Podcasts about Genji

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Best podcasts about Genji

Latest podcast episodes about Genji

Second Shot City
C://Otherscape _Playtest

Second Shot City

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 113:04


Enjoy this non-canon (???) playthrough of a new TTRPG produced by Son of Oak, the guys who made City of Mist. We go through the Tokyo Otherscape Playtest. Nick Lekenosakas plays Unagi the eel girl, Ariya plays Wilson the gun oni and Kelly Berry plays Genji, the mystic detective. We'll be starting Case 5 October 9th.

History Made Beautiful
183: What Happened Behind Lady Murasaki's Tale Of Genji? Discovering the Secret Lives and Times of 11th Century Heian Japan

History Made Beautiful

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 21:18


Lady Murasaki's Tale of Genji is one of the most celebrated novels in Japanese history. The story follows the life of Hikaru Genji, a child of nobility born into ancient Japan's Heian Period. It was written by a woman known only as Murasaki Shikibu, who lived during this tumultuous time and recorded the customs and details of court life. This episode is also available as a blog post: http://martinifisher.com/2022/09/06/what-happened-behind-lady-murasakis-tale-of-genji-discovering-the-secret-lives-and-times-of-11th-century-heian-japan/

Line Cook Thoughts
Episode 170: From Extern To Executive Chef with Katie Reicher

Line Cook Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 33:25


Today on the show I interview Katie Reicher. As Executive Chef of the legendary Greens Restaurant in San Francisco, Katie creates comforting, seasonal, and inspired cuisine served in a welcoming environment that makes every guest feel like family. This approach extends to her kitchen staff as well, where each member feels valued, both as an individual and as part of the team, in an environment that is inclusive and rewarding. Since childhood, Katie has been influenced by the culinary traditions from both sides of her large and extended family. Born and raised in New York's Rockland County, Katie enjoyed Sunday dinners at the home of her Italian American paternal grandmother surrounded by family, friends and copious amounts of delicious, heart-warming food. Through her maternal family's Ukrainian side, the philosophy of food-as- comfort was embraced by her mother Nadine who, in addition to being an accomplished cook in her own right, is an avid gardener, beekeeper, and raises hens for their eggs. Throughout her childhood, Katie and her mom explored the magic of seasonal foods, learning how to bring nature's bounty into everyday meals and traditional holidays, as well as those special moments where food plays such an essential and celebratory role. As an accomplished athlete and academic student, Katie began her college career at Cornell University majoring in nutrition, but soon realized that she wanted to take a more hands-on approach with food. She enrolled in the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, NY and, as part of that program, had the opportunity to apply for an externship at Greens Restaurant in San Francisco. Through this program, Katie was able to work directly with Executive Chef Annie Sommerville (whose tenure ran from 1981 to 2018). This experience gave her first-hand knowledge of the philosophy and approach that has made Greens Restaurant the legendary food destination that it remains today. Upon graduation from CIA in 2016, Katie returned to Greens, working her way through multiple positions before eventually being named Executive Chef in 2020, continuing the rich legacy of female culinary leaders. Katie continues to move the art of vegetarian cuisine forward, incorporating traditional methods while letting the seasons guide her, and by sourcing the best possible products from local artisans and farms such as Green Gulch. Inspired by the restaurant's rich heritage along with her own vision for the limitless potential of vegetarian cuisine, Katie says it best: “My hope is that our guests leave Greens feeling nourished—physically, spiritually, and emotionally.” While not at Greens, Katie enjoys her life in the Bay area with partner Jesse and beloved cat Genji. And underneath her white chef's jacket, you'll find a beautiful tattoo of the snap peas and nasturtiums inspired by her mother's garden, with Meyer lemons and a hummingbird symbolizing her love for the California seasons and the magical bounty it holds. Check out the restaurant's website at https://greensrestaurant.com/about/ Check out the blog at linecookthoughts.com

