Podcasts about project managers

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project managers

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Best podcasts about project managers

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Latest podcast episodes about project managers

Get Flushed
Sari Laurila

Get Flushed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 41:55


Sari Laurila is a Project Manager with the Global Dry Toilet Association of Finland and a passionate champion for sanitation. She joined Pete to talk about her career as an Environmental Engineer, her work with Dry Toilet projects in Finland, Zambia, Swaziland, Tanzania, Ghana and Kenya and the global drive for improved sanitation for all. Visit https://www.huussi.net (www.huussi.net) to learn more about the Global Dry Toilet Association of Finland Visit https://www.sanitrax.com (www.sanitrax.com) to learn about Sanitrax Visit https://www.getflushed.online/booking (www.getflushed.online/booking) to schedule a call with Pete Visit WHOOVA to attend the Sanitation Workers Forum 2021 Visit https://podinbox.com/getflushed (www.podinbox.com/getflushed) to message Pete and enter the draw too win a Get Flushed embroidered baseball cap Support this podcast

Perpetual Traffic
Episode 343: Getting Inside the Mind of a Project Manager with Daniel Green and Alicia Katz of Tier 11

Perpetual Traffic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 12:15


Growing your company is far more than just more traffic. It's all about internal processes and hiring the best people to do different jobs within your organization.    In today's episode, we're mixing things up a little bit. We thought it would be cool to show you some internal conversations we have among team members at Tier 11. Daniel Green, Marketing Creative Strategist, sits down with Alicia Katz, Director of Production/Product Manager, to see how she creates order from chaos. What goes on inside the head of the person who can really make things happen within your organization?   Listen in to gain a better understanding of what it takes to run a successful online business.    IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN: How project management tools help with optimization Two of Alicia's favorite project management tools What a creative bodyguard is and why you need one in your company Tips for giving feedback in a respectful and collaborative way   LINKS AND RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: Daniel Green on LinkedIn Alicia Katz on LinkedIn Funnel Specialist job opening at Tier 11 DM @ralphhb on Twitter with your feedback on today's episode.   OUR PARTNERS: No Limit Creatives gives you unlimited graphics/videos for one low monthly rate.  Clients Online, the go-to Facebook Advertising agency for businesses Keap, an easier way to manage every stage of the customer journey Endless reports and actionable insights from Oribi Get Zero Down (Roland Frasier's new book) FREE. Find out your Leadership Trust Score at Ready to Lead. Register for our free Founders Board workshop   Thanks so much for joining us this week. Want to subscribe to Perpetual Traffic? Have some feedback you'd like to share? Connect with us on iTunes and leave us a review!

The Daily Standup
Five Ways to Be a More Effective Project Manager

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 9:35


Join V. Lee Henson, President and Founder of AgileDad as we discuss the top five ways to be a more effective project manager. I am grateful for project management foundations that lead me to think in a more Agile Way.Be an EXCELLENT Communicator - Understand the rules for best communicationBe a GREAT leader - This is the KEY to project managementUse Data to drive decisions - Manage the process, not the peopleSet realistic expectations - Do not be afraid to say noPromote trust and transparency - Focus on continuous improvement

Food Safety Matters
Ep. 108. STOP Foodborne Illness and AFDO: Joining Forces for Recall Modernization

Food Safety Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:28


Mitzi Baum joined the team at Stop Foodborne Illness as the Chief Executive Officer in May 2019. Prior to beginning her tenure at Stop, Mitzi cultivated a 23-year career at Feeding America beginning as a network services representative rising to the senior level position of managing director of food safety. Mitzi holds a Master of Science in Food Safety and a certificate in Food Law from Michigan State University. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH. Steve Mandernach is the executive director of the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO), which unites high-level regulatory officials, industry representatives, trade associations, academia, and consumer organizations. Prior to becoming executive director in 2018, Steve was the bureau chief for food and consumer safety at the Iowa Department of Inspections. He is a past president of AFDO and current co-chair of the Association's Laws and Regulations committee. He has a J.D. from Drake University Law School. Steve is also a member of Food Safety Magazine's Editorial Advisory Board. Jennifer Pierquet joined the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) in May 2019 as a Project Manager to oversee two support and maintenance contracts for 20 state inspection systems. Jenny leads the recall modernization project and Co-Chairs AFDO's Food Protection and Defense Committee. Formerly, she worked for the Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals, Food and Consumer Safety Bureau as the Manufacturing Foods Regulatory Program Standards Coordinator and was involved in Iowa's Rapid Response Team. Prior to Iowa, she worked for the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. Jenny received a Master's in Public Health from the University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, and is a proud alumnus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Mitzi, Steve, and Jennifer [17:41] about: How the recall process has worked for the last 20 years Some of the problems associated with how recalls are currently handled Identifying gaps in the recall process for consumers The complexity of recalls and recall fatigue STOP's working group and their recommendations to FDA AFDO's recommendations to FDA Are recalls happening fast enough – too fast? Priorities for change that could be implemented quickly Training Using consistent language between agencies Viewing recalls as urgent public health issues News Study Examines Role of Dust Particles in Transferring Pathogens to Produce FSIS Releases FY2020 Foodborne Illness Outbreak Investigations Summary Report FDA Releases New Food Fraud Website We Want to Hear from You! Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@foodsafetymagazine.com

PM Point of View
Project Management Forward from the 2021 UMD Symposium

PM Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 60:46


We know change is constant. So as business practices evolve and new systems & tools are developed, the role of Project Managers and the skills they rely on must change to meet the new demands. PMs who don't move forward risk being left behind. In the third episode from our 2021 UMD PM Symposium series, we discuss the role of "Innovation PMs," and how they can effectively manage open-ended, amorphous innovation projects. And Data: how to collect and leverage meaningful data to make better, faster, informed decisions. Check out more presentations from the UMD Symposium at https://pmsymposium.umd.edu/pm2021/ Listen, learn, and get a free PDU! PDU Information Use the following information in PMI's CCRS system to register the PDUs for this podcast: PDU Category: Online or Digital Media Provider Number: 4634 Talent Triangle: Leadership Activity Number: PMPOV0092 PDUs for this episode: 1 About the Speakers Marcus Glowasz is a Co-Founder and Product Lead at Fortean, a Swiss technology startup that leverages data analytics and artificial intelligence technology to innovate and redefine the project management practice, addressing the growing challenges of project professionals to effectively and successfully deliver projects. Dr. Michael O'Connor is the Director of Strategy & Project Management with Medtronic. He has over 29 years of professional experience in the Medical Device Industry. He is currently a Director at Large for the Product Development and Management Association (PDMA).

Between the Slides
PPP95: When Leading A Project, Remember It's Not YOUR Project

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 15:55


This episode was inspired by re-listening to Jocko Podcast 98 with Dr. Jordan B. Peterson. In the episode Jocko, Echo (good evening) and Dr. Peterson discuss the importance of self evaluation before looking out and judging the world as well as the differences between tyrannical leadership and leaders who inspire others to want to do work for them. In this episode I share what I believe Project Managers can do to stay on the opposite side of tyranny and instead build a bonded, collaborative and productive team.

Between the Slides
PPP95: When Leading A Project, Remember It's Not YOUR Project

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 15:55


This episode was inspired by re-listening to Jocko Podcast 98 with Dr. Jordan B. Peterson. In the episode Jocko, Echo (good evening) and Dr. Peterson discuss the importance of self evaluation before looking out and judging the world as well as the differences between tyrannical leadership and leaders who inspire others to want to do work for them. In this episode I share what I believe Project Managers can do to stay on the opposite side of tyranny and instead build a bonded, collaborative and productive team.

Between the Slides
PPP95: When Leading A Project, Remember It's Not YOUR Project

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 15:55


This episode was inspired by re-listening to Jocko Podcast 98 with Dr. Jordan B. Peterson. In the episode Jocko, Echo (good evening) and Dr. Peterson discuss the importance of self evaluation before looking out and judging the world as well as the differences between tyrannical leadership and leaders who inspire others to want to do work for them. In this episode I share what I believe Project Managers can do to stay on the opposite side of tyranny and instead build a bonded, collaborative and productive team.

Agile Coaches' Corner
User Story Mapping: Why, Who, What, and How with Alba Uribe and Michael Guiler

Agile Coaches' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 31:54


This week, Dan Neumann is joined by two AgileThought colleagues, Alba Uribe and Michael Guiler, to explore the concept of User Story Mapping.   In this episode, Dan, Alba, and Michael are diving deep into different approaches to starting backlog; they describe the benefits of story mapping and explain why it is a great tool to achieve a shared understanding throughout the whole team. Listen to this episode to achieve a comprehensive understanding of Story Mapping with various examples that will help you put this concept into practice.   Key Takeaways ● Why is Story Mapping a great way to create a product backlog? ○ All the team can see the overall vision and what is in the mind of the product owner. ○ It is a way to identify the release strategy. ○ Story Mapping can be a helpful tool when change needs to be embraced. ● Mechanics about how to create a User Story Map. ○ Who? Story Mapping starts with the user. ○ What are the goals to achieve? A journey map for the team including all pain points. ○ How? Identify how to address those pain points. ○ Organizing left to right and top to bottom. ● Examples of Story Mapping and Minimum Viable Product (MVP). ○ Alba shares how she uses Story Mapping in her work as an artist. ● Story Mapping can go wrong. ○ Not knowing how to identify your MVP. ○ Having difficulty identifying opportunities for learning. ○ The what and the why need to be addressed for Story Mapping, not just the how. ○ Having someone with experience in Story Mapping is hugely important for the process to develop the best way possible. ○ There need to be conversations about how Story Mapping will be done.   Mentioned in this Episode: User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story, Build the Right Product, by Jeff Patton and Peter Economy Coaching Agile Teams: A Companion for ScrumMasters, Agile Coaches, and Project Managers in Transition, by Lyssa Adkins Medical Medium: Cleanse to Heal, by Anthony Williams Lean Enterprise: How High Performance Organizations Innovate at Scale, by Jez Humble, Joanne Molesky, and Barry O'Reilly   Want to Learn More or Get in Touch? Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com! Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

Blue Collar Nation
Turning Tech's into Project Managers with Jon Isaacson

Blue Collar Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 63:46


We have  Jon Isaacson back on the show to talk about his great new book called, So You Want to be a Project Manager. We sit down and talk about all the struggles that so many home services contractors have in helping their people make this transition. This is a great episode for any trade as the topic is universal.TITLE SPONSOR: MORNING TECH MEETINGThis episode it brought to you by www.morningtechmeeting.com.  Don't lose money in the field because your service techs are not great at sales, customer service, and communicating with clients.  Morning Tech Meeting has video lessons that can be sent directly to your tech's phones for training.See other great podcasts we enjoy on our Blue Collar Nation Podcast Facebook page.

