Podcasts about Legoland

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Best podcasts about Legoland

Latest podcast episodes about Legoland

RUGGED RANTS
AV Experience Series: LEGOLAND Embraces Technology to Bring Experiential Learning to Life

RUGGED RANTS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 14:50


A new experience at LEGOLAND California Resort allows guests to build their own Ferrari (with help from their own personal pit crew), race it on one of three obstacle-filled tracks, and create a custom, digital version of their fancy new car. The experience is an adrenaline rush for kids, and just one more example of how the brand brings experiential learning to life. On this episode of The Big REthink, as part of our audio visual experience series, LEGOLAND director of entertainment, Jeremy Pancoast, joins host Susan Campbell to talk about how LEGOLAND parks embrace technology and immersion to encourage exploration.

Theme Park Rangers
Disney relaxes some reservation requirements and Legoland opens new boat ride (Ep. 173)

Theme Park Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 29:39


Legoland Florida theme park launches a new boat ride and Disney World and Universal share some surprising news about park reservations, a big ride's opening date and new projects. Disney AP park-hopping news (1:01) Tron opening date (6:16) Return of firework shows (9:03) Legoland boat ride opens (11:10) Universal projects in Texas and Las Vegas (21:49)

The Doughnut Box Podcast
Summer Camp, Geography Lesson, and Grocery Stores

The Doughnut Box Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 46:30


On episode 7 of this season of the Doughnut Box Podcast, Micah and Chris remember the time they went to summer camp, had to put on a drama skit, and the time Chris played the part of Jesus! The Jelly Donut is full of dumb criminals including a burglar who applied for the Sheriff's Office and a man who presented a LEGOLAND driver's license as his I.D?!?!? Micah tests Chris's knowledge of geography and the boys play the "Perfect World' game! Great stories, lots of laughs, and a brand-new hot episode of the Doughnut Box Podcast!

Solo Cleaning School
Building Blocks

Solo Cleaning School

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 30:15


 My boys love to build Legos! It's one of their favorite things to do. You should see the look on their faces when they open a brand new 3-in-1 set on Christmas Day. It's even more awesome to see my 5-year-old building that same Christmas Lego set on the kitchen floor a few hours later while his brothers are working on theirs. Once and a while, I'll even help them if they let me. A few years ago, we got them Ikea furniture for Christmas. Boring, right? Nope. They each got 9 pull-out organizer bins with a table top for their Legos. Oh my, did they run with that one. They spend hours taking every Lego and carefully placing them into the right color-coded bin. It was a win for the boys as they could build their own projects easier with the organizer like a true Master Builder and it was a win for mom and dad as it kept their Legos in one place...sort of. Legos are kind of like a virus. They spread. Legos end up everywhere. Since getting them the Ikea organizers, my boys have used all available flat space on the family room hard floors, kitchen table, and certainly their bedroom tabletop areas and floors to construct massive Lego ciites. They combine other building materials like Duplo and wooden blocks from games we have like Giant Jenga and Kapla blocks. They bring their stuffed animals and plastic animal toys into the creation and then play for hours. It's mesmerizing. Boys love to build.  We went to Lego Land last year as well for a day. This was heaven on earth for a then 4, 8, and 10-year-old boys. The 4-D theatre, ride, and laser challenge were highlights. The part that I liked the best was the giant Legos. While the boys were playing in the 3-level playground, I found the pile of rubberized Legos in the parent waiting area. Each block is around 4-by-8 inches and they had a lot of them. I wanted to relive my Lego glory days and impress my sons when they got done in the playground. One thing or block lead to another. After 30 minutes I had constructed a 4-foot tall enclosed structure with entrance and roof. My boys saw it and immediately the youngest ran inside. "Wow, Dad. This is cool. Did you build this?" Oh yeah, my ego was satisfied. I got pictures of all 3 of my boys inside my castle. In fact, other kids were in line to do the same. They thought my house was part of Lego Land. "Actually, I built this."... "Really, you did this?"Oh yeah again, double boost to my ego.Read the rest of this article at the Smart Cleaning School website

Writers Bloc
Tragedy in Cincinnati w/ Peter King

Writers Bloc

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 74:54


Ben and Blake are back from holiday and share stories from Lego Land and spending time with family.  They transition to another disheartening loss from the Raptors against the Pacers and if they should aim for the play-in or a higher draft pick. NBC Sports Peter King joins Ben and Blake (27:20) to discuss the tragic situation on Monday Night Football with Damar Hamlin from an emotional standpoint, a logistical standpoint, and a player standpoint. The guys close out the day talking about Connor Bedard's heroics in Halifax and if it makes sense to tank for him in the NHL, Carlos Correa's contract stalemate in the MLB and a preview of the Toronto Maple Leafs versus the St. Louis Blues. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates. Break 1: Peter King on: 