The Unfinished Print
Matthew Willie Garcia - Printmaker: Future Nostalgia

The Unfinished Print

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 82:19


Matthew Willie Garcia is an incredibly promising mokuhanga printmaker. Having only, relatively recently, begun his mokuhanga journey, Matthew has already travelled to Japan to participate in MI Lab, and is about to have his first solo mokuhanga show at COOP Gallery in Nashville, Tennessee.  On this episode of The Unfinished Print I speak with mokuhanga printmaker, Matthew Willie Garcia, about his mokuhanga journey, his technique,  and learning new ways of printing. Matthew speaks on the concept of queer mokuhanga, the generosity of the mokuhanga community, and we discuss his other forays in printmaking, compared to his mokuhanga work.  This episode was recorded before Matthew headed off to Japan to participate in the advanced MI Lab workshop in June of 2022. Please stay tuned until after the end credits for my bonus conversation with Matthew about his time at MI Lab.  Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own mokuhanga work on Instagram @andrezadoroznyprints Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com  Artists works follow after the note about them. Notes: may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase. Artists works follow after their note about them. Matthew Willie Garcia - website, Instagram Yoonmi Nam (b. 1974) - is a contemporary mokuhanga printmaker, lithographer, sculptor, and teacher, based in Lawrence, Kansas. Her work can be found, here. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. Jazz (2017) Meiji Era Prints - The Meiji Era of Japan was between 1868-1912 CE. This was a period of immense modernization and industrialization in Japan, where the Japanese economy was booming. New ideas within mokuhanga was occurring as well. Perspective, colour, through new pigments (gamboge, certain yellows), the advancement of photography, and new topics and themes (war, industry, architecture), the Meiji era print designer and publisher had a lot of choice when producing their prints.  Kansas University - founded in 1866 and is the state's flagship University. More info, here. They have a fine printmaking department as taught by Yoonmi Nam, Shawn Bitters, and Michael J. Kreuger. This department focuses on screen printing, lithography, and relief printing. Shawn Bitters - is a printmaker, painter, draftsperson, and photographer. He is Associate Professor, and Undergraduate Director at Kansas University.  Leftward (2007) Michael J. Kreuger - is a printmaker, ceramicist, painter, and animator. He is a Professor at Kansas University.  Two Moons on The River from the series Nondoing (2016) Lawrence Arts Center - is an arts space founded in 1975 in Lawrence, Kansas. More info, here.  Awagami Bamboo Select - is a heavy washi paper (170g), used in printmaking, letterpress, amongst other mediums. It can be purchased by Awagami Factory in Japan, here.  Pansion paper - is a medium-heavy, between 89-95g, paper used in printmaking.  Rives-BFK (Blanchet Frères & Kiebler) - is a type of paper made of 100% cotton, which comes in a variety of colours and weights.  Richard Steiner - is a mokuhanga printmaker who has been making prints for over fifty years. He has lived and worked in Kyōto, Japan since 1980. He is currently still making work. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Nine Left, One Thanked (2017) Rebecca Salter - is the President of The Royal Academy of Arts, in London, England. She is also an artist who has written two books about Japanese woodblock printing, Japanese Woodblock Printing (2001), and Japanese Popular Prints (2006). She worked with the Satō Woodblock Print Workshop, documenting their process. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  riff (2021) David Bull - is a Canadian woodblock printmaker, and educator who lives and works in Japan. His love of mokuhanga has almost singlehandedly promoted the art form outside Japan. His company, Mokuhankan, has a brick and mortar store in Asakusa, Tōkyō, and online, here.  bokashi -  is a Japanese term associated with the gradation of water into ink. There are several types of bokashi. For more information regarding these types of bokashi please check out Professor Claire Cuccio's lecture called “A Story in Layers,” for the Library of Congress, and the book Japanese Printmaking by Tōshi Yoshida, and Rei Yuki. Below are the following types of bokashi. This is from the Yoshida book: ichimonji bokashi - straight line gradation ichimonji mura bokashi - straight line gradation with an uneven edg. Ō-bokashi - a gradual shading over a wide area atenashi bokashi - gradation without definition futairo bokashi - two tone gradation Marvel Comics - is an American comic book publisher founded in 1961. Famous for Spider-Man, Wolverine, and the X-Men.  Jack Kirby (1917-1994) - was an artist and comic book innovator who focused on narrative in his work. More info can be found at the Kirby Museum, here.  from The Eternals (1976) Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) - was an American Pop artist, who worked in New York City. His early work was based on comic books, and later developed into abstract and the melding of different types of Western artistic genres such as Cubism, and Futurism. More info on Lichtenstein's work can be found, here, at the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation.  serigraphy - is another word for the art of silk screen printing. Silk screen printing can be in on various materials, silk, canvas, paper.  reduction printmaking - is a process in printmaking where the printmaker cuts away on a piece of wood, or linoleum. After every carving, the printmaker makes an impression with pigments, beginning with lighter colours, gradually using darker colours. William H. Mays has a fine description of reduction on his website, here.  Cameron Bailey - is a mokuhanga printmaker based in Queens, New York. He works predominantly in the reduction method. His interview with the Unfinished Print can be found, here.   Paul Binnie (b. 1967) - is a Scottish born, mokuhanga printmaker, painter, and portraitist, based in San Diego, California. Paul's theme's in all of his mediums are of landscapes, beautiful men and women, as well as the kabuki theatre. You can find more information about his work, here, and on his Instagram, here.  Romanticism - was a Western art movement in the 1800's focusing on imagination and emotion. Coming after the Enlightenment, a period of order and morality, Romanticism focused on the power of nature, and the chaos of the world. More info can be found at the MET, here.   mudabori - is a technique in mokuhanga where the printmaker carves away unwanted wood in their key block during the colour separation process when planning their work. Power Grip - made by Mikisyo, Japan, Power Grip are wood carving tools of various types. Usually used by beginners, but are used by woodblock printmakers of all levels. masa paper - is a machine-made Japanese washi. Can be used in printmaking and is 100% sulphite pulp.  codex - is a type of book binding in the Western method and is a precursor to the modern book.  Japanese book-binding - in Japan the binding of books began with scroll books based on the Chinese method. Other binding methods evolved over time, such as flutter books (sempūyō) and butterfly books (detchōsō). By the Edo Period (1603-1868) and with the relative peace of the period, paper began to be produced at a steady rate creating a demand for books. Tale of Genji. and Tales of Ise were published for the very first time in this form. * Jon Lee - is a mokuhanga printmaker and tool maker based in Arizona. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  LO912 (2009) Gotō Hidehiko (b.1953) - is a mokuhanga printmaker and tool maker based in Japan. He makes and teaches seminars about the construction of the mokuhanga tool, the baren.  Nothingness (Kyomu) [2010] Chihiro Taki (b. 1988) - is a mokuhanga printmaker who lives and works in Japan. She helps to teach students at MI Lab as an instructor.  とばり - Shroud of Night  Michiko Hamada - is a mokuhanga printmaker based in Japan. She is an instructor at MI Lab. Her Instagram can be found, here.  AB and K ball-bearing baren - is a type of baren used in mokuhanga. It is considered an alternative to the traditional hon baren which is made of a bamboo sheathe, and cord. The ball-bearing baren is made up of plastic, metal, and ball-bearing balls of various types.  Bumpōdō - is an art store based in Tōkyō, Japan, and founded in 1887. The website can be found here, in Japanese. The English pdf, can be found, here.  Lucy May Schofield - is a British printmaker who works in mokuhanga, book binding, byōbu (screens), kakemono (scrolls). Her work has been shown all over the world. Her website can be found, here. Her Instagram, here.  The Mokuhanga Sisters - are a mokuhanga collective consisting of Yoonmi Nam, Mariko Jesse, Lucy May Schofield, Melissa Schulenberg, Kate MacDonagh, Katie Baldwin, Mia-O, Patty Hudak, and Natasha Norman. Instagram CfSHE Gallery - is a gallery located in Chiyoda, Tōkyō. It is associated with MI Lab. More info, here. Their Instagram can be found, here. MI Lab - is a mokuhanga residency located in Kawaguchi-ko, near Mount Fuji. More info can be found, here.  * Ikegami, Kojiro, and Barbara B. Stephan. Japanese Book Binding: Instructions from a Master Craftsman. New York etc.: Weatherhill, 1990. © Popular Wheat Productions opening and closing musical credit -Life is What You Make It,  by Diamon D from his newest record, The Rear View. (2022) logo designed and produced by Douglas Batchelor and André Zadorozny  Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podcast without shooting me an email and getting my express written or verbal consent. I'm friendly :) Слава Україну If you find any issue with something in the show notes please let me know. ***The opinions expressed by guests in The Unfinished Print podcast are not necessarily those of André Zadorozny and of Popular Wheat Productions.***  

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Book House & Book Clubs (September)

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 10:21


What do books about social justice and pandemics, plus banned books and historical works, have in common? As Cheryl McKeon of the Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza explains, these are all choices of one book club or another. Clubs read everything from "big fat books" (800+ pages) to collections of short stories. Books mentioned: "White Fragility"; "Just Mercy"; "1619 Project"; "Caste"; "The Racial Healing Handbook"; "The Tale of Genji"; "A Confederacy of Dunces"; "Wish You Were Here"; "Our Country Friends"; "The Boys: A Novel"; and "Fever." Produced by Brea Barthel for Hudson Mohawk Magazine.

Women World Leaders' Podcast
319. Empowering Lives with Purpose, Interview with Christine McDonald

