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StarTalk Radio
Heat Stroke with Bud Cooper and Radley Horton

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 59:35


How do you prevent a heat stroke? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly learn about stopping heat illness deaths and the challenges of increasing heat waves with kinesiologist, Bud Cooper, and climate scientist, Radley Horton.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/heat-stroke-with-bud-cooper-and-radley-horton/Thanks to our Patrons Zammo Taylor, Bill wessale, Korey B Helms, Kevin Browning, and Justin for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: James St. John, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Subtitle
A brief history of death threats

Subtitle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 24:50


Until recently, issuing a death threat required some effort. Today, anyone with a phone or computer can make a threat—or receive one. The result is a “golden age” for the dark realm of personal threats.   Forensic linguist Tanya Karoli Christensen and forensic psychologist Lisa Warren help us trace the history of death threats from eloquently penned letters to casually written social media posts. As the platforms for making threats are changing, so too are the methods for assessing their potency. Music in this episode by Magnus Ringblom, 91nova, Fabien Tell, BLUE STEEL, Peter Sandberg, Amaranth Cove and Andreas Boldt. Illustration by James Gillray (1756-1815) via Wikimedia Commons. Read a transcript of this episode here. Subscribe to Subtitle's newsletter here.

Subtitle
A brief history of death threats

Subtitle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 24:50


Until recently, issuing a death threat required some effort. Today, anyone with a phone or computer can make a threat—or receive one. The result is a “golden age” for the dark realm of personal threats.   Forensic linguist Tanya Karoli Christensen and forensic psychologist Lisa Warren help us trace the history of death threats from eloquently penned letters to casually written social media posts. As the platforms for making threats are changing, so too are the methods for assessing their potency. Music in this episode by Magnus Ringblom, 91nova, Fabien Tell, BLUE STEEL, Peter Sandberg, Amaranth Cove and Andreas Boldt. Illustration by James Gillray (1756-1815) via Wikimedia Commons. Read a transcript of this episode here. Subscribe to Subtitle's newsletter here.

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – The Biggest Ideas in the Universe with Sean Carroll

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 49:24 Very Popular


How does physics impact our free will? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic Negin Farsad discuss quantum mechanics, parallel universes, and the theory of everything with theoretical physicist and author of The Biggest Ideas in the Universe, Sean Carroll. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons aziz astrophysics, Scott Barnett, Christopher Saal, David Rhoades, and Jenna Biancavilla for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Геральт - geralt / 21281 images on Pixabay site, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

What's Your Forte?
Tyler Shaw Talks Songwriting, Tour Routines and Why Music Ed Matters | What's Your Forte? Ep. 34

What's Your Forte?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 11:30


Today we are incredibly excited to be releasing an interview with Tyler Shaw for the latest episode of What's Your Forte! This week, Tyler chats to Lucas about his tour routines, songwriting process and favourite concerts. Check it out on YouTube and Facebook (link in stories)! Tyler Shaw is a multi-Platinum-selling artist, producer, and actor. The Chinese-Canadian musician from Vancouver released his hit song “Kiss Goodnight” in 2012, quickly hitting Platinum sales. In 2014, Tyler earned a JUNO Award nomination for ‘Breakthrough Artist of the Year' and released certified Platinum track “House of Cards” and Gold “Wicked” from his 2015 debut album Yesterday. Tyler's breakout hit “With You,” from his 2018 sophomore album, Intuition, reached Double Platinum status, and he was nominated for a JUNO Award for ‘Pop Album of the Year' in 2019. Shaw has opened for massive international artists, including Shawn Mendes and Alessia Cara, and toured with Selena Gomez. In 2021, Tyler spearheaded (with Fefe Dobson) the collective artist initiative ArtistsCAN to raise funds for COVID-19 relief in Canada. The pair gathered other musicians from across the country, including Justin Bieber, Michael Bublé and Marie-Mai, to cover the classic single “Lean On Me,” with proceeds going to the Canadian Red Cross COVID relief fund. Tyler's eponymous third studio album was released in 2021 and features the top 10 hit pop single “I See You.” Most recently, Tyler released his viral rendition of GAYLE's No. 1 hit “abcdefu.” “Love You Still” (abcdefu Romantic Version), started as a TikTok duet in late January. To date there are over 4 billion views of videos with the audio on TikTok, 14.5 million streams and more than 1 million videos created using the song. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tyler-Shaw-Photoshoot-Cover.jpg Mwik10, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Grace Anglican Church Gastonia, NC
Falling Upon a Generous God, Luke 16:1-13

Grace Anglican Church Gastonia, NC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022


What did the dishonest steward do that was so commendable? In Father Jeremiah's sermon, he considers just what the steward's shrewdness was about. Was the steward depending upon his own shrewdness and ingenuity? Or was there someone else he was depending upon in the midst of his crisis? Listen now to find out more!Image by: Andrei Mironov, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons. Image location: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%D0%9F%D1%80%D0%B8%D1%82%D1%87%D0%B0_%D0%BE_%D0%BD%D0%B5%D0%B2%D0%B5%D1%80%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%BC_%D1%83%D0%BF%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B2%D0%B8%D1%82%D0%B5%D0%BB%D0%B5._%D0%9A%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%82%D0%B8%D0%BD%D0%B0_XXI_%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%BA%D0%B0..jpg

Data Coffee
66 (S2E24). iOS, Airflow, Doom, and biomedicine

Data Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 64:38


Ведущие подкаста "Data Coffee" обсуждают новости и делятся своими мыслями! Shownotes: 00:00 На презентации apple показали iphone 14 со спут... 20:24 Doom running on dynamic island iphone 14 21:32 Airflow 2.4.0 is coming in mid-septemer 26:23 Airflow extension for visual studio code 28:15 2022 state of workflow orchestration 43:17 Tjournal закрылся после 11 лет работы 44:22 Multi-gpu support for jupyter notebooks 48:24 Настенных роботов превратили в интерактивные по... 49:04 Runway — ai-based video editor 51:58 Искусственный палец научили определять материал... 55:41 Умные очки для незрячих с поддержкой искусствен... 58:20 Для восстановления после ожогов используют рыбь... 1:00:41 Have an old ipad lying around? you might be abl... Обложка - Raymangold22, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons Сайт: https://datacoffee.link, канал в Telegram: https://t.me/datacoffee, профиль в Twitter: https://twitter.com/_DataCoffee_ Чат подкаста, где можно предложить темы для будущих выпусков, а также обсудить эпизоды: https://t.me/datacoffee_chat

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Graham Potter Joins Chelsea | Premier League

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 5:09


Chelsea signed manager Graham Potter from Brighton. Graham Stephen Potter is an English professional football manager and former player who is the current head coach of Premier League club Chelsea. In a 13-year playing career, Potter, who played as a left-back, made 307 appearances in the Football League. Chelsea Football Club is an English professional football club based in Fulham, West London. Founded in 1905, they play their home games at Stamford Bridge. The club competes in the Premier League, the top division of English football. They won their first major honour, the League championship, in 1955. Martin Årseth, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Long before electricity, wind catchers of Persia kept residents cool. Climate-conscious architects are taking notes.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


