot of race still to happen, but I would not be feeling confident if I was just assuming that was going to be a safe R seat. Just the impact of that particular issue - and Jaime Herrera Beutler's been there a long time, so I'm sure there's some loyalists who are a little bit offended that that's how her career ended. So I don't know - it's just, like you said, it's messy. And the brand is just murky right now and so much of it's driven just by anger and backlash - that's a very crude tool to wield. It's effective in motivating people, but you don't know which direction they're gonna go. And if just the conservative media apparatus is just - it completely runs on that type of thing and it's unwieldy. [00:11:40] EJ Juárez: I'll just jump in briefly - I agree with Doug. I think the challenge here is that in any other year, if you were gonna look at the Democrat in that race and say you pulled less than 34%, that's not a good number to build from. And that's a really tough place to find a strategy and a foothold. I think that given the uniqueness of the challenger who's making it through to the general, it throws that playbook out. And we're gonna see over the next month - I think these next 30 days are gonna be really telling over just how much get up and go those local Democrats have in order to make up those percentages. [00:12:20] Crystal Fincher: I agree. And so we'll move to the 8th Congressional District race, which is a bit further north - parts of a few different counties, including King County - that saw Kim Schrier, who is the current incumbent Democrat, finish with a pretty strong result. And had some strong challengers in terms of Republicans who were duking it out - so you had Reagan Dunn, Matt Larkin, and Jesse Jensen all competing on the Republican side, with Matt Larkin making it through. What do you make of this result, EJ? And what do you think it says about where Republicans are at, even in King County? [00:13:03] EJ Juárez: I think it says a lot about Reagan Dunn. I really do. I think that to be perhaps the most high-profile Republican in King County and maybe in that entire district and have that showing really shows - I think it says a lot about both his candidacy and viability for further office, but ultimately his track record and what he's been able to accomplish. Matt Larkin, a relatively unknown Republican coming in, being able to beat a sitting County Councilmember in this contested primary - definitely bad news for establishment Republicans in this moment. [00:13:46] Crystal Fincher: Certainly not what a lot of people predicted. What do you think the general election's gonna look like in this race, Doug? [00:13:53] Doug Trumm: It does have the makings of a squeaker. When I was looking on election night, I was optimistic and I think - if I'm recalling correctly - that Kim Schrier's lead's just eroded a little bit and maybe that's just the rural parts of the district are seeing less of that traditional King County progressive swing at the end. But she still does have, I think, the upper hand and with the higher-profile candidate not making it through again, you have the case of - is the party going to be really excited getting behind Larkin the way they may have for Dunn, as the anointed dynasty son or whatever. And it just goes to show again - they're just having a really hard time picking candidates in the way that they easily used to - anoint the successor and get a candidate through who had all the connections and all the money. Larkin might find that with this sort of being a high-profile race for control of the House, but it certainly isn't what they'd planned. [00:15:02] Crystal Fincher: Does not appear to be what they planned. And it seems like Reagan Dunn and Jesse Jensen were really concerned with going after each other and not really paying attention to Matt Larkin. It seemed, or at least he seemed to duck a lot of the crossfire going back and forth. Do you think that might have contributed to him making it through - just that he wasn't in-between the whole mud slinging battle? [00:15:28] Doug Trumm: Yeah, that seems to be the case. And Reagan Dunn was just doing so much to try to rebrand himself. And maybe that just wasn't a great idea because a lot of the King County Republicans tried to make this moderate brand that they thought would be - and probably that would play - better in the county. But then knowing that he had this primary, suddenly he's taking these votes where he's reaffirming he's anti-abortion, anti-choice and taking these County Council votes where, if he wasn't in that race, you feel like he might have voted differently. And I don't know if voters also just react negatively that kind of like finger-to-the-wind opportunism. Just be yourself sometimes can get you some points that being a little too smart by half might actually cost you. [00:16:24] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think so. I think this was interesting - also the Senate race with Tiffany Smiley and Patty Murray was interesting - in that, especially this 8th Congressional District race, was one that Republicans really thought was - they were going to have, I think certainly a stronger showing than this, that they were expecting Kim Schrier to be a little bit more vulnerable than she turned out to be. And looking at some of these other races where they thought - Hey, these are big opportunities for pickups - and not only did it not turn out very well percentage-wise, but their preferred candidates didn't even make it through. I think both of you alluded to some of the message discipline challenges that they're having. And a lot of times we've talked about - Hey, Democrats' messages are, may have some issues and stuff. They seem to actually be pretty effective that the Democratic results were fairly strong compared to what expectations were going in, and Republicans seemed to struggle. And you just talked about Reagan Dunn having a challenge with talking about where he's at in terms of abortion rights. He before had tried to be a moderate, this time it seemed like he really initially and in the middle there felt like he needed to say - yeah, absolutely I'm pro-life, I personally don't believe in abortion and don't want that. And with the Dobbs decision - Republicans could say that before, certainly more than if you had - I don't think that Washington residents, feeling that they had protections federally plus in the state, really felt like there was a vulnerability and so just let that slide. I don't think that was the case this time. And I heard Reagan Dunn in one interview say - yeah, that happened federally, but here in this state, abortion is settled law - which is literally what we heard Justice Kavanaugh say, what we heard a number of Congresspeople say before that right was eliminated at the federal level. So there just isn't confidence or comfort that that is settled law and it seems like Republicans are a bit flatfooted. And realistically, just not in-step with the 65 or so percent of the public that strongly favors abortion rights. How do you think they handle that issue in the primary? And what does that say for how things will look in the general? [00:18:59] EJ Juárez: I'll jump in first here. I think it feeds into this idea that I think Republicans have been happily beating the drum on of - everything's fine, except for we're gonna oppose everything that might not make it fine - in this divorced-from-reality narrative of - as long as we hold the line, it can't get worse and we're not actively participating in that. And at the same time, 65+%, 78+% of the