Women World Leaders' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 32:21


Prostitute. Addict. Homeless. Criminal. Today's guest Christine C. MacDonald teaches about what she shares in her book, The Same Kind of Human.   Christine uses stories of her own lived experiences,  scripture, and practical resources to equip and teach people of faith how to serve others with the love of Jesus. Despite her blindness, Christine see's "who" the person is and loves them "where" they are as Jesus did. She helps us to see the humanity of those we often judge or shun with arms of love and a message of hope.   **** Kimberly Hobbs   Welcome to Empowering Lives with Purpose and I'm your host, Kimberly Hobbs. I am the founder of Women World Leaders. We are so glad that you joined in with us today and I would love to welcome our guest Christine McDonald. welcome Christine. Where are you from? Christine McDonald   Hi, Kimberly. It's thanks for having me. Um, I am from Oklahoma, but I consider Missouri home. Kimberly Hobbs   Missouri is your home. Okay, but you're from Oklahoma. Yes, great to have you and, and ladies, ha this woman is a bundle of joy. I if as you can see, by her beautiful smile, she is just precious. And we are so thrilled that God allowed us to connect for this purpose today to do this podcast. So it is our desire ladies at empowering lives with purpose to encourage you and empower you to a closer walk with our Savior. And we believe that each of you are a masterpiece. God says in Ephesians 210 that we are God's masterpiece created a new and Christ Jesus to do the very good things that he planned for us long ago. And we believe he has a plan for you. As you're listening today. Just listen and see what God may be speaking to your heart as we get to talk to Christine today and hear a little bit about her story and her life and what she's doing for Jesus. So I want to share a little bit about who Christine MacDonald is. Christine is a beautiful woman of God. She's sold out to serve him wholeheartedly. She was a prostitute addict, homeless and a criminal. And Christine clarity McDonald is a survivor of human trafficking. She is the author of the memoir cry purple, and the book which is now out and you can you can find this book. It's called the same kind of human which we are going to talk about today, which addresses the biases and assumptions that we commonly hold about exploited and marginalized populations. She is She shares her stories of her own life's experiences her scripture and thought provoking commentary and practical resources. And she equips and teaches people of faith, to encourage and serve others and connect them to Jesus with them, seeing who they are, and loving them where they are with the eyes of grace. She helps us see the humanity of those we often judge or Shawn, and Christina empowers us to instead reach out to those people with arms of love and a message of hope. And as you get to hear Christine's heart, you're going to see like how beautiful she truly is to care so much about the individual. So there's a scripture that I always ask God, God gives me something when I do these podcasts that's going to speak to the people. And we said that the title of this podcast is going to be the same kind of human and what does that mean? And Christine is going to expound on that. But the scripture God gave me to talk about was God makes everything beautiful for its own time. And he has planted eternity in the human heart. But even so, people cannot see the whole scope of God's work from beginning to end. That's Ecclesiastes 311. And again, this scripture I felt just so goes with what Christina is going to teach on. But Christine, can you share a little bit about your story which led you today for what you're doing for God's Kingdom glory? Christine McDonald   Sure, it's it's actually God's story not mine. Kimberly Hobbs   Amen. Amen, sister. Right, right. Christine McDonald   I love the Scripture, that's beautiful. Um, so um, I. So we all have a story, right? And that is so amazing and taking our story and using it for His glory. And in you know, I kind of came from a messy past I grew up in the foster care system. I didn't have a father and mother didn't know who that was, you know, I kind of had that hole in my soul, if you will, longing for that. That father figure and that family unit, my mother struggled with mental illness and alcoholism. I was in and out of the foster care system. We moved around a lot. So it wasn't a lot of time for connection relationship. And then at 15, I ended up as a runaway, just 21 different tools 15 different foster care, you know, homes. Yeah. And so I, as a runaway, I have an abandoned house in the middle of winter just thinking as any 18 year old, those of you moms of teenagers know, everybody. Myself included as a kid, I thought I knew everything. And I've been through sexual abuse, you know, I've witnessed domestic violence into a lot of things, but you know, in my 15 years of life, right, and I had been in this abandoned house and a guy befriended me, offered me a place to stay and actually offered me a job, right? I thought my my individual survival skills are better than anything these grown ups got for me. And because you know, 15 and no everything and in that guy gave me a place to stay. He offered me a job, I gave him a fake name. I said I was AC car. I said, I was spacey because every school I went to everywhere Stacy was like that popular pretty girl. Everything I wasn't car because I was picked up in a car and I was fifth Catering and I couldn't think of anything better. Wow. And I said I was 19 I was growing up, right? And I was like, and and so kind of looking for work. And he said, Well, you're in luck. I got you. I'm like what he's like yeah, he's like, I own this business. I have the help wanted in the newspaper. You know? Yeah, I'll give you a job. I've been paying you cash for a couple of days for you make a covenant. And if you hate it that's a lost you have a few bucks in your pocket and I'll drop you back off for a pink jet. I'm like, okay, sure... Kimberly Hobbs   oh, boy, Christine McDonald   I was selling flowers and hockey tongs and and in the neighborhood and trinkets and things in, in adult entertainment, like strip clubs. Go Go Back then it was go go. You know, go go dancing was the thing because homos girl I'm old. Wow. And what he did is what we would call the grooming process. He befriended me. He gave me a place to stay. I had to catch my packet. I would go in and do this. And he didn't ask me any questions. And no, this was so much safer than anything I had experienced. He wasn't put his hands on me. You know, there was no violence. There was no sexual abuse. He wasn't trying to be sexual. There was none of that right. But what he ended up doing was selling me to a guy that yeah, for $2,500 he sold me to the man that owned those adult entertainment centers $2,500 I was sold. And then I was sold in the back rooms. That night, the exchange of the $2,500 medi had to test the goods the guy that he sold me to to test the goods the goods of course for me. Um, so we would call that breaking me in so the first guy would have been what we would call a groomer. The second person did what we call breaking them breaking new egg, right? The segregation, the humiliation, the violence, the fear, all of that. And I spent then they would, they were selling me in and out of the backroom, to these gentlemen clubs in Oklahoma City, Coffeyville, Kansas, and Tulsa, Oklahoma. And I was introduced into drugs. And in that drugs actually became like that coping mechanism, right, it became the thing I would do because I knew what they were fixing to do. And then it became the thing I would do after because I didn't have to think about what it just happened. All that minutia, I became a full blown addict. And eventually at 17, I was escorted off property at gunpoint. I mean, I had nobody to call I was wasn't even allowed to go the bathroom. I mean, what do you do? And I was escorted off property at gunpoint, didn't even know what city I was in. And I said, if we ever see you again, we'll kill you. Again. When I was escorted off the property. I'm walking down the street guy pulls up and says, hey, you need a lift. I said, I don't know where I'm going. And he's like, Well, I'm heading to Iowa. Like, I don't know about Iowa. He's like, Well, I'll stop in Kansas City to gas up and grab dinner. It's the halfway point. I said, Kansas City that's like Chicago. Can I go? And I did. I wrote all the way to Kansas City. I was about a five hour drive. I got off in Kansas City in downtown in the middle. He dropped me off in the heart of downtown where the games prostitution and the pimps and drug there's all of this mess is going on around me like oh my gosh, and I had basically been held captive for two and a half years and may made a decision on my own in two and a half years. Wow. Really traumatic and overwhelming. I didn't know what to do. I tried to get into the shelter. I didn't have an ID, right. I didn't know how to do these processes again. I mean, this was such a culture shock for me. They told me I had to come back at a certain time. And while I'm standing, these people are all around me. And all these things have guys like, hey, blondie. You don't look like you belong here. He's like, can I give you a list somewhere? And I'm like, I don't know where I'm going. And he's like, Girl, you're not safe down here. Let me let me help you out. Right? Why not know was he was a pimp. And that he would I would spend the next 17 years being bought and sold. Yeah. And then I finally, you know, got Brandon that there was a lot of arrest, a lot of violence, just a whole lot of things. Yeah. So that that was kind of my pathway. Until the last day I was on the streets when I almost took a life at gunpoint, and I said, I can't do this, I can't be a monster. And I know I have the capacity and me. I don't care if he finds me and kills me. I will not be responsible for taking her life. And that that started my pathway out. So that that was my freedom gate is what I call it. So wow, wow. Kimberly Hobbs   Oh, my goodness, like it's a little bit even much to take in listening to all that in a short amount of time. It's it's could be overwhelming and you lived it. Christine, you lived that life. And and I know the audience because we didn't even mention it yet. But Christine is blind. Christine, can you talk about that portion of your life as well? Christine McDonald   Yeah, that's actually where I found my faith. Right. So now I'm tell us about that, please. Yes. So my faith, and this is where God pierced my heart for my calling is like, it's funny. Everybody tells me I'll tell us a story about us. And I'm not there was a pivotal moment in my life that God utilizes to catapult my faith and to teach me how the body of Christ operates. Right. And so I've been out for a couple years, and I met a guy. And we were I had not really had had a really tainted understanding of Jesus. And God, I had pastors that had paid for me, right, I had gone to churches that said, you can't eat unless, unless you, you know, accept Jesus Christ as your Lord and Savior, and you're gonna burn in hell. And I just heard all these awful things. It was so Genji, if so, and I am the quarter that my pimp had me work, there were three churches, and he would make all these things right. And not once if any of these people have faith, right? They're supposed to be the good guys you think, come to my rescue or intervene, you know, you know, and so like, like, I have to say that the whole Jesus people that didn't feel so great set so well with me because of a lot of experiences I talked about. And same kind of human. And then I got pregnant, there were some complications in that pregnancy. And I was forced to choose between the life of my unborn child and my own eyesight, I went blind, in three days, wow, there was medication that would have saved my eyesight, and the inflammation in my brain that was causing the blindness, but it would have taken the life of my unborn child and, and I chose my baby. And when my baby was old, I had to have both of my eyes medically removed to so that's really where my faith really, really like that transformational piece, right? We can go to church and we can like, get into some Bible study and memorize some scripture, but that's not the same as having that moment where you are truly transformed by the Spirit. And this is where that part of my journey started. I had been going to church I'd been going to Bible study and I was Piven and go into church I was listening and learning right. And yet I had yet had that spiritual awakening that transformation until that blindness happened. Kimberly Hobbs   Wow, wow. Christine. And so your faith was solidified through that time because your walk began your trust and your your reliance on Jesus truly took form right and not not visible with what your eyes could see but the trust of what you could not see. And that's incredible. And so then, I am just amazed again, I I've been able to talk to Christine on on the side a lot which is beautiful. But Christine, you you develop this passion of serving God and your heart became pierced for people. And you wanted to understand people and love them in their humaneness and love them to Jesus. Right. So why why was that such a passion for you? Because you were on the other side of it. Right? Right knew what it was like and people were not.  