The Leadership Stack Podcast
Ep 299: How to Choose the Right Project Manager

The Leadership Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:57


Sean: And now I'm wondering, how do you find those right project managers that you mentioned earlier? Because I'm sure you've found a lot of wrong ones. How did you get the right ones? Dancho: Very hard. For me at the beginning, maybe that's juniority and then becoming really an expert in the field, but you do a lot of interviews and some tests and personality and stuff just to get the right guy, and at the end of the day, it's not the right guy. And I give up, I give up on trying to find the right guy. Now my different strategy is to grab five people. I start working with them for three months, and then I see what they're made of. Because on your CV, you can put so fantastic stuff on all the magic that you've delivered. Then very well polished or on the interview because you know that you're being observed. You can start pretending, faking it even. So you cannot really evaluate whether someone is good or not. So our whole logic is to take them, work three months with them. You've realized if someone is sitting next to you for three months, you can understand their character, their soul, their intentions because you cannot fake it for three months. It's a long period. And what we were starting doing here in Bizbee is like, we grab - we actually take five, seven interns put them for three months and after three months we take one or two. And we know that that is the best from the best because you got 50 applications, you take five to seven people, you take one or two. And we don't hire managers, we grow managers. So from the people, someone will grow or show some interest in marketing. We're moving them in marketing they'll show interesting sales. We're moving them to sales. And it's really evolution rather than a quick fix. And it's much longer. It's much more expensive when you think about it, because I need a lot of time to grow people. But at the end of the day, I tried every other way. I tried hiring experts in their field and then they come with a big ego behind them. Like, you know what? I have 10 years of experience, I know how to do it. We're like, well, look at the market - the market needs this, it's not whether what you want or you don't want, the market needs this. If you can fulfill it, perfect; if not, there's no point. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/leadershipstack Join our community and ask questions here: from.sean.si/discord Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leadershipstack

Negotiate Anything: Negotiation | Persuasion | Influence | Sales | Leadership | Conflict Management
What You NEED to Know About Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion with Gregory Swinton

Negotiate Anything: Negotiation | Persuasion | Influence | Sales | Leadership | Conflict Management

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:20


In this episode, Gregory Swinton, Project Manager at NBBJ Design, discusses key teachings around diversity, equity, and inclusion. Request a Custom Workshop For Your CompanyGet Free Access to Over 15 Negotiation GuidesNBBJ DesignFollow Greg on LinkedInFollow Kwame on LinkedInIf you've been a listener of the show and you've gotten a lot out of our programming, you can click here to Support Negotiate Anything.Kwame Christian with Gregory Swinton Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/negotiate-anything. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Trek Untold: The Star Trek Podcast That Goes Beyond The Stars!
74: Star Trek Adventures" RPG with Project Manager Jim Johnson

Trek Untold: The Star Trek Podcast That Goes Beyond The Stars!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 88:55


Roleplaying games have a long history with the Star Trek franchise, and in this episode, we learn about the current incarnation of it, "Star Trek Adventures." Jim Johnson is the project manager for this game at Modiphius Entertainment. First, he tells us about his history writing sci-fi and Star Trek and gaming and how it led him down the road to joining Modiphius to oversee this RPG. From there, we learn about how to play the game, special functions unique to it compared to other RPGs like "Dungeons & Dragons," and what's new for the game like the latest expansion, "The Shackleton Expanse." Inside NY Comic Con During COVID-19: https://youtu.be/kQSxXhjBV78 Visit Pancan.org to support the Trek against Pancreatic Cancer Please subscribe to our YouTube channel and hit the notifications button to be updated when we go live or upload our next video! Support Trek Untold by checking out our merchandise at https://teespring.com/stores/trekuntold or become a Patreon at Patreon.com/TrekUntold. Trek Untold is sponsored by Triple-Fiction Productions, a US-based company that 3-D prints Trek-inspired prop replicas for fan films and cosplayers, as well as accessories and playsets for all iterations of Trek figures through the years. Visit them at Triple-Fictionproductions.net.   Don't forget to subscribe to the show and leave a rating if you like us!    Follow Trek Untold on Social Media Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/trekuntoldTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/trekuntoldFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/trekuntold Follow Nerd News Today on Social Media Twitter:  Twitter.com/NerdNews2Day Instagram: Instagram.com/NerdNewsToday Facebook: Facebook.com/NerdNewsToday Trek Untold is sponsored by Treksphere.com, powered by the RAGE Works Podcast Network, and affiliated with Nerd News Today.

We Build Great Apartment Communities
062: Adding More Value to Real Estate Assets through Well-Curated Public Art with Mauricio Ramos

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 39:43


Not all art galleries are found in museums - sometimes they are found in apartments communities! Join John Brackett in today's episode as he sits down with Mauricio Ramos, a successful multi family investor and engineer who uses awesome designs and artworks on his real estate assets to produce a lasting great first impression, lure tenants and provide positive ambience in the community. Mauricio Ramos has been a full-time entrepreneur and investor since 2016. Currently controls over $2,700,000 in Real Estate Assets, Deal Sponsor in 4 syndications, invested in 509 units across Texas. Episode Highlights: Mauricio's transition from single family homes to multi family market Mauricio talks about why San Antonio is great place to invest in real estate Positive changes in multi family market brought by the Covid-19 pandemic How Mauricio is evolving his company to be able to capture more opportunity in the market Differentiating his property assets through local artwork Why people would want to live in a “colourful” neighborhood The importance of psychographics Connect with Mauricio: Email  LinkedIn  About Our Guest: Mauricio Ramos has been a full-time entrepreneur and investor since 2016. Currently controls over $2,700,000 in Real Estate Assets, Deal Sponsor in 4 syndications, invested in 509 units across Texas. In addition to his passion of Apartment Building Investing and helping others, Mauricio owns and manages a few short term rentals (Airbnbs) and has successfully “flipped” contracts on multifamily contracts with 5 and 6 figure proceeds.  Before becoming a full-time entrepreneur, Mr. Ramos was a Project Manager in the commercial construction industry in Texas working for a number of General Contractors, such as Byrne Construction, Skanska USA Building, among others. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Learn Real Estate Investing | Lifestyles Unlimited
(November 13, 2021) Project Manager and Interior Designer Increase Their Net Worth by 400% In 5 Years With Real Estate Investments!

Learn Real Estate Investing | Lifestyles Unlimited

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 41:43


Jeff and Courtney heard about Lifestyles Unlimited from their friend at work and the information changed their lives. Talking today with David Ruzicka, hear how they achieved financial freedom, quadrupled their net worth, and bought their dream home, all in just 5 years!  Click to Listen Now

Learn Real Estate Investing | Lifestyles Unlimited
(November 13, 2021) Project Manager and Interior Designer Increase Their Net Worth by 400% In 5 Years With Real Estate Investments!

Learn Real Estate Investing | Lifestyles Unlimited

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 41:43


Jeff and Courtney heard about Lifestyles Unlimited from their friend at work and the information changed their lives. Talking today with David Ruzicka, hear how they achieved financial freedom, quadrupled their net worth, and bought their dream home, all in just 5 years!  Click to Listen Now

Disability Talks: Don't Dis My Ability
Exploring Accessibility Excellence with PA Museums and Historical Sites

Disability Talks: Don't Dis My Ability

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 36:23


Shelly sits down with Project Manager, Jenny Angell to discuss the two year long project that the Pa Museums and Historical Sites have undertaken to identify what changes they can make to create accessible excellence throughout the state. If your organization could use a fresh look, contact Jenny to obtain a packet.  Pa Museums website: https://pamuseums.org/accessibility-excellence/Want to be a guest on our show?  Connect with us at: https://www.abilitiesinmotion.org/podcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/AbilitiesinMotionPALinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/abilitiesinmotion/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BerksCountyCIL?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5EauthorInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/instaaim/

FreightCasts
F3 Day One: Autonomous trucks and systems EP376 WHAT THE TRUCK?!?

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:07


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are coming to you live from day one of F3: the Future of Freight. They're covering autonomous trucks; automating operations; the war for talent; the next generation of FreightTech founders and more. They're joined by Matt Carroll, Project Manager at Waymo; Sanjiv Khurana, General Manager, Digital Vehicle Solutions at Daimler Trucks North America; Adrian Garcia, Founder & CEO at Gatego; Lauren Russell, Chief Marketing Officer at Armstrong Transportation and Micah Osborne, CTO and co-founder and Will Jones CEO and co-founder at Loadflex.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

What The Truck?!?
F3 Day 01: Autonomous trucks and systems

What The Truck?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:07


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are coming to you live from day one of F3: the Future of Freight. They're covering autonomous trucks; automating operations; the war for talent; the next generation of FreightTech founders and more. They're joined by Matt Carroll, Project Manager at Waymo; Sanjiv Khurana, General Manager, Digital Vehicle Solutions at Daimler Trucks North America; Adrian Garcia, Founder & CEO at Gatego; Lauren Russell, Chief Marketing Officer at Armstrong Transportation and Micah Osborne, CTO and co-founder and Will Jones CEO and co-founder at Loadflex.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

Tomorrow's Leader
#213 - Getting the Job Done with Kevin Torf

Tomorrow's Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 22:22


When leading their first project or the thousandth, a project manager's number-one priority is always the same: getting the job done. But how can they make it happen, all while leading a team? In this episode, host John Laurito is joined by T2 Group Managing Partner Kevin Torf. They talk about project management, engaging teams, and empowering people as a leader. They also talk about Kevin's book Getting the Job Done: Practical Advice and Real-World Anecdotes to Manage Successful P.R.O.J.E.C.T.S., which breaks down project management into eight core concepts that were key to T2 Group's success.Kevin is a co-founder and managing partner of T2 Group™. He developed the company's hybrid-Agile methodology, which is used by T2 Tech program and project managers to plan and develop client projects. Many of T2 Tech's clients have adopted this methodology in-house and are using it to manage all projects organization-wide. Kevin currently plays leading roles as the chief IT architect for extensive IT infrastructure projects and field operations. For example, Kevin oversaw the IT infrastructure design and implementation for a $636-million new hospital construction project at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. He's also acted as principal during the design and implementation of a redundant architecture and disaster recovery site for Sharp HealthCare. In another large-scale initiative, Kevin directed the IT remediation plan for a multimillion-dollar restructuring of the enterprise IT environment for a merged six-hospital system. In addition to his leadership abilities, Kevin has been instrumental in negotiating multimillion-dollar contracts with crucial technology vendors for many clients.Reach Kevin at:Website: https://t2group.us/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevintorf/Twitter: https://twitter.com/KevinBTorfGet a copy of the book: https://www.amazon.com/Getting-Job-Done-Kevin-Torf/dp/1736028367Show notes:[2:13] What motivated him to write his book?[3:23] The difference between a Project Manager and a Leader[4:55] What does empowering someone look like[7:55] Mistakes that leaders often make[10:12] The culture he typically sees in a winning organization[12:28] How should leaders handle an uncollaborative team member?[16:56] What readers can get from Getting the Job Done[21:55] OutroGet a copy of Tomorrow's Leader on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/huseae9hText LEADER to 617-393-5383 to receive The Top 10 Things That The Best Leaders Are Doing Right NowFor questions, suggestions, or speaker inquiries, contact me at john@lauritogroup.com

GovLove - A Podcast About Local Government
#482 Planning for Advanced Air Mobility Impacts on Local Government

GovLove - A Podcast About Local Government

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 40:20


Urban air mobility. Two guests joined the podcast to talk about advanced air mobility and how it could change the transportation landscape for cities. Robert Pearce is the Associate Administrator for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and Davis Hackenberg is the Project Manager for Advanced Air Mobility at NASA. They discussed the types of aircraft this sort of travel would involve, how it might be used, and the impact on local governments. Host: Lauren Palmer

Lawyerist Podcast
#353: Managing Projects Without a Project Manager, with Ashley Steckler

Lawyerist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 42:24


Lawyerist Product Director, Ashley Steckler, shares how to better scope and manage projects for your business. If today's podcast resonates with you and you haven't read The Small Firm Roadmap yet, get the first chapter right now for free! Thanks to Clio, Rankings.io, TextExpander, and Postali for sponsoring this episode.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Lawyerist Podcast : #353: Managing Projects Without a Project Manager, with Ashley Steckler

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 42:24


Lawyerist Product Director, Ashley Steckler, shares how to better scope and manage projects for your business. If today's podcast resonates with you and you haven't read The Small Firm Roadmap yet, get the first chapter right now for free! Thanks to Clio, Rankings.io, TextExpander, and Postali for sponsoring this episode.