As a kid, radio producer Sima Ghadirzadeh spent her summers in one of the hottest places on earth — the desert city of Yazd, Iran. “Yazd was always to me this mysterious place that had miraculously escaped the process of modernization,” Ghadirzadeh said. Here, intricate wind-catching towers rise above the alleyways — they're boxy, geometric structures that take in cooler, less dusty air from high above the city and push it down into homes below.  An ab anbar or "water reservoir" with wind catchers (openings near the top of the towers) in the central desert city of Yazd, Iran. Credit: Diego Delso/CC BY-SA 4.0/Wikimedia Commons This 12th-century invention — known as badgir in Persian —  remained a reliable form of air-conditioning for Yazd residents for centuries. And as temperatures continue to rise around the world, this ancient way of staying cool has gained renewed attention for its emissions-free and cost-effective design. Wind catchers don't require electricity or mechanical help to push cold air into a home, just the physical structure of the tower — and the laws of nature. Cold air sinks. Hot air rises. Ghadirzadeh said she can remember as a child standing underneath one in her uncle's living room in Yazd. “Having been outside in the heat, and then suddenly, going inside and being right under the wind catcher and feeling the cool breeze on you, was so mysterious,” Ghadirzadeh said. Temperatures in Yazd can regularly reach 115 degrees Fahrenheit. But somehow, it was bearable, Ghadirzadeh said. She and her cousins spent their days exploring the city's shaded alleyways or in the basement. Evenings were spent on the rooftop under the stars. Mornings, back again in the thick-walled rooms and courtyards.Historians say wind catchers are at least 700 years old. Written records in travelers' diaries and poems reference the unique cooling structures. “From the 13th century, we have references to the wind catcher — by some estimates, they were in use in the 10th and 11th centuries,” said Naser Rabbat, director of the Aga Khan program for Islamic architecture at MIT. Most wind catchers only cooled the air by a few degrees, but the psychological impact was significant, Rabbat said. They soon appeared all over the medieval Muslim world, from the Persian Gulf to the seat of the Mamluk empire in Cairo, where they are called malqaf. In Iran, the wind catcher is a raised tower that usually opens on four sides because there's not a dominant wind direction, Rabat said. The ones in Cairo are “extremely simple in form,” usually with a slanted roof and a screen facing the direction of favorable wind, he added.Over time, wind catchers became symbols of wealth and success, growing increasingly elaborate. Homeowners would install intricate screens to keep out the birds. Water features and courtyard pools could bring the temperature down even more.  “They would even put water jars made out of clay underneath — that would cool the air further,” Rabbat said. “Or, you can put a wet cloth and allow the breeze to filter through, and carry humidity.” Many of the older techniques that kept life comfortable in the Persian Gulf fell out of favor after World War II, said New York and Beirut-based architect Ziad Jamaleddine. The leaders of these countries commissioned European architects to build cities in their image. “Partially demolishing or totally erasing the historic urban and dense fabric,” Jamaleddine said. Those shaded walkways, created by overhanging buildings and angled streets so beloved in historic cities like Yazd, were no longer considered desirable. “What they did is they substituted it with the gridded urban fabric city we are very familiar with today. Which perhaps, made sense in the cold climate of western Europe,” Jamaleddine said. But in a place like Kuwait or Abu Dhabi, mass quantities of cool air are necessary to make this type of urban planning comfortable. Attempts to re-create wind catchers occurred during the oil crisis of the 1970s and 1980s in cities like Doha, where the Qatar University campus incorporates several equally distributed wind towers. But these projects became less common when oil prices returned to normal.  Qatar University campus features new wind catcher design built into the architecture.  Credit: Sky2105, CC BY-SA 3.0/Wikimedia Commons Wind catchers are not easy to replicate without a deep understanding of the landscape and environment, Jamaleddine said. “It's closely related to the way people live, and how they inhabit a space. It can't simply be copied.”  Architects call this the principle of “passive solar design.” Today, air conditioners and fans make up more than 10% of global electricity use, according to the International Energy Agency. The air conditioners are leaking refrigerant into the atmosphere, which acts as a greenhouse gas. And they no longer function when the power goes out — as seen this summer during extreme heat waves across the world. Architect Sue Roaf thinks it's "almost criminal" to build structures that continue to rely on air-conditioning, knowing its impact on the climate. Roaf focuses on climate-adaptive building and chose to build her home using the same principles of ventilation and insulation that she learned while studying the wind catchers of Yazd. Strategically placed windows and thick, cave-like walls keep Roaf's home at a cool 69 degrees Fahrenheit without air-conditioning, even during Britain's historic heat wave this summer.“I have a vertical roof up the center of the house, and there's a roof light that I open up,” Roaf said. “So, you get the stack effect, drawing cooler air or warmer air through the house.”It's a passion project that demonstrates what's possible for building in a warming world. “The old thinking was more romantic – let us learn from the ancients,” Rabbat said. “The new thinking is [that] we have much more calibratable technology. Why don't we use it to harvest much more of the energy we can collect?” For example, mechanical pumps could spray vapor inside, cooling the air the same way the ceramic jugs of water once worked under the wind catchers of Yazd, he said. Today, Yazd is a bustling city full of motorcycles and high-rise buildings. But video editor Mohamed Bandekhoda said he likes the older parts best. “Whenever I'm sad or depressed, I go for a walk in the Old City,” he said. “The breeze in the alleys heals you.” Wind catchers dot the beautiful Yazd skyline, Bandekhoda said, but he's only seen ones that are restored and open for tourists. He's never been inside a home with one in use. “My grandmother's house, for example, has one — but no one knows where to open it,” Bandekhoda said. For now, it remains in wait, ready to inspire the next generation of climate-conscious architects.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Long before electricity, wind catchers of Persia kept residents cool. Climate-conscious architects are taking notes.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