Okay, so tell us about that. Tell us about that. Unknown Speaker   I remember my first started going to church to people would be like, Oh, she's like, dress like a prostitute. You can't do that. But I hadn't accepted Christ yet. Right? I had not yet. I was coming to church, and I was speaking, I was showing up but people were just like, really? judgy. And I dealt with a lot of that. Well, I was a prosecutor. I've been a prostitute for 21 years. So better God, I couldn't pierce my heart to do differently if he wasn't in my heart yet. So I was seeking and so they were pushing me away, right? And I was trying to find my place but yet I still have that yearning and that drawing and I felt odd and I was trying to learn I had been through the things well, you can't have a sandwich unless you accept Jesus in your heart and I think well, so you want me to lie to you and tell you I believe something I don't even understand. So I can have a sandwich Well, that's like asking me to commit perjury right. To in order to get food I want to get this he met the human needs in the moment right he'll blabber he met these people in those moments with in their mess, right. And those humanities were met a little off the bat God, Jesus. Um, but in that there was that spiritual transformation. And so how do we how do I use my experiences where I've gone to church, and they're talking about purity in the women's Bible study and purity events and things like that, and I'm like, Hold on, I was trafficked. I mean, I was sexually abused that at at eight, you know, um, how do how does somebody like me find period? Right? And because I did not yet have that biblical foundational understanding. And so thank you. Well, but the conversations were things that people like me would feel are unobtainable. I'm never going to Mass Spec patients, right. And so what do you do you go find another church, because you're still sick. And right. So I thought, Well, gosh, after I wrote my book, cried purple, which is for people that have experienced substance use disorders, people that have been in prison, people that have done these things, so they can have hope. God really pierced my heart. Well, you know, the Bible really tells us why Jesus example you know, he was hanging out with the leper who was hanging out with the prostitutes. He was finding equity for the homeless, right making sure hey, man, how do we use I don't know what the Bible tells us. It Real Life practical application. Kimberly Hobbs   And so can I can I say right here I was so moved Christine. When you told me how you put that into action? Yeah, reaching people where they were when you sat on that curb next to a prostitute can you share with the audience about how you did that you just because of where you were you were able to meet someone where they were and love them to Jesus?  Christine McDonald   Yeah so um, samples of things that I give in same kind of human when I come into churches are go to organizations and facilitate trainings with real life practical application is I too, I walk my walk, I don't just teach people how to do this and love like Jesus and break our own biases and help us on thread those so that they keep us from seeing these vulnerable people. But I live that out in my everyday life, man. One day, there was this gal and I heard her cry in from my apartment, and I'm like, open my door. Now. Like I said, I'm totally blind. But guys, when I hear somebody sobbing, and I go outside of my colo, is there somebody out there? And I still hear a cry. And so I just start walking towards the sound. I got my little cane. And I'm like, Can I sit here and she's like, you don't want to sit here. I'm a prostitute. And I'm like, I think it'll be okay darlin. And so I sit there and I'm like, What's your name? And she says, doesn't matter. You don't have to tell me right? Um, and I said, are you hungry? And I ran up and I grabbed some stuff out of my fridge and put some stuff together for to keep coke go bags handy because I can teach people and equip people to serve these people. But I've got to practice what I preach, if you will. So I live that out too, in my day to day, so I give her this food and I sit back down and at a car comes and she's like, I don't want to go and I'm like, It's okay. And she's like, she's like, so why are you here? And I said, well, there was a time If I worked this corner that I was paid for, that I was beaten up on this corner and cars passed me, I was hungry and I was cold. For years I've been arrested on this corner, I've been through some stuff on these corners. And nobody saw me. And nobody intervened. I was invisible my pain, all my longing for that rescuer. And I made a commitment to my heart to make sure that people can feel seen. And so that's why I teach people how to people. By my commitment, God pierced my heart and equip me to help people see those people in their own communities. And then how do you connect with people that their trust has been violated in so many ways? And how do you reach those people that are a little more challenging? Kimberly Hobbs   Oh, my goodness, exactly. And that, that same girl, you were able to develop a relationship because you invested time, Christine, you took time to know who she was, as God sees her? And not just try to push your agenda on her? Right? Yes. And that's what we have to learn, ladies says that. There, everybody's busy and you God provides moments in time for us to reach people where they are. And this is the beauty of Christine's life. That this is what she does now is she has the ability to teach people to love people where they are, and not just judge them or shun them for what they're doing. Christine McDonald   Right? Kimberly Hobbs   Exactly. Because they don't even know right? Oh my gosh, oh my gosh. So we all have so much busyness going on in our lives. So we need to look around at people and be still long enough to see them as God sees them and be wise to their surroundings and their life. You know, like you, you told me when you were a prostitute, you know, and, and you got into this truck and, and some guy was trying to push a tract on you and tell you about Jesus. But you're like, wait a minute, wait a minute, unless you give me money, I'm gonna be in big trouble. I gotta get out of here. And instead of being sensitive, he drove off pushing his agenda on you not hearing Christine McDonald   And I got beat you with broken bones, right?  Kimberly Hobbs   You got beat up for it when you got out of that truck without money to give to your pimp. And that man cause a lot of pain in your life. Of course, you were turned off to Jesus at that point, like how could this guy be so insensitive, right. But this is what this whole podcast is about ladies and why Christine is investing her time to be here today is to share. We have to take moments to look at the life that we are talking to about Jesus. God is not a God of disorder, but of peace. As an all the meetings of God's holy people. So ladies, right, we have to bring our life into order and look in the moment that God has put us in at the heart that he has put in front of us to share Jesus with. So So Christine, how do you teach people to be honorable to other people? Christine McDonald   Well, I think we have to examine our own motives. Sometimes we do it for our own hearts to feel good. Okay, that of the person that we're serving. And we feel like well, if I bring them to Jesus, that's a win for me. Well, you can't bring somebody I mean, we can even go on to to the psychology behind this, the people that have been impacted by trauma people that have this whole messy mess. Number one, we can't decide when they feel safe. And we can start building that trust relationship. So consistency and being okay, being a safe plan or what you might not see the reward. Look, we are supposed to surrender and submit. And that means that we become selfless. And that means that we're not doing this for our own rewards. And I see it happen a lot. Wait. So ask yourself, why are you doing this? This isn't because it makes you feel bad because you did something good for somebody? Are you really doing it to draw people into God's kingdom, right? It has to be that motivation. And that may mean you're just that seed cleaner to change the way if that guy would have just said, Hey, here's here's a track and I stuck it in my back pocket. He kept on going. Who knows? I might have read it one day. Amen. Right? He wanted to like, I want you to be saved, and I need you to do this. And that was all about his own agenda, right? Yeah, yeah. Yeah. And so when we can, we have these moments of time and you gotta be okay, like I use this analogy, like, a blind girl is going to try to get sighted people on analogy. Litter. If you have one little piece of glitter in the floor, you're not going to see it. But if there's several little pieces of glitter and the light shines on that shiny thing on the universe, oh, it's just a little pile of glitter. You can be okay. So think of your state planning as like are building that little bit of hope. Right? And, and build on that instead of looking for your own Marisa and and I've learned, you know I've been I've been I've been speaking and doing these kinds of things since about 2007 teaching people how to do effective outreach today to find new churches and communities, what's going to be the best population that you guys are really led to be in, and it's practical in your community, that's a need. But I've been you know, when we do this, I've been doing this for a really long time. But I think so often what I see is you have to examine your own heart and your own motive. I have seen people start up programs, and they'll ask me to come in and consult with them and how to strengthen how to do better because people aren't saying, I don't like you're making them sign a statement of faith in order to have a place to eat and sleep for the next 30 days. Oh, Kimberly Hobbs   my gosh, right.  Christine McDonald   a Bible study for six hours a day. And they don't even know who this is, you're asking to sign a statement of fact about for you to give him a place. Kimberly Hobbs   Christine, Christine, I have to read this verse again, that I read as we started off, because it's so appropriate here. God makes everything beautiful for its own time, he has planted eternity in the in the human heart. But even so people cannot see the whole scope of God's word from beginning to end. So again, we Christine McDonald   So again we love them like Jesus by giving him that bed. And those meals, and inviting them to church have been learn about God, big enough to be God and their heart on their own. You don't need say, in order for us to help you for the next six months, you sign the statement of faith, right, except Jesus in your heart and will take care of your ex. facilitate a safe space and being good people will take care of their humanity. Create the space for God to God. Kimberly Hobbs   Hey, man, let God be God. Right. God may be using you ladies to do his work. So he's put this life or person in front of you and their their life might be different than Christine's we don't know what their life is. But let God do the work. And you just love them. And you just spent the time and put them and serve be a servant. And have a servant's heart. And that takes time. It doesn't just happen quickly, right? People? You're exactly right. Yeah. So we have to wrap it up, Christine. And I just want to share with the ladies though that there is unbelievable, Christine. She teaches she's a she teaches at churches, she speaks all over and you can reach Christine and Christine dot cry purple@gmail.com. She has her books available the same kind of human. She also has cried purple. She loves to speak at churches and events. She also has a movie out. And you tell them about the movie. Christine, like this is so exciting. Christine McDonald   I have a docu drama. So I called it a documentary. And I was corrected as Tokyo drama. And so it's all about trafficking and the intersection between pornography, and how that fuels sexual exploitation. It has snapshots of my story and some of my work and ministry. So but it really gives us a call to action. So it's in a festival run won a bunch of awards. It's so exciting. It'll be available this spring. But if you go to Christie speaks ministry, or if you find me on YouTube, or our Facebook, you know, you can kind of follow that journey and what is inspired from this whole thing, which I'm excited to start showing in churches and having conversations in communities is it's it's we've been, you know, we're in conversations now about like, a full episodic series that really like walks through the different chapters of my life. Wow, wow. It's just crazy. Kimberly Hobbs   So it is not out yet. It'll be out in the spring. It will. Okay, so fantastic. So ladies, please look for that. And look Christina up on her website. So you have that so when the movie does come out, you can watch it but you know, I heard Christine speak at the faith and Film Festival in Orlando, Florida. She spoke there and shared and it she was just such you can hear her heart just pour out to people and I just again, if you have any wants or inclination to bring Christine to your church or to call on her, please please go to her website again. She's also available on YouTube at Christine speaks ministry. Her website is Christine's beaks ministry.com or.org There's so many places you could find her and also, Christine C. McDonald on Facebook. I just want them to find you, Christine because what you're doing for God's Kingdom you are busy, busy, busy at work, and you could have taken all the adversity thrown your way and had a pity party the rest of your life because my gosh, or life, but God right, but God, and so you are an inspiration, my sister, I am so grateful that you came on. And I know that you would just reach out to anybody who tried to reach out to you. So thank you, thank you for being a guest today. We love you and appreciate you, Christine, and what you're doing for God's kingdom. You're beautiful. And, ladies, we are so grateful that you tuned in today. And this is what we do at women, world leaders. We empower women with purpose to walk in their beautiful plan that God has just for them. Remember, ladies, you're a masterpiece you're created anew in Christ Jesus, to do the things that he planned for you Long, long ago. So think about that. Pray with Jesus, and take those opportunities of that precious life that he puts in your path, to share His love with others and get to know them where they are. So as we close out our podcast today, remember that we have tools for you at women, we're leaders, we have books. We have podcasts available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday teaching podcasts we have encouraging podcasts, and we just want you to be part of all of it. So from his heart to yours, we are women world leaders. All content is copyrighted and cannot be used without expressed written consent. God bless you all and have a beautiful day.    

