Podcasts about Berlin Wall

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Barrier constructed by the German Democratic Republic, enclosing West Berlin

  • 1,134PODCASTS
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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
Berlin Wall

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Best podcasts about Berlin Wall

Latest podcast episodes about Berlin Wall

Ron Paul Liberty Report
Narrative Collapse! From England To Israel, Governments Race To Abandon Vaccine Passports!

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 25:47


Facing a fight for his political life, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced an abrupt end to England's vaccine passport, mask mandates including in schools, and work-from-home orders as the Omicron "scare" fizzles. In Israel, Finance Minister Avigdor Liberman is demanding an end to that country's vax pass. The bricks are falling from this Berlin Wall. Also today: New footage of Ashli Babbitt will NOT please the Jan 6th Committee and a new study out of Brazil will not please Fauci.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
London Calling: Is it Over?

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:58


In this week’s London Calling, James and Toby argue about whether the global pandemic is over (Toby thinks it is, while James thinks it’s a false dawn) and discuss the Johnny-come-latelies who claim to have been lockdown sceptics all along. They compare them to repentant Communists after the fall of the Berlin Wall. They also […]

London Calling
Is it Over?

London Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:58


In this week’s London Calling, James and Toby argue about whether the global pandemic is over (Toby thinks it is, while James thinks it’s a false dawn) and discuss the Johnny-come-latelies who claim to have been lockdown sceptics all along. They compare them to repentant Communists after the fall of the Berlin Wall. They also worry that it may be all over for their old friend Boris (well, James isn’t that worried) and what is going to offered up to satisfy the Tory base in “Operation Save Big Dog,” whether that puts the television license back on the table. And if the BBC is such great value for the money why doesn’t it become a subscription service? In Culture Corner, thumbs up to Yellowjackets (Sky in the UK, Showtime in the US) with reservations and Dopesick (Disney+ in the UK, Hulu in the US), while Toby gives lukewarm reviews to The Duke, Being the Ricardos (Amazon Prime) and Red Rocket. Opening sound this week is the PM apologizing to the House for parties at No. 10.

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 3639: “Flurona! Establishment Wants You to Panic Over Made Up Virus” The War Room Owen Shroyer

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 102:08


The media is up in arms over a Covid mutation they're referring to as 'flurona.'With Big Tech censorship accelerating there's never been a better time to blast our transmissions out on social media and smash through the electronic Berlin Wall! Infowars

The Book Pile
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

The Book Pile

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 34:48


Among all the classic horror books dealing with horrifying supernatural terrors preying upon small children, this is the one with the prettiest poetry. Plus, Dave dumbs things way down, and Kellen tries to save the Berlin Wall.*TheBookPilePodcast@gmail.com*Kellen Erskine has appeared on Conan, Comedy Central, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, NBC's America's Got Talent, and the Amazon Original Series Inside Jokes. He has garnered over 50 million views with his clips on Dry Bar Comedy. In 2018 he was selected to perform on the “New Faces” showcase at the Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal, Quebec. Kellen was named one of TBS's Top Ten Comics to Watch in 2017. He currently tours the country.*David Vance's videos have garnered over 1 billion views. He has written viral ads for companies like Squatty Potty, Chatbooks, and Lumē, and sketches for the comedy show Studio C. His work has received two Webby Awards, and appeared on Conan. He currently works as a writer on the sitcom Freelancers.

BroPod
Uwe Rösler: East Germany, Manchester City & Management

BroPod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 74:58


Uwe Rösler is a German former professional football player and current manager. Uwe grew up in East Germany, attending the renowned school of excellence for elite sports before starting his professional career at Lokomotive Leipzig. He went on to play with several German clubs, including; BSG Chemie Leipzig, FC Magdeburg, Dynamo Dresden, and FC Nurnberg - all before making the move to Man City where he enjoyed the most successful spell of his playing career, scoring a total of 64 goals in 176 games, which earned him a place in City's Hall of Fame in 2009. He later went on to end his playing career in Norway at Lillestrøm before starting his managerial career at the same club. Since then, he has managed several clubs over the past 17 years, including; Viking, Molde, Brentford, Wigan, Leeds, Fleetwood, Malmö, and most recently Fortuna Dusseldorf. Uwe shares with Markus and Ciaran his experiences growing up and living in East Germany, which consisted of a regimented yet innovative school of excellence program, threats from Stasi, the secret police force, and being in the middle of the uprisings that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall -  all of which had a profound effect on his playing and managerial career. Further, we go on to discuss his cult hero status at Manchester City and his desire to have retired there, and the cancer that forced him to retire in Norway while at Lillestrøm. Thanks for sharing Uwe. The latter part of the episode grapples with his managerial career, as we discuss him putting his stamp on a team in an increasingly shorter time-frame for managers,  and how he compares himself to when he first started in 2004 both tactically and "politically".Follow BroPod on Twitter @BroPod1 and Facebook. Feel free to subscribe and review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify and all other outlets. #beother

Basketball History 101
Episode 72 - Arvydas Sabonis

Basketball History 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 14:45


In the late 1980s, Arvydas Sabonis was the greatest player in the world -- yet, because he lived behind the Iron Curtain, he was unable to play in the NBA. When the Berlin Wall finally fell and he joined the Portland Trail Blazers, he was already in his 30s, well past his prime. Despite this, he still managed to play at a dominant level in the NBA against much younger men. LINKS https://youtu.be/WEYnLxrs4W8 https://youtu.be/mbu4aKh57yw CREDITS Rick Loayza: Head researcher, writer, and voice Jacob Loayza: Editor, producer, and publisher MUSIC "At Sunrise" by the Osipov State Russian Folk Orchestra, Vera Nikolaevna Gorodovskaya, Vitaly Gnutov, and Rudolf Belov "Horizons" by Roa SPORTS HISTORY NETWORK sportshistorynetwork.com sportshistorynetwork.com/podcasts/basketball-history-101/ FACEBOOK m.facebook.com/Basketball-History-101-103801581493027/ BUSINESS CONTACT bballhistory101@gmail.com

FireStarters Podcast
Extra Bit 51 - Admin Error and A Picnic

FireStarters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 17:43


In this Extra Bit; Dan tells us about the fall of the Berlin Wall. Henry's Pick: Lost season 1 summary Dan's Pick: Ghostbusters (1984)

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
How the Stasi reinvented themselves

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 26:20


In November 1989, the Berlin Wall fell and the GDR collapsed. 91,000 Stasi employees, many of them experienced officers with access to highly personal information, found themselves unemployed overnight. There is a myth that most of them were old men who disappeared quietly to live off their state pensions. But this was not the case. Former FBI agent Ralph Hope tells Phillip about ex-Stasi officers working everywhere from the Russian energy sector to the police and even the government department tasked with prosecuting Stasi crimes. 