As a kid, radio producer Sima Ghadirzadeh spent her summers in one of the hottest places on earth — the desert city of Yazd, Iran. “Yazd was always to me this mysterious place that had miraculously escaped the process of modernization,” Ghadirzadeh said. Here, intricate wind-catching towers rise above the alleyways — they're boxy, geometric structures that take in cooler, less dusty air from high above the city and push it down into homes below.  An ab anbar or "water reservoir" with wind catchers (openings near the top of the towers) in the central desert city of Yazd, Iran. Credit: Diego Delso/CC BY-SA 4.0/Wikimedia Commons This 12th-century invention — known as badgir in Persian —  remained a reliable form of air-conditioning for Yazd residents for centuries. And as temperatures continue to rise around the world, this ancient way of staying cool has gained renewed attention for its emissions-free and cost-effective design. Wind catchers don't require electricity or mechanical help to push cold air into a home, just the physical structure of the tower — and the laws of nature. Cold air sinks. Hot air rises. Ghadirzadeh said she can remember as a child standing underneath one in her uncle's living room in Yazd. “Having been outside in the heat, and then suddenly, going inside and being right under the wind catcher and feeling the cool breeze on you, was so mysterious,” Ghadirzadeh said. Temperatures in Yazd can regularly reach 115 degrees Fahrenheit. But somehow, it was bearable, Ghadirzadeh said. She and her cousins spent their days exploring the city's shaded alleyways or in the basement. Evenings were spent on the rooftop under the stars. Mornings, back again in the thick-walled rooms and courtyards.Historians say wind catchers are at least 700 years old. Written records in travelers' diaries and poems reference the unique cooling structures. “From the 13th century, we have references to the wind catcher — by some estimates, they were in use in the 10th and 11th centuries,” said Naser Rabbat, director of the Aga Khan program for Islamic architecture at MIT. Most wind catchers only cooled the air by a few degrees, but the psychological impact was significant, Rabbat said. They soon appeared all over the medieval Muslim world, from the Persian Gulf to the seat of the Mamluk empire in Cairo, where they are called malqaf. In Iran, the wind catcher is a raised tower that usually opens on four sides because there's not a dominant wind direction, Rabat said. The ones in Cairo are “extremely simple in form,” usually with a slanted roof and a screen facing the direction of favorable wind, he added.Over time, wind catchers became symbols of wealth and success, growing increasingly elaborate. Homeowners would install intricate screens to keep out the birds. Water features and courtyard pools could bring the temperature down even more.  “They would even put water jars made out of clay underneath — that would cool the air further,” Rabbat said. “Or, you can put a wet cloth and allow the breeze to filter through, and carry humidity.” Many of the older techniques that kept life comfortable in the Persian Gulf fell out of favor after World War II, said New York and Beirut-based architect Ziad Jamaleddine. The leaders of these countries commissioned European architects to build cities in their image. “Partially demolishing or totally erasing the historic urban and dense fabric,” Jamaleddine said. Those shaded walkways, created by overhanging buildings and angled streets so beloved in historic cities like Yazd, were no longer considered desirable. “What they did is they substituted it with the gridded urban fabric city we are very familiar with today. Which perhaps, made sense in the cold climate of western Europe,” Jamaleddine said. But in a place like Kuwait or Abu Dhabi, mass quantities of cool air are necessary to make this type of urban planning comfortable. Attempts to re-create wind catchers occurred during the oil crisis of the 1970s and 1980s in cities like Doha, where the Qatar University campus incorporates several equally distributed wind towers. But these projects became less common when oil prices returned to normal.  Qatar University campus features new wind catcher design built into the architecture.  Credit: Sky2105, CC BY-SA 3.0/Wikimedia Commons Wind catchers are not easy to replicate without a deep understanding of the landscape and environment, Jamaleddine said. “It's closely related to the way people live, and how they inhabit a space. It can't simply be copied.”  Architects call this the principle of “passive solar design.” Today, air conditioners and fans make up more than 10% of global electricity use, according to the International Energy Agency. The air conditioners are leaking refrigerant into the atmosphere, which acts as a greenhouse gas. And they no longer function when the power goes out — as seen this summer during extreme heat waves across the world. Architect Sue Roaf thinks it's "almost criminal" to build structures that continue to rely on air-conditioning, knowing its impact on the climate. Roaf focuses on climate-adaptive building and chose to build her home using the same principles of ventilation and insulation that she learned while studying the wind catchers of Yazd. Strategically placed windows and thick, cave-like walls keep Roaf's home at a cool 69 degrees Fahrenheit without air-conditioning, even during Britain's historic heat wave this summer.“I have a vertical roof up the center of the house, and there's a roof light that I open up,” Roaf said. “So, you get the stack effect, drawing cooler air or warmer air through the house.”It's a passion project that demonstrates what's possible for building in a warming world. “The old thinking was more romantic – let us learn from the ancients,” Rabbat said. “The new thinking is [that] we have much more calibratable technology. Why don't we use it to harvest much more of the energy we can collect?” For example, mechanical pumps could spray vapor inside, cooling the air the same way the ceramic jugs of water once worked under the wind catchers of Yazd, he said. Today, Yazd is a bustling city full of motorcycles and high-rise buildings. But video editor Mohamed Bandekhoda said he likes the older parts best. “Whenever I'm sad or depressed, I go for a walk in the Old City,” he said. “The breeze in the alleys heals you.” Wind catchers dot the beautiful Yazd skyline, Bandekhoda said, but he's only seen ones that are restored and open for tourists. He's never been inside a home with one in use. “My grandmother's house, for example, has one — but no one knows where to open it,” Bandekhoda said. For now, it remains in wait, ready to inspire the next generation of climate-conscious architects.

StarTalk Radio
Satellite Showdown

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 43:09 Very Popular


How do satellites work? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Chuck Nice explore CubeSats, space lasers, and the ecology of low Earth orbit with VP of Raytheon, Sandy Brown, and associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics, Kerri Cahoy. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/satellite-showdown/Photo Credit: NASA, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Drübergehalten – Der Ostfußball­podcast – meinsportpodcast.de
Ringfuchs Wrestling Podcast #113 – Titelregentschaften

Drübergehalten – Der Ostfußball­podcast – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 38:23


Der lange Weg nach der eigentlichen Krönungen: Titelregentschaften klingen auf dem Papier immer ganz selbstverständlich, sind jeodch eine Kunst für sich. Wir untersuchen, wieso! Es gibt vermutlich keinen wichtigeren Moment als den, bei dem der monatelange Herausforderer nach einer langen, beschwerlichen Jagd auf den Titel nach langer Zeit endlich das heißersehnte Gold in Richtung Himmel strecken und sich für den Titelgewinn feiern lassen kann. Doch nach der Krönung folgt mit der Titelregentschaft gleich die nächste Challenge für den großen Champion, denn der Titel will ja bekanntlich auch verteidigt werden. Und das stellt auch den heißesten Act jeder Company vor einige Fragen: Gibt es eine spannende Story zu erzählen? Hält das Publikum auch noch die Treue, wenn der Underdog plötzlich ganz oben angekommen ist? Und ändert sich der Champion vielleicht sogar hier und da charakterlich ein wenig, um seiner neuen Rolle gerecht zu werden? Die Antwort auf all diese und noch weitere Fragen versuchen wir in unserer neuen Folge zum großen Thema Titelregentschaften zu finden! Tretet mit uns in Kontakt bei Facebook und Twitter. Oder kommt auf unseren Discord-Server! Die Musik ist wie immer von den wunderbaren Planetoids Bildquellen: Unknown authorUnknown author, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons_Oskhosk_WI_030808.jpg>Mshake3, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons , CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons Miguel Discart from Bruxelles, Belgique, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons Der Beitrag Ringfuchs Wrestling Podcast #113 Titelregentschaften erschien zuerst auf Der Ringfuchs Wrestling Podcast. Du möchtest deinen Podcast auch kostenlos hosten und damit Geld verdienen? Dann schaue auf www.kostenlos-hosten.de und informiere dich. Dort erhältst du alle Informationen zu unseren kostenlosen Podcast-Hosting-Angeboten.

Grace Anglican Church Gastonia, NC
God's Duty, Our Hope, Luke 15:1-10

Grace Anglican Church Gastonia, NC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


Image: Marble statue of The Good Shepherd carrying a lamb, c. 300-350, from the Catacombs of Domitilla, Vatican Museums, Carole Raddato from FRANKFURT, Germany, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons. Image Location: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Marble_statue_of_The_Good_Shepherd_carrying_a_lamb,_c._300-350,_from_the_Catacombs_of_Domitilla,_Vatican_Museums_(31302117574).jpg

StarTalk Radio
Feet of Engineering with Michael DiTullo and Jason Hanft

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 49:35 Very Popular


Can a shoe design save your life? Neil deGrasse Tyson, Chuck Nice, and Gary O'Reilly explore how engineering can help save the lives– and feet– of thousands with diabetes, with industrial engineer Michael DiTullo and foot and ankle surgeon, Dr. Jason Hanft. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/feet-of-engineering-with-micheal-ditullo-and-jason-hanft/Photo Credit: Mikael Häggström, M.D., CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Southern African vultures subject to poisonings, extinction