台日Hot什麼?哈!
傑尼斯傳奇!光GENJI & 男鬥呼組

台日Hot什麼?哈!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 20:50


#感謝聽眾朋友們投稿! 1987/8/19 #光GENJI 出道 1988/8/24 #男鬥呼組 出道 像是歷史人物一樣,每年都在大型音樂節目上、跨年曲目上能聽到前輩的歌曲,光GENJI和男鬥呼組到底是什麼樣的存在?被稱為「最後的超級偶像」,又有哪些歌曲令人驚豔?今晚和我們一起認識兩組大前輩! ✨本集選歌 ✨

Crónicas Lunares
Murasaki Shikibu - La historia de Genji

Crónicas Lunares

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 3:53


Cuéntame un libro. 1. Las mil y una noches 2. La historia de Genji --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/irving-sun/message

The History of Literature
427 Bashō's Best - Haiku and the Essence of Life

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 89:01


In our last episode, Jacke looked at the life of celebrated Japanese poet Matsuo Bashō (1644-1694), the widely acknowledged master of haiku. In this episode, Jacke looks deeper into the nature of Bashō's best works, organizing them into some loose categories and offering some thoughts on haiku in Bashō's world and ours. Additional listening suggestions: 425 Matsuo Bashō, Haiku's Greatest Master 75 The Tale of Genji by Lady Murasaki 418 "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Michael & Ethan In A Room With Scotch - Tapestry Radio Network
Special: Ethan Flirts with The Tale of Genji

Michael & Ethan In A Room With Scotch - Tapestry Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 57:58


An Ethan-only special episode (sorry) in which Ethan gives us just a taster of the massive medieval Japanese novel The Tale of Genji, by Murasaki Shikibu, and makes his case that a Japanese woman may have written the first “true” novel.Next time Michael and Ethan will begin discussion of our next Mongo Book: Gargantua and Pantagruel, by Francois Rabelais. Join the discussion! Go to the Contact page and put "Scotch Talk" in the Subject line. We'd love to hear from you! And submit your homework at the Michael & Ethan in a Room with Scotch page. Donate to our Patreon! BUY A NIHILIST BLANKET! Your Hosts: Michael G. Lilienthal (@mglilienthal) and Ethan Bartlett (@bjartlett) MUSIC & SFX: "Kessy Swings Endless - (ID 349)" by Lobo Loco. Used by permission. "The Grim Reaper - II Presto" by Aitua. Used under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License. "Thinking It Over" by Lee Rosevere. Used under an Attribution License.