The Fourcast
Jon Snow looks back at his career at Channel 4 News

The Fourcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 26:42


He's an icon of broadcast journalism, trusted to deliver the news to the nation for almost half a century. The face of facts, authority, and empathy. But as 2021 comes to an end, so too does Jon Snow's time at Channel 4 News.  So in his final week at Channel 4 News, today on The Fourcast, Kiran Moodley looks back at just a few of the many highlights of his incredible career. From the fall of the Berlin Wall to interviewing Nelson Mandela, as we celebrate a man who's been at the front line of history in the making for 45 years.  Sources: ITN / Channel 4 News

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme
The Truth About Crypto Currency

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 46:17


Neil Koenig, Producer, Journalist and ideaXme board adviser interviews David Roche, Founder of Independent Strategy and Quantum Economics. The news today is full of stories of fortunes made or lost through investment in Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other crypto currencies. But what exactly are these new digital currencies? How did they come about, how do they work, and why are they so popular? In this interview, David Roche tells the story of the birth and development of this new kind of money, the impact it is already having on global economics and politics, and the reasons why central banks and governments are so worried by the rise of crypto currencies. David Roche is a global investment strategist based in Hong Kong. During a long career he has forecast some of the major turning points that have affected global markets, such as the demise of the Soviet Bloc and the subsequent fall of the Berlin Wall, and the financial crisis that swept Asia in the late 1990s. David Roche grew up in County Kildare in Ireland. He holds an MA from Trinity College, Dublin and an MBA with the highest distinction from INSEAD. He is also a Chartered Financial Analyst and has a diploma in accounting and finance from the UK's Association of Certified Accountants. In his youth he spent time in various countries, including a period in what was then known as the USSR. He says he fell into a career in investment strategy “by accident”. After a spell working for JP Morgan, he joined the multinational financial services enterprise Morgan Stanley, where he was Head of Research and Global Strategist. In 1994, after leaving Morgan Stanley, he founded Independent Strategy, an investment research firm which provides advice to institutional investors and governments. He often contributes to many top financial publications and is also a regular commentator on the BBC, Bloomberg TV and CNBC television networks. He is also the author of several books, including “New Monetarism”, “Sovereign DisCredit!” And “DemoCrisis”. David Roche Links: Independent Strategy: https://www.instrategy.com/the-team/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/daithideroishte Neil Koenig Links: https://www.linkedin.com/in/neilkoenig/ https://twitter.com/neilkoenig?lang=en

This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2334: HAVE WE FOUND OUR BETTER SELVES? by Meril R. Smith

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 24:46


HAVE WE FOUND OUR BETTER SELVES?: (WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM COVID-19) by Meril R. Smith"... a manual for now and the future, providing intelligent, practical guidance for all concerned with the new lifestyle template that Covid has imposed."- Barbara Bamberger Scott, The US Review of BooksHAVE WE FOUND OUR BETTER SELVES? is a follow-up to a "survival" book that was written during the first three months of the COVID-19 Pandemic. With over a year and a half of living with the COVID-19 virus and with the probability of COVID-19 finally being under control, this book helps all of us step back and take a look at how we have thought and acted during the months and months of pandemic. Ask yourself, "Am I just trying to forget the whole thing as if it were just a nightmare? Or, are there things I have learned about myself and my family that are important now and in the future? What new skills have I learned? Are there ways I think about and treat other people that have changed? Do I like myself better? Am I finding my better self? Am I also helping each person in my family find their better selves?Meril's unique experience as a spacecraft controller during the moon landings, a student of history, an enjoyment of research, a good sense of humor, a wide variety of life experience, and a forty-year career in all levels of education, provides an excellent backdrop for Meril's informative and easy to read books.Meril R. Smith grew up at the end of World War II with children of migrant farm workers, children born in the Japanese internment camps, and children of day laborers and blue-collarworkers. Poverty, recessions, and helping each other were all basic parts of surviving. Living through the times of the Berlin Wall, the Salk polio vaccine, economic recessions, the space race, the development of Silicon Valley, and the Vietnam War fueled Meril's passion for understanding people and events. His training, life experience, and career provides an excellent backdrop for writing HAVE WE FOUND OUR BETTER SELVES? (WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM COVID-19).https://www.amazon.com/HAVE-FOUND-OUR-BETTER-SELVES-ebook/dp/B09CLRSP67www.WritersBranding.comhttp://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/wb121621a.mp3      

Movie Go Round
#144 – Good Bye Lenin!

Movie Go Round

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 57:55


In this Around the World pick, David introduces Brett and Nicole to a German film from 2003, Good Bye Lenin! Directed by Wolfgang Becker, this comedic drama follows a son's efforts to keep his mother from learning about the fall of East Germany and the Berlin Wall after waking from a coma, missing the revolution. A film steeped in one, giant lie: does the team think Becker pulls it off? Is it endearing or irresponsible? Next episode is You Did This to Us: We're watching Doolittle! Email the show at hi@mgrpodcast.com. Find us online by heading over to mgrpodcast.com. Help shape the show by voting during You Did This to Us polls every 5 weeks on our site and social media! Movie-Go-Round is hosted by Nicole Davis, David Luzader, and Brett Stewart. The show is edited by Brett Stewart and Nicole Davis. Our theme, 'The Show Must Be Go,' is provided by Kevin MacLeod. Movie-Go-Round is hosted on Pinecast. Get 40% off your first 4 months using code r-7ca2df.

War Studies
The fall of the Soviet Union 30 years on

War Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 54:19


“The USSR as a geopolitical reality and subject of international law has ceased to exist.” In December 1991, the Presidents of Russia, the Ukraine and Belarus came together in the forests of the Polish-Belarussian border to agree this statement. On Christmas Day two weeks later, the USSR, one of the world's two super powers as well as a centuries-old Russian Empire was dissolved, with no large-scale violence, civil war or nuclear weapons. But what led to this seismic event in geo-politics? Was the collapse inevitable after the fall of the Berlin Wall? And what were the major consequences of this tidal wave of change for the people of the former Soviet Bloc and Russian relations with the West, that we're still grappling with today? In this special bumper episode of the War Studies Podcast marking 30 years since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Professor Sam Greene, Director of King's Russia Institute, talks to Dr Ruth Deyermond, Senior Lecturer in Post-Soviet Security, and Dr Natasha Kuhrt, Lecturer in International Peace & Security, about how and why the USSR collapsed. They explain why its death surprised many in the East and the West, the chaotic and overwhelming changes people had to deal with almost overnight, and why the West's response to the collapse of communism sowed the seeds of rising tensions in relations between Russia and the West today.

The President's Inbox
The U.S.-Russia Stalemate, With Mary Elise Sarotte

The President's Inbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 35:47


Mary Elise Sarotte, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis distinguished professor of historical studies at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss what the United States got right, and wrong, in its relations with Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union.    Articles Mentioned in the Podcast   George Kennan, “Long Telegram” to the State Department, February 22, 1946   “X” (George Kennan), “The Sources of Soviet Conduct,” Foreign Affairs (July 1947)   Vladimir Putin, “On the Historical Unity of Russians and Ukrainians,” The Kremlin, July 12, 2021   M.E. Sarotte, “Containment Beyond the Cold War: How Washington Lost the Post-Soviet Peace,” Foreign Affairs (November/December 2021)   Books Mentioned   M.E. Sarotte, Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (2021)   M.E. Sarotte, The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall (2014)

Brussels Sprouts
Not One Inch, with Mary Sarotte

Brussels Sprouts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 53:32


How did the NATO expansion process during the 1990s influence the relationship between Russia and the West? Mary Sarotte joins Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Jim Townsend to discuss her new book, Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate. Mary Sarotte is an expert in the history of international relations and the inaugural holder of the Kravis Chair at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. In addition to Not One Inch, she is the author of numerous other works, including The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall and 1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe. Her books have been named Economist and Financial Times "Books of the Year", along with receiving other awards and commendations.