actual electorate are saying - we are totally on the other side of this issue than you, and you've missed the boat. And it doesn't take much for a voter to look at candidates, frankly like Reagan Dunn, who have that record or others who have public statements like Matt Larkin to say - actually, you've not done that, you've not done anything, you've chosen not to take an action here. And I think Kim Schrier was expertly deploying her messaging on the other end of that by - whether it was her TV ads or her radio spots and her visibility were always spot-on - bringing in the Republican mayors of Wenatchee, the mayors of Issaquah highlighting the fact that she was on the ground being active, not playing into the Republicans' assumption that voters would just be defense-oriented. [00:20:22] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and she's been active throughout her term on the ground and building those relationships and really delivering for the people in all of the areas of her district, which I think a lot of people questioned initially - Hey, is she gonna represent all of us? Is she gonna get out to the various counties? Is she comfortable in this really diverse district that is both urban, suburban, and rural - and that stretches nearly from the coast to the mountains. It is really an interesting district and a microcosm of the state, and she seems to have navigated that very well. So I think we will proceed to a number of the legislative district races. And we'll start with a few - I think overall, it's fair to say that Democrats finished very strongly. Certainly at the beginning of this cycle, there was a lot of excitement from Republicans here in the state, legislatively, and concern from Democrats saying - Hey, this could be a tough year. We have a lot of seats that we may need to be defending. We've got redistricting. We're not knowing how that's gonna turn out. And so is this going to be a year where Democrats potentially lose a number of seats? It's a midterm that a lot of times is challenging for the party in power - just that's the way it's traditionally gone. And these results turned out pretty favorably for Democrats across the board. Thinking about things overall before we get into specific districts, are there thoughts that you have, Doug, on just how things look for Democrats across the board legislatively? [00:22:07] Doug Trumm: I think we can pretty safely say that Democrats are still gonna have control of the State Legislature. There might be a swing of a seat or two in either direction - and that can include Democrats getting more seats, which if you believe all of the coverage - but leading into this election, it was just a lot of reprinted Republican press releases about how there was a wave coming and you better tremble. They might lose a seat or two but given where they're at right now, which is if you haven't been following along - that's 57-41 advantage in the House, it's a large advantage in the House. And then the Senate, there is a 28-21 advantage for Democrats. So they got a little cushion, so if they lose a seat or two - becomes a little bit more of a headache from time to time, as far as whipping the votes. But they're ultimately still setting the agenda, controlling the committees. So at the end of the day, the hope of controlling one of those chambers and stopping all this string of legislation - and, Crystal, I know we've criticized the Democrats here and then for some of the stuff they weren't able to get done, but let's take a moment to acknowledge that there has been a pretty steady stream of major legislation coming from this last few years of having Inslee in the governor's seat and having both chambers controlled that - including a major climate bill and including a major transportation package - neither of them are perfect, but they're definitely a lot better than doing nothing. So anyway I don't know if that's partially a reflection of voters realizing - Hey, this is working out decently for us to let one party with a fairly clear vision and passion for what they're doing lead things. And then on this other side, we have a pretty honestly all-over-the-place message - and other times just really simple to the point of ad nauseam, just hating taxes every time. Well, sometimes we have to pay for stuff. So I think it's a favorable result and it'll be interesting to see some of those close races actually end up coming the Democrats' way. [00:24:26] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Any thoughts that you have, EJ? [00:24:29] EJ Juárez: I've been thinking a lot about what it must be like to be JT Wilcox right now - the man who's running the Republican House strategy, the guy who's raising all this money in his caucus - for what purpose? And I kept believing that the strategy would become clear, that we were going to get indications of how all that money was going to be used on that side. And ultimately, they might as well just put that in a vault, and set the vault off to the ocean, given it a Viking funeral - because it did not produce. And there is nothing more damning in politics than being able to spend that much money with no results. And so I think the big takeaway for me looking at these legislative races, and I largely agree with Doug, is that Democrats who had controlled both chambers and the governor's office for so long and had really legitimate critique around not delivering on the biggest issues for Washington for many years from all sides - passed some big stuff and started to do big things and voters rewarded them by bucking what was supposed to be a very bad year for them. And so I hope that at least many of those Democrats, especially the incumbents maybe who aren't on the ballot this year, are watching that going - okay, here's the data point, let's keep going, let's do more, and see if this holds if voters will continue to reward us for delivering on the things that we know are important to them. [00:26:09] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I would completely agree with that. And to your point, to both of your points - they have taken some substantive moves, particularly at a time - we're seeing some significant action taken congressionally recently, that they're just making some progress with some major legislation. But even on issues that, federally, congress has been stuck on, our State Legislature has been able to act and move - things like a $35 cap on insulin for families was something that was passed by Democrats this past session. As you just talked about, Doug, record investments in transportation and transit and mobility and helping people be able to safely get through their communities and handle their daily tasks, even if they don't drive. And even areas where - Hey, there's highway expansion - that may be a little bit controversial. They moved on an issue that had been stuck for over a decade and getting through and getting past the I-5 bridge connection between Washington and Oregon. And so it is something where they have done some big things. They do appear to have been rewarded - particularly those that have stood strong. And there was, I think, a question in some of these swing districts that have gone between Democrats and Republicans, that have been repeatedly extremely close, whether Republicans were gonna be able to land some arguments that stuck, whether some of those criticisms from a couple years ago, or four years ago were still valid today. And it seems they fell flat, flatter than they have for a long time. So I think just starting with a few legislative districts - starting