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Vultures have a pretty bad reputation as ugly scavenger birds. But by feeding on animal carcasses, they stop the spread of human diseases such as anthrax, tuberculosis and rabies. And that important role is now at risk. Some vultures, such as the white-backed species, are considered critically endangered in southern Africa; they've been listed on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's red list of endangered species since 2015. Vultures in southern Africa are vulnerable to extinction in large part because they are poisoned. The poisoning occurs for various reasons, including the harvesting of their body parts for use in traditional medicine. They may also be killed by farmers or poachers.  The white-backed vulture of southern Africa faces threat of extinction.  Credit: John Haslam/Wikimedia Commons Last month, more than 150 white-backed vultures died in a week in separate incidents in Botswana and South Africa. The vultures in both incidents appear to have been directly targeted for their body parts, according to conservationists.Linda van den Heever, a vulture specialist with Birdlife South Africa, a nongovernmental organization focused on bird conservation, said that the 100-plus vultures that died in South Africa's Kruger National Park were poisoned.A buffalo carcass was “snared and then laced with a highly toxic poison,” she said, adding that the vultures had “their heads and feet removed and in some instances, even their organs.”Poisoning accounts for 60% of vulture mortalities, according to van den Heever. When farmers poison meat to kill predators like jackals and caracals that prey on their livestock, vultures are sometimes unintended victims. But the intentional poisoning of vultures for their body parts is an age-old practice — one that needs to stop, said Fadzai Matsvimbo of Birdlife Zimbabwe. “There is the belief that vultures can enhance contact with the ancestors, look into the future and predict results,” Matsvimbo said. “One can argue that traditional medicine has long been part of African cosmology because it is not a new phenomenon [but] our populations are not what they used to be in the past. We are a growing population, the birds are in decline, it's no longer sustainable for us to be harvesting animal products for traditional medicine.”Van den Heever said that it's most devastating when poachers poison carcasses to kill the vultures that feed on them. They do this because vultures give away the position of a poached animal to authorities by circling overhead.  “Poachers don't want vultures circling over carcasses, so they will poach a large mammal and lace it with poison and that can kill hundreds of vultures."Vultures can also face an early death when they fly into electrical wires and break their bones. They also get electrocuted when they perch on cables and pylons.  A lappet-faced vulture with a broken wing taken in by Victoria Falls Wildlife Trust is now ready to get released back into the wild. Credit: ish Mafundikwa/The World The long reproduction cycle of the white-backed vulture militates against their increase in numbers. They can live up to 20 years, but it takes about eight weeks for an egg to hatch, four months for the fledgling to leave the nest, and seven years to start laying one egg a year. However, there are some signs the white-backed vulture is determined to stick around. In April 2021, Roger Parry of Zimbabwe's Victoria Falls Wildlife Trust, drove around a white-backed vulture nest colony that he has monitored for several years. He said there had been a 16% increase in nests compared to the year before. “It is quite positive, but we need to watch it quite closely,” he said. And in South Africa, van den Heever said there has been an increase in the number of Cape vultures over the years. “Species like the Cape vulture were also declining quite steadily in the last couple of decades, but they seem to be stabilizing,” she said. In the absence of a scientific explanation, she speculated that maybe they have adapted well to human encroachment and livestock farming, or unlike the white-backs, they may be less vulnerable to mass-poisoning incidents.These wins are important, but unless mass deaths like those in Botswana and South Africa are stopped, the future of vultures in southern Africa remains precarious. Laws protect vultures in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe, where killing a vulture can land one in jail for up to three years or a more than $2,000 fine.But enforcing these laws can be elusive.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Southern African vultures subject to poisonings, extinction

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Vultures have a pretty bad reputation as ugly scavenger birds. But by feeding on animal carcasses, they stop the spread of human diseases such as anthrax, tuberculosis and rabies. And that important role is now at risk. Some vultures, such as the white-backed species, are considered critically endangered in southern Africa; they've been listed on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's red list of endangered species since 2015. Vultures in southern Africa are vulnerable to extinction in large part because they are poisoned. The poisoning occurs for various reasons, including the harvesting of their body parts for use in traditional medicine. They may also be killed by farmers or poachers.  The white-backed vulture of southern Africa faces threat of extinction.  Credit: John Haslam/Wikimedia Commons Last month, more than 150 white-backed vultures died in a week in separate incidents in Botswana and South Africa. The vultures in both incidents appear to have been directly targeted for their body parts, according to conservationists.Linda van den Heever, a vulture specialist with Birdlife South Africa, a nongovernmental organization focused on bird conservation, said that the 100-plus vultures that died in South Africa's Kruger National Park were poisoned.A buffalo carcass was “snared and then laced with a highly toxic poison,” she said, adding that the vultures had “their heads and feet removed and in some instances, even their organs.”Poisoning accounts for 60% of vulture mortalities, according to van den Heever. When farmers poison meat to kill predators like jackals and caracals that prey on their livestock, vultures are sometimes unintended victims. But the intentional poisoning of vultures for their body parts is an age-old practice — one that needs to stop, said Fadzai Matsvimbo of Birdlife Zimbabwe. “There is the belief that vultures can enhance contact with the ancestors, look into the future and predict results,” Matsvimbo said. “One can argue that traditional medicine has long been part of African cosmology because it is not a new phenomenon [but] our populations are not what they used to be in the past. We are a growing population, the birds are in decline, it's no longer sustainable for us to be harvesting animal products for traditional medicine.”Van den Heever said that it's most devastating when poachers poison carcasses to kill the vultures that feed on them. They do this because vultures give away the position of a poached animal to authorities by circling overhead.  “Poachers don't want vultures circling over carcasses, so they will poach a large mammal and lace it with poison and that can kill hundreds of vultures."Vultures can also face an early death when they fly into electrical wires and break their bones. They also get electrocuted when they perch on cables and pylons.  A lappet-faced vulture with a broken wing taken in by Victoria Falls Wildlife Trust is now ready to get released back into the wild. Credit: ish Mafundikwa/The World The long reproduction cycle of the white-backed vulture militates against their increase in numbers. They can live up to 20 years, but it takes about eight weeks for an egg to hatch, four months for the fledgling to leave the nest, and seven years to start laying one egg a year. However, there are some signs the white-backed vulture is determined to stick around. In April 2021, Roger Parry of Zimbabwe's Victoria Falls Wildlife Trust, drove around a white-backed vulture nest colony that he has monitored for several years. He said there had been a 16% increase in nests compared to the year before. “It is quite positive, but we need to watch it quite closely,” he said. And in South Africa, van den Heever said there has been an increase in the number of Cape vultures over the years. “Species like the Cape vulture were also declining quite steadily in the last couple of decades, but they seem to be stabilizing,” she said. In the absence of a scientific explanation, she speculated that maybe they have adapted well to human encroachment and livestock farming, or unlike the white-backs, they may be less vulnerable to mass-poisoning incidents.These wins are important, but unless mass deaths like those in Botswana and South Africa are stopped, the future of vultures in southern Africa remains precarious. Laws protect vultures in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe, where killing a vulture can land one in jail for up to three years or a more than $2,000 fine.But enforcing these laws can be elusive.