Theme Park Rangers
Theme parks 2023: New rides, land and haunt (Ep. 170)

Theme Park Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 29:02


The new year is here and with it brings exciting changes to area theme parks. Orlando Sentinel tourism reporters Dewayne Bevil and Katie Rice discuss new rides opening in 2023 and several attractions that will close for good. Legoland Pirate River Quest (1:19 ) Disney Tron (4:31) Splash Mountain closing (8:39) Epcot changes: Moana & new spectacular (12:28) SeaWorld Surf coaster (14:05) Universal  KidZone revamp (16:54) New Minions Land (19:26) New Passholder area at Islands of Adventure (20:42) HHN Chucky house (25:26)

Playful Humans - People Who Play for a Living
Wendi Dykes McGehee - Lego Serious Play Facilitator & Professor of Organizational Psychology

Playful Humans - People Who Play for a Living

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 30:47


Wendi Dykes-McGehee is a professor of organizational psychology and leadership at APU and an organizational effectiveness consultant who uses LEGO(R) SERIOUS PLAY(R) to foster deeper learning and help organizations solve complex challenges. She spent 11 years working at Legoland in California in organizational development and training.  Follow her on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/wendi-dykes-mcgehee-ph-d-9621b29/ Support the showJoin the Playful Humans community: Subscribe to the YouTube channel Subscribe to the Podcast Join the culture club! Book a playshop for your team Support our sponsors

Drinking The Cool Aid
Rent-a-hitman in LegoLand // 144 // Dumb criminals

Drinking The Cool Aid

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 44:25 Transcription Available


A bank robber that calls ahead of time, a criminal with a LegoLand license, a swarm of bees, and pumpkins stuffed with condoms.  These are just a few of the stories you will hear in our dumb criminals episode!Website: https://www.drinkingthecoolaid.com/RESOURCES:Bank robbery suspect calls ahead with demand for cash - CNN.comFlorida Man Accused of Attacking Girlfriend With Banana – NBC 6 South Florida (nbcmiami.com)Charles Ross, Fla. man, arrested for giving wedgies outside movie theater, police say - CBS NewsFlorida Man Bites Neighbor's Ear Off Over a Cigarette | The Daily Pulp | South Florida | Broward Palm Beach New Times | The Leading Independent News Source in Broward-Palm Beach, FloridaTop 10 World's Dumbest Criminals [2022 Updated] (crazyask.com)Fugitive busted after applying for job at NJ sheriff's office (nypost.com)Dangerous driver of wild car chase, whips out Legoland license (nypost.com)‘How about me:' Man gets himself arrested after asking why he was left off Rockdale most wanted list – WSB-TV Channel 2 - Atlanta (wsbtv.com) 'Out of Control' Cop Impersonator Arrested Again (newser.com)Man Throws Beer Bottle At Bartender For Changing Music From BLACK SABBATH To Christmas Song - BLABBERMOUTH.NETWoman Charged With Unleashing Bees on Cops (newser.com)Border Patrol Found More Than Pulp Inside These Pumpkins (newser.com)Kansas Man Sentenced for Illegal Autopsy Scheme (newser.com)What Not to Do Upon Leaving Jail (newser.com)Cops: Burglar Returned to Crime Scene for His Keys (newser.com)Fake Hitman Website Fools Woman, Who Is Headed to Jail (newser.com)John Collazos, Fake Dentistry Suspect, Now Accused Of Kissing Patient's Buttocks | HuffPost Weird News

TDR Now
Visiting Legoland Japan in Nagoya - Episode 271

TDR Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 35:47


I share my experience of my first visit to Legoland Japan, located in Nagoya! This a great theme park to add to your list of things to do in Japan! We discuss rides, shows, and most importantly, all the lego-shaped food.