with a big focus in the Senate, which I know Republicans were looking at as one of their potential biggest pickups. In the Senate, where the margin is closer than it is in the House, in the 26th Legislative District down on the Kitsap Peninsula with Senator Emily Randall facing a very strong challenge initially from Republican Jesse Young, who is a state representative running for that Senate seat. And Emily has finished - I think stronger than most people anticipated. I think this is one of those races where Republicans - to your point, EJ - invested a ton of money. Jesse Young was one of the biggest fundraisers - outraised, outspent Emily Randall - but Emily finished with over 50% of the vote. She's at 51.5% right now to Jesse Young's 44.3% - certainly not the result that Republicans were looking for and I think frankly, a better result than Democrats were expecting. What happened in this race and why do you think Emily finished so strongly, Doug? [00:29:20] Doug Trumm: I think basically that that part of the state, which is just across the Tacoma Narrows Bridge from Tacoma - it's behaving a lot more like part of the Seattle metropolitan area. And that means it's, I think just generally, it's shifting to the left. And there's a lot of specific things - there was the big thing they were gonna try to hit Emily on - was they wanted to lower the toll on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. And that ended up being a huge football this session, but ultimately Democrats got to a place where they were okay with slightly moderating that toll, but maybe there was some thought that that left them vulnerable. But it appears that if that was gonna be their dark horse issue or whatever, voters went - well, that seemed like the responsible thing to do. You still do have to pay for that bridge and you have to pay for roads in general. You can't just suddenly go - everything's free. As much as we would love that, that means it's coming out of sales tax and other even more regressive sources that are farther from the use case. I guess I just bring that up since I do focus on transportation issues a lot, but I do think that getting around the district is a big one - and they did get a upgrade to the Gorst interchange as well in the transportation bill. And as urbanists, we maybe don't love that widening, but in that district - solving that bottleneck for them might have been something they look at Randall - she's getting stuff done. And certainly we already talked about abortion, but I think in that district it's likely to be a very big issue that's motivating turnout. And with Jesse Young being a pretty extreme right Republican - that's just not a good matchup as they maybe thought it was on paper, just because he has name ID from being a representative and raising a lot of money. At the end of the day, it's just not the right messenger or the right message. So it's not a gimme, by any means - she has 51.5%, I think you said - but that's certainly a good, strong position to be into and barring some sort of real stumble, I think she'll get re-elected and rightfully so. [00:31:44] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and helping a potential seatmate in the Representative open seat currently there - Adison Richards, the Democrat, also finishing with just over 50% against Spencer Hutchins, the Republican candidate. And I think, particularly with Spencer - they tried to paint him as pragmatic, just worried about what people would call kitchen table issues traditionally. I think people talk about a lot at the kitchen table, including issues of values and rights - but really tried to focus on an economic message. They certainly tried to hit Emily Randall when it came to taxes, they were also talking about gas prices. And I think there was a recognition that - one, as they talked about with Biden sometimes, this is a bigger problem than just Washington State or even the United States when it comes to gas prices. There are some other major geopolitical forces at play there that influence that. And I think as you mentioned, Doug, it's not that most people are actually anti-tax - they just want to get their money's worth, I think is the bottom line. And I think with a number of the things that Emily Randall, that Democrats have really talked about being important to invest in, people are feeling that money is being spent in the ways that they feel is valuable and useful and they can see a case to be made for that. What do you see in this district, or what do you think this says about just competitive districts overall, EJ? [00:33:31] EJ Juárez: I'll start by - I think every time we talk about Jesse Young, we also have to talk about the fact that he was barred from talking to his own legislative assistants by the Legislature. This is a man who faced credible and serious allegations of being hostile and intimidating to staff. This is also a man who mixed his professional staff with his campaign staff and was campaigning with state resources on state time, so every opportunity - [00:34:00] Crystal Fincher: Which is illegal, which you cannot do. [00:34:05] EJ Juárez: - had to get that in there 'cause good governance, good - excuse me - good government is important. The second thing is the 26th gives me big 30th LD circa five, six years ago vibes. This is a pattern where we gradually saw Federal Way - that region - transfer to a much more solidly Democrat district, or at least more reliably Democrat district than we have. I think we're watching in real-time, the 26th make a similar transition - probably not apples-to-apples, but it's close enough where we're seeing this trend line of more Democrats consistently showing up. And our candidates, regardless of fundraising ability, doing better and better. That is not to take anything away from Emily because that woman is a rock star, right? She is working really hard. She is in the field and she's actually addressing the least sexy issues of many districts, right? It is the retail politics of where are your sidewalks, let's talk about the farmer's market, let's talk about land use in your neighborhood and the park down the street. And unlike many other legislators, this is something that's popping up again and again on her socials and in her campaign ads and how she is moving through the world. So I think this is a case of an incredibly hard-working Democrat incumbent, who is earning potentially this reputation of somebody who can hold super hard districts and I think raise a bunch of money at the same time. While she may have been outraised, she's pulling in sizable donations and has been a consistent, I think, player in her caucus. [00:35:46] Doug Trumm: Yeah, that's dead on. And I just want to add in quick to that - in addition to her just being clearly a rising star in the party, this district has a fast ferry to Seattle and it's close to Tacoma - this is a place where people are going to escape really high housing prices in Seattle. That is where the working class is moving and that's where your barista lives, maybe. So it's certainly someplace where it's easy to see that trend continuing because Bremerton is building a good amount of housing - they're embracing that to some extent and that's gonna change who's in the district - it's gonna be a younger district for that reason. [00:36:34] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and to your point - Bremerton has, Gig Harbor has made important strides on zoning housing action, building enough housing to house the people who are moving there, who are living there, and really taking