All Things Iceland Podcast
Behind the Icelandic Music Scene Panel Discussion

All Things Iceland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:35


So many people around the world have fallen in love with Icelandic music because of the amazing artists from this tiny country in the North Atlantic ocean. Like many industries, the Icelandic music scene has had to pivot during tough times in order for artists to continue working/creating and for the industry itself to keep alive. To get a better insight into how the Icelandic music scene has adapted during this time, I hosted a panel of experts in the industry. These amazing people include María Rut Reynisdóttir is the Head of Cultural Office for the City of Reykjavik and the Project Manager for Reykjavík Music City; Sigtryggur "Siggi" Baldursson is the Managing Director for Iceland Music, whose mission is to help tell the story of Icelandic music around the world, and he was the drummer in the band "The Sugarcubes"; Will Larnach Jones is the Managing Director and Head of Bookings for Iceland Airwaves, one of Iceland's biggest music festivals. Listen to Live Icelandic Music During "Live from Reykajvík" Use my special link below to get a discounted rate of the live stream of the "Live from Reykjavík" concert happening on November 6th, 2021. This hybrid event has limited in-person seats and will be live-streamed from four iconic venues in Reykjavík. Amazing Icelandic artists like Ásgeir, Bríet, Aron Can, Daughters of Reykjavík, and more will perform. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OA7bwomj45A&list=RDCMUCacXXvaNHJQhMYU7f77OrBA&start_radio=1 Full Biographies of the Speakers on the Panel Sigtryggur Baldursson - MD of Iceland Music Siggi heads up a great time at Iceland Music, whose mission it is to help tell the story of Icelandic music around the world. Iceland Music is the music export office of Iceland. We facilitate the growth and development of the Icelandic music sector through building relationships between musicians and the various services that support their careers, such as festivals, PR and labels, and transnational promotion. Iceland Music also administers a number of export grants to Icelandic musicians which help them perform internationally. He is also a kind, warm and funny man! And in a former life he was the drummer for The Sugarcubes, who were the first Icelandic band to make big waves overseas, and as such played a huge part in the music / tourism conversation around Iceland, and with the label Bad Taste (Smekkleysa) María Rut Reynisdóttir - Head of the Culture Office in the City of Reykjavík María Rut studied Creative Project and Process Management at the KaosPilot school in Denmark and started her career in Iceland as the Executive Assistant to Magnus Scheving, creator and CEO of the LazyTown children's TV series. María first got involved in the music industry when she joined the social music platform Gogoyoko.com back in 2008 as Head of Charity (and later COO) and took on the management of Iceland's biggest reggae band, hjálmar. She was the Program Manager of Iceland Airwaves in 2010, the Manager of the You Are In Control conference on creative industries in the digital age in 2011 and the General Manager of the Icelandic Music Awards 2012 - 2015. María has taught Project Management at the Icelandic Academy of the Arts and sat on the board of Gogoyoko.com and Music Express travel fund. María has been the manager of internationally acclaimed artist Ásgeir from the start of his career in spring 2012 as well as managing dj. flugvél og geimskip. María became the Project Manager for the Music City of Reykjavík where her responsibilities will be to ensure and support a thriving music community in the city through various activities and projects. She is now the Head of Cultural Office for the City of Reykjavik. Will Larnach -Jones, Managing Director and Head of Boookings for Iceland Airwaves Will Larnach-Jones has worked in music for 20 years – wearing many hats throughout that time – manager, publicist, agent, A&R, music programmer, marketing 'guru' and erstwhile (rubbish) DJ. Along the way,

Contractor Evolution
Accountability: Are Your People Doing What You Pay Them To Do? - Dave Stephens

Contractor Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 43:06


To get your free GSR template (for a Project Manager) go to http://www.btacademy.com/ce/download/gsr-template/ So if you listen to this show with any regularity, it's pretty safe to say the organism that is your business is evolving.  And while that's an exciting feeling, it also brings about a feeling of uncertainty you're probably familiar with…. Are my people doing what I hired them to do?  Are they an ROI-generating asset for my business?  Or are they just an expense?  Are they executing at the level that I was back when I was doing their job (and a million others)? Or are they a costly piece of dead weight?  I realize that might sound a little cynical.  Or like we're assuming the worst.  But I'm sure most of you have had this thought cross your mind at least once or twice. When your business was small and simple.  This question was pretty easy to answer.  If you hired a laborer to work alongside you, you could see with your own two eyes that they're completely effing the D.  There's the door.  Bye!   But as your company evolves, roles become more complex and nuanced, layers get added to the organizational chart, truly knowing how people are performing becomes less clear.   So the question becomes…. How do we, as leaders, manage at scale?  How do we make sure our individual team members are executing on their individual goals, so that we as a company hit ours? To answer this question we brought Dave Stephens on the show.  Dave's company, Lida Homes is an 8 figure custom home builder and high end renovation contractor.  He runs a tight ship of 24, and specifically in this show we're going to learn how he uses one on one Goal Setting and Review meetings (or GSR for short) to lead his 5 project managers to create award winning homes and customer experience.   Over the last 3 years, he's won the Canadian Home Builders Association's builder of the year award, and over the last two has received the highest level customer satisfaction award in his Vancouver Island region.  Dave directly attributes this success and recognition to the way he leads his team through GSR.   His people do their jobs. Extremely well. In today's Episode: What a GSR is and why it is important to both quality and growth in your business How to use a point system in your GSRs to create black and white accountability What a contracting business looks like before implementing GSRs vs after implementing GSRs How you can expect your team (especially your PM's) to respond when you introduce GSRs What a great GSR with a project manager specifically looks like How to have a hard conversation with an employee who is underperforming See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lunch With Norm - The Amazon FBA & eCommerce Podcast
Project Management SOPs - Keys to Entrepreneur Success w/ Vandana Rastogi - Ep. 211 - Lunch With Norm

Lunch With Norm - The Amazon FBA & eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 65:28


Expanding can be a difficult task for a small business, not everyone has the time to get people on board with processes all while running a business. On today's Lunch with Norm, we have Vandana Rastogi, Norm's Senior Project Manager to discuss when the best time to hire is, what proper communication and training looks like, and what the structure should look like when you hire multiple people. We will also talk about how to build a performance based work culture, setting up to succeed and how to deal with mistakes from VAs. This episode is brought to you by Global Wired Advisors Global Wired Advisors is a leading Digital Investment Bank focused on optimizing the business sale process. Our approach combines decades of merger and acquisition experience with online and e-commerce expertise to increase the transactional value of your greatest asset. Maximizing the value of your company in a business sale is achieved through the full expression of its future potential. Choosing the right representation to provide this vision to the right buyer, means putting your future in focus. For More information visit https://globalwiredadvisors.com/ This episode is also brought to you by Sellerise. Take a deep dive into your business processes to make data-driven decisions and outperform the competition in an innovative way. Sellerise is a comprehensive solution for your everyday business needs with innovative tools like the PPC Dashboard, Smart Alerts, Review Requester, and Keyword Tracker. Everything you need to grow and scale your business is just one click away. Stand out from the crowd and conduct business whenever, wherever. Innovate your effort and work smarter, not harder. The difference is amazing. Sellerise is for professionals at every level of the business journey. Simply select the capabilities that best fit your needs. Visit https://www.sellerise.com This episode is brought to you by Zee Are you a private label seller looking to expand into larger markets internationally or need an experienced  import partner to keep growing? Zee makes selling your Amazon products abroad easy with excellent import knowledge, door-to-door solutions, customer service and scalability. Streamline your import process with Zee today to increase profit margins and continue to scale. Ready to expand your ecomm empire and take your Amazon FBA Business global? Visit https://zee.co to learn more! This episode is also brought to you by .CLUB Domains .CLUB is the most used new top-level domain name and the perfect web address for your membership or subscription-based startup or business. Why? Because your customers are your CLUB! Grow your business with a domain name that instantly means membership and subscriptions. There are a lot of great domain name choices today, but if your business is about building a community of members around a product or service, there's no better URL than YourName.club. With 1.3 million registrations worldwide, there are already thousands of e-commerce sites using .CLUB. - great subscription businesses like Soap.club, Firstleaf.club and Coffee.club. You too can join the .CLUB today. Visit https://www.get.club. On today's show we have Vandana Rastogi, Norm's Project Manager. Vandana will be talking about training and communication of Virtual Assistants for you business. We will discuss what the structure looks like, the required tools, and how to build a performance based culture for your employees. This episode is brought to you by Global Wired Advisors, Sellerise, Zee & .CLUB Domains.

The Common Good Podcast
Dr. Michael Mantel discusses his new book, “Thirsting for Living Water,” Sarah Lee shares about the Global Church Forum , and Brian and guest co-host Steve Coble talk about faith and politics - November 1, 2021

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 55:22


(00:00-9:12): Brian welcomed guest co-host Steve Coble! Steve is the Pastor of Teaching, Discipleship, and Spiritual Formation at Renewal Church of Chicago. Learn more about Steve at renewalchicago.com Brian and Steve shared their thoughts on Tish Harrison Warren's New York Times opinion article, “We Remember Saints Because They're a Lot Like Us.”  (9:12-27:29): Dr. Michael Mantel, President and CEO of Living Water International, joined Brian and Steve to talk about his new book, “Thirsting for Living Water: Finding Adventure and Purpose in God's Redemption Story.” Learn more about Living Water International at water.cc Learn more about Michael and his book at michaeljmantel.com (27:29-37:19): Sarah Lee, Director of Communications & Project Manager for The Grow Center for Church & Mission, joined Brian to talk about the Global Church Forum coming up on November 5th and 6th.  Register for the Global Church Forum at globalchurchforum.city and learn more about The Grow Center for Church and Mission at thegrowcenter.com (37:19-45:56): Brian and Steve unpacked Trevin Wax's Gospel Coalition blog post, “Neither Progressive Nor Conservative? Yes and No.”  (45:56-55:21): Brian and Steve shared their thoughts on Scott Sauls' blog post, “Many Pastors Are Lonely…Must They Be?”  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

People and Projects Podcast: Project Management Podcast
PPP 341 | The Pushy Project Manager, with Antonio Nieto-Rodriguez

People and Projects Podcast: Project Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 38:43


Help For Leading and Delivering Projects Part of leading and directing projects is influencing--ethically using the tools and techniques at our disposal to deliver the intended results. Could it be that, at times, we might even need to be a bit pushy? That's something that my guest mentions here in episode 341. I'm excited to be joined by Antonio Nieto-Rodriguez to talk about his new book, the Harvard Business Review Project Management Handbook. In addition to being an author, Antonio is a practitioner and consultant with a heart for teaching and raising up a new generation of project leaders. He's the former chairman of the Project Management Institute and is a highly respected researcher and management consultant. Learn more about Antonio at AntonioNietoRodriguez.com/. Join our Global LEAD52 Community Ready to take your leadership skills to the next level? LEAD52 is your 5-minute weekly pass to leadership intelligence. You get 52 weeks of learning, delivered right to your inbox, taking less than 5 minutes a week. And it's all for free. Join us at https://GetLEAD52.com. Thank you for joining me for this episode of The People and Projects Podcast! Talent Triangle: Leadership   Modern Jazz Samba by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4063-modern-jazz-samba License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Notanico Merengue by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4145-notanico-merengue License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Agile Coaches' Corner
Halloween Special: Scary Scrum Stories with Hal Hogue and Erica Menendez