Once BITten!
@Bitcoinforkidd1 - #Bitcoin Education For Kids! #216

Once BITten!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 104:38


BTC $ 47,386 -------- Pleb Service Announcement. Bitcoin 2022 will be held on Miami Beach from 6-9th April and you can use code BITTEN at check out to get a 10% discount. All tickets are transferrable and 100% refundable if you are unable to travel due to Covid Restrictions. http://tixr.com/pr/BITTEN/26217 -------- Today's guests on the show are Frieda and Chris Bobay who were inspired to write and illustrate the book 'Bitcoin For Kiddos'. Join the three of us and Lauren as we take a trip down the rabbit hole from a kids eye view. Why is #bitcoin so important to this husband and wife team and who are they trying to reach? How did #bitcoin affect the marital relationship between Chris and Frieda? Why are current events stirring emotions in Frieda @mycohealth who grew up in West Germany close to the Berlin Wall? Are there any plebs out there who can help get the book into as many people's hands as possible? Chris and Frieda have been kind enough to offer 15% off all orders using code BITTEN15 at checkout! bitcoinforkiddos.com A huge thank you to Chris and Frieda for all their work in the space and we all look forward to what's coming next from @Bitcoinforkidd1 HQ! I stand on the shoulders of giants. Thank you: @coincorner @TheBitcoinConf @swanbitcoin @relai_ch @ShiftCryptoHQ for your trust and support. @jimreapermusic for creating www.once-bitten.com @hodlerthanthou and the Britcoiners @twentyoneism @BTCreserveHQ You can also support the show by using the @Breez_Tech App and @fountain_app by searching for the Once BITten Podcast! Apple Pods - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/once-bitten/id1497540130 Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/4wWzXFEyAJtM6aOLA6c4Q2 Shills and Mench's: BTC CONFERENCE http://tixr.com/pr/BITTEN/26217 - Code BITTEN SWAN BITCOIN www.swanbitcoin.com/oncebitten/ RELAI www.relai.ch/bitten - Code BITTEN SHIFTCRYPTO http://shiftcrypto.ch/bitten Code BITTEN COINCORNER https://www.coincorner.com/social/princeySOV BITCOIN RESERVE - https://bitcoinreserve.com/ref/bitten BITCOIN FOR KIDDOS - bitcoinforkiddos.com code BITTEN15

History Extra podcast
How US-Russian relations fractured in the 1990s

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 36:50


Mary Sarotte tells Spencer Mizen about her new book Not One Inch, which reveals how diplomatic missteps after the fall of the Berlin Wall soured US-Russian relations and fuelled the rise of Vladimir Putin.(Ad) Mary Sarotte is the author of Not One Inch: America, Russia and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/Not-One-Inch-Post-Cold-Stalemate/dp/030025993X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Way the World Works: A Tuttle Twins Podcast for Families
228. Why Was The Fall of The Berlin Wall So Important?

The Way the World Works: A Tuttle Twins Podcast for Families

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 16:38


In 1961, the communists who controlled the Eastern side of Germany after WWII began building a wall to shield their people from the capitalist Western side of Germany. This resulted in families being separated and devastation across the whole country.

Election R&D - 2020 and Beyond
Ben Rhodes Talks "After the Fall: Being an American in the World We've Made"

Election R&D - 2020 and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 57:15


Center Director Bob Shrum is joined by Ben Rhodes, former Obama advisor, to discuss his latest book on America's role in rising global authoritarianism, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to today, and the urgency to fight for what he thinks the U.S. should be. Featuring: Bob Shrum - Director, Center for the Political Future; Warschaw Chair in Practical Politics, USC Dornsife Ben Rhodes - Author; Co-Host of “Pod Save the World;” Former Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications and Speechwriting, Obama Administration; Spring 2020 CPF Fellow

Cold War Conversations History Podcast
A Cold War childhood in Albania

Cold War Conversations History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 58:30


Lea Ypi grew up in one of the most isolated countries on earth, a place where communist ideals had officially replaced religion. Albania, the last Stalinist outpost in Europe, was almost impossible to visit, almost impossible to leave. It was a place of queuing and scarcity, of political executions and secret police. To Lea, it was home. People were equal, neighbours helped each other, and children were expected to build a better world. There was community and hope.Then, in December 1990, a year after the fall of the Berlin Wall, everything changed. The statues of Stalin and Hoxha were toppled. Almost overnight, people could vote freely, wear what they liked and worship as they wished. There was no longer anything to fear from prying ears. But factories shut, jobs disappeared and thousands fled to Italy on crowded ships, only to be sent back. Predatory pyramid schemes eventually bankrupted the country, leading to violent conflict. As one generation's aspirations became another's disillusionment, and as her own family's secrets were revealed, Lea found herself questioning what freedom really meant.Free is an engrossing memoir of coming of age amid political upheaval. With acute insight and wit, Lea Ypi traces the limits of progress and the burden of the past, illuminating the spaces between ideals and reality, and the hopes and fears of people pulled up by the sweep of history.Buy the book and support the podcastUK buyers  https://amzn.to/2ZVgRx4US buyers https://amzn.to/3psOkr8Now time doesn't come free and I'm asking listeners to support my work recording these incredible stories via a small (or large)l donation. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can't wait for next week's episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook. SchattenbergI am delighted to welcome Lea Ypi  to our Cold War conversation…There's further information here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode210/Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Looking for a Xmas gift for the Cold War aficionado in your life? Do check out loads of gift ideas including our wide range of CW themed mugs at our store. More info here https://rdbl.co/3kv7lYk Have a look at our store and find the ideal gift for the Cold War enthusiast in your life? Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/store/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/coldwarpod)