steps to address the housing affordability crisis that we've been seeing - and making progress in those conversations and taking action in ways that I think is surprising sometimes to people in Seattle, and that Seattle is lagging behind areas in Pierce County and in Spokane, when it comes to taking definitive steps to build more housing supply, address the housing crisis, and move there. It's really interesting. I completely agree that this does remind me of the 30th Legislative District around the Federal Way, Auburn area of a few years back, of the early to mid-20 teens that we saw there and that it is progressively coming more blue. And I do think that is because we're seeing a lot more people, displaced really, from Seattle and more expensive areas to those areas, discovering how they are - those areas or are organically growing also. And so we're seeing a number of the Pierce County suburbs shift to be a little bit more blue as well as suburbs in King County. And so it's a really interesting phenomenon that we're seeing - which we might as well move to the 30th Legislative District results. This was another really interesting district, especially with redistricting - a lot of people wondering is this going to be a district that's a challenge? There's been a lot of talk about public safety, there's been a lot of talk about economic issues. And this is another area where Republicans invested a lot of money and tried to attack the Democrats in this district for taking action that was popularly supported by voters in the district before, seems to have been a vindicating vote in that area where Claire Wilson is at 54% ahead of Linda Kochmar, who was a known Republican name in the area. Jamila Taylor finishing above 54% against Casey Jones, who's actually a policeman, an officer in the area. And then with an open seat - the one vacated by Representative, or that's being vacated by Representative Jesse Johnson - Kristine Reeves, who is a former State Representative who left to run for Congress and now is running again for this seat, finished with just shy of 43%. And that was a competitive Democratic primary - so between Kristine Reeves 43% just about, Carey Anderson, the other Democrat in the race, at just about 14% - a really strong Democratic showing in that seat against the Republican who made it through to the general election with 37% of the vote. 55+% is what people would love to see. This used to be a district with Republicans there - very purple, not reddish purple - that has just continued to move solidly blue. I think to that point you have legislators here with Jamila Johnson [Taylor], who's the head of the Black Legislative Caucus, and Senator Wilson who are great retail politicians, great in the community, doing the work on the ground to get this through. What does this result say to you, starting with EJ? [00:40:23] EJ Juárez: At the risk of being a little too snarky, I think what this says is Federal Way and Auburn love a good repeat candidate. We've got Linda Kochmar, who has run how many times now? We've got Kristine Reeves coming back to serve in the House. And by no means is it a single value on any of these also-rans and multiple-time candidates. It is that - one, the bench there is producing the same types of candidates, but the difference is the Democrats are doing better every time, right? These are not radically different candidates than that have been running in the past. What I'm interested in is - you've got Representative Johnson, who had done incredible work on criminal justice reform. Voters clearly were not buying the hype from the media on just how controversial this must have been when it's actually not - that would've been borne out in the vote share - that is a clear correlation, there would've been some level of backlash. I think the other piece here is that turnout was not good in that region. And when you look at King County overall and you look at who's voting specifically in the 30th LD, there is much work to be done. And so while it is impressive that Democrats are putting up 44, or excuse me, 54+% in each of these races, I don't think they can rest. And I think that if they do their - while I don't think it's enough for the GOP to come back and pull one of these seats, it would be a disservice to the nearly decade of massive investments that that caucus and the party has made in that region - that is full of renters that is full of young families, and people that - to Doug's point earlier - escaping housing prices who are sandwiched between Tacoma and Seattle now. So I think it's a fascinating place with lots to watch still. [00:42:18] Crystal Fincher: Very fascinating - a ton to watch. You are absolutely correct - turnout there, in many areas in South King County really, is bad. It's poor. And everyone has to do a much better job of engaging voters where they're at. We have to meet them on the doors. We have to meet them in the community. We have to do the work to make sure that we're reaching out to everyone and listening and hearing what they need, what's concerning to them, what they're saying is needed in their neighborhoods and their communities, and responding and addressing that to make sure that government and their representation is relevant to them. I think there's work to be done there and just the continued communication. So I think this is certainly one where I agree that it probably is not going to flip, but a lot of work just needs to be done in the community. And the more the community is engaged and galvanized, the more they're going to be able to do and lead. This seems like such an opportunity in this district - where sometimes we look at for Democrats, the Seattle districts and say - okay, this is just a safety seat. These people can lead on groundbreaking policy on things that we know are the right thing to do and that just need more proof of concept, more data from implementations on the ground, and people can say - okay, they implemented it there. It wasn't scary. The sky didn't fall. We can expand this. We've seen that with $15 an hour minimum wage. We've seen that with a lot of paid leave legislation. Even renter protections in Federal Way - they were among the leaders in passing a local initiative there that then we saw replicated across the state and legislative action taken on. So it's - I just see this as such a district of opportunity, if they really can engage and connect with the community to be able to do that. Thank you for listening to part 1 of our Hacks & Wonks 2022 Post-Primary Election Recap. Part 2 will be in your feed this Friday, August 19th. You can find the audio and transcript for the full recap on our website, officialhacksandwonks.com. The Producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler. Our Assistant Producer is Shannon Cheng, and our Post-Production Assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. Our wonderful co-hosts for the recap were EJ Juárez and Doug Trumm – that's two m's at the end. You can find EJ on Twitter at @EliseoJJuarez, and you can find Doug at @dmtrumm. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii and now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on Twitter at @HacksWonks. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on itunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts. Just type “Hacks and Wonks” into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows, and our mid-week show, delivered right to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com, and in the podcast episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