Agile Coaches' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 35:54


This week, Dan Neumann is joined by Hal Hogue and Erica Menendez, colleagues and consultants at AgileThought.   In this episode, they are delivering a Scary Stand Up as a special edition for Halloween. Get ready for a unique, funny, and terrifying show where they are diving deep into how frightening certain aspects of an Agile life can be, from Daily Scrum to Sprint plannings. Dan, Hal, and Erica are sharing valuable examples and giving great tips and suggestions to enhance the daily work and move towards the set goals in an authentic Agile way.   Key Takeaways ● Facilitating Daily Scrums can be scary! ○ When the Scrum Master is leading a meeting people tend to just focus on them. ○ Understanding the “why” behind the Daily Scrum is crucial. ○ The Scrum Master needs to give the team space. ○ Respecting the time box is necessary. ○ Collaboration needs to take place throughout the day, not only during Scrum meetings. ● The Chickens and Pigs metaphor is outdated, stop using it! ○ There is a danger in using the chickens and pigs metaphor since it creates walls and barriers to collaboration. ○ It has not been in the Scrum Guide for about a decade. ● Instead of too much chattering, a board can be used as a visual tool to help coordinate the plan for the next 24hrs in a Daily Scrum. ○ Remember that a board cannot replace a conversation. ● Scary Sprint Planning! Boooohhhh! ○ Stop bullying someone for a task that is carried over, it is the whole team's responsibility in the first place. ○ The Scrum values should be embodied all the time. ○ The team is really working towards the Sprint Goal, is not a really big deal if one task is carried over. ○ Remember to define the Why, the What, and the How. ○ Being remote makes the work even more challenging. ● Sprint Reviews can be horrific! ○ A short Sprint Review does not mean it is a good one! Are you considering the reason behind it? ○ Sprint Reviews are great opportunities for feedback, don't waste them! ○ What is the Increment like? Where does the team want to go next? ○ Everybody should be together in a Sprint Review. ● Embrace your scary stories, this is how you learn and improve!     Mentioned in this Episode: Coaching Agile Teams: A Companion for ScrumMasters, Agile Coaches, and Project Managers in Transition, Lyssa Adkins   The Scrum Fieldbook: A Master Class on Accelerating Performance, Getting Results, and Defining the Future, JJ Sutherland   The Reengineering Alternative, William Schneider   Want to Learn More or Get in Touch? Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com! Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

The Take
Winter is coming: How the energy crunch is squeezing everyone

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 18:32


All around the world, supplies of energy cannot keep up with soaring demand. That means higher energy prices. But more expensive natural gas, oil and other fossil fuels means staying warm this winter will cost consumers a lot more money. Today we explain what triggered this energy crisis, who will it hurt the most, and how the fossil fuel crunch  could impact the climate crisis? In this episode:  Henning Gloystein (@hgloystein), Director of Energy, Climate & Resources at Eurasia Group Justin Schott,Project Manager of Energy Equity Project, Urban Energy Justice Lab (@JustUrbanEnergy) at the University of Michigan School for Environment & Sustainability  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Paddle N' Fin
S4E282 Bass Fishing For Noobs- Kyle Peterson, Soft Bait Designer for Berkley

Paddle N' Fin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 50:56


Kyle Peterson, Soft Bait Designer for Berkley Sean sits down with Kyle Peterson, Project Manager for Berkley Soft Baits. We talk about the twists and turns of life that got him started in the bait designing game, what goes into designing new baits, and what its like to see people catching fish on a bait or lure of your own design. Kyle talks about some of the baits hes worked on including the Berkley Gilly which just won Best of Show at ICast! In keeping with Noobs show spirit he even gives us a few rigging tips. Join us for an interesting dive in to lure design and what would be a dream job for many of us! Follow Kyle on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/peterson_119/ Waypoint TV- https://waypointtv.com Patreon-https://www.patreon.com/paddlenfin Podcast & Website- www.paddlenfin.com YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/paddlenfin Email- paddlenfin@gmail.com Social Media- @paddlenfin Yak Gadget- www.yakgadget.com Pelican Professional- www.pelican.com Rocktown paddlesports - rocktownadventures.com JigMasters Jigs- https://jigmasters.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Between the Slides
PPP92: The Successful Project Manager with Donna Gregorio

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 96:09


Sharing Donna Gregorio's 30+ years of Project Management and leadership experience through a great conversation on how Project Managers should seek to become irreplaceable not irrelevant, the importance of conducting "get well checks" on your projects and more practical tips for new and experienced Project Managers alike.

Between the Slides
PPP92: The Successful Project Manager with Donna Gregorio

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 96:09


Sharing Donna Gregorio's 30+ years of Project Management and leadership experience through a great conversation on how Project Managers should seek to become irreplaceable not irrelevant, the importance of conducting "get well checks" on your projects and more practical tips for new and experienced Project Managers alike.

Between the Slides
PPP92: The Successful Project Manager with Donna Gregorio

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 96:09


Sharing Donna Gregorio's 30+ years of Project Management and leadership experience through a great conversation on how Project Managers should seek to become irreplaceable not irrelevant, the importance of conducting "get well checks" on your projects and more practical tips for new and experienced Project Managers alike.

Radically Pragmatic, a podcast from the Progressive Policy Institute
MOSAIC MOMENT: Growing Women-Owned Businesses Through Private Capital

Radically Pragmatic, a podcast from the Progressive Policy Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 40:02


On today's episode of Radically Pragmatic, PPI's Mosaic Economic Project brought together a panel of women to discuss the intersection of access to private capital formation for new and small businesses owned by women and particularly minority women; how the response to the pandemic (government stimulus intervention including PPP) has impacted entrepreneurs and what policies looking forward can and will make a difference in accessing private capital for women entrepreneurs. Joining Jasmine Stoughton, Project Manager of the Mosaic Economic Project is Emily Egan, a graduate of Mosaic's Women Changing Policy Working and Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Tulane University; Kim Armor, Chief Financial Officer and Managing Director at Comcast Ventures; and Emily Waldorf, Senior Vice President of Strategic Development at Comcast. Learn more about the Mosaic Economic Project here: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/project/the-mosaic-project/ Learn more about the Progressive Policy Institute here: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
The “doer” Scrum Product Owner and its anti-patterns | Gonçalo Valverde

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:11


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. The Great Product Owner: Critical behaviors great PO's exhibit Great Product Owners are able to help the teams focus on the impact (and outcomes) of their work. Gonçalo shares a tip to define outcomes in a way that is easy to understand for the team and the stakeholders. We also talk about some specific behaviors that great PO's have in relation to the team. The Bad Product Owner: The “doer” PO and its anti-patterns This particular PO had a background as a Project Manager. That led him to focus on controlling the team's work and tasks, rather than the evolution and impact of the product. When PO's focus more on “delivering” and less on “impact”, this may lead to the team losing sight of the customer and their needs.  Are you having trouble helping the teamwork well with their Product Owner? We've put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO's collaborate. About Gonçalo Valverde Gonçalo is an Agile Coach from Portugal working with teams and organizations in their continuous improvement journey. As a keen amateur photographer, he learned that less is more and how constraints help one focus on the outcomes. He's also a co-organizer of Agile Coach Camp Portugal.  You can link with Gonçalo Valverde on LinkedIn and connect with Gonçalo Valverde on Twitter.

London History
68. London's First Railway

London History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:32


Where was London's first railway line? How was crisis adverted? Why was the project a Project Manager's nightmare? Join Hazel as she explored this often forgotten history. Learn things about London that most Londoners don't even know in a 20 minute espresso shot episode of London history with a splash of personality. There's so much we can't fit into our tours, no matter how hard we try. This London history podcast is where we can get down and dirty with the detail! You're not going to find this level of detail in any guidebook. Let us know if there's a particular person, event or place you want to know more about in our podcast. Review & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts. Show notes, including transcript, photos and recommended reading: https://londonguidedwalks.co.uk/068-londons-first-railway --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/londonguidedwalks/message

Command Z Podcast
Episodio 107: Yes Rosario | Diseñando tu Idea de Negocio

Command Z Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 63:04


Yes Rosario es una estratega de negocios dedicada a dirigir y estructurar iniciativas hasta que estas alcancen cumplir sus objetivos, a través de su empresa que lleva su nombre. Su visión es inspirar a los profesionales y negocios a que no descarten sus ideas. Tiene un Master en Business Administration en Gerencia de Proyectos y un Bachillerato en Producción y Mercadeo de Eventos. Ha trabajado por más de 9 años con freelancers, empresas privadas y organizaciones sin fines de lucro en ventas, mercadeo, gestión de proyectos, planificación estratégica, sistematización y optimización de procesos, entre otros. Además, es maestra de Empresarismo para escuela superior. Cuando no está trabajando anda comiendo, bailando, dando un paseo por su isla (Puerto Rico) o compartiendo con sus seres queridos. Por eso para Yes, es importante la eficiencia, para tener tiempo de lograr nuestras metas y a la misma vez hacer lo que nos hace feliz. Ps: Es la Project Manager de Command Z Podcast. :) BTW dos detalles importantes no te puedes perder el "Behind The Scenes", Yes Rosario nos habla de los datos más importantes que debes saber a la hora de crear tu plan de acción. Escucha sobre: Cuántas fuentes de ingreso debes tener para tener un negocio exitoso dentro de la industria creativa. Qué 3 servicios debes tener a la mano para comenzar tu emprendimiento creativo Cómo hacer un plan de acción y que debes considerar Yyyy lo más importante; ¡Cómo ponerle precio a tu tiempo! Además tendremos una mentoría grupal donde te acompañamos paso a paso en la planificación de convertir una idea en un negocio rentable que incluye: 5 reuniones virtuales en vivo de mentoría grupal Sesiones de consultoría individual con Yes Rosario Sesión de consultoría individual con Lays Curbelo Plantillas, guías Revisión semanal de tu plan durante el programa Soporte vía correo electrónico durante el programa para aclarar cualquier duda. Acceso a chat grupal de apoyo Si quieres más información de todos lo que ofreceremos entra aquí: https://commandzpodcast.hubspotpagebuilder.com/-temporary-slug-b7f1e7d5-909d-402b-a833-cd8ea6568658. Tendremos espacios limitados so apúntate no te quedes fuera. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/commandzpodcast/message