The History of Computing
Clifford Stoll and the Cuckoo's Egg

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 11:38


A honeypot is basically a computer made to look like a sweet, yummy bit of morsel that a hacker might find yummy mcyummersons. This is the story of one of the earliest on the Internet. Clifford Stoll has been a lot of things. He was a teacher and a ham operator and appears on shows. And an engineer at a radio station. And he was an astronomer. But he's probably best known for being an accidental systems administrator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who setup a honeypot in 1986 and used that to catch a KGB hacker. It sounds like it could be a movie. And it was - on public television. Called “The KGB, the Computer, and Me.” And a book. Clifford Stoll was an astronomer who stayed on as a systems administrator when a grant he was working on as an astronomer ran out. Many in IT came to the industry accidentally. Especially in the 80s and 90s. Now accountants are meticulous. The monthly accounting report at the lab had never had any discrepancies. So when the lab had a 75 cent accounting error, his manager Dave Cleveland had Stoll go digging into the system to figure out what happened. And yet what he found was far more than the missing 75 cents. This was an error of time sharing systems. And the lab leased out compute time at $300 per hour. Everyone who had accessed the system had an account number to bill time to. Well, everyone except a user named hunter. They disabled the user and then got an email that one of their computers tried to break into a computer elsewhere. This is just a couple years after the movie War Games had been released. So of course this was something fun to dig your teeth into. Stoll combed through the logs and found the account that attempted to break into the computers in Maryland was a local professor named Joe Sventek, now at the University of Oregon. One who it was doubtful made the attempt because he was out town at the time. So Stoll set his computer to beep when someone logged in so he could set a trap for the person using the professors account. Every time someone connected a teletype session, or tty, Stoll checked the machine. Until Sventek connected and with that, he went to see the networking team who confirmed the connection wasn't a local terminal but had come in through one of the 50 modems through a dial-up session. There wasn't much in the form of caller ID. So Stoll had to connect a printer to each of the modems - that gave him the ability to print every command the user ran. A system had been compromised and this user was able to sudo, or elevate their privileges. UNIX System V had been released 3 years earlier and suddenly labs around the world were all running similar operating systems on their mainframes. Someone with a working knowledge of Unix internals could figure out how to do all kinds of things. Like add a program to routine housecleaning items that elevated their privileges. They could also get into the passwd file that at the time housed all the passwords and delete those that were encrypted, thus granting access without a password. And they even went so far as to come up with dictionary brute force attacks similar to a modern rainbow table to figure out passwords so they wouldn't get locked out when the user whose password was deleted called in to reset it again. Being root allowed someone to delete the shell history and given that all the labs and universities were charging time, remove any record they'd been there from the call accounting systems. So Stoll wired a pager into the system so he could run up to the lab any time the hacker connected. Turns out the hacker was using the network to move laterally into other systems, including going from what was ARPANET at the time to military systems on Milnet. The hacker used default credentials for systems and leave accounts behind so he could get back in later. Jaeger means hunter in German and those were both accounts used. So maybe they were looking for a German. Tymenet and Pacbell got involved and once they got a warrant they were able to get the phone number of the person connecting to the system. Only problem is the warrant was just for California. Stoll scanned the packet delays and determined the hacker was coming in from overseas. The hacker had come in through Mitre Corporation. After Mitre disabled the connection the hacker slipped up and came in through International Telephone and Telegraph. Now they knew he was not in the US. In fact, he was in West Germany. At the time, Germany was still divided by the Berlin Wall and was a pretty mature spot for espionage. They confirmed the accounts were indicating they were dealing with a German. Once they had the call traced to Germany they needed to keep the hacker online for an hour to trace the actual phone number because the facilities there still used mechanical switching mechanisms to connect calls. So that's where the honeypot comes into play. Stoll's girlfriend came up with the idea to make up a bunch of fake government data and host it on the system. Boom. It worked, the hacker stayed on for over an hour and they traced the number. Along the way, this hippy-esque Cliff Stoll had worked with “the Man.” Looking through the logs, the hacker was accessing information about missile systems, military secrets, members of the CIA. There was so much on these systems. So Stoll called some of the people at the CIA. The FBI and NSA were also involved and before long, German authorities arrested the hacker. Markus Hess, whose handle was Urmel, was a German hacker who we now think broke into over 400 military computers in the 80s. It wasn't just one person though. Dirk-Otto Brezinski, or DOB, Hans Hübner, or Pengo, and Karl Koch, or Pengo were also involved. And not only had they stolen secrets, but they'd sold them to The KGB using Peter Carl as a handler. Back in 1985, Koch was part of a small group of hackers who founded the Computer-Stammtisch in Hanover. That later became the Hanover chapter of the Chaos Computer Club. Hübner and Koch confessed, which gave them espionage amnesty - important in a place with so much of that going around in the 70s and 80s. He would be found burned by gasoline to death and while it was reported a suicide, that has very much been disputed - especially given that it happened shortly before the trials. DOB and Urmel received a couple years of probation for their part in the espionage, likely less of a sentence given that the investigations took time and the Berlin Wall came down the year they were sentenced. Hübner's story and interrogation is covered in a book called Cyberpunk - which tells the same story from the side of the hackers. This includes passing into East Germany with magnetic tapes, working with handlers, sex, drugs, and hacker-esque rock and roll. I think I initially read the books a decade apart but would strongly recommend reading Part II of it either immediately before or after The Cukoo's Egg. It's interesting how a bunch of kids just having fun can become something far more. Similar stories were happening all over the world - another book called The Hacker Crackdown tells of many, many of these stories. Real cyberpunk stories told by one of the great cyberpunk authors. And it continues through to the modern era, except with much larger stakes than ever. Gorbachev may have worked to dismantle some of the more dangerous aspects of these security apparatuses, but Putin has certainly worked hard to build them up. Russian-sponsored and other state-sponsored rings of hackers continue to probe the Internet, delving into every little possible hole they can find. China hacks Google in 2009, Iran hits casinos, the US hits Iranian systems to disable centrifuges, and the list goes on. You see, these kids were stealing secrets - but after the Morris Worm brought the Internet to its knees in 1988, we started to realize how powerful the networks were becoming. But it all started with 75 cents. Because when it comes to security, there's no amount or event too small to look into.

Keep Leading!™
KL130: The Respectful Leader

Keep Leading!™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 35:31


KL130 Gregg Ward Founder, Center for Respectful Leadership The Respectful Leader Episode Summary RESPECT! This simple word was turned into an anthem by the legendary Aretha Franklin! We could use more “respect” in our world today.  For this reason, on Episode 130 of the Keep Leading!® podcast, I discuss respectful leadership with Gregg Ward, the Center for Respectful Leadership founder. Bio Gregg Ward is the Center for Respectful Leadership executive director and a best-selling, award-winning author, speaker, facilitator, and executive coach. Gregg is on a mission to transform lives and organizations by focusing on Respectful Leadership, Emotional, Social and Cultural Intelligence. The Respectful Leader (Wiley, 2016), Gregg's latest book, was awarded “Best Book of the Month” by Amazon and instantly became a best-seller. In 2018, the book won the Gold Medal in the prestigious Axiom Business Book Awards competition. Gregg began his career in 1986 as a specialist trainer for The New York City Police Department. Since then, he has developed and delivered over 2,500 keynote presentations and talks, training programs, seminars, webinars, and workshops for global organizations such as Booz Allen Hamilton, Kaiser Permanente, Ford, Qualcomm, the US Navy, and Warner Bros Studios. Gregg also served for five years as a freelance journalist on assignment throughout Europe for BBC Radio and other UK media. He is incredibly proud to have covered the fall of the Berlin Wall. Gregg holds a BFA from Boston University, is a Board-Certified Coach (BCC), a Master Corporate Executive Coach (MCEC), and is an Executive Coach with The Center for Creative Leadership. He is based in San Diego, CA. Website https://centerforrespectfulleadership.org/ Other Website https://greggwardgroup.com/ LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/greggward/ Twitter https://twitter.com/greggwardgroup   Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CenterForRespectfulLeadership   Leadership Quote "You respect yourself, you respect other people, and you'll do okay." Muhammad Ali said this to me when he was visiting my home outside of NYC when I was five years old (my dad was a sportswriter who was interviewing him at the time).  Get Your Copy of Gregg's Book! https://greggwardgroup.com/bookstore/ Subscribe, share and review on Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/keep-leading/id1461490512 Full Episode Transcripts and Detailed Guest Information www.KeepLeadingPodcast.com   Keep Leading LIVE (Live Recordings of the Keep Leading!® Podcast) www.KeepLeadingLive.com The Keep Leading!® podcast is for people passionate about leadership. It is dedicated to leadership development and insights. Join your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator® as he speaks with accomplished leaders and people of influence across the globe as they share their journey to leadership excellence. Listen as they share leadership strategies, techniques, and insights. For more information visit https://eddieturnerllc.com or follow Eddie Turner on Twitter and Instagram at @eddieturnerjr. Like Eddie Turner LLC on Facebook. Connect with Eddie Turner on LinkedIn. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

rSlash
r/Maliciouscompliance Build a Fence? OK, I'll Build the Berlin Wall!

rSlash

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 14:27


r/Maliciouscompliance In today's episode, OP has a couple of obnoxious neighbors who try to pressure OP into paying for a brand new fence between their two properties. They refuse to contribute any money to the fence, so OP takes some creative liberties by constructing a massive concrete wall that would put the Berlin Wall to shame. Oh, and he made sure to point the ugly side of the wall towards his neighbor's house! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

No Dice, No Glory Podcast Page
No Dice No Glory Episode 109: Interview with Aden Magee

No Dice, No Glory Podcast Page

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 52:32


We resume our interviews with the authors from Casemate Publishers. Today we have Aden Magee, the author of The Cold War: Wilderness of Mirrors. The book covers the Military Liaison Missions that existed in Germany after WWII up until right after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Mr. Magee has first hand knowledge on the role of these missions and how they figured into the larger counter-espionage mission of the US Military. The book is a fascinating account on the role of these teams during the thick of the Cold War. 