This week we continue with our summer sermon series, “Bumper Sticker Faith,” celebrating Christmas in August. The birth of Jesus will forever be the reason for the season, yet how might this phrase actually be a distraction from the true meaning of Christmas? Come this Sunday as we'll also be celebrating baptisms… it might very well be better than Christmas morning! The post Keep Christ in Christmas appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Eastridge Today
Eastridge Today: Life. Hope. Power. The Spirit's Work In You.

Eastridge Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 27:59


Welcome to Eastridge Today. A podcast from Eastridge Church, located in Issaquah, WA. Tune in each week for an inspiring message. To watch or listen to the full service go to: eastridgetodayradio.com

Mitch Unfiltered
Episode 202 - All Aboard Destination Greenville, North Carolina & LA Soundtrack of Summer

Mitch Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 141:38


RUNDOWN Mitch and Scott reunite and are eager to watch Issaquah play in the Little League World Series in Greenville, South Carolina! They briefly catch up on the Danny O'Neil and Jim Moore online feud, Mitch's upcoming Nationals game, and SeaFair weekend. The guys also chat about celebrity clickbait and an interesting article about Shohei Ohtani. Today's featured guests are former Dodgers GM Fred Claire, Mariners writer with Prospect Insider Jason Churchill, and ESPN Seahawks insider Brady Henderson. The show wraps up with “Other Stuff” stories ranging from Deshaun Watson's suspension, to the wrath of Bill Belichick, to the divorce lawsuit with Kanye and Kim! GUESTS Fred Claire | Former Dodgers GM Jason Churchill | Prospect Insider Mariners writer Brady Henderson | ESPN's NFL Nation Seahawks reporter TABLE OF CONTENTS 0:00 | Hotshot and Mitch might be more excited about Issaquah playing in the Little League World Series than the team! 29:30 | Are M's fans going to be teased about potentially acquiring Shohei Ohtani for the next two years? 43:12 | GUEST: Former Dodgers general manager Fred Claire returns to the show for a remembrance of broadcast legend Vin Scully. 1:02:47 | GUEST: Jason Churchill is back with the M's in a wildcard run and less than two months until the MLB postseason. 1:23:48 | GUEST: Brady Henderson hops aboard for a Seahawks camp update as the preseason approaches. 1:46:27 | Today's "Other Stuff" topics include a story from Deshaun Watson's six game ban, to a former Patriot and his fear of Coach Belichick, to Kanye West legal complications.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

We have had so much fun so far in our journey through some classic Christian bumper stickers. This week, instead of correcting a misconception about Jesus in a bumper sticker, we are going to live fully into bumper sticker theology as we explore together the meaning of “Save gas, walk with Jesus.” Join us as we learn to pattern our walk and life with the pace of Jesus. The post Walk With Jesus appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Faith Presbyterian Church
The Rev. Eric Irwin – In the Presence of the Unseen, Hebrews 11:13-16 & 2 Corinthians 4:16-18

Faith Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022


The Rev. Eric Irwin, pastor of Covenant Presbyterian in Issaquah, brings God's word to us this evening. CCLI Copyright License 751114; CCLI Streaming License CSPL116892

Mitch Unfiltered
Episode 201 - M's Win Castillo Sweepstakes & Issaquah Little League World Series Bound

Mitch Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 208:47


RUNDOWN Hotshot is gearing up for a trip to North Carolina as the Issaquah All Stars are headed to the Little League Softball World Series and Mitch might even make an appearance! Since the guys convened last, the M's picked up a new ace, but does the Tale of the Tape indicate it was worth it? A blended interview portion including C. Trent Rosecrans to chat about Luis Castillo followed by three of our favorite guest segments from over the years. The “Other Stuff” segment features topics such as Mitch's rental car story, the lack of fervor for the upcoming Seahawks season, and Charles Barkley turning down LIV golf! GUESTS C. Trent Rosecrans | The Athletic Reds writer Dave Grosby | Former Seattle sports radio host Olin Kreutz | NFL center '98-'11 Ginny Burton | Tacoma-native & UW class of 2021 TABLE OF CONTENTS 0:00 | Scott's prediction about Issaquah softball came true as the Little League All Stars are going to the World Series! 20:06 | The Mega Millions craze has come to an end as one lucky winner in Illinois picked the right numbers.  23:10 | Mitch breaks down the Tale of the Tape for Luis Castillo and players the Mariners traded to the Reds. 49:10 | GUEST: C. Trent Rosecrans checks in to provide a scouting report of the Mariners latest acquisition Luis Castillo from Cincinnati. 1:01:29 | GUEST: Dave Grosby joined Mitch and Scott to tell some stories from their years in Seattle sports media as "The Groz" entered retirement. 1:53:45 | GUEST: Hawaiian football legend Olin Kreutz jumped aboard to chat about his memorable football career and challenges he faced along the way. 2:24:35 | GUEST: Perhaps the most memorable interview in Mitch Unfiltered history, Ginny Burton shares her story of overcoming years of drugs and violence to earning her degree from UW. 2:54:45 | The episode closes up with “Other Stuff” stories such Mitch's gold Jaguar rental car, the lost enthusiasm for Seahawks camp, and Barkley declining a LIV Golf media deal.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Do you feel like you are being watched by people? By God? Like people are keeping score of your actions? This weekend we will clear up the idea that God is just a big score keeper. The post I Saw That appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Chuck and Buck
H4: 7-28 Deadliners, Double Green Jackets and One Last Thing

Chuck and Buck

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 43:05


The MLB trade deadline is only days away and it's still eerily quiet, but what possibilities are the Mariners looking at? We explore in Deadliners. Ashley has won the last two Green Jackets and while her pre-gloating would make it seem like we've already awarded her, we haven't, so we all must suffer through it. We wrap up the show with one last thing- shoutout to Issaquah softball!

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Do you ever look at a bumper sticker and instantly feel like you know something more about the driver? Are bumper stickers about our faith a good representation of Jesus and the Kingdom? Can’t wait to dive into our new series, “Bumper Sticker Faith,” to explore how our faith is so much bigger than catchy slogans. So, what do you think: is Jesus your co-pilot? The post Is Jesus Your Co-Pilot? appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2: The Army is Seeing a Drop in Recruitment

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 37:34


 What's Trending: King County community leaders gathered to talk about gun violence prevention tactics, preventing gang violence and preventing kids from joining gangs needs to be a big part of this plan, Pramila Jayapal says she has had a rough couple of weeks to ensure her safety while trying to do her job, claims it was related to Jan. 6, The AP conveys that the Army is cutting down the number of soldiers that it expects to have for the next 2 years, General Milley says it is due to CRT //  Big Local: A Tri-Cities man was arrested after a drug-fueled crime spree and was denied a goodbye hug, the denial of the hug was the tagline of the article, the second ever Budfest in Bellingham has been growing their audience, the organizer says it may be the last Budfest // GUEST: Eric Hoolahan (CEO of Bellevue Rare Coins) on recent attempts by criminals to burglarize his businesses in Bellevue and now one attempt in Issaquah. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mitch Unfiltered
Episode 199 - Husky Athletics Question Marks & "Hiding In Plain Sight" Director's Cut