Weird Studies
Episode 130: Holiday Memories

Weird Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 76:31


In August, 2022, JF and Phil flew to the UK to attend the Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute (DISI) at the University of St. Andrews and the Supernormal Festival in Oxfordshire. In addition to recording two live shows (to be released in the coming weeks), they encountered billiant minds, novel ideas, and arresting works of art that opened new avenues for thought. It's these encounters that anchor this conversation, which branches off to touch ideas such as the elusive ideal of intersciplinarity, Hakim Bey's temporary autonomous zone, the legacy of the 20th-century counterculture, the fate of revolutionary movements, non--human intelligences, and the weirdness of human thought. Header Image by RomitaGirl67 via Wikimedia Commons (https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vintage_Malibu_Barbie_2.jpg#mw-jump-to-license). Listen to volume 1 (https://pierre-yvesmartel.bandcamp.com/album/weird-studies-music-from-the-podcast-vol-1) and volume 2 (https://pierre-yvesmartel.bandcamp.com/album/weird-studies-music-from-the-podcast-vol-2) of the Weird Studies soundtrack by Pierre-Yves Martel (https://www.pymartel.com) Support us on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/weirdstudies) Find us on Discord (https://discord.com/invite/Jw22CHfGwp) Get the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau (https://cottonbureau.com/products/can-o-content#/13435958/tee-men-standard-tee-vintage-black-tri-blend-s)! Get your Weird Studies merchandise (https://www.redbubble.com/people/Weird-Studies/shop?asc=u) (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop (https://bookshop.org/shop/weirdstudies) References Dial M for Musicology, Interdisciplinarity (https://dialmformusicology.wordpress.com/2015/06/28/disciplinarity/) Hakim Bey, The Temporary Autonomous Zone (https://bookshop.org/books/t-a-z-the-temporary-autonomous-zone-ontological-anarchy-poetic-terrorism/9781570271519) Entitled Opinions Podcast (https://entitledopinions.stanford.edu/episodes) William Gibson, Foreword to Samuel Delaney's Dhalgren (https://bookshop.org/books/dhalgren/9780375706684) DISI Podcast, Many Minds (https://disi.org/manyminds/) John Krakauer (https://www.santafe.edu/people/profile/john-krakauer), professor of nuerology and neuroscience Hunter S. Thompson (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter_S._Thompson), American journalist The Great Ape Dictionary (https://greatapedictionary.ac.uk/), specific database used by Cat Hobaiter (https://zenodo.org/record/5600472#.Yxe3NOzMK_L)

StarTalk Radio
Things You Thought You Knew - Big Bang Dilemma

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 37:31 Very Popular


Are we rethinking the Big Bang? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore features of the James Webb Space Telescope, magnetism and how the aurora borealis works, and if the Big Bang is being debunked. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/things-you-thought-you-knew-big-bang-dilemma/Photo Credit: United States Air Force photo by Senior Airman Joshua Strang, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Unsung History
Agatha Christie

Unsung History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 42:56


Agatha Christie is the best-selling novelist of all time, whose books have been outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. You can probably name several of her books and recurring characters, but how much do you know about Agatha Christie herself? In our final British History episode, we look at Agatha Christie's life, in the hospital dispensary, at home with her daughter, abroad on archeological digs, and behind the typewriter. Joining me in this episode to help us learn more about Agatha Christie is historian Dr. Lucy Worsley, OBE, Chief Curator at Historic Royal Palaces and BBC presenter and author of the new book, Agatha Christie: An Elusive Woman, which will be published in the United States on September 6, 2022. Our theme song is Frogs Legs Rag, composed by James Scott and performed by Kevin MacLeod, licensed under Creative Commons. The episode image is Agatha Christie as a young woman, circa 1910. It is in the public domain and available via Wikimedia Commons. The audio interlude is “Mystery Waltz,” written by Raymond Scott and performed by Raymond Scott and His Orchestra in 1953. The audio is in the public domain and available via Archive.org. Additional Sources: AgathaChristie.com: The home of Agatha Christie “A Very British Murder with Lucy Worsley,” BBC Select TV Mini Series, 2013. “When the World's Most Famous Mystery Writer Vanished,” by Tina Jordan, The New York Times, June 11, 2019. “The Essential Agatha Christie,” by Tina Jordan, The New York Times, October 25, 2020.  “Why Agatha Christie is even more awesome than you thought,” by Margaret Sessa-Hawkins, PBS NewsHouse, September 15, 2015. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Committing High Reason
Ben Gurion's Betrayal of American Jewry: The Jacob Blaustein Story

Committing High Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 30:29


At this week's gala WZO 125th Anniversary soiree in Basel, Switzerland, Israel's "Minister of Diaspora Affairs" made mentioned a "deal" between Ben Gurion and Jacob Blaustein regarding the relationship between American Jewry and Israel. He called for a renewed such "agreement" to be made today. But the way the story was described is fiction. American Jews complained to Ben Gurion that Israel was putting American Jews in danger. Ben Gurion promised to change Israel's presentation of itself as the Jewish state, but he betrayed his promise, as did Zionist leaders, repeatedly. In this podcast, the real story of Israel's betrayal of American Jewry.The Times of Israel articleBen Gurion's letter to the AJCPhoto: Jospeh Proskauer. Bain, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Micro-Cosmos: A Science Fiction Podcast
Episode 9 - The Alternative

Micro-Cosmos: A Science Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 25:55


Alex contemplates authority, bonds, and things that aren't quite right. CONTENT WARNINGS: Gaslighting/unreality, anxiety/ panic attacks, self loathing, paranoia, audio feedback/glitching , medication mention, death mention, smoking mention, discussion of mental health, relationship conflict, yelling, crying.This episode, The Alternative, was written by Jesse Smith, edited by Luka Miller and Lauren Tucker, and directed by Jesse Smith and Lauren Tucker. It starred Jesse Smith as the voice of Athena Romero, Jackson Rossman as the voice of Miles Abbott, Luka Miller as the voice of Alex de la Cruz, Kaleb Piper as the voice of Felix Couvillion, and Pippa van Beek-Paterson as the voice of Cal. Original music by Julia Barnes, and sound editing by Tobias Friedman. Transcribed by Cole T. Bonus sound effects courtesy of the National Park Service, Wikimedia Commons in the public domain, and Freesound.org under a Creative Commons 0 License.Be sure to stay tuned to our feed for future content.Looking for other fans of the show? Consider joining our official Discord server: https://discord.com/invite/D73AQVWTHX . To follow the show and find transcripts, you can find us on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram as @microcos_pod/microcospod. Questions, comments, and concerns can be emailed to us via futuretailmixpros@gmail.com For more information on the show, visit our website, microcospod.space.

BFM :: General
Myths & Facts on the Malaysian Social Contract

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 26:24


The Social Contract. When we hear this term, most of us have a particular image in our heads – an image of Tunku Abdul Rahman, Tan Cheng Lock and V. T. Sambanthan in a chamber with some old British dudes signing something that has come to define Malaysian politics and history for better or worse. But what if we told you that there's no mention of “The Social Contract” in our constitution? So, where did that term come from? We unpack this with Noor Nethusha Nusaybah, historian and President of Imagined Malaysia.Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

"This is the sound of the knife grinder, who walks along with his bike, offering his services. In Portugal they are called "o amola-tesouras" which translates as the scissors' sharpener. In a fast consumption era, this is the sound of a disappearing profession - the man who sharpens knifes, scissors, fixes umbrellas, making himself heard by potential customers through the unique yet (almost universally?) recognizable call of his whistle, echoing through the streets. This sound was recorded from my window, back in 2014, when I was living in Rua Miguel Torga, in Costa de Caparica, writing my PhD thesis at the time." Recording provided by Alexandra Baixinho. This is part of the Obsolete Sounds project, the world's biggest collection of disappearing sounds and sounds that have become extinct – remixed and reimagined to create a brand new form of listening. Explore the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/obsolete-sounds IMAGE: nborges from Portugal, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world
Loss of the eastern hemlock from hemlock woolly adelgid infestation

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 10:16


As of 2015, 90% of the geographic range of eastern hemlock in North America has been affected by Hemlock woolly adelgid. According to Science Daily, the pest could kill most of the eastern region's hemlock trees within the next decade. Inside a mature growth eastern hemlock grove, this soundscape recording captures the sound of the delicate, flat sprays of one of our most beautiful eastern native trees - before it is gone forever. The ambient, if not ghostly sonorities of the hemlocks are intermittently punctuated by the groanings of one dead trunk leaning against another hemlock trunk still alive. I captured this recording on a cold winter day inside an hemlock old growth forest at Whites Nature Preserve in Litchfield, CT. Recording provided by Michael Gatonska. This is part of the Obsolete Sounds project, the world's biggest collection of disappearing sounds and sounds that have become extinct – remixed and reimagined to create a brand new form of listening. Explore the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/obsolete-sounds IMAGE: Fritzflohrreynolds, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Aposto! Altı Otuz
Aposto Altı Otuz | 29 Ağustos Pazartesi - “Seküler öcüler”, “rüşvet ağı”