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach
My Debut Novel Elan, Elan is Finally Published!

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 1:59


My debut novel, the one I've been working on for a few years now, is finally out in the world. It was inspired by my summers spent in Slovakia, where my family is from and where I have witnessed firsthand the changes that have unfolded, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to entering the European Union. Slovakia is a young nation that's still trying to form its identity within the world—much like the characters in Elan, Elan. Summary of Elan, Elan: Erik plans on making this summer the best ever, mainly to soften the blow to his best friend Dani when he leaves for secondary school in the fall. But his noble plans are immediately compromised when Erik's old crush Ivana returns to their rural Slovakian town. Seeing Ivana again brings Erik's old feelings racing back to the surface, but she hasn't come back alone—Ivana is now dating Erik's most hated foe. Erik has dirt on the rival, but using it to break them up might mean losing Ivana forever. With Erik distracted, Dani faces a summer of brutal struggles and rough transitions on his own. With all these yearnings, secrets, and changes in the air, can Erik and Dani's lifelong friendship survive the summer? Purchase it through Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Elan-Phil-Svitek-ebook/dp/B09MMK51VJ/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=phil+svitek&qid=1638044625&sr=8-1. Afterwards, leave a review and spread the word. Thank you! RESOURCES/LINKS: -Coach or Consultant Services: https://philsvitek.com/lets-work-together/ -Podcast Services: http://philsvitek.com/podcastservices -Love Market Film (available now): https://www.amazon.com/Love-Market-Amy-Cassandra-Martinez/dp/B09DFS3FTZ/ref=sr_1_14 -Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/philsvitek -Merchandise: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/phil-svitek---360-creative-coach/ -Instagram: http://instagram.com/philsvitek -Facebook: http://facebook.com/philippsvitek -Twitter: http://twitter.com/philsvitek -Financially Fit Foundation: http://financiallyfitfoundation.org -Master Mental Fortitude Book: http://mastermentalfortitude.com -Elan, Elan Book: http://philsvitek.com/elan-elan -In Search of Sunrise Film: http://philsvitek.com/in-search-of-sunrise

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture
(Bonus) Analysis of "Tear Down this Wall" Speech

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021


(Bonus) "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall", also known as the Berlin Wall Speech, was a speech delivered by United States President Ronald Reagan in West Berlin on June 12, 1987. Reagan called for the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, to open the Berlin Wall, which had separated West and East Berlin since 1961. The name is derived from a key line in the middle of the speech: "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" Though Reagan's speech received relatively little media coverage at the time, it became widely known after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. In the post-Cold War era, it was often seen as one of the most memorable performances of an American president in Berlin after John F. Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech of 1963.

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture
President Reagan, Tear Down This Wall Speech - 1987

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 29:42


S03-E18 President Ronald Reagan spoke at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin that is often referred to as the “Tear Down this Wall” speech. Like many other U.S. presidents, President Reagan gave a speech in Berlin during the Cold War between the U.S. and the Soviets. To demonstrate solidarity with the German people who were in Soviet-occupied East Germany, President Kennedy stated two decades earlier “I am a Berliner” and identified with their struggle for freedom. President Reagan's speech touched on many topics, but the most famous line came in the middle of the speech when he not only identified with the struggle that President Kennedy had described, but Reagan called upon the Soviets to tear down the Berlin wall. The Brandenburg Gate was just one spot along a long line of separation that divided Germany in half with Communist troops, barbed wire, and fences. This is generally listed as one of President Reagan finest speeches. Two years after this speech was given, the Berlin Wall indeed was removed and the Brandenburg Gate was opened. But the story for why that occurred is a tremendously complicated event and one that may be explored in another speech in the future. In addition to this audio episode, I also provide several PDF documents: first, a transcript of this speech, secondly a biography of President Reagan, thirdly, a history of the Brandenburg Gates, and finally, a short analysis of Reagan's speech. These audio recordings come from the American Rhetoric online database. This website provides more than 5,000 speech transcripts, audio recordings, and videos of public speeches, sermons, lectures, interviews, and more. Check out the website at http://americanrhetoric.com The following links allow you to subscribe to the podcast: iTunes and Apple Podcast, Amazon Music/Audible, Castbox.fm, Deezer, Facebook, Gaana, Google Podcast, iHeartRadio, Player.fm, Radio Public, Samsung Listen, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, Twitter. and Vurbl. Automatically available through these podcast apps: Castamatic, iCatcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, RSSRadio, and more. Please post comments to the individual episodes at http://historicvoices.org, podcast review and rating section within iTunes and other apps, or email to me, arendale@umn.edu You can also checkout my other four podcasts and other social media at www.davidmedia.org

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

The One Way Ticket Show
Parag Khanna - Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, Best-selling Author & World Traveler

The One Way Ticket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:03


Parag Khanna is a leading global strategy advisor, world traveler, and best-selling author. He is Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. Parag's newest book is MOVE: The Forces Uprooting Us (2021), which was preceded by The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century (2019). He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also the author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). Parag was named one of Esquire's “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century,” and featured in WIRED magazine's “Smart List.” He holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has traveled to nearly 150 countries and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. On this episode, Parag shares his one way ticket to Berlin and reflects how he became enchanted with the city after visiting as a child right after the Berlin Wall fell, and the lessons Berlin has to teach other cities today. Plus, Parag highlights some of the fascinating observations from his latest book, MOVE: The Forces Uprooting Us. And for the man who's been to nearly as many countries on the planet as there are countries, where hasn't he gone that he'd like to visit? Tune in and find out. Parag is just one of the engaging personalities featured on The One Way Ticket Show, where Host Steven Shalowitz explores with his guests where they would go if given a one way ticket, no coming back. Their destinations may be in the past, present, future, real, imaginary or a state of mind. Steven's guests have included: Nobel Peace Prize Winner, President Jose Ramos-Horta; Legendary Talk Show Host, Dick Cavett; Law Professor, Alan Dershowitz; Fashion Expert, Tim Gunn; Broadcast Legend, Charles Osgood; International Rescue Committee President & CEO, David Miliband; Former Senator, Joe Lieberman; Playwright, David Henry Hwang; Journalist-Humorist-Actor, Mo Rocca; SkyBridge Capital Founder & Co-Managing Partner, Anthony Scaramucci; Abercrombie & Kent Founder, Geoffrey Kent; Travel Expert, Pauline Frommer, as well as leading photographers, artists, chefs, writers, intellectuals and more.

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode VII: The Berlin Wall & The Soviet Fall

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:29


This week's crisis could have ended with the world in a giant blaze of nuclear flame, but it didn't. In fact, it's an example of how a crisis can be handled so effectively, that most people don't even remember it as a crisis. This week, we are talking about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War. It's November, 1989. Reagan famously delivered his "tear down this wall" speech in 1987, but West and East Berlin are as divided as ever. In the summer of 1989, Chinese military forces had mowed down peaceful protesters in Tiananmen Square. Horrified by the images of violence, American leaders, and George H. W. Bush in particular, were eager to avoid provoking a similar crackdown in Eastern Europe. The stakes couldn't have been higher. Both sides were armed with enough nuclear weapons to destroy the world many times over, and they had itchy trigger fingers.Then, unexpectedly, at a press conference, a mid-level bureaucrat ordered an enormous change in policy. He accidentally announced that residents would be allowed to leave East Germany. Word spread like wildfire. Within hours, thousands of residents were lined up at the gates to cross into West Berlin.Why didn't this moment turn into one of violence and bloodshed? What were the repercussions of the collapse of a global superpower and its economic system? How might things have gone differently? To answer these questions, we have two dynamite guests. First, we have a voice that you will probably recognize. Our podcast host, Dr. Jeffrey Engle. When he's not hosting The Past, The Promise, The Presidency, Jeff works as the founding director of the Center for Presidential History. He has also written or edited twelve books on US foreign policy, including The China Diary of George H.W. Bush: The Making of a Global President and The Fall of the Berlin Wall: The Revolutionary Legacy of 1989.We then spoke to Dr. Mary E. Sarotte, who is the Kravis Professor of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is also the expert on the expansion of NATO in Germany at the end of the Cold War and the author of Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate, The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall, and 1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe.