Mitch Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 150:27


RUNDOWN At the top of the show, Hotshot provides an update on the state champ Issaquah softball team before heading off to San Bernardino. Then, Mitch unveils his Stump the Band question of the day which dovetails into a funny Al Martin Story before jumping into the listener mailbag. Then, Mr. Playoffs explains the MLB postseason format and the guys discuss potential roster moves for the M's. A four-pack of featured guests are Husky insider Christian Caple, filmmakers Chris & Erik Ewers, and long-distance runner Michael Wardian. The show closes with the “Other Stuff” segment which includes McDonalds observations, Zach Wilson's romantic rumors, and John Daly's eccentric attire at The Open Championship! GUESTS Christian Caple | The Athletic UW reporter Chris & Erik Ewers | Hiding In Plain Sight directors Michael Wardian | Ultra-marathoner TABLE OF CONTENTS 0:00 | Issaquah softball is state champs and Hotshot is headed to San Bernardino just in time for Episode 200. 7:19 | Today's Stump the Band question is about the M's which reminds Mitch of the infamous Al Martin story about USC. 33:35 | Mr. Playoffs explains how the MLB postseason works now with three wildcard slots and Mitch & Scott talk about the M's roster heading into the trade deadline. 53:05 | GUEST: Christian Caple talks about the uncertain future for UW athletics with conference realignment and the QB battle heading into the 2022 season. 1:16:46 | GUEST: Film directors Chris and Erik Ewers chat about the new Ken Burns documentary Hiding In Plain Sight which discusses the rise of youth mental health issues. 1:44:29 | GUEST: Runner Michael Wardian swings by to share his story of running across the entire country and the highlights along the way. 2:08:38 | The “Other Stuff” segment features topics ranging from Mitch's McDonalds observations, to Zach Wilson hot gossip, to John Daly's Hooters pants!

Faith Presbyterian Church
Our Refuge, Psalm 46:1-11

Faith Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022


The Rev. Andrew Perkins, Assistant Pastor and Church Planting Resident at Covenant Presbyterian Church in Issaquah, brings God's word to us this evening.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Everyone experiences freedom in different ways. For some it shapes their everyday more than others, but what does freedom have to do with our faith in Jesus Christ? Come and join us as we end our series looking at how we as a church proclaim and understand the freedom we have in Christ, and what we are called to do with our freedom. The post Freedom in Christ appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Unraveled: Long Island Serial Killer
Introducing Mind of a Monster: Ted Bundy and The Green River Killer

Unraveled: Long Island Serial Killer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:01 Very Popular


If you enjoyed Unraveled, check out a new season of Mind of a Monster from ID. Episode 1 is available to listen here. Follow Mind of a Monster wherever you get your podcasts. In this season, criminal psychologist Dr. Michelle Ward takes us to Washington State in the 1970s to investigate two of the most prolific serial killers in US history – Ted Bundy and the so-called Green River Killer, Gary Ridgway. Both use deception to prey on young women and utilize the vast terrain to dump their bodies. And they did it almost 100 times between them – maybe more. In this episode, multiple young women are disappearing without a trace. Then, on September 7, law enforcement's worst fears are confirmed when human remains are found in the woods near Issaquah. But there is even worse to come… Watch full episodes of Mind of a Monster on discovery+: discoveryplus.com/mindofamonster. Start your 7-day free trial today. Terms apply. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mind of a Monster
S3 Ep.1: One Serial Killer Follows Another

Mind of a Monster

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:01


In this season, criminal psychologist Dr. Michelle Ward takes us to Washington State in the 1970s to investigate two of the most prolific serial killers in US history – Ted Bundy and the so-called Green River Killer, Gary Ridgway. Both use deception to prey on young women and utilize the vast terrain to dump their bodies. And they did it almost 100 times between them – maybe more. In this episode, multiple young women are disappearing without a trace. Then, on September 7, law enforcement's worst fears are confirmed when human remains are found in the woods near Issaquah. But there is even worse to come… Watch full episodes of Mind of a Monster on discovery+: discoveryplus.com/mindofamonster. Terms apply.Find episode transcripts here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1qxiK6JKxAuNwN1N0JrHQnBrODKsZexFo See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

When Jesus said to the first disciples, “Follow me,” it wasn't an invitation to an ordinary or subpar story. It was an invitation into a story of life like they had not experienced before. Join us this weekend as we explore how new life is a necessity for those who follow Jesus. The post Necessity of New Birth appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

We have been created for relationship and community with one another. We become more and more of who God created us to be when we help one another grow and eventually flourish. Together, let’s learn more about what it means to be the body of Christ which lifts one another up and encourages life lived together, and how the body of believers—the church—becomes an important part of God’s work in his world. The post Fellowship of Believers appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church
The Whole Mission of the Church

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


The human need to be “seen,” it turns out, is the foundation of human development from the onset and self-regulation throughout. It is no wonder that the first revelation of God to humans is that he is the one who sees us. El Roi. How does being seen and seeing others play out, not just in our personal lives but in society today? How should the ministry of seeing others shape the very mission of Christ’s church? The post The Whole Mission of the Church appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Another lawsuit Seattle has to pay up on because they deleted text messages

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:29


1pm - The Fastest 15 // David Spade gives thousands to Burger King worker who got a gift bag after celebrating 27 years with the company // Another lawsuit Seattle has to pay up on because they deleted text messages // Oregon teachers claim eye-rolling is rooted in white supremacy, is “harmful practice” // Dave Chapelle vs land developers // GUEST: Kellen McKinney, woke up to intruders in his Issaquah home, one said hello and walked out // Kamala says interracial marriage is in jeopardy See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Author's Corner
Episode #62: Why Writing a Textbook is Not Much Different Than Writing a Novel with John Kilpatrick