The Car JoeMeZ Podcast
Episode 327: Gumshoes

The Car JoeMeZ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 95:18


Join Joe Shoes and Michael Gomez as they present their weekly buffet of pop culture goodness! This week, your double-main men are discussing: Technology (1:17), Sami Zayn (3:06), Hanukkah (5:06), Gumshoes (7:08), Legoland (10:15), Gift Baskets (16:28), AVATAR 2 THE WAY OF THE WATER (22:56), That 90s Show (56:59), Married With Children's "It's a Bundyful Life" (1:01:09), Tales From the Crypt's "And All Through The House" (1:07:20), TREEVENGE (1:17:50) & Big Finish: Top 3 Guns N Roses songs (1:25:22) Follow on all the socials: Twitter: @CarJoeMeZ, @TheJoeShoes, @thegomez154 Instagram: @CarJoeMeZ, @TheJoeShoes, @thegomez154 YouTube: Joe Shoes Twitch: Mr. Joe Shoes, MeZ Movie Pro Wrestling Tees Store: Capt. Joe Shoes TikTok: @TheJoeShoes Blog Site: CarJoeMeZ.com

South Road Boys
#268 No Tent Here

South Road Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 61:50


Depp Vs Heard is back for more. Does Joe need an image update? Can you punch annoying kids at Legoland? Troy throws hate on Ghost Campers. There's a dumb Bob Irwin headline. Punk turns to junk. Wimbledon gets Rogered. Is it time to get the boobs out? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Wetterbox
Stimmt es, dass es keine zwei gleichen Schneekristalle gibt?

Wetterbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 5:25


Jein, lautet die Antwort. Es hängt von der Grösse der Schneekristalle ab. Und was das mit Legos zu tun hat, ist Thema dieser Wetterfrage. Ein Legohaus ist eine wunderbare Analogie zu einem Schneekristall. Das Legohaus besteht aus einzelnen Legosteinen, der Schneekristall aus einzelnen Wassermolekülen. Schnee ist Wasser in fester Form. Bauen Kinder aus wenigen Legoteilen immer wieder ein Haus, kann es durchaus sein, dass einmal zwei genau gleiche Exemplare entstehen. Analog bei den Schneekristallen: Bei ganz kleinen und einfachen Kristallen können zwei Exemplare durchaus identisch aussehen. Es hängt von den Möglichkeiten ab. Nur schon ein kleiner Schneekristall von 1 mm Durchmesser besteht aus 100 Trillionen Wassermolekülen. Es versteht sich von selbst, dass es unfassbar viele Möglichkeiten gibt, so einen Schneekristall zu bauen. Übrigens hätten all diese Legosteine in keinem Kinderzimmer der Welt Platz: Sogar im Legoland in Ulm in Deutschland kommen «nur» 55 Millionen Legoteilchen zusammen. Genau wie Legosteine, gibt es auch bei Schneekristallen einen Bauplan – die Gesetze von Physik und Chemie. So haben alle Schneekristalle eine sechseckige Struktur. Das ist durch die Form der Wassermoleküle gegeben. Es gibt jedoch viele verschiedene Formen: Nadeln, Säulen, Plättchen oder die klassischen Schneesterne.

Married With Movies
Episode 421: Se7en

Married With Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 64:43


In this episode, the Mullets recount a trip to Legoland before tackling the movie that made David Fincher, the movie that makes us hate Kevin Spacey even more and the movie that makes us scream about boxes.All kinds of awesome, bonus content is available on our Patreon! Rate, review and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify! Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

The Real Estate Syndication Show
WS1496: What's Next For Multifamily Amid Inflation | Harry Nima-Zegarra

The Real Estate Syndication Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 26:04 Transcription Available