Puestos pa'l Problema
PPP Extra: Papelón Alert con el Plan de Ajuste

Puestos pa'l Problema

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 56:50


Empezamos sin plan de ajuste, terminamos de grabar sin plan de ajuste. Esperamos para nada. Te contamos el trasbastidores del drama legislativo. Además, ponemos en contexto todo lo que está ocurriendo con la UPR, Medicaid y Medicare. Hoy con el popukid Guillermito Guasp. Presentado por nuestros patroncitos PYMES --- Sabes que V Condado abrió un servicio de apartados donde puedes tener tu apartado por tan solo $9 dólares al mes! Con tan solo $9 dólares al mes podrás adquirirlo para tu uso personal o de tu negocio dándole presencia con una dirección física en Condado. (recuerda no es lo mismo Condado a otras áreas de la metro…)  Para más detalle comunícate al 787-248-411 --- Los jabones Don Gato son hechos a mano, sin químicos dañinos ni detergentes. Elaborados con los mejores aceites naturales, esenciales y aromàticos, seguros para la piel. Pruébalos y siente la diferencia. Visítalos ahora en jaboneradongato.com  y con la compra de 4 barras o más te llevas gratis una jabonera de madera, además al utilizar el código "ppp"  obtienes un 10% de descuento en tu compra. Sígelos en sus redes face book, instagram y twitter como jaboneradongato para mantenerte informado. -- NUEVO PATRONCITO! Somos una compañía netamente puertorriqueña dedicada al mantenimiento preventivo y correctivo de elevadores de cabina y para carga incluyendo modernizaciones, mejoras a la cabina e instalación, en adición para personas impedidas o para personas mayores que no puedan subir escaleras trabajamos sillas elevador en todo Puerto Rico e Islas Vírgenes. *el parafraseo puede ser “antes que otros te fallen comunícate con los expertos de IES”, te mejoramos cualquier oferta. Contacto: - info@elevadorespr.com -787-460-8100 Drex Velázquez, Project Manager -787-908-3462 Eduardo Castillo, Ventas -- Ecorganic Boutique, una empresa puertorriqueño que vende todo tipo de productos naturales y orgánicos para el hogar y para las personas, niños, niñas y mascotas. En Ecorganic encontrarás las mejores marcas, sin ingredientes tóxicos ni dañinos para el ambiente. cheque a los productos para el regreso a la escuela! Cupón de descuento para los que sintonizan PPP: 15% de descuento código: PPP Conoce sus productos ecorganicboutique.com. Síguelos en las redes sociales como Ecorganic Boutique. Gracias Ecorganic Boutique.   Suscríbete a nuestro Patreon y recibe contenido exclusivo, artículos: https://patreon.com/puestospalproblema See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Best of the WWEST
Episode 106: Deyanira Mendoza Dominguez, P.Eng, Certified Project Manager, and Woman of Action

Best of the WWEST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 41:03


Deyanira Mendoza Dominguez, a self-described non-boring engineer, has been to 16 countries, which she visited with her husband on their motorcycles to conduct research! You'll hear all about it in this episode. She also lets us in on what kind of challenges are presented to someone immigrating to Canada who is also a woman in STEM, and how those challenges helped her stand on her own two feet and build an empire around her.  Deyanira was made in Mexico, but she is purely Canadian. Deyanira Mendoza Dominguez is an experienced Professional Engineer, Certified Project Manager, and Woman of Action. Her motto is “making the impossible possible”. She is a non-boring Engineer and the first published Mexican woman to complete a continuous two-year return motorcycle journey through the Americas, doing research in 16 countries. She is motivated to support underprivileged girls and to be an equity advocate for women and immigrants. For full shownotes, transcription, and land acknowledgement visit http://i.sfu.ca/tzOITn Relevant Links: Deep Space Food Challenge Deyanira on LinkedIn - find all of her projects here Governor General's Canadian Leadership Conference MDMOTO Group Stumbler Woman of Action Hosted by: Vanessa Hennessey Theme Music: “Positive and Fun” by Scott HolmesProduced by: Vanessa Hennessey

The Quiet Light Podcast
Incredible Exit Series: Taner Hasanoglu Sells His FBA Business

The Quiet Light Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 38:46


Taner Hasanoglu is an entrepreneur who successfully scaled and recently sold his Amazon FBA business. He is now an e-commerce and supply chain advisor that helps other entrepreneurs effectively launch and manage their businesses. Taner has a wealth of experience in e-commerce operations, product management, revenue generation, process improvement, and more. Before this, Taner spent seven years in corporate America, where he worked as a Content Center Manager for American Family Insurance, a Customer Support Supervisor for Cenlar FSB, and a Project Manager for Centene Corporation. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  In this episode… Are you a new brand emerging in the Amazon market, but aren't sure how to succeed? Do you want to know how to transition from entrepreneur to exitpreneur? Growing and scaling your e-commerce business takes time and dedication — and getting ready to sell can be another hurdle. How do you know the best practices when you don't have any exit experience under your belt? Taner Hasanoglu successfully scaled and recently exited his Amazon FBA brand. As an entrepreneur, he knows the importance of patience and authenticity — and now he's here to share his insights with you.  In this episode of the Quiet Light Podcast, Joe Valley and Ethan Alexander sit down with Taner Hasanoglu to discuss the best practices for scaling and selling your e-commerce brand. Listen as Taner discusses how he developed and eventually sold his Amazon FBA business, his tips for successfully launching your products, and the importance of a dedicated broker when selling your brand. Stay tuned.

Manage This - The Project Management Podcast
Episode 139 – Project Managers, People Managers

Manage This - The Project Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


The podcast by project managers for project managers.  Project managers or people managers? In this episode we talk about leadership development and the project manager's role in creating self-sustaining and cohesive teams. Hear about steps for building high-performing teams that function independently and effectively, and how to create a healthy culture and strong team alignment. […] The post Episode 139 – Project Managers, People Managers appeared first on PMP Certification Exam Prep & Training - Velociteach.

Between the Slides
PPP91: The Value of Video Games for Project Managers

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 20:39


Video games are fun. They can also help us build build or enhance some of our Project Management skills. Check out this episode to hear more about history of video games, Project Management's use in developing games and skills I think Project Managers can take away from playing video games.

Between the Slides
PPP91: The Value of Video Games for Project Managers

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 20:39


Video games are fun. They can also help us build build or enhance some of our Project Management skills. Check out this episode to hear more about history of video games, Project Management's use in developing games and skills I think Project Managers can take away from playing video games.

Between the Slides
PPP91: The Value of Video Games for Project Managers

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 20:39


Video games are fun. They can also help us build build or enhance some of our Project Management skills. Check out this episode to hear more about history of video games, Project Management's use in developing games and skills I think Project Managers can take away from playing video games.

Business Innovators Radio
Francine Weinberg – Founder Of SnacTripster – Brilliance Business

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:34


Francine WeinbergEven though it took 7 long years of struggle and failure before she could successfully produce SnacTripster, Francine beat the odds and was determined to get the job done and bring this product to market. With an incredible perseverance, she believed that a more durable and reusable type of food travel product can help special needs kids while reducing single-use plastic waste in the environment. Finally, Francine made SnacTripster a reality! Francine holds a prestigious Bachelor of Engineering degree and an MBA. She has an extensive background consulting to Fortune 500 companies as a professional Project Manager and believes that creativity is the best way to solve complex problems. She also holds multiple patents in the US and Internationally for SnacTripster and other products.www.SnacTripster.comSource: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/francine-weinberg-founder-of-snactripster-brilliance-business

The Everyday PM: Project Management Principles for Your Everyday Life

Dakota White is a results-oriented Project Manager with experience in higher education and healthcare business operations, with a track record of consulting with executives to influence business decisions and optimize organizational effectiveness. She is best known for successfully managing cross-functional relationships and streamlining business processes. Amidst the pandemic, Dakota took on her first "megaproject," the campus transformation at Loma Linda University Health located in Loma Linda, California. The medical center operates some of the largest clinical programs in the United States in areas such as neonatal care and outpatient surgery, and is recognized as the international leader in infant heart transplantation and proton treatments for cancer. In this week's episode of The Everyday PM Podcast, Dakota and I chat about what a megaproject is and how she kept her sanity and focus working on a project of this magnitude. According to the Project Management Institute (PMI), the following attributes are associated with a megaproject: large-scale; complex; cost more than 1 billion US Dollars; take many years to build; involve multiple public and private stakeholders; are transformational; and impact millions of people. Executing a megaproject can be highly risky. The risk of executing a megaproject amidst a pandemic is astronomical. Dakota White shares her experience in leading a megaproject, how she was able to coordinate the project amongst a team of project managers and stay grounded amidst the uncertainty. Enjoyed the conversation with Dakota? Want to learn more about mega projects and what it takes to execute one successfully? Leave your thoughts and feedback in the comments section below! Reference: Project Management Institute (2014). What you should know about megaprojects | PMI academic summary. Retrieved from https://www.pmi.org/-/media/pmi/documents/public/pdf/research/research-summaries/flyvbjerg_megaprojects.pdf. *** Follow Our Hosts on LinkedIn: Ann Campea, MSPM, MPH, PMP Worldwide Readiness Program Manager at Apple, Inc. Program/Project management professional with 10 years of experience in product development, physical retail launches, health care, and tech industries. Dakota White, MBA Project Manager - Campus Transformation at Loma Linda University Health Results-oriented Project Manager with experience in higher education and healthcare business operations, with a track record of consulting with executives to influence business decisions and optimize organizational effectiveness. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theeverydaypm/support

The Remote Real Estate Investor
What a professional project manager can do for your project