The Unfinished Print
Rebecca Salter - Printmaker: Skilled Unknowing

The Unfinished Print

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 56:32


On this episode of The Unfinished Print it is with honour, and great pleasure that I am able to present to you, my interview, with British  artist Rebecca Salter. We speak on her mokuhanga, her own work and work produced together with the Satō woodblock workshop in Kyōto. We discuss where Rebecca believes mokuhanga has gone since writing her book, Japanese Woodblock Printing (2001), a book which constantly inspires me in my own work. This book helps me to understand, what has felt at times to be such an esoteric and complicated art form, just a little bit more.  Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own mokuhanga work on Instagram @andrezadoroznyprints Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com Notes: may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase. Rebecca Salter - website, interviews with Royal Academy, 1 and 2. University of West England - once called Bristol Polytechnic, is a public research University located in Bristol, England. British Museum - is a public museum, located in London, England, and is focused on human history, arts and culture. It was established in 1753.  Kyoto City University of Arts - is a public university of the arts located in Kyōto, Japan, and was established in 1880. lithography - is a printing process which requires a stone or aluminum plate, and was invented in the 18th Century. More info, here from the Tate.  screen printing - also called, serigraphy, is a method of printing by using stencils and forcing the ink through a screen onto paper, or other fabric. More info, here. Akira Kurosaki 黒崎彰 (1937-2019) - one of the most influential woodblock print artists of the modern era. His work, while seemingly abstract, moved people with its vibrant colour and powerful composition. He was a teacher and invented the “Disc Baren,” which is a great baren to begin your mokuhanga journey with. At the 2021 Mokuhanga Conference in Nara, Japan there was a tribute exhibit of his life works. Azusa Gallery has a nice selection of his work, here. intaglio printmaking - is a style of printmaking, the opposite of relief printmaking, where scratches are made with a burin on the plate (copper, zinc, aluminum) and then dipped in acid. Ink and pigment is rubbed on with a brayer, brushes, etc. More info can be found, here.    scrolls - called kakemono 掛物 or emakimono 絵巻物  in Japanese. These scrolls contain many different types of themes and subjects. More info can be found, here. monoprint - is a print made from a re-printable block, such as wood, or an etched plate. It is usually a one and done type of printing with only one print being made. blue and white Japanese ceramics - are ceramics made for the Japanese market. Originally imported into Japan in the 17th Century from China, local Japanese ceramists from northern and southern Japan began locally producing ceramics. As trading with the Dutch escalated more porcelain wares were being imported from Europe into the Japanese port of Imari. Imari became the word to describe these types of blue and white ceramics.  Genji Monogatari emaki - is an elaborate scroll produced in 12th Century, Japan. It is based on the famous Tale of Genji, a tale written in the 11th Century and is attributed to Murasaki Shikibu (around 973-1014). You can find images of this scroll, here.  Edo Culture - the Edo Period of Japan (1603-1868) was a period of peace and prosperity for the Japanese military government, or bakufu. Led by the Tokugawa family, Edo period culture flourished in theatre, literature, and the arts. For a fantastic book on the subject please seek out, Edo Culture: Daily Life and Diversions of Urban Japan by Kazuo Nishiyama (trans. Gerald Groemer) and Edo Kabuki in Transition: From the Worlds of the Samurai to the Vengeful Ghost by Satoko Shimazaki.  Edo v. Kyōto Kabuki - kabuki theatre is a bombastic and powerful theatre from Japan. In its long history it has been generally attributed to both  Edo (Tōkyō) and Kyōto.  Edo kabuki is called aragoto kabuki and Kyōto kabuki is called wagoto kabuki. Aragoto kabuki is generally very loud and external, whereas Kyōto kabuki is more understated and gentle.  Satō woodblock workshop - is a traditional Japanese woodblock production house based in Kyōto, Japan. Here is an article from The Journal of Modern Craft with Rebecca Salter regarding this workshop.  Japanese woodblock of the 1950's and 1960's - post-war Japan was growing at an exponential rate, and this was true for the Japanese woodblock print. As the sōsaku-hanga movement began to out last the shin-hanga of the 1920's in terms of production, where most people could produce prints on their own,  American scholars , Oliver Statler (1915-2000), and James Michener (1907-1997), helped catalogue and document the burgeoning Japanese woodblock print movement through their books, The Floating World (1954), by Michener, and Modern Japanese Prints: An Art Reborn (1956) by Statler, for a Western audience. Along with the Western art scene and the 1951 São Paulo Art Biennial, Japanese woodblock prints began to be respected as a stand alone piece of fine art.  kozo paper -  is paper made from mulberry bark and is commonly used in woodblock printmaking, and cloth.  Echizen, Fukui - is a city located tin the prefecture of Fukui. The paper produced from this region is kozo, mitsumata, and gampi.  More information can be found from the website of Echizen Washi Village. Mosquito net technique - is a technique in ukiyo-e, and can of course be reproduced by the modern mokuhanga practitioner, where very fine lines are carved on two wood blocks and, when printed together, create the image of slight, thin netting. Rebecca Salter details this technique in her book, Japanese Woodblock Printing (2001)   Yale Center for British Art - located in New Haven, Connecticut, the YCBA is dedicated to British art of all types.  Louise Caan - is a British architect and teacher based in Oxford where she teaches architecture at the Oxford Brookes School of Architecture.  urushi zuri - is a technique which is used in traditional Japanese woodblock and mokuhanga, where pigment is mixed with nikawa (animal glue), and printed to enhance the enjoyment of the print. Usually seen in black hair, or garments represented in the print.  Japanese museums dedicated to Japanese woodblock -  if you are visiting Japan and are interested in the Japanese woodblock print you are spoiled for choice. This list is definitely not complete so I would advise doing some research for local museums which may be open in different parts of Japan you may be visiting. This list is a mix of museums dedicated specifically to the woodblock print, or museums dedicated to woodblock print artisans.  Finally, check online for larger art museums , galleries, and department stores, in the area that you're visiting to see whether they are having any shows dedicated to woodblock print artists, genres, etc. while you're there. I've added hyper-links. The Japan Ukiyo-e Museum  - Matsumoto, Nagano Sumida Hokusai Museum - Ryogoku, Tōkyō Ōta Memorial Museum of Art -  Harajukiu/Omotesando, Tōkyō Tokaidō Hiroshige Museum - Shizuoka City, Shizuoka Hokusai Museum - Obuse, Nagano Kamigata Ukiyo-e Museum -  Ōsaka CIty, Ōsaka Nakagawa Batō Hiroshige Museum - Nakagawa, Tōchigi Kawanabe Kyōsai Museum - Warabi, Saitama Naoko Matsubara - is a Japanese/Canadian contemporary artist, and sculptor, who lives and works in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.  She has focused much of her artistic life on making mokuhanga and has gained critical acclaim for it. My interview with Naoko Matsubara can be found, here.  Katsutoshi Yuasa - is a Japanese contemporary artist, and sculptor, who works predominantly in mokuhanga. He has  produced an incredible mount of work. My interview with Katsu can be found, here.  Brook Andrew - is an Australian contemporary artist who has shown internationally.  Ukiyo-e Censorship - the military Tokugawa government (bakufu) was not happy about being criticized. Ukiyo-e prints often lampooned authority with their imagery. Other artistic pursuits in Japan at the time, such as kabuki theatre, did the same. In ukiyo-e and Tokugawa history there were “reforms” which the bakufu created in order to stem this type of criticism. The Ehon Taikōki of 1804, which focused on woodblock prints and poetry, and The Tempo Reforms of 1841/42 that focused on actor prints, the manufacturing of woodblock prints,  and their price, to name just a few reasons.  William Evertson - is an American woodblock printmaker and sculptor based in Connecticut, USA, who's themes focus on the politics and process of The United States.   Annie Bissett - is an American mokuhanga printmaker based in Rhode Island, USA. She explores American life, past and present,  sexuality, and the esoteric through her prints. My interview with Annie Bissett can be found, here.  Paul Binnie - is a Scottish mokuhanga printmaker and painter, based in San Diego, USA. Having lived and worked in Japan in the 1990's, studying at the Yoshida atelier while there, Paul has successfully continued to make mokuhanga and his paintings.  Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition - is a summer exhibition held at the Royal Academy in London, England. It is an open submission, one which started in 1769, showcasing all types of artistic mediums.  余韻 - (yoin) - is a Japanese word which means “lingering memory.” The Lake District - is an area in North West of England which has numerous mountains, lakes, and a National Park. It has been an inspiration for many artists, writers, and actors for years. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  © Popular Wheat Productions opening and closing credit music - Cut/Copy - Rendevous from the album, I Thought of Numbers (2001) logo designed and produced by Douglas Batchelor and André Zadorozny  Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podcast without shooting me an email and getting my express written or verbal consent. I'm friendly :) Слава Україну If you find any issue with something in the show notes please let me know. ***The opinions expressed by guests in The Unfinished Print podcast are not necessarily those of André Zadorozny and of Popular Wheat Productions.***      