Inflation has hit many economies worldwide. And, it affects many businesses as well. In fact, in the US, the Fed had been raising interest rates in hopes to combat inflation. But, how does this affect multifamily investing? What are the things you need to know right now to weather the “storm”?Harry kicks off by sharing how he ventured into real estate investing while doing a full-time career as a doctor. He also talks about what to expect in the space amid inflation and the current economy, ways on how you can minimize the risks in real estate investing, and why you need to invest in a growing market. Click the play button now and learn how you can survive amid the inflationary environment!Key Points From This Episode: Harry shares that he and his wife are originally from Peru and they move to the U.S. to train as doctors. After settling in, they venture into real estate investing as a way to earn passive income.Why did Harry start in real estate with single-family homes?After some time investing in single-family homes, Harry and his wife decided to invest in commercial real estate.Harry discusses what's next for multifamily syndication amid inflation.Harry says the success of multifamily syndication depends on asset management.What are the benefits of investing alongside an operator?How multifamily syndication offers the benefit of diversification?How to minimize the risk in multifamily investing?Harry emphasizes the importance of underwriting.What are the things you need to consider when you want to invest in REITs?The difference between REITs and syndication.How does Harry prepare for a downturn?Why do you need to go out of your comfort zone and overcome the fear of failing?Harry's best source for meeting new investors right now.Harry's tip for passive investors: educate yourself.The daily habits that have produced the highest returns for Harry.How does Harry like to give back?Tweetables:“I believe that's also a goal for most active investors to become only passive investors.”“Real estate and multifamily also may suffer a little bit in the next year or two.”“Because of what happened last year, a lot of the success of a syndication depends also on the asset management teams.”“This is something that I see in general, like in real estate, but especially in multifamily, when you invest passively, you can leverage people.”“(I'm) trying to focus or invest in bigger cities or areas that are actually growing. I try to stay, for now, away from tertiary markets.”Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:Harry Nima-Zegarra  on LinkedInNima Equity websiteAbout Harry Nima-Zegarra Harry is a Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Physician, real estate investor, entrepreneur, co-founder, and manager of Nima Equity, a commercial real estate syndication company where he helps physicians to earn passive income, lower taxes and achieve financial freedom. Harry has experience in rental properties and currently owns and manages 9 properties across the DFW metropolitan area. Harry is General Partner in 1076 units in 4 different States.Harry met his wife Mitsi in Medical School in Peru and they finished their training in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Harry currently works at a tertiary medical center in Dallas, TX.Harry and Mitsi love the outdoors. They have 2 boys, who love playing basketball and soccer. They love to vacation and travel to Cancun and Florida where they enjoy time at the beach, Disney or Legoland. Harry is also an avid runner.

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
The SEC Doesn't Regulate Poop Emojis

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 47:28


Doogles covers recent happenings in the South Korean bond market caused by a fiasco at Legoland. Skippy heads back to FTX coverage, including its assets/liabilities and bankruptcy filing. Speaking of fraud, Elizabeth Holmes gets sentenced. Doogles highlights Elon Musk's ultimatum and the Twitter exodus. The episode wraps with some soapbox dialogue on Cathie Wood.Join the Skippy and Doogles fan club. You can also get more details about the show at skippydoogles.com, show notes on our Substack, and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

iamGEEK
WDW Trip Report -- Is the Magic Gone?

iamGEEK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 47:58


#257 Ryan is back from The Thing Conference in Orlando and a Walt Disney World Trip with a side of Legoland.  Hear about his latest experience at the parks and which theme park ended up being a bright spot in the trip plagued with illness, delays and hurricanes.  Is the magic gone? Ryan and his family found some magic along the way where they least expected it.  Can you still have a good time with all of the restrictions and reservations?  Are the apple fries at Legoland worth all the hype? Thank you for listening to our show!  Tell your friends about us and be sure to leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts!   We livestream every episode on YouTube, so find us there and any social media as iamgeekshow!  

The Rights To Ricky Sanchez: The Sixers (76ers) Podcast
Crazy Ben Simmons Story, Scott O'Neil Gets A Job, Paul Reed Selling Stuff On Twitter

The Rights To Ricky Sanchez: The Sixers (76ers) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 57:23


Four days in between games?! We talk about Scott O'Neil's new job in charge of Lego Land, the Ben Simmons story that his teammates don't believe he's hurt and Spike's mental block from moving on from Simmons, Paul Reed selling hoodies on Twitter, and an awesome mailbag. Get tickets for Carl Landry Record Club Live at https://www.etix.com/ticket/p/6435907/mutlu-philadelphia-the-lounge-at-world-cafe-live Sign up for Fly The Process Austin here: https://www.rightstorickysanchez.com/fly The Rights To Ricky Sanchez is presented by Draft Kings Sportsbook Adam Ksebe is the official Realtor of The Process at 302-864-8643 Become a Mortgage CS Ricky VIP at mortgagecs.com/ricky Stateside Vodka is the official Sponsor of the Corner Three Newsletter with Zo --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spike-eskin/message

Skip the Queue
The importance of building a great social community and process behind rebranding a 70 year old attraction