Aposto! Altı Otuz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 8:30


Günaydın. Türkiye'nin 2. çeyrekteki büyüme beklentisi açıklandı. CHP lideri Kılıçdaroğlu, "rüşvet ağı" iddialarına karşı suç duyurusunda bulunacaklarını duyurdu. Daimi Ortak Mekanizma'nın ilk toplantısı gerçekleşti.Bugünün bülteni Mintus destekleriyle ulaşıyor. Fotoğraf: Ralf1969, Wikimedia Commons

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

Prayer sound from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past on the SNES. Recording provided by The Sounds Resource. This is part of the Obsolete Sounds project, the world's biggest collection of disappearing sounds and sounds that have become extinct – remixed and reimagined to create a brand new form of listening. Explore the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/obsolete-sounds IMAGE: Dave or Atox, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

"The eerie sounds of the Eastern Hemlocks in the old growth forest provided the setting for things that went bump in the night. A frog calls to its mate, the door squeaks open, and the strings of the lap harp emerge into the forest." Composition by Stuart Wilding.  This is part of the Obsolete Sounds project, the world's biggest collection of disappearing sounds and sounds that have become extinct – remixed and reimagined to create a brand new form of listening. Explore the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/obsolete-sounds IMAGE: Fritzflohrreynolds, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

"A lot of my work focuses on recontextualising sound, image and memory, and the materials I use (other than samples) often tend to be toys, learner keyboards, tiny joke drumkits, etc., so this particular recording seemed a good fit to me. "I have a personal relationship with the recording in that I played A Link To The Past on Game Boy during a few long car journeys when I was fairly young, perhaps 5. I recall being scared by it at points - the dungeons and the bosses were impossibly difficult for me and my infant reflexes - and I have some recollection of the prayer sound from the recording. "So I wanted to take this sound that I associate with being slightly unnerved, and way out of my depth, and attempt to recontextualise it into something joyful by splicing in this very sugary, major-key track. "I started by cutting the sample up, and reconstituting it into two layered, phased pulses that evolve gradually. I then overlaid a track I'd made using samples from unused recordings of my own work, as well as some vocals through a small megaphone toy." Composition by Shit Creek.  This is part of the Obsolete Sounds project, the world's biggest collection of disappearing sounds and sounds that have become extinct – remixed and reimagined to create a brand new form of listening. Explore the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/obsolete-sounds IMAGE: Dave or Atox, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world
The grinder's whistle - tulmur soundset

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 16:36


"We were drawn to the sound of the Grinder's Whistle – it was subtle with a distant, organic quality. It came through like it could have been a bird call. This stood out when compared to the other obsolete sounds which were primarily machines and gadgets.  "This was the sound of a person continuing an age-old trade in their local community. Because of that, we wanted to accompany this call with a work that was equally warm and flowed as if it was also wandering the local street. We used analogue beats and effects-drenched guitar, accompanying a field recording of birds close to home.  "We played ‘in-the-moment' with open windows to invite a capture of immediate surrounding life. The Grinder's Whistle appears in entirety twice in the piece – at other times there are glimpses layered throughout. We encourage intimate listening through headphones…" Composition by Sherman and Field.  This is part of the Obsolete Sounds project, the world's biggest collection of disappearing sounds and sounds that have become extinct – remixed and reimagined to create a brand new form of listening. Explore the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/obsolete-sounds IMAGE: nborges from Portugal, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

StarTalk Radio
Things You Thought You Knew - Timeline of the Universe

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 46:32 Very Popular


How far back in the universe's timeline can the JWST see? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly explore the Coriolis Effect, hurricanes, the gridiron timeline of the universe, the physics of spinning objects, and much more!NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/things-you-thought-you-knew-timeline-of-the-universe/Photo Credit: NASA/GSFC, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Jacques Descloitres, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 108 - Antidotes to toxidromes