Transformations with Jayne
Naming and Claiming Your Space with Michele Fujii

Transformations with Jayne

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 44:44


I love a story of someone finding their way in Japan! Michele Fujii came back to Japan with her husband and found a job, one day realising that although it was a nice job, she really wanted to extend herself and so she started doing just that. If you are wanting to make the most of living in Japan and want to know “how”, then Michele's story might be just what you need to spark some inspiration for you to take control of your life in Japan.  If you enjoyed this episode and it inspired you in some way, we'd love to hear about it and know your biggest takeaway. Take a screenshot of yourself listening to the episode on your device, post it to your Instagram Stories, and tag me, https://www.instagram.com/transformationswithjayne/?hl=ja (@transformationswithjayne)  or https://www.speakpipe.com/TransformationswithJayne (send us a message here.) In this episode you'll hear: How Michele came to be in Japan  The Tale of Genji and how that sparked Michele's journey of self development The surprising thing that happened at work for Michele when she started taking control of her own career What's next for Michele!  Links of things mentioned in this episode: Michele's landing page: https://subscribepage.io/6YOWE1# (https://subscribepage.io/6YOWE1#)   About Michele: Michele holds a master's degree in Japanese Language and Culture from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research areas of interest are transculturation and the internationalization of universities and vocational schools in Japan. She has worked as a freelance translator, a Japanese-language textbook editor in Boston, and an English teacher in Shiga Prefecture with the JET Program from 2010 to 2013. Currently, she promotes the Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) Initiative at Kansai University's Institute for Innovative Global Education, facilitating U.S.-Japan relations between higher education institutions. Connect with Michele: LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/fujiimichele/ ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/fujiimichele/) Medium https://medium.com/@michele-fujii ( https://medium.com/@michele-fujii) Connect with Jayne: PodLaunch with Jayne:https://www.jaynenakata.com/podcastconsulting ( https://www.jaynenakata.com/podcastconsulting) Mentioned in this episode: Join the waitlist for BYO Build Your Own PodLaunch https://transformationswithjayne.captivate.fm/byopodlaunch (BYO Waitlist)

Rated G for Gamers
Saturday Morning Retro Episode 21 - Streets of Rage (Genesis), Tekken 3 (PS1), Chaos Legion (PS2), Genji - Dawn of the Samurai (PS2)

Rated G for Gamers

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 66:44


On this month's episode of Saturday Morning Retro, Dan and Dave talk about Chaos Legion and Genji - Dawn of the Samurai for the PS2. Also, in our Triple R segment, Streets of Rage for the Genesis and Tekken 3 for the PS1.

Un livre, un lecteur
Brigitte Peltier est l'invitée de Florence Berthout

Un livre, un lecteur

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022


Un livre, Un lecteur. Florence Berthout reçoit Brigitte Peltier pour « Criminel... pour quelques haïkus Mémoires de prison d'un haïjin pacifiste (1941-1945) » De Genji Hosoya (traduit par Seegan Mabesoone) aux éditions Pippa À propos du livre : «Criminel... pour quelques haïkus Mémoires de prison d'un haïjin pacifiste (1941-1945) » paru aux éditions Pippa Criminel pour quelques haïkus… est l'autobiographie de Genji Hosoya traduite du japonais par Seegan Mabesoone. Genji est arrêté par la Police Spéciale Tokko le 5 février 1941 pour « soupçons d'opinions subversives » puis est condamné à deux ans de prison ferme. Il passe en tout deux ans et demi incarcéré à Tokyo. Après sa sortie de prison, victime des bombardements aériens sur la capitale en 1945, il décide de partir avec sa famille pour Hokkaido. Trois ans avant sa mort, en 1967, Genji publie ses mémoires sous le titre Doronko ichidai (« Mes années de boue »), dont est tiré le présent texte, Haiku jiken, inédit en français. En publiant cette traduction restée inconnue jusqu'à nos jours, Seegan Mabesoone met en lumière le témoignage poignant d'un pacifiste dont nous pouvons nous inspirer. En ces temps troublés, où les heures tragiques de la Seconde Guerre mondiale se rappellent à notre mémoire, ce texte constitue un témoignage de première main sur la répression des poètes pacifistes au Japon dans les années 1940. Il nous permet de comprendre, de ressentir concrètement les étapes de la fabrication du consentement à la guerre : imposer un pouvoir dictatorial dans toute la société, légitimer l'invasion d'un pays voisin, anéantir toute tentative de résistance pacifiste. On y découvre la vie quotidienne d'un jeune poète de haïku, père de famille dans un quartier populaire de Tokyo, qui se retrouve soudain dans les geôles du pouvoir fasciste, du fait de quelques versets pacifistes. Genji décrit sa vie carcérale, les interrogatoires, les bombardements sur Tokyo, parfois de façon très crue, souvent avec un humour tragi-comique émaillé de haïkus. Un texte essentiel à lire et à relire de part et d'autre de l'Eurasie, du Japon à la France, en passant par l'Europe de l'Est... Seegan Mabesoone.

Collège de France (Histoire)
13 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 70:11


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
13 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 70:11


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
12 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 75:11


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
12 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 75:11


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
11 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 80:25


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
11 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 80:25


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
10 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 68:06


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
10 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 68:06


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
09 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 133:59


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
09 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 133:59


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

A Case For Classics
Episode 86: Wrong Translation!

A Case For Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 17:33


I read the wrong translation! Oh well, we're still going to talk about the woman who wrote this work, The Tale of Genji, and about the time in Japanese history that it represents. Good trivia here!

Collège de France (Histoire)
08 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 73:03


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
08 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 73:03


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
07 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 75:03


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
07 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 75:03


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
06 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 79:45


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
06 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 79:45


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
05 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 66:05


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
05 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 66:05


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
04 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 71:42


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
04 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 71:42


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Her Half of History
6.2 Murasaki Shikibu and the World's First (Great) Novel

Her Half of History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 18:35


The Tale of Genji is often listed as the world's first novel. Is it a novel? Is it the first? That's highly contentious, but whatever you decide, Lady Murasaki Shikibu wrote this classic a very long time ago. See sources and more details on the website.

Collège de France (Histoire)
03 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 70:50


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
03 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 70:50


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Books on Asia
Liza Dalby on Geisha, Kimonos, and Translating Setouchi Jakucho's "Places"

Books on Asia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 32:46


In this episode of the Books on Asia Podcast, sponsored by Stone Bridge Press, host Amy Chavez talks with anthropologist, shamisen player, author, and translator Liza Dalby about her books and her new translation of the recently deceased novelist cum Buddhist nun Jakuchō Setouchi's memoir "Places."Liza is author of the Geisha, Kimono: Fashioning Culture, East Wind Melts the Ice: A Guide to Serenity Through the Seasons, and  Hidden Buddhas: A Novel of Karma and Chaos. Her previous translations include Little Songs of Geisha: Traditional Japanese Ko-Uta.Amy and Liza talk about Liza's long career writing about Japan, starting with Geisha and how that world of women changed along with the modernization of Japanese society, why the geisha survive today, and the meaning of the word "kimono." They also discuss different kinds of kimono, the difference between the yukata (often called a "summer kimono") and a robe. Liza lets us in on the controversy behind the original cover of Tale of Murasaki and how and why she convinced the publisher to change it to the current one.They also talk about the controversies behind Setouchi Jakuchō, how Liza came to translate her autobiography, and how she missed a chance to talk to Jakuchō during a visit to Kyōto.Lastly, Liza reveals her  favorite books on Japan:The Tale of Genji, by Murasaki ShikibuRobin Gill's translations of haikuthe woodblock prints of Yoshi Toshi and the late John Stevenson's booksVisit Liza Dalby's website.The Books on Asia Podcast is sponsored by Stone Bridge Press. Check out their books on Japan at the publisher's website.