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:08


Antonia Botero is a project manager, licensed architect, and urban designer. As the owner of MaddProject, a boutique project management consulting firm, she specializes in advising real estate owners and related-industry businesses with their development projects, keeping them on task, on schedule, and on budget.  In this episode, Antonia shares the scope of work of a project manager - what they do, what they don't do, what they cost, and when you would want to bring one in on your developments. --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor Podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of the remote real estate investor. I'm Michael Albaum, and today I'm joined by a very special guest, Antonia, she is a project manager, extraordinare licensed architect in numerous states, and then the owner of MaddProject, and she's going to be talking to us today about when you should think about hiring a project manager, what are some of the do's and don'ts, do's and also what it's like to be a woman running her own business in the construction space. So without further ado, let's get into it.   Antonia, the Conqueror project manager, extraordinaire, licensed architect in multiple states and owner of MaddProject, how are you today?   Antonia: I am wonderful. Thanks for having me.   Michael: Now, absolutely. Thanks for taking the time to hang out with us. So you are a jack of all trades, you do a lot of different stuff. Tell us a little bit about what it's like to be a project manager. But before we get into that, can you share with everybody what the best way to get ahold of you is or a hold of your company bad project, if after listening to this episode, they're like Antonia is a beast. She's a rockstar, I want to use her as my project manager.   Antonia: Sure, absolutely. So my website is great is a great way to get ahold of me, there's a little contact me form in there that I watched very closely. So Mad project.com. And you can scroll down, contact me. Also, there's a great newsletter that I write about once a month. So if you want to get it, you can hear from me that way. And additionally, I'm very active on Twitter. And I will give you my handle and you can share it in the notes as well. But that's a really easy way to contact me. And worst case, if you really just want to get to me, it's Antonia at Madd Project calm with a double D. So that's her always I'm very easy to get a hold of.   Michael: Awesome, awesome. Well, again, thank you for coming on and sharing with everybody. What I want to talk about today is what it's like to be a project manager. What are some of the things that a project manager does? And then what are some of the hurdles that you've seen people really stumble over when doing rehab or renovation projects where maybe they should have gotten a project manager?   Antonia: Sure, absolutely. So typically, on development projects, there's one person who serves as a point of contact for the owner, who helps coordinate the design team helps to oversee the permitting process and ultimately oversees or helps to oversee the construction manager during construction process. So generally, when you have larger projects, you should expect to have a project manager somebody either in house with the developer or a third party, like my company, that their job is just to make sure that the project is going in the right direction that you're accomplishing through design, all the different, you know, goals that are set forth in the pro forma. So that's generally what a project manager does.   Michael: Okay, I guess what would be the scale or the scope of a project that you would feel a project manager would be justified in coming on because a lot of our listeners will do cosmetic rehab, update flooring, kitchen, bathroom, that kind of thing. And they might be thinking to themselves, oh, shoot, do I need a project manager for that? What do you what would you say is kind of the defining scope or cost.   Antonia: So you know, it really depends on what you want the project manager to do, if it's something where you just need a little bit of help on strategy. That's one way if you need comprehensive project management because you've got no idea what you're doing. By way either of you know it's a new type of project that you've never done before or you've never done any kind of design or construction before you don't know how to hire an architect. It's really more about the resources that you have available and less about the size of the project itself. I think that's more the thing that I would say pushes you to have a project manager   Michael: Okay, now I love that. What about let me give you a scenario because I think this has been a lot of our listeners fall into this category and curious your take on on project management versus their project management. So I'd say 95, maybe 98% of our investors or listeners are remote investors. And oftentimes they are newer investors. And so if they want to take on a project that involves some significant rehab of a house, maybe changing some bedrooms, around changing the footprint of the property, and then some cosmetic stuff, and they don't have any experience and they're remote, is that something you think they'd be justified in hiring a property manager to help facilitate and coordinate?   Antonia: I mean, I definitely think that there could be a lot of value. If they're thinking of doing it again, at some point, because there's a lot of things that you can standardize, for example, like, let's say, you know, that you like a certain tile in the kitchen, you know, that you want your bedrooms to be a certain size. And in order, instead of having to go through the process, you know, learning the lessons, the hard way, you could have a more strategic sort of session with, you know, we do hourly consults, or 30-minute consults, where we could talk about some of those strategies, we could talk about some of the things you could standardize.   So I think, perhaps not hiring someone full on, but at minimum, having some sort of conversations with somebody either be at the architect that you end up hiring for the project, because you're going to need one, if you're doing something like that, or the contractor that you hire for it. I think having some general strategy of Hey, like, what are the things that we're going to have to do? What are what is the permit like? How long do those things take, and then ultimately, going back and saying, Hey, we want to do this, again, let's make a list of all the things that we learn in terms of, you know, how long permits actually took, what finishes, we do end up liking that were very easy to get during construction, they were easily available at the local store, and in sort of really find a way to, like, take the lessons and actually use them, right?   Because a lot of the problem that people have is that, you know, let's say you do it once, and you're gonna make mistakes, and that's okay. But if this is the first time you're doing it, and you still don't know, like, how to pick tile, I mean, are you doing?   Michael: What are you doing?   Antonia: I'd really say, sort of sit down for a minute and think a little bit about strategy and about like, and then as you go through the process, write down some of the lessons so that you can refer back to them, and really have a better go around the second, third, fifth time.   Michael: I love that. And I think it makes so much sense. And I mean, I love to that mad project does these half hour hourly console's because so many people don't know what they don't know. And so don't even know what questions to ask if they're a property manager or contractor who they're working with. So I think a strategy session could be so valuable. I know you and I have talked about my development project. And I wish we had sat down for numerous strategy sessions before taking on that project, but too little too late that this is how this is the learning lesson on the job.   So what about in terms of driving? timing? Is that something that a project manager should be expected to do or could be expected to do? If I'm a remote investor and contractor says, Hey, it'll take a month, I hire a project manager and said, okay, make sure they're out there getting this stuff done, because I'm remote? Is that something that you're able to help help out with?   Antonia: Absolutely. So there's a couple of different ways that a project manager should be doing that. And again, it also depends on the size of the project. If you're, for example, in your example, where you're saying, okay, it's for remote investors, you know, the project manager should have a couple of different points of contact with the team that is actually on the ground, whether the project manager is also remote or not, you know, there should be at least a weekly meeting during construction, and that in that weekly meeting, you should be discussing things like, hey, like, did the inspector come this week? Are we gonna run out of the tile that I really like that I know, has like a two week lead time? And so we really need to anticipate it. Hey, are you actually on schedule? And if you're not on schedule, why aren't you on schedule? Oh, because the plumber didn't show up? Why didn't he show up? Did we? Did you not pay him? Or is it because you know his guy last minute had a family thing and couldn't come on Tuesday.    So it's really having those touch points and having them constantly like you can say, oh, we're gonna have weekly meetings and then by the third one, people lose steam or, or kind of feel like, Oh, well, you know, we've had them the last two weeks, we don't really need to continue having them. That's absolutely the wrong thing to do. You want to have constant touch points, you want to make sure that you're, you know, all the time paying attention to what's going on, particularly on those remote projects where if you're doing like a single family rehab, they go really quick.   So you want to make sure that you're Hearing the problems every week, you know, the contractor a lot of times a lot of these contractors can have a question. And they can forget to ask you for four weeks, and then, you know, they stopped work because they didn't have an answer to a question that they forgot to ask you. So, you know, a project manager can absolutely help to do one, make sure that you're having the meetings. And number two, you can in your agreement with your project manager, you can ensure that they are walking the site, at least, you know, every two weeks.   So, there's really a lot of things that you can do you know, the project management, you can also have these periodic meetings with the different parties. So you don't necessarily have to have a meeting with everybody you can have I mean, I highly encourage having like an all hands meeting once a week for for like a single family rehab. But you can also make sure that like Tuesday mornings, you call the architect, and you're just gonna, you know, you're just kind of chit chat, you're like, Hey, how's it going, like, Hey, what are you up to, you know, cuz those are the times when you get like, the dirt, right? Like, Hey, I went out there, and like that green that you chose for that wall is, you know, the contractor is not going to tell you, they're like, Oh, yeah, I painted the wall,   Michael: And I got paid for it!   Antonia: He's not gonna say, Hey, I didn't write the I paid for it, I painted the wall, and you you come visit from out of town, and you look at it, you're like, Oh, my God. Good idea. Right. So those are the things you want to avoid. And the way that you avoid them is by keeping that contact. And and again, you know, once you're a remote investor, and you've done this a few times, honestly, these are things that once you kind of get the hang of them, you don't need to hire someone else to do them, you can do them yourself, if you have a good strategy and a good framework to begin to do them. And then you got to have the discipline, right?   So having a project manager a lot of times in a project is like having like a coach, you know, it's the person who's saying, like, Hey, you need to pay this invoice, hey, you need to sign this contract, hey, you need to make this decision. You know, hey, like, I need to, I need you to go to down to the city and sign this document like normally, having that extra discipline helps a lot in the project and they helped to drive the schedule. So all of these things and having that constant coaching and sort of follow up, follow up follow up was absolutely the role of Project Manager. And it is the thing that really keeps the schedule, which as we know and development schedule scheme, and that doesn't matter what project you have.   Michael: Anyone who's watching the YouTube version of this will have noticed that I was smiling, grinning ear to ear when Antonio was talking about the plumber, because like literally, that's what happened, like flipped by GCS and all the Providence show up and I got family stuff like Are you serious? Are you kidding right now. So it that kind of stuff happens.   Antonia: But it's also important to know that the guy didn't show up because he had a kids soccer game that he forgot about, versus Hey, you didn't show up? Because the contractor didn't pay him? And then you're like, wait, I paid you. So why didn't you pay the guy. So and the more you know, the quicker you figured that out, the better because you don't want to be having that conversation when you're like two weeks away from supposedly being done. And then it turns out that, you know, your contractor or your your CM has not been paying your subs for the last, you know, four weeks, and you come to find out that you have a lien on your house, right?   So, you know, in that sense, like, that's also why it's important because you can avoid these major sort of problems. If you're able to catch them as they're happening.   Michael: Love it. Love it. So that's, I think, a really great summation of what project managers do do. Can you talk to us a little bit about maybe what the clients have expected of you in the past, but you said, you know, like, this really is outside the role and scope of a project manager, when what should people expect to have done by other people or to do themselves?   Antonia: Oh, boy,   Michael: Feel free to go crazy with this one.   Antonia: You know, we've run into some funny situations that I mean, I've I've installed bread, I've built furniture on site, I've I've brought people coffee. I've been on site overnight on installs of big jobs. You know, within the bounds of professional reasonableness, we basically do everything. And I that's a big, you know, caveat that I put at the beginning of that reasonable professionalness.   Michael: Right, right, which is so shades of gray. Right, in that statement?   Antonia: Oh, yeah. Yeah. And then every now and then, I mean, you know, for for me on the bigger super complex projects where you know, you have sort of a syndicate or group of, or different group of investors coming in to code up a project. This is like the really big stuff. I will sit in a lot of investor meetings, just because Very often investors will ask, you know, the sponsor, Hey, how are you going to build this? You know, what are these things cost? What's your schedule? Like? What are you? What's your team? Like? Like, who's actually giving you insight? How are you going to review applications? All these things? And, you know, I'm the one answering those questions on behalf of the sponsor, the person who hires me. So there's a little bit, you know, that goes into that, you know, we also do a lot of feasibility at the beginning of a project.   Many times people will come to us to say, Hey, you know, we went down the road of designing this entire project, and it doesn't pencil. And it turns out that it's a terrible idea to build a high rise building in this neighborhood. What do we do, and so I'll actually, you know, I'll put my architect urban designer hat on, and I will redesign the entire building.   So I, you know, it's been crazy. And I think the last year pandemic, you know, kind of gave people a little bit of reason to pause. And to rethink a lot of these things. And so I actually ended up with almost every single project that has come through in the last 18 months, I have redesigned at the request of the owner, that they said, hey, look like we whatever we have isn't really working. What do you think we should do? Like, how do we start project management on this? And I'm like, Hey, guys, let's take a step back, read a feasibility and make it work. So we'll do a lot of that.   So we go from, you know, we are a little bit involved in those investor conversations, because they often have questions that we aren't equipped to answer. And we're also involved in feasibility, you know, I'd rather be involved in projects that don't need to have the ship turned around, I'd rather just be involved from the beginning, but it is what it is. And then…   Michael: It is what it is.   Antonia: Yeah. And then finally, you know, we are obviously the on site day to day stuff, you know, design decisions, technical, mechanical, electrical plumbing decisions regarding ownership preference, and what's really going to be the best way to go with systems. You know, all of that stuff, obviously, that that's the more traditional stuff that you'd expect to see. And where we are a little bit less traditional is on the design, and is on that sort of investor facing stuff.   Every now and then I'm asked to be a part of potential investor conversations. And if for whatever reason, the situation is a little murky, or there's a lot of kind of unanswered things like, you know, it's a dance, right, you want to make sure that you're helpful and that you're, that you're there. But at the end of the day, I am not the owner of the project. And so I have to be very careful, not only from like a deal perspective, like I don't, I don't want to say anything that's gonna tank your deal. That's, you know, that doesn't help anybody. But at the same time, like, I am a registered architect, I do carry professional liability. And I am very aware of it. And so, you know, I my agreements with all my clients, like explicitly says that, on the project involved, I have no professional standing, I am not the architect of the project. And sometimes there's conversations or moments with building departments or things like that, where I have to really be disciplined about my role on the project and the fact that I'm not I'm not a professional with professional standing on this project.   So that's kind of the general where we draw the boundaries, you know, and then there's the, you know, the stuff that is not professional. We deal with some of that, too, but that's how they, you know,   Michael: It sounds like we could probably do a whole episode on that.   Antonia: Oh, yeah. Yeah, for sure.   Michael: So I'm curious, Antonio, why in the last 18 months have Have you had to redesign all the projects? I mean, what have you changed? What have you seen changed in the last 18 months?   Antonia: Well, I mean, I think a little bit, you know, some, some project types got a little bit of a break, naturally, like hospitality did. You know, one of my projects is student housing. And they had a little bit of a break related to financing to, you know, banks were not running to finance these projects. And so, you know, these owners took the time to say, Hey, you know, what, maybe there's a better way. And there's a, there's a way where we can make this a little bit more efficient, a little bit more appropriate. And so they took the time to do it, just because, again, they had a natural break related to the fact that, you know, no capital was looking out to put money into student housing or hospitality project. I mean, hospitality was pretty, pretty hard hit.   So yeah, it's, you know, there was definitely a lot of redesigning hotel ideas in these last 18 months,   Michael: Okay. And redesign in the sense that it's no longer a hotel or redesigned from the perspective of we're just going to do it a little bit differently than it was done more traditionally in the past.   Antonia: Two different types of projects that I have redesigned predominantly to Housing has been, you know, one of the types that I've redesigned. And then the other one was hospitality. In the case of the hospitality project, it had a condo component to it, has a kind of component to it, the mix was changed a little bit, the sizes of the units were changed a little bit, you know, the amenities were changed a little bit, ultimately, I mean, so this is for an existing building that has, has this massive renovation going on.   So it was really kind of with what you had and how far they had already gone into construction, because that buildings already in construction, they are like the interior renovation was already underway, basically, they were basically looking to make it a little bit more attractive. Now understanding that COVID had to happen and how the pandemic had changed the way that people use space, particularly public space. So that was what the hotel sort of redesigned, it's still a hotel, that building is probably always going to be a hotel, it's very significant. And so we didn't change the use completely.   In the case of the student housing, for example, there was a little bit more of wanting to make the construction a little bit more efficient. And so really looking at the massing. And how much of the structure was wood, how much of the structure was concrete, you know, whether it was more or less expensive to build as a podium versus a wrap, you know, if we were going to go above four floors, and if we did, what that meant for the construction type. And so having these sort of technical conversations completely changed the massing of the building   Michael: Interesting,.   Antonia: Like altogether, completely different building completely different size. And then it again, you know, prompted a lot of conversations about public space, because this, this building is the size of a city block. And so, you know, you had a lot of like that deep in between space. So it's like, well, how do we create courtyards? You know, originally they had a massive courtyard, and we said, hey, look, you know, really big corners are usually very uncomfortable spaces. And so what are why don't why are we a little more thoughtful about how we divide this space? And and what can we do in those courtyards to program them and make the whole project just better? That's sort of the flavor and the reasoning why you'll you know, we would redesign projects. So…   Michael: That makes total sense how neat. That's really cool.   Antonia: That's pretty cool. I enjoy that a lot. Because one of the things that I don't talk a lot about on Twitter, for example, is that I am actually an urban designer, I do have a graduate degree in urban design, and I and I, like, you know, the idea of the whole building, how does that building affect the the environment around it? How do you approach it? How does it you know, address the street? What's the human scale of it? Where are the amenities? Where do you see them from? What's the good corner? What's the corner, you want to avoid? All of these sort of urban questions really come into play when we do these building redesigns? You know, where are you going to get a lot of shade in the courtyard? Where are you, you know, is that going to be an uncomfortable place to hang out? So that's pretty cool for me to get the chance to do that.   Michael: Yeah,   Antonia: Being an architect without the hassle of being,   Michael: Right, only the good parts?   Antonia: Exactly.   Michael: So it sounds like there isn't a whole lot that you don't do. And that's for sure, like a double, triple negative sentence, but that's okay.   Antonia: Something like that. Yeah. I mean, who then the reasonable, asks, we, there's, you know, and every now and then we're finding new things that people approach us for, you know, one thing that also became a little bit interesting was, I had a couple family offices reach out during pandemic to say, Hey, we have this project going on, or we're gonna invest money into this project that's kind of starting soon, we want you to look at the people who are going to build it, and let us know if you think they can pull it off. And to me, that was a little bit surprising.   