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 19:48


Episode 105: Antidotes to toxidromes. Some poisonings share common signs and symptoms and may be treated with antidotes without laboratory confirmation of the offending agent. Dr. Francis discussed with Dr. Arreaza some of those toxidromes and how to treat them. Written by Aida Francis, MD. Participation by Hector Arreaza, MD. Definitions: • Antidotes are substances given as a remedy that inhibit the effects of another drug of abuse or poison. Most are not 100% effective and fatality is still possible after administration. • Toxidrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms caused by an overdose or exposure to chemicals or drugs that interact with neuroreceptors. Toxidrome is the combination of the word “toxin” and “syndrome”. Management strategies of toxidromes are determined by the signs and symptoms even when the causative agent has not been identified. A little bit of Background: The World Health Organization reported that 13% of deaths caused by poisonings are children and young adults. Intentional poisoning attempts are more frequent among adolescent women than men. It is difficult to evaluate poisoned patients because they are too altered to provide history and there is often not enough time to perform a physical exam or obtain serum studies prior to life-saving interventions. To diagnose a toxidrome clinically, you need three elements: pupil size, temperature, and bowel sounds. For example: Pinpoint pupils with hyperactive bowel sounds point to cholinergic toxidrome, and dilated pupils with high temperature, and hypoactive bowel sounds point to anticholinergic (see details below). Pinpoint pupils -> Bowel sounds -> Hyperactive: CHOLINERGIC -> Hypoactive: OPIOIDS Normal or dilated pupils -> Temperature -> High -> Bowel sounds -> Hyperactive: SYMPATHOMIMETIC -> Hypoactive: ANTICHOLINERGIC -> Normal or Low -> Bowel sounds -> Hyperactive: HALLOCUNOGENIC -> Hypoactive: SEDATIVE-HYPNOTICS Anticholinergic Toxidrome and the Physostigmine antidote: • Anticholinergics inhibit the binding of acetylcholine to the muscarinic receptors in the central nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system. Examples of anticholinergics include atropine and tiotropium. Other substances that may cause anticholinergic toxidrome include antihistamines (especially first-generation: diphenhydramine), antipsychotics (quetiapine), antidepressants (TCAs, paroxetine), and antiparkinsonian drugs (benztropine). Symptoms of toxicity include tachycardia, non-reactive mydriasis, anhidrosis, dry mucous membranes, skin flushing, decreased bowel sounds, and urinary retention. Neurological symptoms include delirium, confusion, anxiety, agitation, mumbling, visual hallucination, and strange behavior. Neurological symptoms last longer because of the anticholinergic lipophilic properties which cause them to distribute into fatty organs and tissues like the brain. “Mad as a hatter, red as a beet, blind as a bat, hot as a hare, dry as a bone” [Spanish: loco como una cabra, rojo como un tomate, ciego como un topo, seco como una piedra, caliente como el infierno] • The antidote for anticholinergic toxidrome is physostigmine. It is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and prevents the metabolism of acetylcholine. This increases the level of acetylcholine in both the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. Physostigmine can cause seizures and arrhythmia, so close monitoring in the hospital is required during treatment. Cholinergic toxidrome and its antidotes atropine and pralidoxime: Acetylcholine is part of the parasympathetic nervous system and cholinergic substances can induce a parasympathetic response. Some of these substances include pesticides, organophosphates, carbamate, and nerve gas. Chlorpyrifos had been used to control insects in homes and fields since 1965. It has been used in our crops in Bakersfield, and the most recent mass exposure was in May 2017. it was banned on food crops in the US in August 2021. It has been banned for residential use for a longer period. Repeated exposure to chlorpyrifos causes autoimmune disorders and developmental delays in children and fetuses. The symptoms of cholinergic toxidrome can be summarized with the SLUDGE/ “triple” BBB acronym. This includes salivation, lacrimation, urination, defecation, gastrointestinal cramping, emesis, bradycardia, bronchorrhea, and bronchospasm. There can also be muscle fasciculations and paralysis. • The antidote is Atropine. Pralidoxime is used for organophosphates only because it cleaves the organophosphate-acetylcholinesterase complex to release the enzyme to degrade acetylcholine. Pralidoxime should be used in combination with atropine, not as monotherapy. It requires hospital admission, and a note for organophosphate, remember that the patient needs external decontamination (shower). Let's go to part 2 of our discussion, environmental exposure. Carbon Monoxide Toxidrome and the antidote oxygen: Carbon monoxide intoxication is usually due to smoke inhalation injury. Carbon monoxide is a silent gas produced by carbon-containing fuel or charcoal. Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) forms in red blood cells when hemoglobin combines with carbon monoxide, reducing the binding and availability of oxygen at the tissue level. It's like CO falls in love with hemoglobin and hemoglobin cheats on Oxygen by binding to CO instead, and neglects oxygen delivery to tissues. Carbon monoxide also causes direct cellular toxicity. The symptoms and signs of poisoning include headache, altered mental status, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbance, Cherry-red lips, coma, and seizure. You can also see lactic acidosis and pulmonary edema. Neurological symptoms can be chronic, so it's important to follow up. The blood COHb level must be used to confirm the diagnosis because standard pulse oximetry (SpO2) and arterial partial oxygen pressure (PaO2) cannot differentiate COHb from normal oxygenated hemoglobin. You must obtain a serum COHb level. • The antidote is 100% oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy and close follow-up. Consider intubating if there is edema of the airways due to inhalation injury. Cyanide Toxidrome which include sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate, and hydroxocobalamin In combination with Carbon Monoxide poisoning Cyanide poisoning can simultaneously be caused by inhalation of smoke or colorless hydrogen cyanide or ingestion of cyanide salts or prolonged use of sodium nitroprusside (ICU for hypertensive emergency). Symptoms are very similar to carbon monoxide poisoning. There may be long-term neurologic deficits and Parkinsonism. Diagnosis is clinical and waiting for serum cyanide levels can cause treatment delay. However, serum lactate levels over 10 mmol/L suggest cyanide poisoning. • Since cyanide poisoning resembles carbon monoxide poisoning and both toxidromes typically present simultaneously in the pathognomonic fire victim, treat simultaneously with sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate, and hydroxocobalamin as well as oxygen as mentioned with carbon monoxide poisoning. Hypnotic and sedative substances (antidote: flumazenil) Examples of hypnotic or sedative substances are alcohol, benzodiazepines, or zolpidem. Signs and symptoms of toxicity include slurred speech, ataxia, incoordination, disorientation, stupor, and coma with mild and rare hypoventilation and bradycardia. • The antidote is flumazenil which is a competitive antagonist at the benzodiazepine receptor. After treatment monitor patients for seizures in case of TCA poisoning, arrhythmia, or epilepsy. Opioid toxidrome (antidote: naloxone) Examples of opioid intoxication in children would be heroine in adolescents or accidental ingestion of pain medication in young children. Signs and symptoms are similar to the sedative toxidrome except for the pathognomonic finding of miosis or “pinpoint pupils” on physical exam. There will also be respiratory depression, hyporeflexia, bradycardia, muscle rigidity, and absent bowel sounds or constipation. Hypoventilation is severe and can cause death. • The antidote is naloxone which is a synthetic opioid receptor antagonist that can diagnose and treat opioid poisoning. It is indicated if the respiratory rate is less than 12. It has a short half-life and is repeatedly administered every 3-5 minutes until the respiratory drive is restored in order to avoid rebound respiratory depression and intubation. It has a rapid onset so the patient must be observed for 24 hours for opioid withdrawal symptoms. Summary: It is important to be able to recognize a toxidrome and antidote early. Once the antidote is administered, you should observe the patient 24 hours for symptoms of rebound toxicity or withdrawal. Consider repeat administration of the antidote if rebound symptoms occur and treat withdrawal symptoms as needed. Don't forget to consider multidrug poisoning if symptoms are non-specific. Thank you for having me on your podcast to review this topic. ____________________________ Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 108, “Antidotes to Toxidromes.” Remember you can start treatment of a patient with typical signs and symptoms of specific toxidromes, especially in patients who are unstable. We hope you enjoyed this episode. We thank Hector Arreaza, Aida Francis, and Arianna Lundquist. Audio Edition by Adrianne Silva. Even without trying you go to bed being a little wiser. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week! _____________________ References: 1) Jaelkoury, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons. 2) Hon KL, Hui WF, Leung AK. Antidotes for childhood toxidromes. Drugs Context. 2021;10:2020 11-4. Published 2021 Jun 2. doi:10.7573/dic.2020-11-4, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8177957/. 3) Royalty-free music used for this episode: Space Orbit by Scott Holmes, downloaded on July 20, 2022 from https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/.

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
30 Years of Growth | Premier League

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 4:17


Three decades of the premier league, and still going strong. The Premier League, is the top level of the men's English football league system. Contested by 20 clubs, it operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the English Football League. Seasons typically run from August to May with each team playing 38 matches. Espandero, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

BFM :: General
Tunku Abdul Rahman - Architect of the Federal Constitution

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 49:16


One cannot think of Malaysia's independence day, without thinking of the late Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al-Haj, Malaya's first Prime Minister. Ahead of our 65th independence day, we reflect on the role Tunku played in securing our nation's independence, and also look at the role the Merdeka Constitution played in shaping the nation's new path as an independent nation. Joining us to do this are Emeritus Professor Datuk Dr Hj Shad Saleem Faruqi, Holder of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Chair at the University of Malaya and a trustee of Yayasan Tunku Abdul Rahman (YTAR), Johan Rozali-Wathooth, also a trustee YTAR, and Ida Thien, the Deputy CEO of YTAR. The trio also share how Yayasan Tunku Abdul Rahman is preserving Tunku's legacy through its programmes and initiatives.Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Cognitive Engineering
Re-release: Power Transitions

Cognitive Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 25:29


As the UK Conservative leadership race enters the final stretch, we take a look back at a previous podcast on power transitions where we discussed the United States' change in administration from Trump to Biden. What are the potential pitfalls when one government is replaced by another? Is there a recipe for success or can we always expect issues and uncertainty? - 2022 Conservative Party leadership election (UK) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Conservative_Party_leadership_election_(UK) --------- A beginning is a very delicate time. The transition from one set of leaders to another can be fraught with difficulty. Talking before the US Capitol riots brought this so sharply into focus, we discuss what makes for a smooth handover of power. In this podcast we discuss the factors that lead to turbulent power transitions and whether we can predict how they will go. We examine historical precedents from monarchical successions, enforced regime changes and democratic handovers, and question whether leaders are more or less vulnerable just after they have ascended to the throne. This podcast was recorded prior to the unruly invasion of the US Capitol Building - how accurate were our predictions regarding whether Donald Trump would attend Joe Biden's inauguration? A few things we mentioned in this podcast: - List of UK Prime Ministers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_prime_ministers_of_the_United_Kingdom - List of Italian Prime Ministers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_prime_ministers_of_Italy - No evidence of a significant 4-year cycle in US crime http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/uscrime.htm Find more Cognitive Engineering episodes here http://podcast.alephinsights.com and for more information on Aleph Insights visit our website https://alephinsights.com Image: Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Millions Sold | 2022 FIFA World Cup