The Author's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 47:00


Every day is a good day to talk about books. So, we invited John Kilpatrick to offer a fresh perspective on writing in this episode filled with humor and valuable writing tips. Don't miss his surprising discoveries of the commonalities between textbooks and novels, and get to explore the contemporary definitions of writing today!Key Takeaways from This EpisodeAdvantages of prioritizing book's readability over technicalityThe importance of identifying your target audienceSimilarities that exist between textbooks and novelsLiterary voice changes and ways to deal with itHow to make people understand complex subjects easierResources Mentioned in This EpisodeThe Godfather by Mario Puzo | Paperback and KindleSo, Anyway… by John Cleese | Paperback and KindleLegend in GraniteSea Power by E.B Potter and Chester NimitzAbout John KilpatrickJohn Kilpatrick is the Managing Director of Greenfield Advisors, Director of the Washington State Economic Development Finance Authority, and is on the National Board of Advisors for Carson College of Business at Washington State University.He holds a Ph.D. in Finance from the University of South Carolina and is the author of numerous books, including the recently published McGraw Hill text, Real Estate Valuation and Strategy. Dr. Kilpatrick's consulting and academic research activities include work for and funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Departments of Energy, Interior, Defense, and Commerce, Oak Ridge National Lab, Southeastern Universities Research Association, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and numerous city and county governments and private organizations. He is one of the leading authorities in the world on mortgage-backed securities and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, the Boston Globe, The New York Times, and other national publications. Dr. Kilpatrick and his wife split their time between homes in Issaquah, Washington, and Key West, Florida. In his spare time, Dr. Kilpatrick is an instrument-rated private pilot, an avid yachtsman, and a Paul Harris Fellow of Rotary International.Website: John A. Kilpatrick | Greenfield AdvisorsLinkedIn: John A. Kilpatrick, Ph.D.Twitter: @john_kilpatrickJohn's book: Real Estate Valuation and Strategy: A Guide for Family Offices and Their AdvisorsLove the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Here's How » Join The Author's Corner Community today: Website: Robin ColucciLinkedIn: R Colucci, LLCFacebook: Robin ColucciTwitter: @Robin_ColucciRobin Colucci's Book: How to Write a Book That Sells You: Increase Your Credibility, Income, and Impact

Seattle Now
Saving local forests, with help from big business

Seattle Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 13:55


Earlier this month, a blockchain company based in Delaware struck the biggest carbon offset deal in history with the city of Issaquah. This kind of deal is a new frontier in both saving local forests and tackling climate change. We talked to Seattle Times environment reporter Lynda Mapes about how this all works back when the state of Washington announced they're getting into this game. Today we're revisiting that episode.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - High capacity magazine ban

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 38:40


What's Trending: High-capacity ammo magazines will be banned, Washington and Oregon scientist push for young children to get vaccinated, and Lightyear flops at the box office. Big Local: Strawberries don't grow in time for the Marysville Strawberry festival, and an Issaquah man gets his home broken into while he was home sleeping.  The World Cup is coming to Seattle.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church
Dependence on the Holy Spirit

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


What does it mean to be “consciously dependent” on the Holy Spirit? In fact, who IS the Holy Spirit? What do we actually know about the person and work of the Holy Spirit, and why are we dependent on the Spirit?  Perhaps we have some baggage and misconceptions around the Holy Spirit, so let’s dive in together and take a 30,000-foot view of scripture, and see the remarkable, amazing, essential work and presence of the Holy Spirit in the life of a […] The post Dependence on the Holy Spirit appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

How would we respond if someone asked us, “What is Pine Lake Covenant Church about?” or “What is the Evangelical Covenant Church?” Who have we been and who are we becoming? Join us the next six weeks as we proclaim, “This is Us.” The post Centrality of God’s Word appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Sermons – Pine Lake Covenant Church

What do the Great Commandment and the Great Commission have to do with loving our neighbor? This week, Pastors Austin, Nancy & Mark share stories of how these two Greats intersect in their lives as followers of Jesus. The post Intersection of the Greats appeared first on Pine Lake Covenant Church.

Soulfully You Podcast with Coach Chris Rodriguez
Developing Emotional Intelligence in Children, with Marcelle Waldman

Soulfully You Podcast with Coach Chris Rodriguez

Play Episode Play 25 sec Highlight Listen Later May 27, 2022 55:24


Do you have a positive or negative reaction when you think about your emotions? How safe is it for you to express your feelings in your community? It is essential to cultivate language to express the full spectrum of emotions in order for us to grow.Today's conversation with educator and creator of Feellinks, Marcelle Waldman explores the importance of developing emotional intelligence within yourself, your family, and your community.Marcelle lives in Issaquah, Washington, with her husband and two children in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. Her concern over the staggering rates of anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, troubles in school, and relationship difficulties affecting our children drive Marcelle's passion for social-emotional learning. FeelLinks is a hands-on resource for children that includes a set of plush emotion dolls and a feelings journal to promote growth in lifelong skills in emotional intelligence, self-awareness, self-management, and relationship skills. FeelLinks' mission is to strengthen children's social-emotional connections and confidence. Learn more about Marcelle at www.myfeellinks.comConnect with Marcelle on Facebook @myfeellinks Instagram @myfeellinksConnect with Coach Chris on Instagram at @coach_chrisrodriguez. For all episodes and info about my coaching program, visit me at www.coachchrisrodriguez.com.Looking for a safe community to express the full spectrum of your emotions? Join Coach Chris for Soul-Life Balance Masterclass at https://coachchrisrodriguez.com/soul-life-balance/.Be sure to subscribe and leave a review on your favorite podcast platform!