Talks from the Hoover Institution
Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate

Talks from the Hoover Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 18:11


Friday, November 12, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   Not one inch. With these words, Secretary of State James Baker proposed a hypothetical bargain to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev after the fall of the Berlin Wall: if you give up your part of Germany, NATO will “not shift one inch eastward.” Controversy erupted almost immediately over this 1990 exchange—but more important was the decade to come, when the words took on new meaning. Gorbachev let his Germany go, but Washington rethought the bargain, not least after the Soviet Union's own collapse in December 1991. Washington realized it could not just win big but win bigger. Their new approach: Not one inch of territory need be off limits to NATO.  On the thirtieth anniversary of the Soviet collapse, Sarotte uses new evidence and interviews to show how, in the decade that culminated in Vladimir Putin's rise to power, the United States and Russia undermined a potentially lasting partnership. Not One Inchshows what went wrong.  Please click here to read the introduction to Prof. Sarotte's new book. An expert in the history of international relations, Mary Sarotte is the Kravis Distinguished Professor at Hopkins-SAIS, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and visiting faculty at Harvard's Center for European Studies.  She is the author, among other books, of The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall and 1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. In the past, she has worked as a journalist at The Economist and Die Zeit, served as a White House Fellow, and held fellowships with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton.    Norman Naimark is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Robert and Florence McDonnell professor of East European History at Stanford. His current research focuses on Soviet policies and actions in Europe after World War II and on genocide and ethnic cleansing in the twentieth century. ABOUT THE PROGRAM This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.

The Bunker
Daily: Albanian Rhapsody – Fighting for freedom in Stalinism's last bastion

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 28:32


Albania in the 1980s was the last bastion of Stalinism in Europe. It was difficult to visit, and a place of poverty, executions and secret police, but for LSE politics professor Lea Ypi it was also home. She talks to Alex Andreou about her astonishing memoir Free: Coming of Age at the End of History, which details her childhood in one of Europe's most repressive countries, what came afterwards, and what it truly means to be free. “The fall of the Berlin Wall was brushed aside as something that didn't concern Albania” “At some point the state slogan was gone and was replaced by a coca-cola advert” “I've spent half my life under socialism, half my life under liberalism… neither of these systems delivered what they set out to” “To live in real democracy means to have a real say in the laws that are made” “What we have is not a democracy, but rather a liberal representative system” https://amzn.to/3HcK7Qw Presented by Alex Andreou. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producers: Jelena Sofronijevic and Jacob Archbold. Music by Kenny Dickinson. Audio production by Alex Rees. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Witness History
Spying in Berlin

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 8:57


At the height of the Cold War the German city of Berlin was known as the spy capital of the world. Spies were operating on both sides of the Berlin Wall as tensions between democratic West Germany and communist East Germany meant governments on both sides of the ideological divide were desperate to find out what the other side was planning. In the early 1980s Nina Willner became the first female US army officer to lead intelligence missions into East Germany. For her there was an added poignancy to her work, as her mother's family were living in East Germany while Nina was operating in East Berlin. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 the divided family was reunited and Nina wrote a memoir, ‘Forty Autumns' about their very different lives. Caroline Bayley spoke to Nina Willner for Witness History about her experiences of the Cold War in Berlin. Photo by Régis BOSSU/Sygma via Getty Images - The frontier between West and East Berlin.

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
Reagan Knocked Down That Wall

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 12:27


RUSH: The 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is going on right now. It's dark over there in Germany. I have a story here from the State-Controlled Associated Press: ‘Merkel Thanks Gorbachev on Berlin Wall Anniversary.' Now, let's be clear about something. ‘Barack Hussein Obama. Mmm, mmm, mmm!' was invited to go and said (imitating Obama) ‘Mmm, mmm, mmm, ain't going! Got to bowl, gotta play golf, got a concert in the House, got a date night, gotta celebrate health care. I ain't going. I don't believe in freedom, anyway. That wall, we communists, we don't celebrate our failures. Let Gorbachev handle it. Besides, I don't want to go over there and be upstaged by Ronald Reagan.' I have not found any reporting yet — I'm not saying she didn't do it, but I've not found any reporting yet that says Merkel mentions Reagan. Now, she did back on November 4th in a speech. She said, ‘Ronald Reagan far earlier than others saw and recognized the sign of the times when standing at the Brandenburg Gate in '87. He said, ‘Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate, tear down this wall.' This appeal to something that never will be forgotten,' Merkel said. This appeal? So Gorbachev is over there and by the way, he's out there making news. He's now comparing the climate change effort here, militant environmentalism has now replaced the Cold War. And nations have to come together to solve that problem. https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2009/11/09/reagan_knocked_down_that_wall/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

British History Series
The Berlin Wall Fell On 9th Nov 1989 But Why Was It Built in the First Place?

British History Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:56


The Berlin Wall fell on 9th November 1989 but why was it built in the first place? This episode will give you a quick understanding. #BerlinWall #History #EuropeanHistory You can also watch this episode on YouTube. This podcast is free and will remain so but if you'd like to support me whilst also accessing exclusive content, perks, free gifts and more, you can join my Patreon club at www.Patreon.com/BritishHistory and support for as little as £3 a month. (Perks depend on tier selected). Support for Free by liking, commenting and sharing this podcast. Sign up to receive my free weekly newsletter with the added bonus of having 7 days to book new tours and events before they are released to the general public! Click Here http://eepurl.com/dvGx2H --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/british-history/message

Gen X Guide To The Universe
MTV & Fall of the Berlin Wall

Gen X Guide To The Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 43:52


In 1989, MTV broadcast the fall of the Berlin Wall. In 2021, Heather and Jameson talked about, and some other stuff. Tune in this week to hear about the Berlin wall (Check out this article: “MTV's revolutionary hour on the Berlin Wall” https://tinyurl.com/78bt56va), how annoying Bono is (very), Jameson's lack of appreciation for Hedwig and the Angry Inch, confirmed for Jameson it's Taye Diggs and not Taint Diggs, Heather's “summering” in Berlin (check out the Checkpoint Charlie museum: https://tinyurl.com/y3bpjw6s), and Jameson confuses Lindsay Graham with Ashley Graham. The duo also breaks down Berlin's “Take My Breath Away” (https://tinyurl.com/xrvdf6ew). And of course, get your tickets here to Afterwork Theater's production of Newsies starring the incomparable broadway baby, Julie Mirwis: https://tinyurl.com/ymzu4d5d

The Thoughtful Travel Podcast
260 Berlin: Travel Bringing History to Life

The Thoughtful Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 21:56


History, current events and politics are intrinsically interesting, but when you have the chance to travel to the places where important world events have taken place - or be somewhere at the moment something historic actually occurs - then that's even more impactful. In this special episode, I trace my personal history with the city of Berlin, and how my travel experiences there have brought history to life for me (as well as influencing, well, basically my whole life!). I start off way back in the 1960s when - no, I wasn't alive - the Berlin Wall was built, and then move forward to 1990 when I had the immense luck of being in Berlin for the night of reunification, as a fourteen-year-old. Coming all the way from Australia meant that experiencing such a historic moment firsthand impacted me in many ways. I returned to Berlin several times after 1990, and most recently took my some in 2015, and it's pretty amazing to track our experiences. Links: News audio extracts from https://archive.org/details/1962-08-16_The_Wall and https://archive.org/details/newsweekonair_891112_complete Join our Facebook group for Thoughtful Travellers - https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtfultravellers Join our LinkedIn group for Thoughtful Travellers - https://notaballerina.com/linkedin Show notes: https://notaballerina.com/260   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

HistoryPod
9th November 1989: Berlin Wall opened by the East German government after Günter Schabowski mistakenly announced that GDR citizens could cross to West Berlin with immediate effect

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


Although the border remained closed for around three hours, by 11pm the Berlin Wall checkpoint at Bornholmer Strasse had been ...