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 3:41


United States amongst; the most ticket holders for the World Cup in Qatar. The 2022 FIFA World Cup is scheduled to be the 22nd running of the FIFA World Cup competition, the quadrennial international men's football championship contested by the senior national teams of the member associations of FIFA. It is scheduled to take place in Qatar from 20 November to 18 December 2022. Spetsnaz 1991, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – Dinosaur Discoveries with Kimberly Chapelle

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 46:18 Very Popular


What did dinosaurs really look like? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Marcia Belsky explore questions we all have about dinosaurs, fossils, feathers, and asteroids with paleontologist Kimberly Chapelle. Is Jurassic Park accurate?NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Photo Credit: Copyright © 2005 David Monniaux, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Thilo Kehrer Joins West Ham United | La Liga

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 2:03


West Ham United signed Thilo Kehrer from Paris Saint-Germain. Jan Thilo Kehrer is a German professional footballer who plays as a defender for Premier League club West Ham United and the Germany national team. Mainly a centre-back, he can also play in either full-back position. West Ham United Football Club is an English professional football club that plays its home matches in Stratford, East London. The club competes in the Premier League, the top tier of English football. The club plays at the London Stadium, having moved from their former home, the Boleyn Ground, in 2016. Wikipedia Image Credit: Steffen Prößdorf, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Unsung History
Henrietta Maria

Unsung History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 42:02


Henrietta Maria, the French Catholic wife of King Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland in the 17th Century, was called a “Popish brat of France” by her British subjects, blamed for the English Civil War, and seen as a mannish and heartless mother. The reality is, of course, much more nuanced. Henrietta Maria fiercely loved Charles and their children and fought to protect them in any way she could during a time of upheaval and violence. In this episode we push past the caricature of Henrietta Maria to see the real, complicated, person she was. Joining me in this episode is historian and writer Leanda de Lisle, author of the new book, Henrietta Maria: The Warrior Queen Who Divided a Nation, which will be released in the United States on September 6, 2022. Our theme song is Frogs Legs Rag, composed by James Scott and performed by Kevin MacLeod, licensed under Creative Commons. The episode image is “Henrietta Maria,” painted by Anthony van Dyck, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons. Additional Sources: “Who was Henrietta Maria of France?” Royal Museums Greenwich “Henrietta Maria, Queen Of Great Britain (1609-69),” Royal Collection Trust “Queen Henrietta Maria,” Merton College Oxford “English Civil Wars,” History.com  “The English Civil Wars: History And Stories,” English Heritage “British Civil Wars,” National Army Museum Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Tanguy Nianzou Joins Sevilla | La Liga

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 2:29


Sevilla signed Tanguy Nianzou from Bayern Munich. Nianzou Tanguy-Austin Kouassi, known as Tanguy Nianzou, is a French professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for La Liga club Sevilla. Sevilla Fútbol Club is a Spanish professional football club based in Seville, the capital and largest city of the autonomous community of Andalusia, Spain. It plays in Spanish football's top flight, La Liga. Sevilla have won the UEFA Europa League six times, the most of any club. Image Credit: Sandro Halank, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Casemiro Joins Manchester United | Premier League

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 3:51


Manchester United signed Casemiro from Real Madrid. Carlos Henrique Casimiro, known as Casemiro, is a Brazilian professional footballer who plays as a defensive midfielder for Premier League club Manchester United and the Brazil national team. Manchester United Football Club, commonly referred to as Man United, or simply United, is a professional football club based in the Old Trafford area of Greater Manchester, England. The club competes in the Premier League, the top division in the English football league system. Image Credit: Granada, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

New Books Network
Normalization

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 22:26


In this episode of High Theory, Gëzim Visoka and Nicolas Lemay-Hebert tell us about normalization in international relations. Their research applies Foucault's social theories of the normal and abnormal to the objects of political science: states, international organizations, and practices of intervention. In the episode (and in their book) Gëzim and Nicolas reference Foucault's Lectures at the College de France on the Abnormal (printed in English by Verso and Macmillan). They discuss three exemplary figures from Foucault's work on the abnormal: the monster, the incorrigible, and the onanist. Each one has a corresponding figure in international politics. Their new book Normalization in World Politics is available as an open access text from Michigan University Press. That means you can read it for free! Check it out, and learn all about the ways we produce, impose, and maintain normal and abnormal affairs in the international order. Gëzim Visoka is an Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Dublin City University, whose research focuses on peacebuilding and statebuilding, transitional justice, global governance, foreign policy, and diplomatic recognition. Nicolas Lemay-Hébert is an Associate Professor of International Relations at the Australian National University. He works on interventions: local resistance to political interventions, the political economy of interventions, and mapping political interventions. This week's image is a 1689 world map, Nova totius terrarum orbis tabula Amstelodami, ex officina G. a Schagen (1682), t'Amsterdam Gedruckt by G. van Schagen, by de Nieuwe Haerlemmer Sluys. It was originally made in using copper engraving, then much later digitized and made available to the public on Wikimedia Commons. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

High Theory
Normalization

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 22:26


In this episode of High Theory, Gëzim Visoka and Nicolas Lemay-Hebert tell us about normalization in international relations. Their research applies Foucault's social theories of the normal and abnormal to the objects of political science: states, international organizations, and practices of intervention. In the episode (and in their book) Gëzim and Nicolas reference Foucault's Lectures at the College de France on the Abnormal (printed in English by Verso and Macmillan). They discuss three exemplary figures from Foucault's work on the abnormal: the monster, the incorrigible, and the onanist. Each one has a corresponding figure in international politics. Their new book Normalization in World Politics is available as an open access text from Michigan University Press. That means you can read it for free! Check it out, and learn all about the ways we produce, impose, and maintain normal and abnormal affairs in the international order. Gëzim Visoka is an Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Dublin City University, whose research focuses on peacebuilding and statebuilding, transitional justice, global governance, foreign policy, and diplomatic recognition. Nicolas Lemay-Hébert is an Associate Professor of International Relations at the Australian National University. He works on interventions: local resistance to political interventions, the political economy of interventions, and mapping political interventions. This week's image is a 1689 world map, Nova totius terrarum orbis tabula Amstelodami, ex officina G. a Schagen (1682), t'Amsterdam Gedruckt by G. van Schagen, by de Nieuwe Haerlemmer Sluys. It was originally made in using copper engraving, then much later digitized and made available to the public on Wikimedia Commons. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

StarTalk Radio
Space Sustainability with Steve Wozniak, & Guests

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 39:36 Very Popular


How can we keep space safe? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic-environmentalist co-host Matt Winning learn about the space industry and how we can keep debris out of orbit with aerospace engineers Jenna Tiwana and Danielle Wood, with words from Steve Wozniak. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/space-sustainability-with-steve-wozniak-guests/Thanks to our Patrons Sub Zero, Maury, Harrison Wilcox, Jim Langner, and JAYME HATTERSLEY for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/P. Marenfeld, CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

StarTalk Radio
What is Monkeypox? With Dr. Anne Rimoin

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 28:41 Very Popular


What is Monkeypox? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice learn essential information about the history of monkeypox, how it's spread and how people can prevent themselves from getting it with epidemiologist Dr. Anne Rimoin.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/what-is-monkeypox-with-dr-anne-rimoin/Photo Credit: NIAID, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

StarTalk Radio
Hormones on Steroids with Dr. Aniket Sidhaye

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 48:18 Very Popular


How do hormones affect us? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly explore the body's endocrine system, steroids, hormones, and how we can hack it with an endocrinologist, Dr. Aniket Sidhaye.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/hormones-on-steroids-with-dr-aniket-sidhaye/Photo Credit: quimono, CC BY-SA 4.0, Pixabay through Creative Commons via Wikimedia Commons