Collège de France (Histoire)
02 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 61:33


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
02 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 61:33


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
01 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 71:42


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

Collège de France (Histoire)
01 - Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 71:42


Jean-Noël Robert Collège de France Philologie de la civilisation japonaise Année 2021-2022 Le départ du bouddhisme : le tournant anti-bouddhique de la pensée d'Edo Docteur d'État, directeur d'études à l'EPHE, membre de l'Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Jean-Noël Robert a d'abord étudié l'histoire de la pensée bouddhique au Japon. Ses travaux ont surtout concerné les doctrines de l'école Tendai, fondée sur le Sutra du Lotus, dont il a traduit la version chinoise, les débats doctrinaux et l'histoire de l'assimilation de la pensée bouddhique au Japon à travers la poésie classique et l'évolution linguistique. Dans le prolongement de cette enquête langagière sino-japonaise, il étudie cette année l'une des œuvres non encore traduites du grand romancier Ihara Saikaku (XVIIe siècle) sous l'éclairage croisé du Roman du Genji et de l'influence bouddhique, particulièrement sensible dans ce livre.

A History of Japan
Selections from The Tale of Genji

A History of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 29:51 Transcription Available


It's one thing to learn about The Tale of Genji, but in this episode I am reading it to you! Join Genji Hikaru as he seeks out new lovers, deals with being sick, and then sadly is made to endure a staggering loss.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/AHistoryOfJapan)

New Books in Women's History
Machiko Ōgimachi, "In the Shelter of the Pine: A Memoir of Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu and Tokugawa Japan" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Women's History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 33:49


In the early eighteenth century, the noblewoman Ōgimachi Machiko composed a memoir of Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu, the powerful samurai for whom she had served as a concubine for twenty years. Machiko assisted Yoshiyasu in his ascent to the rank of chief adjutant to the Tokugawa shogun. She kept him in good graces with the imperial court, enabled him to study poetry with aristocratic teachers and have his compositions read by the retired emperor, and gave birth to two of his sons. Writing after Yoshiyasu's retirement, she recalled it all—from the glittering formal visits of the shogun and his entourage to the passage of the seasons as seen from her apartments in the Yanagisawa mansion. In the Shelter of the Pine is the most significant work of literature by a woman of Japan's early modern era. Featuring Machiko's keen eye for detail, strong narrative voice, and polished prose studded with allusions to Chinese and Japanese classics, this memoir sheds light on everything from the social world of the Tokugawa elite to the role of literature in women's lives. Machiko modeled her story on The Tale of Genji, illustrating how the eleventh-century classic continued to inspire its female readers and provide them with the means to make sense of their experiences. Elegant, poetic, and revealing, In the Shelter of the Pine is a vivid portrait of a distant world and a vital addition to the canon of Japanese literature available in English. Jingyi Li is a PhD Candidate in Japanese History at the University of Arizona. She researches about early modern Japan, literati, and commercial publishing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Off the Page: A Columbia University Press Podcast
Machiko Ōgimachi, "In the Shelter of the Pine: A Memoir of Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu and Tokugawa Japan" (Columbia UP, 2021)

Off the Page: A Columbia University Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 33:49


In the early eighteenth century, the noblewoman Ōgimachi Machiko composed a memoir of Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu, the powerful samurai for whom she had served as a concubine for twenty years. Machiko assisted Yoshiyasu in his ascent to the rank of chief adjutant to the Tokugawa shogun. She kept him in good graces with the imperial court, enabled him to study poetry with aristocratic teachers and have his compositions read by the retired emperor, and gave birth to two of his sons. Writing after Yoshiyasu's retirement, she recalled it all—from the glittering formal visits of the shogun and his entourage to the passage of the seasons as seen from her apartments in the Yanagisawa mansion. In the Shelter of the Pine is the most significant work of literature by a woman of Japan's early modern era. Featuring Machiko's keen eye for detail, strong narrative voice, and polished prose studded with allusions to Chinese and Japanese classics, this memoir sheds light on everything from the social world of the Tokugawa elite to the role of literature in women's lives. Machiko modeled her story on The Tale of Genji, illustrating how the eleventh-century classic continued to inspire its female readers and provide them with the means to make sense of their experiences. Elegant, poetic, and revealing, In the Shelter of the Pine is a vivid portrait of a distant world and a vital addition to the canon of Japanese literature available in English. Jingyi Li is a PhD Candidate in Japanese History at the University of Arizona. She researches about early modern Japan, literati, and commercial publishing.

New Books in Early Modern History
Machiko Ōgimachi, "In the Shelter of the Pine: A Memoir of Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu and Tokugawa Japan" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 33:49


In the early eighteenth century, the noblewoman Ōgimachi Machiko composed a memoir of Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu, the powerful samurai for whom she had served as a concubine for twenty years. Machiko assisted Yoshiyasu in his ascent to the rank of chief adjutant to the Tokugawa shogun. She kept him in good graces with the imperial court, enabled him to study poetry with aristocratic teachers and have his compositions read by the retired emperor, and gave birth to two of his sons. Writing after Yoshiyasu's retirement, she recalled it all—from the glittering formal visits of the shogun and his entourage to the passage of the seasons as seen from her apartments in the Yanagisawa mansion. In the Shelter of the Pine is the most significant work of literature by a woman of Japan's early modern era. Featuring Machiko's keen eye for detail, strong narrative voice, and polished prose studded with allusions to Chinese and Japanese classics, this memoir sheds light on everything from the social world of the Tokugawa elite to the role of literature in women's lives. Machiko modeled her story on The Tale of Genji, illustrating how the eleventh-century classic continued to inspire its female readers and provide them with the means to make sense of their experiences. Elegant, poetic, and revealing, In the Shelter of the Pine is a vivid portrait of a distant world and a vital addition to the canon of Japanese literature available in English. Jingyi Li is a PhD Candidate in Japanese History at the University of Arizona. She researches about early modern Japan, literati, and commercial publishing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History of Japan
The First Novel

A History of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:58 Transcription Available


We set court politics aside in this episode to explore the life and work of Murasaki Shikibu, the eleventh-century lady-in-waiting who penned a work which is considered by many scholars to be the world's first novel: The Tale of Genji.For artistic renditions of Murasaki Shikibut and Sei Shonagon, check out the supplemental post!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/AHistoryOfJapan)

Read Japanese Literature
The Tale of Genji

Read Japanese Literature

Play Episode Play 35 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:48 Transcription Available


The world's oldest novel. A hero who is a paragon of beauty with an extreme Oedipus complex.(CW: sex, rape, incest, pedophilia.)

The Avatar Hour Podcast
43. 'The Legend of Genji' - Interviewing the Creators!

The Avatar Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 74:14


**SPOILERS FOR AVATAR: THE LAST AIRBENDER, THE LEGEND OF KORRA, AND THE RISE OF KYOSHI* Happy Pride Month, dear listeners! This week, we sat down with Macky, Juan, and Dray to talk about their highly anticipated fan-made web comic, The Legend of Genji. Listen as we deep dive into the story, what the process of developing a web comic is like, and what makes The Legend of Genji so special. Visit their website to learn more about the world of Genji at www.legendofgenji.com and follow them on their social media! Facebook: The Legend of Genji Twitter: @LegendofGenji Instagram: @legendofgenjiofficial Subscribe to our Patreon for exclusive bonus content at patreon.com/theavatarhourpodcast Follow us on social media to stay up to date on new episodes! Facebook: The Avatar Hour Podcast (@theavatarhourpodcast) Instagram: @theavatarhourpodcast Twitter: @avatarhour