But I had more than one request, like that. So that kind of thoughtfulness is really on the investor side, and a little bit, adding a little more sophistication and a little bit more data to people who aren't used to having that data or have the background to make those decisions has been really interesting.   Michael: Oh, that's great. That's great. Just a little quick word to the wise for the folks that are doing that hotel redesign, tell them not to have to fires during the course of construction, or really screw things up for him. Take it from me.   Antonia: I will. Yes, I will make sure we should add that to the list of things to watch out for.   Michael: That's great. So tell me when someone is going out and looking to hire a project manager or have a concert with the project manager, bring them into the fold? Should First off, what should they be looking for? What should some of the interview questions they speak to them about? And then you mentioned remote versus that remote could or could not be an issue. Can you speak to that a little bit?   Antonia: Sure. Um, so one of the things that you want to find out from a project manager is you really want to understand the scope of services that they provide. Not, you know, unlike some of the professional disciplines that are related to development, project management is not really regulated in any way. So different people do different things. And it really depends on their background. So you can get some project managers who are very strong during the construction process that will absolutely have no idea how to lead a design team.   So and not to their fault in any way, they will advertise that, hey, I don't, I'll take it from the moment that you have construction documents, and you have permits and your financing, I'm good. But before that, like, I can't help you. So these, like make sure that that has been spoken about, like if you need somebody to lead your design team. You know, in the instances of small projects, if you have a really good architect, they can, they should be able to project manage the whole design aspect of it. But you want to make sure that you're on the same page regarding what you need, right.   So if you need somebody to help you figure out pay applications. And if you want to carry your own ACR, that's an Anticipated Cost Report, which I highly recommend for big projects, you need to have a conversation with the project manager that they will do that, you know, even project managers that are really strong in construction will not carry an anticipated cost report for you. You know, a lot of times that falls on the finance side. And it's a little bit disjointed and difficult to do. Because if you've never done one before, and if you're not familiar with construction, it's really difficult to anticipate things like change orders, you know, so there's very little anticipated in your anticipated cost report if you can't have any foresight, because you have no technical understanding.   So again, being super upfront and clear about the things that you need. Having said that every now and then I will have clients reach out or potential clients reach out and say, You know what, Antonia, I need help on this project. And I have absolutely no idea what I need. And that's fair. And being that upfront and honest about it is a great starting point. Because then the project manager, or the potential project manager can say, Okay, tell me your situation. And we can tell you what services we offer and where we think we can fill in the gaps. And a really, really good one will say, Hey, you know what, these are things that I don't do, and either I can recommend someone to do them, or this is how we should handle them.   So again, it's just being upfront about what you need. And really being comfortable with that person's experience and, and connections in the industry, because that's really important too. And making sure that they're able to they're, they're gonna be able to pull it off and you know, someone that I respect and you trust, right, that you trust their their experience, I would also recommend asking for references.   Michael: Yep.   Antonia: I always, I always have, like, you know, about about eight people that I keep in mind for references. And the reason I do that is because my contact with them has been super varied. You know, some people are people that I've worked for some people are people that have worked for me, others are contractors I've worked with others, or architects I've worked with. And so depending on the type of project that I'm sort of going for, and if the potential client says, Hey, I need references, I'll tailor my references to be adequate for what they're going to be building so that they're appropriate and relevant. So always ask for references, you know, I mean, you just want to be comfortable with the person, you're going to spend a lot of time with this person, you want to make sure that you can communicate well with them, that you can be candid with them. It's sort of like the lawyer kind of thing, like you want to make sure that that you're comfortable telling them everything that's relevant, because if this person is supposed to represent you, and they only have half the information, you also have to trust them that they're not going to share some stuff that you don't want to share with people right at the wrong time.   So it's all of these things, I mean, that I would really watch out for on that, on how to pick a project manager.   Michael: That's great. And then remote versus local remote to the project local to the project, what are your thoughts there?   Antonia: So you know, now especially again, same thing as last 18 months have been really interesting, because for a long time a lot of people were very adamant about, well, if you're going to manage this project, you have to be there. And I've found that not necessarily to be true, because for several years ahead of 2020 I had been managing projects remote just as a result of the kind of work that I was doing. I was doing a lot of hospitality work nationally and so We lived on a plane, you know, and the rest of the time you were managing it remotely. And we had very specific systems that we had set up.   So you know, that, that's a big part of it is if you're going to go with someone remote, make sure they have strong systems to manage it. And you want to put in that agreement that, hey, you need to be there once a month, you need to have that in your agreement, and then your understanding, and you need to talk about how often you're going to need them to be there. You know, having said that, it really depends on the project. And it really depends on the investor, as what you're comfortable, you know, a lot of banks will require to walk your site once a month. And so you may want to make sure that to put that into the agreement.   You know, there's two minds about it. You know, on one hand, I will tell you, there's nothing like having someone on site all the time. But at the same time, I will tell you that I've only ever done one project where I had to be there every day. And it was extremely complicated. You know, it had a massive Historic Preservation component to it, it had crazy MEP coordination for you know, kitchens, commercial kitchens. You know, it was a large urban project, it was six acres, there was a lot to it, there was like every day it was wild. And just very few projects fit that bill. So you can have that you can request that but be willing to pay for it. Right.   So that's also a consideration. If you want somebody there every day, if you want someone, someone there once a week, or, or once a month, that's going to have a different price point. And so you have to also be really honest, a good project manager will be able to tell you that hey, you don't me to be there everyday. You do need eyes on your project, especially while it's under construction. Absolutely. But you know, now managing design. I mean, I have teams right now that are let's say my average team is like 15 people, like project team. And out of those 15 people you can have, you can have them be in like six different states.   Michael: Wow.   Antonia: And like, that's normal right now. Michael: Wow. You know, that's really cool. And it really opens up the the availability for project managers of who you can select, that's great.   Antonia: For sure. And you know, what, it also allows you to start hiring design firms that are more appropriate for projects. And a lot of times people were like, well, I want to hire a local architect, and you want to go talk to the guy, and you were doing a student housing project, but the guy had never done student housing, or multifamily, for that matter. But he had done, let's say, commercial spaces, that was kind of the closest local guy you're gonna find, you know, now you can, you can hire the best student housing architect in the country, and still feel fairly confident that they're going to be able to figure out what's appropriate for your project and working whatever jurisdiction you're in. So that's also a great advantage to owners to really open up that pool to get better resources for their projects. There's no excuse anymore. Basically,   Michael: There's no excuse for sucking.   Antonia: There's no yeah, there's no excuse for hiring a crappy team.   Michael: Oh, that's so good to keep in mind. And you touched on it, I definitely want to come back to it. So I think what's probably on a lot of people's mind is cost. What is it typical? Is there such a thing as a typical cost structure? And what should people expect to pay for project management services?   Antonia: Sure. So you know, for interior renovations, let's say that are under $5 million, which is kind of your typical hospitality renovation. For you know, the branded hotels or, and even the boutique stuff to to a certain size, you're looking at, you know, $5 million, and under, typically, those project managers will charge a percentage of the full project cost. And that doesn't include only construction, it also include your soft costs. So managing your design team, going through the process of hiring the architect everything, though manage, it's like turnkey if you will.   Those people will charge somewhere between five and 6% of the overall. And I don't agree with that general structure, I that's not how that project works. So we're fee based, right? So we'll give you a fee. That's the fee monthly for the duration of the project. Except during construction, depending on the larger projects, we actually switch our our style a little bit during construction. Actually, I put more resources on that. And so that's when it's a little bit more, but not, not so much more that you're like whoa, it doesn't double.   So, on those smaller projects, you'll see like a five to 6% that's typically what you'll also see In ultra luxury, single family, and ultra luxury, I'm talking about houses that are over maybe $4 million or so, where you absolutely need a project manager. Some of these buildings are so complicated between crazy structures insane, like audio systems, you know, really expensive materials where if you cut the marble wrong, it's like a $70,000 mistake. Yeah, so in those instances, that's what do you out, I would say that that's kind of market. So that's what you should expect to see.   On the larger projects like and larger, and you're going to realize that there's a gap here, and we can try to address the gap. So on larger projects, let's say $30 million over, particularly if it's ground up, what you'll usually see reps charges two to 3%. And again, on large projects, I don't think that that's the right way to build a project. You know, there's things that I think it sets up the wrong incentives, you know, like, oh, if your construction costs more than you pay anymore? I don't know, that doesn't seem right.   Michael: Right, right.   Antonia: And then, yeah, and then sometimes, like, there's instances where you're, and this rarely happens, but when it does, and this year was a good example of it, you know, ownership decides to redesign the building, and now you're doing an extra year of work, not necessarily for any extra fee. And when you are a smaller consulting company that can really hit you. So that also hedges for that, like I am, how much I am per month, until we reach construction, period. And if it and if you guys decide to put a pause on it to go do some exercise, and you want me involved in it, you know how much it's gonna cost you.   And so the benefit with having the fee based option, or the fee based billing that we do, is you know how much we're going to cost from day one, like, you know, you can anticipate those costs on day one, whereas a lot of project managers, or project management companies, you don't really know how much they're gonna cost you. I mean, you think they you do, but you actually don't,   Michael: Because your costs change throughout the project.   Antonia: Because your costs change throughout the project. So it's a really tough situation. And it always it's, it just always creates all kinds of funny situations with people, and you end up having conversations that are not related to moving the project forward. So you know, and then there's that gap, right? So what happens to projects that are, let's say, ground up $10 million?   My thought is, if you're in that position, and you're a developer, it is very likely that you didn't just wake up and get there, you kind of have a process of getting there.   Michael: I would hope so.   Antonia: Right. And so in those instances, and I've had people like that reach out, I will tell them, I will say, hey, look like this is how much I am because it's no less work from a project management standpoint than a $30 million project. The difference is obviously the fee, and the fee that that the sponsor will charge investors for management. And so given that the management fee is going to be a lot less, you know. Most of the time, I will say, hey, let's Why don't we set up like a retainer? That is not comprehensive project management? I have that going on right now with with one company in it, and it works fairly well with them. I mean, you know, they call me when they have a question. They call me for strategy, but I don't actually manage the day to day.   And it works really well. So on those, I just tell them like, Hey, you know what, you're, you're perfectly capable of managing this yourself. You know, if you have questions like you can call me and I have those relationships where I don't mind, like being on the phone for an hour here and there and growing those relationships so that when they do have the 100 million dollar deal, and then they're like, Hey, we're ready to have a really crazy project, and we really need you then. Then I'll be you know, we know that we work together well, and it works out.   So that's kind of the super long answer to your question how much your project managers should charge but no theories and yeah, you have to watch it To be honest, like I you know, it can there's some shenanigans in there. So just, you know,   Michael: Like anything, there's so many little shenanigans. Awesome. Well, I want to I want to start wrapping up here, Antonia and curious to get your thoughts. And if you could speak to kind of what it's like to have to be a woman in the space and any recommendations you have for women investors out there that are trying to do some projects in a space that's been traditionally male dominated?   Antonia: Yeah, for sure. Um, you know, I think one of the things as any woman, business owner in any kind of industry, to be honest, one of the things that we always have to remember that that Men are usually pretty good at. And I'm not again, usually I'm adding that…   Michael: There's an asterisk there!   Antonia: Yes, um, is setting, you know, very good professional boundaries. And I think that that is something that in my experience a lot of women have a little bit of a harder time with because we want to be nurturing, right, we want to help, we want to, we want to be like, Oh my gosh, like you I really need to help you out of this project mess that you got yourself into and and so when you actually begin to look at owning your own business and whether it's that's a development company, or whether that is just a project management company, or just the the rehab that you're doing, and you're happens to be the owner, and you happen to be a woman, you know, setting up those those boundaries ahead ahead of time, right, and saying, like, hey, like, these situations, like I'm not going to put up with or are these things are not things that are okay, interpersonally not just between men and women, like really, this is just not professional, and sort of standing your ground and, and again, being kind about and being professional about it, but really setting those boundaries and, and making sure that the that you're you're training the people around you, so that you have those boundaries, right, you want to say like, Hey, you know, you can't call me on Sunday at six in the morning about this project, like that's not okay. Whether you're the owner, or or you're the consultants, so that's a little bit, one thing that I would just say, you know, boundaries are super important when you're doing your own stuff. They, they make things much better for everybody on projects. So that's one thing.   The other thing is, you know, for me, actually, and I just picked this, for myself, the idea of the perfection, like if I don't have all of these things lined up, then I'm not going to be able to, I'm not qualified or, or I don't belong in that space, or whatever. And I struggle with that still, you know, where it's like, well, I haven't done this, and I haven't done that. And so because of that I don't belong here. That's not true. You know, like, you'll meet plenty of people that haven't done X, Y, and Z and, and contribute amazingly, into a certain community. Because we all have something to contribute.   And so having that sort of understanding there from day one to say, like, Hey, you know what, like, maybe I haven't done these things, maybe I didn't go to that school, maybe I don't know, the mayor. But you know what, I'm going to do this rehab, and I'm going to rock it. You know, being a woman shouldn't never be like, Oh, I can't go there, I can't show up to the jobsite because I'm a woman, you know, that that kind of fits into that category as well. Either you know, the things that you haven't accomplished or who you are just because of who you are, it really shouldn't hold you back from from doing the things that that you that you feel like you could you can do and if you give them your best effort, there's no reason why you know, being a woman or, or not having a certain experience should should limit you. It certainly doesn't limit a lot of people out there and so that's kind of the other thing.   And then I think finally you know, for me, you know, not to not to make it sound like it's all roses, it's definitely hard in some instances. But I've gotten really lucky in that I've run into really good mentors. And you know, they're all men because obviously the industry has a has sort of the demographic that it has and they've been fantastic you know most of them have become friends they're people that I keep in touch with the people that I've brought business to after the you know after years and so you know, if you're able to lean on them and kind of call them and say hey look like I don't have to deal with situation or they're really the people who are going to champion who and so finding those mentors and having them close by is really pretty important finding kind of not only the mentors you know, just finding your tribe eventually finding other women in the industry who are like kicking ass out there and just you know, leading mechanical companies and leading Plumbing Companies you know, developing things themselves and, and having them as a you know, as a nearby kind of support, but also a little bit of someone that you can look up to and say hey, like they've done it. So.   But it is certainly tough, I'll give you that there there's some instances where you know, there's situations where you want to make sure that you're very ready to say you know what, I'm not gonna play like that's the boundary and and to me if you're able to really set those boundaries for yourself, and you know, that really goes back into like your self worth and like all of these really big kind of sort of your emotional stability You know, making sure that your your sugar is low right now, because you haven't had lunch, you know, it really goes back to like being really good. Really good for yourself. So that then you're able to establish those boundaries so that then you're able to deal with those situations because you know, development is really hard, you have a lot of unknowns. And it does add an extra layer that you're a woman and so people sometimes react to you differently. But I think it's all you know, if you're able to say like, hey, these are my boundaries, and this is my power, and I'm gonna go conquer the world, you know, brings us back to the conqueror.   Michael: Antonia the conqueror   Antonia: Then you're able to, like, occupy those spaces and contribute, right? Because that, I think, is the part where a lot of women don't realize but like, like, we need your contribution, you know, as a as an industry and not because you're a woman, it's because of what's in your head and the ideas that you have. And, and if we're losing your contribution, because you're a woman, I mean, how stupid is that? Right? So that's kind of my, my, my bent on it. But again, you know, we could have an entire episode about the ridiculous less than professional situations that I've been in that are super salacious and ridiculous issue, we're probably like, take up a pen name and write a book. But that's not to say that, right? So, you know, that's that's kind of how it is.   Michael: I everything you just said like, yes, yes, yes, I love it all go back and re listen to the last six, seven minutes of what was just said, pure gold. Love it. Love it.   Antonia: Glad to hear it.   Michael: Well, no, absolutely, absolutely. So thank you so much. and tune in for sharing and coming on today. Any final thoughts before we let you out of here,   Antonia: Um, you know, just that same in that same vein, you know, there's so much, it's such a place of abundance, to be honest, it's such a hustle and not hustle in the bad way. But like it, you know, it's such a, an amazing, general way of doing business, you know, development has all of these amazing opportunities for all kinds of professionals, or even for people who don't have a ton of experience in it, you know, getting involved in real estate development, like owning things, you know, like, we can't say that without saying I used his name, right.   So it's like owning things, and understanding how your built environment works. And being a part of it contributing, it is just so wonderful. And I really think the sphere of community that we have is amazing. And so, you know, continuing to grow, that continuing to be a part of it continuing to contribute is just such an honor. And it's really wonderful to, you know, I'll tell anybody, if you if there's a way that you can get into owning things and into contributing to your neighborhood and to the people around you. That's just, you know, that's what being a citizen being around and being here, you know, being alive is for people like me, but then again, I grew up in development. So for me, like, it's just something I'm really passionate about, and I if you have the means to do it, and in the interest, go for it.   Michael: Love it, love it, check out Antonia on Twitter, check out her company mad project. It was such a pleasure to have you on and I'm looking forward to chatting again soon. Take care of Antonia.   Antonia: Yeah, it was wonderful. Thank you so much for having me. And I'm looking forward to being back at some point we can talk about a bunch of other things.   Michael: Absolutely. We'll take care. I'll talk to you soon.   Antonia: Thank you. Awesome, everybody. That was our show a big big big thank you to Antonia I got tons of great actionable takeaways from that. Hopefully you did too. Especially cuz I'm in the midst of a pretty significant development project. And Tony has been a really, really big help there. So go back and listen to the episode with the chorusing on the next one. Happy investing.   