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:46


The Berlin Wall was an icon of the Cold War and a physical embodiment of the divide between East and West. Its rise and fall was a microcosm of the conflict and its fall marked the beginning of a new post-Cold War world.Today on the podcast Dan is joined by two eyewitnesses to the wall to hear first-hand its physical and psychological impact. First Dan speaks to Sir Robert Corbett. His military career was book-ended by the wall as his first command as a young officer in the Irish Guards was in Berlin during the 1960s and one of his last major commands before retiring was as the last Commandant of the British Sector in Berlin. He describes the tension and challenges of operating in Berlin and the ever-present possibility of conflict between the two sides. He also provides an eye-opening account of how the euphoric moment of the wall coming down was also a moment of grave danger and could have led to serious violence without his careful diplomacy.Secondly, Dan is joined by Margit Hosseini. She grew up in the city and witnessed events of the 1950s and 60s as the wall went up before leaving to live in London. She remembers her experiences of what it was like to be surrounded by the wall as it went up and to witness family's, including her own, be divided by its ominous presence. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
The Berlin Wall & The Tunnels Beneath It

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 35:06


On 9 November 1989, the commander of a Berlin Wall border crossing yielded to demands and allowed guards to open the checkpoints. By the end of the day parts of the wall were being chipped off as souvenirs. In this episode, Helena Merriman takes us through the surprise overnight building of the wall which cut neighbourhoods, streets and families in half. She then takes us through the many methods of escape attempted by East Berliners. In particular, we are introduced to Joachim Rudolph who, very unusually, tunnelled back to the East after his escape in order to help others. Helena is the award-winning creator of the acclaimed BBC Radio 4 podcast, Tunnel 29, and the author of a book of the same title.© GeorgeLouis See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour: Fred Yaniga, Hans von Spakovsky, & Lorraine Murphy

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


TOPICS: The fall of the Berlin Wall, OUR BROKEN ELECTIONS, and French novelist Honoré de Balzac Host Scot Bertram talks with Fred Yaniga, Chairman and Associate Professor of German at Hillsdale College, who was in Germany when the Berlin Wall began to fall in 1989. Hans von Spakovsky, Senior Legal Fellow with the Heritage Foundation, […]

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour
Fred Yaniga, Hans von Spakovsky, & Lorraine Murphy

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 47:02


TOPICS: The fall of the Berlin Wall, OUR BROKEN ELECTIONS, and French novelist Honoré de Balzac Host Scot Bertram talks with Fred Yaniga, Chairman and Associate Professor of German at Hillsdale College, who was in Germany when the Berlin Wall began to fall in 1989. Hans von Spakovsky, Senior Legal Fellow with the Heritage Foundation, discusses the new book he co-authored, OUR BROKEN ELECTIONS: HOW THE LEFT CHANGED THE WAY YOU VOTE. And Lorraine Murphy, Associate Professor of English at Hillsdale, continues her occasional series on novels in the Realist tradition by introducing us to the French writer Honoré de Balzac.

Verbal Diorama
GoldenEye

Verbal Diorama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 41:29


You know the name. You know the number. He has a licence to kill, he likes his vodka martinis shaken, not stirred. He's a sexist misogynist dinosaur, a relic of the Cold War.... And then, along came GoldenEye. Propelling James Bond into the post-Cold War, post-fall of the Soviet Union and the Berlin Wall, and a technologically advanced 1995. It had been six years since the previous Timothy Dalton Bond, and Pierce Brosnan's interpretation feels worlds, and decades, away from Dalton's. GoldenEye was the first James Bond movie to not take reference from any of Ian Fleming's original novels or short stories, however instead is a direct homage to Fleming himself, and his work during the Second World War. This was the millennial's Bond, and while Pierce Brosnan's career as Bond didn't quite land the way this movie took off, Brosnan would create the template for a more modern James Bond going forward and leave a lasting legacy in the franchise that has so far remained unmatched. Not to mention, that N64 game is cracking! For England! I would love to hear your thoughts on GoldenEye! GET IN TOUCH.... Twitter https://twitter.com/verbaldiorama (@verbaldiorama) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/verbaldiorama (@verbaldiorama) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/verbaldiorama (@verbaldiorama) Letterboxd https://www.facebook.com/verbaldiorama (@verbaldiorama) Email verbaldiorama [at] gmail [dot] com Website https://my.captivate.fm/verbaldiorama.com (verbaldiorama.com) SUPPORT VERBAL DIORAMA.... Leave a 5-star rating/review: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/verbal-diorama/id1453296967 (Apple Podcasts) or https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/verbal-diorama-803268 (Podchaser) Join the Patreon: https://verbaldiorama.com/patreon (https://verbaldiorama.com/patreon) Thank you to all the patrons Simon E, Sade, Jardiel, Claudia, Simon B, Laurel, Derek, Jason, Kristin, Cat, Andy, Mike, Griff, Luke, Emily, Michael, Scott, Mark, Brendan, Ian, Lisa, Sam, Will, Jack and brand-new patron Dave! Buy Merch! https://verbaldiorama.com/merch (https://verbaldiorama.com/merch) Tees, mugs, hoodies and totes are available! EPISODE THANKS TO.... Most excellent patrons: Andy and Mike from Geek Salad for their Patron thoughts. You can find them @geeksaladradio on Twitter Derek from The Midnight Myth for his Patron thoughts. You can find him @TheMidnightMyth on Twitter Griff from The Paul and Griff Show for his Patron thoughts. You can find him @paulngriffshow on Twitter Subscribe, follow and listen to Geek Salad, The Midnight Myth and The Paul and Griff Show in your podcast app of choice! And also to Patron Brendan for his thoughts! Twitter peeps @thatfkingguy @ShoottheFlick @Oral_mfc @SpyHards @ItsAMusicalPod @TheCinemaGuys @NikolisKitchen @alatereviewer @GorillaBrainPod @LaunchingTPilot @willf86 Instagram folk None this time Facebook chums Erik Theme Music: Verbal Diorama Theme Song Music by Chloe Enticott - https://www.facebook.com/watch/Compositionsbychloe/ (Compositions by Chloe ) Lyrics by Chloe Enticott (and me!) Production by Ellis Powell-Bevan of Ewenique Studio Support this podcast

The John Batchelor Show
1814: Does Putin's Moscow rule Scholz's Berlin? H. J. Mackinder. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 14:01


Photo:  East German construction workers building the Berlin Wall, 20 November 1961. @Batchelorshow Does Putin's Moscow rule Scholz's Berlin?  H. J. Mackinder. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.ft.com/content/097438c1-c0c0-4e6b-993a-9c502f05cf83