KUOW Newsroom
The city where salmon might be the most famous residents: Travel For Good

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 2:08


KUOW is spotlighting local travel ideas that are good for more than just a pretty post on Instagram. In this installment of our Travel for Good series, we take you to the city of Issaquah, where salmon are some of the most famous residents.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Limp Antifa

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 38:06


What's Trending: The latest of what we know following the supermarket shooting in Buffalo, an Issaquah elementary school cancels classes due to COVID, and antifa goes limp at a Row v. Wade rally. Victim died as medics waited for critically understaffed Seattle Police to arrive to scene.  Rantz and the voice in his head.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - Animals gone wild

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 35:33


Guest host Victoria Taft What's Trending: Sen Mike Lee speaks out about the insides of the court clerks, VT gets a ticket downtown and shares her experiences. Big Local: Snohomish is building a trash mountain, and a black bear needs help in Issaquah. A turkey on the loose in DC.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: Another Rothrock ruling coming up

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 33:24


12pm - The Big Lead @ noon // Another Rothrock ruling coming up to keep an eye on // GUEST: Dennis Brown, father of Jordan Brown who was shot and killed in the Tacoma pot shop robbery by teenagers, is frustrated with Judges going light on juvenile suspects // Issaquah school cutback due to low ​enrollment See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2: Edmonds Gun Storage Law Overruled by Supreme Court

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 37:31


 What's Trending: Hundreds of electric scooter riders are reporting being injured from riding them, about 11% of riders have reported injuries, CNN+ has been shut down, their ratings were down and expanding to a streaming platform was a failed idea, Ron DeSantis has responded to Disney by saying that he does not want a California company controlling what happens in Florida, //  Big Local: Washington State Supreme Court ruled against Edmonds gun storage law, ruling was that there can be no laws that are more strict than the state law, man who robbed a bank in Tacoma has been arrested, Washington State Dept. of Agriculture is hiring for positions to trap Giant Hornets for this season, 80 year old Issaquah man was a victim of being a nice guy, a man who came off as nice moved into the tree on the elderly man's property, also took money from the man's debit card //  President Joe Biden makes a strong push to get more aid to Ukraine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Financial Flossing
Ep 039: Maintaining a Positive Office Culture

Financial Flossing

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 26:20


Diana Wu Financial Flossing: Guiding Dental Professionals to a Brighter Future with Ross Brannon  Episode 039: Maintaining a Positive Office Culture Diana's story started in Cebu, Philippines. As a child, she loved working with her hands, and loved helping people. She studied dental medicine at Cebu Doctors' University in Cebu, and later obtained her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree with distinction from Indiana University. In recognition of her academic excellence, she was inducted into the Theta chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon National Dental Honor Society in 2012. She is also a recipient of muerous awards, such as: Seattle Met Top Dentist, America's Best Dentist, top Doctor, top Dentist, Expertise.    Her journey into practice ownership arose from her desire to provide a better quality of care for her patients, a better work environment and culture for her team, and an overall better quality of life for everyone. She focuses on creating systems and making the office as efficient as possible with patient experience in mind. For years since her start up, her office has grown rapidly, thriving, and is now accepting patients via word-of-mouth referrals, as well as attracting top-talent seeking opportunities in the practice.   Listen to this information-packed Financial Flossing episode, where Diana shares tips on relocating and rebuilding with respect for your staff and patients in mind first.   Here is what to expect on this week's show: Hoops you may have to jump through if you're looking to move to the US to practice dentistry How Diana built up enough of her own reputation to leave her associate dentist position and start her own dental firm  Tips on relocating to a different city and building your own dental practice, staff, and reputation from scratch Why Diana chalks her reputation as the best dentist in Issaquah up to the way she treats her staff and patients Why a culture of respect and care in a dental practice is so important to maintain How to apply the same mindset of patience and forgiveness to not only your relationships with staff and patients, but with yourself as well Connect with Diana: WEBSITE: https://www.issaquahpremierdental.com/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/issaquahpremierdental/ LINKEDIN: https://linkedin.com/company/issaquahpremierdental TWITTER: https://twitter.com/issaquahpremier INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/issaquahpremierdental/  YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWerikVBUnQcnG7AG_D-vCQ YELP: https://www.yelp.ca/biz/issaquah-premier-dental-issaquah-6 GOOGLE: https://g.page/issaquahpremierdental/ PINTEREST: https://www.pinterest.ca/issaquahpremierdental/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mitch Unfiltered
Episode 182 - Special Edition Seahawks No-Table & Deshaun Watson's Precarious Next Steps

Mitch Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 151:22


RUNDOWN   Danny O'Neil steps in for Scott who is in Spokane with Issaquah's state championship tournament team. Before starting the show, Danny chats about his NCAA tournament travel plans and Mitch lays out the Beat the Boys contest rules. Then, the guys dig into the major shakeup by the Hawks and the dropped criminal charges of Deshaun Watson. Today's guests are Brady Henderson and Joe Fann for a special edition of the Seahawks No-Table, Peter King, and ESPN's senior Broncos writer Jeff Legwold. Mitch and wrap up the episode with “Other Stuff” topics ranging from KD trashing on the New York mayor to NFL's broadcast lineup to Calvin Ridley's gambling investigation!   GUESTS   Brady Henderson | ESPN Seahawks insider    Joe Fann | WynnBet & Blue Wire podcast host  Peter King | NBC Sports national NFL writer   Jeff Legwold | ESPN Broncos writer     TABLE OF CONTENTS   1:13 | Where is Danny headed to for opening round NCAA tournament action?  6:46 | Submit your bracket entry for Beat the Boys presented by Fireside Home Solutions for fabulous prizes!   24:28 | Danny puts on his John Schneider hat to role play and answer the big questions ahead for the organization.  33:56 | Will Deshaun Watson find his way onto a team this year and how will be be received by the court of public opinion?   56:13 | GUEST: Brady Henderson and Joe Fann hop aboard to weigh in on the massive moves last week for the Hawks and the prospects of bringing in Deshaun Watson.  1:23:47 | GUEST: Peter King is back to provide his national perspective on the Russell trade, Watson's legal update, and Calvin Ridley's gambling storyline.   1:44:03 | GUEST: Broncos senior writer for ESPN Jeff Legwold shares his view of the Wilson acquisition from the Denver side .   2:02:19 | Today's “Other Stuff” segment features stories ranging from LSU firing their coach before the tourney, Kevin Durant lashing out at the NYC mayor, and Calvin Ridley's suspension.