Ritter on Real Estate
Understanding Supply And Demand In Your Market With Scott Krone

Ritter on Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:26


Today's Ritter On Real Estate guest is Scott Krone. Scott is a Chicago native whose career in architecture began in 1991 by pursuing his Masters of Architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology. While obtaining his degree, he also worked as a Project Manager for Optima, Inc. During his time at Optima, Krone's responsibilities included notable projects such as the 400-unit Cormandel in Deerfield, IL, the 40-unit HedgeRow in Winnetka, IL, and the 51-unit Optima Center Wilmette in Wilmette, IL. In 2012, Krone founded Coda Management Group – a firm that specializes in managing real estate assets. Since its inception, Coda manages a wide range of real estate including single and multi-family homes, retail, commercial warehouse and self-storage and multi-use flex athletic spaces. Currently, the platform of investments is in excess of $55 million.Krone has authored High Performance Homes – Navigating the Green Road to YourDream Home, a book for homeowner's seeking to incorporate green technology intotheir home.Most recently, Scott also founded a revolutionary storage business The One StopSelf Storage. It's committed to make its members' time of transition rewarding andstrives to remove challenges and hurdles commonly found in the industry. The OneStop brand is built upon the premise of providing the best in storage solutionscontained in sustainable, renewable construction and it's located in WI, OH, KY andME (Milwaukee, Toledo, Dayton, Ellsworth, and soon to Louisville and Chicago).Key Points From The Episode:From being an architecture graduate to understanding the roles of a developer.Appreciating the impact of structuring a deal.Understanding supply and demand in your market.Self Storage and why it's so predictable. Beating the competition by cutting prices safely.Comparing capital splits in competitive rate of returns.Evaluating deals through understanding structures and risks.Importance of having mentors in your career.Listening to what your gut tells you and avoid second-guessing your decisions.Drivers for self-storage.Due diligence and the lack thereof can make or break a deal.Taking the leap and moving forward.Books mentioned:The Road Back To You by Ian Morgan Krohn

The Ivy Podcast
The Essence of Successful Project Management with Margaret Meloni – Owner of pmStudent.com

The Ivy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 25:28


Margaret Meloni, MBA, PhD is the pmStudent.com community leader. pmStudent.com is devoted to helping Project Managers successfully navigate the art […]