B&H Photography Podcast
Riff on the Caption– A Conversation with Photographer Lester Sloan and Aisha Sabatini Sloan

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 69:45


We were expecting this episode to be a great one and it did not disappoint.  The B&H Photography Podcast team welcomes photographer Lester Sloan and his daughter, author Aisha Sabatini Sloan, to discuss their new book, Captioning the Archive: A Conversation in Photographs and Text.  The book is a conversation about photography and photojournalism, but more a conversation between father and daughter, one that had been taking place for years, for a lifetime, and finally put to print.     Selecting images from his long career as a Newsweek staff photographer, as well as his personal projects dating back to 1960's Detroit, Sloan and Sabatini Sloan provide extensive “captions” to these images, offering not only details about past events but personal reflections from both of their perspectives. The book is also an intensive contextualization of the images with the benefit of hindsight and of insight. Backstories from a life in photojournalism, of photos of Nelson Mandela, of David Hockney, of Steven Spielberg, of political turmoil and day-to-day assignments, and the right questions posed to fill in the deeper meaning around a photo taken.   “I took pictures of everything that happened.” – Lester Sloan   Unfortunately, in the weeks before we recorded this episode, Sloan's archive of original slides and negatives was damaged in a flood.  The damage to some of his most important originals is extensive and a Kickstarter campaign has been established in an attempt to repair, restore, and digitize the collection. Please consider donating. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lester Sloan began his photography career as a cameraman for the CBS affiliate in Detroit, then worked as a staff photographer in Newsweek magazine for twenty-five years, documenting the 1967 uprising in Detroit, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the OJ Simpson trial. Lester was a contributing essayist with NPR's “Weekend Edition” the recipient of the prestigious Neiman Fellowship and was the on-set photographer for Spike Lee's 1996 film, Get on the Bus. Aisha Sabatini Sloan is a writer whose work has appeared in anthologies such as Dear America, Truth to Power, and The Paris Review. Her 2017 book, Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, was chosen as the winner of the “1913 Open Prose Contest”, she is the recipient of a 2020 National Endowment for the Arts Award and this year she received the National Magazine Award for her essays in the Paris Review.   Guests: Lester Sloan and Aisha Sabatini Sloan Photograph © Lester Sloan

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1757: Hyperinflation, John Hyre, Death of SDIRA Retirement Plans Part 2

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 47:42


It's part 2 of our interview with John Hyre, a tax attorney sounding the alarm on what the law makers are doing to control YOUR retirement funds, covertly slipping in legislation that will affect your SDIRAs, IRAs, ROTHs, 401ks etc. The Democratic House is looking to gut self-directed retirement accounts (especially IRAs, possibly 401(k)s and Solo 401(k)s), and they are attempting to do it very quietly and very quickly. You can stand by and do nothing…and pay the price, literally. Or you can fight. To protect your retirement (or the funds that feed your business if you raise money from SDIRAs/401(k)s), you will need to fight promptly and loudly. Procrastinators are useless in this fight. On “how to fight it” visit the sites listed below. Key Takeaways: [1:41] The World is a Small Place [4:30] Florida Housing Market [6:30] The English Language is a Thief [8:36] Dead Poets Society [9:20] The Dollar as a Language [9:48] Packaged Commodities Investing [13:25] A Leftist's Inflation Warning Under Biden  [14:40] What is Hyperinflation [21:07] Creating Wealth Virtual Event [22:22] Tell Your Story to Legislature [23:17] Tips for Jason's Investors [26:13] The J-Lo Benefit [27:42] C-Corp, S-Corp, LLC, Property Management, Rentals, [38:50] The Augusta Rule [42:05] Ken McElroy and the Collective   Tweetables: Geography is less meaningful than it's ever been in human history. Jason Hartman A government that is broke becomes predatory on it's citizens. Jason Hartman The government is trying to force you off of Main Street into Wall Street. John Hyre They're building a Berlin Wall out of paper backed by guns. They don't care if you leave; but your money needs to stay. John Hyre You don't want the tax tail to wag the economic dog. John Hyre   Websites: HandsOffMyIRA.com TaxReductionClass.com TaxReductionLawyer.com TheCollectiveMastermind.com   The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect  What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com  Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization    

Dan Snow's History Hit
Tank Standoff at Checkpoint Charlie

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 24:58


For 16 hours between the 27 to 28 October 1961, the world held its breath as Soviet and US tanks faced each other down at Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin and came very close to turning the Cold War hot. However, one of the most dramatic and dangerous showdowns of the cold war has been largely overshadowed by the Cuban Missile Crisis a year later which saw the two superpowers go head to head once more. To discuss how it was that tanks came to be deployed ready for battle at one of the most sensitive locations along the Iron Curtain Dan is joined by Iain MacGregor, author of Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, the Berlin Wall and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth. Iain and Dan discuss how the confrontation was brought about by a trip to the opera, the political miscalculations that led the world to the brink of war and how the crisis was averted. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1756: John Hyre, Death of SDIRA Retirement Plans, Peter Thiel, Worldwide Housing Bubble Part 1

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 41:35


In today's episode, we have John Hyre, a tax attorney sounding the alarm on what the law makers are doing to control YOUR retirement funds, covertly slipping in legislation that will affect your SDIRAs, IRAs, ROTHs, 401ks etc. You need to take action before it's too late.  The Democratic House is looking to gut self-directed retirement accounts (especially IRAs, possibly 401(k)s and Solo 401(k)s), and they are attempting to do it very quietly and very quickly. You can stand by and do nothing…and pay the price, literally. Or you can fight. To protect your retirement (or the funds that feed your business if you raise money from SDIRAs/401(k)s), you will need to fight promptly and loudly. Procrastinators are useless in this fight. On “how to fight it” visit the sites listed below. Key Takeaways: [1:30] Homes sold BEFORE built  [4:12] The World Housing Bubbles [6:20] A Brief Intro on our Guest [7:54] Housing Bubble Risk on VisualCapitalist.com [10:45] Rollercoasters, the Perfect Housing Metaphor [12:30] The Collective- an Invitation [14:14] Introducing John Hyre [15:02] The Tax Practice [16:16] Why Should We Be Concerned About this New Tax legislation [18:01] If It Passes, What Will Happen? [21:28] HandsOffMyIRA.com [25:28] Building a Berlin Wall Out of Paper [26:43] What You Can Do [27:35] Strategies Moving Forward [30:50] Sample Deal [32:51] What Peter Thiel did [33:44] The Broader Economic Impact [36:01] Ken McElroy Invites You to the Collective Mastermind   Tweetables: A government that is broke becomes predatory on it's citizens. Jason Hartman The government is trying to force you off of Main Street into Wall Street. John Hyre They're building a Berlin Wall out of paper backed by guns. They don't care if you leave; but your money needs to stay. John Hyre You don't want the tax tail to wag the economic dog. John Hyre   Websites: HandsOffMyIRA.com TaxReductionClass.com TaxReductionLawyer.com VisualCapitalist.com TheCollectiveMastermind.com   The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect  What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com  Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization    

Car Talk
#2138: Thirty Four Years of Listener Retaliation

Car Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 55:00


This week, Car Talk's month long 34th Anniversary Celebration/Apology continues, with an all-listener request show. We've got the Bosnian Vowel Drop, Arup Gupta, the original Melissa Peterson letter, Death Valley Dinesh, and the circumferentially challenged Daniel Pinkwater reading highlights from the BMW owner's manual. Also, Dana needs help removing a chunk of the Berlin Wall from a friend's trunk, and Christy decides it's time to 'fess up to her Dad about destroying his car 15 years ago. All this and more, on The Best of Car Talk.