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 44:49


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.draytonmanor.co.uk/https://twitter.com/DraytonManorhttps://www.instagram.com/draytonmanor/https://www.tiktok.com/@drayton_manor Danielle Nicholls - Senior Content Executive at Drayton Manor ResortWhen I graduated from Leeds Trinity University with a degree in Media & Marketing and a multitude of marketing placements in 2017, I was set on combining my two passions - storytelling and theme parks.After a year in a marketing communications role with a tour operator, I was lucky enough to secure a role in the Drayton Manor marketing team.Here at Drayton, I'm responsible for creating engaging visual and written content for all marketing channels - including web, PR, email, in park signage and of course, social media.My main focus over the last 4 and a half years has been to build an engaged social community across all our channels – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, LinkedIn and YouTube.I'm forever grateful to work in such a fantastic industry, filled with incredible energy and enthusiasm.https://www.linkedin.com/in/nichollsdanielle/Twitter @dnicholls_Instagram @_daniellenicholls Ross Ballinger - Design & Brand Manager at Drayton Manor Resort (Inc. Hotel, Zoo & Europe's only Thomas Land) Brand protector and innovator... I played a senior role in a busy agency studio team for nearly 9 years. I joined fresh from leaving university with a sort after London placement under my belt.I now produce fresh, engaging, and dynamic design creative for digital advertising, marketing campaigns, theme park attractions, working closely alongside a talented Marketing team. All to promote Drayton Manor Resort in the most effective and exciting method possible.I can guarantee expertise and a wealth of experience, the final outcome of the design process is not the end of my creative input, you can be assured that maintaining brand continuity and freshly injected excitement remains my priority.Spend time with me and you'll understand why I wanted to be an Actor, but you'll be glad I didn't as my energy provides office enthusiasm and endless creative steer.www.linkedin.com/in/ross-ballingerwww.behance.net/rossballinger(Portfolio)Instagram @rossballingerTwitter @rossballingerTikTok @rossballinger Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in, or working with, visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with two great team members from Drayton Manor, Danielle Nicholls, Senior Content Executive, and Ross Ballinger, the Design and Brand Manager. We discuss the complex rebranding process. And how building a great social media community can mean your fans having your back when it comes to big change. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Woohoo, I've got Danielle and Ross from Drayton Manor on the podcast today. Hello.Danielle Nicholls: Hi.Ross Ballinger: Hello there. Very excited to be here.Kelly Molson: I love how excited you are. I'm just talking, listeners, Danielle and Ross are literally the most pumped guests I've ever had on the podcast.Ross Ballinger: That's it, we'd better live up to that now.Danielle Nicholls: I know, right?Kelly Molson: They've got a snazzy Drayton Manor background behind them, which is looking fierce. But as ever, we're going to start with our icebreaker questions. Imagine that you're just down your pub with your mates. This is how I need you to feel with the icebreaker questions.Ross Ballinger: Okay. Get a few beers in.Kelly Molson: Ready?Ross Ballinger: Yeah.Kelly Molson: What are you most likely to buy when you exit through the gift shop?Danielle Nicholls: Pin badge, I reckon. Yeah, I've got a little pin badge collection.Kelly Molson: I like this. Ross?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, I'm very similar. I'm fridge magnet.Kelly Molson: You can't go wrong with a fridge magnet.Ross Ballinger: No. And we've got a secondary fridge, under the stairs, which where we keep the beers. And that's where all the fridge magnets go, at the end, if we've been to an attraction.Danielle Nicholls: I love it.Kelly Molson: Is that because your house is beautiful and your partner does not want them on her fridge and you have to hide them?Ross Ballinger: Exactly. Exactly that. The wife does not want them on the normal fridge. They're hidden behind the door.Kelly Molson: Oh, I like her style.Ross Ballinger: But I've got to get a fridge magnet.Kelly Molson: Pin badges, fridge magnets, excellent choices. Mine would be a rubber. Have I told you about my rubber collection?Danielle Nicholls: That's interesting, no.Ross Ballinger: So you collect branded rubbers?Kelly Molson: Right. Well, I used to when I was a kid. I'm going to show you them. I've got them on the desk next to me.Danielle Nicholls: Oh my God, please do.Kelly Molson: I'm sorry, listeners. For the people that are listening, this is rubbish. But if you're watching the YouTube video, hello. Welcome to my rubber collection.Danielle Nicholls: Amazing.Kelly Molson: So they still smell. Again, this is not podcast material, but they smell absolutely incredible.Ross Ballinger: Smell really good.Danielle Nicholls: Oh my God, I love it.Kelly Molson: This is an '80s collection of novelty rubbers.Danielle Nicholls: What's your oldest rubber in there, which have you had the longest?Kelly Molson: So there's one in there from the planetarium, the London Planetarium.Ross Ballinger: Doesn't exist anymore. There you go, that's memorabilia.Kelly Molson: Look at my Thorpe Park one, that's my Thorpe Park one.Danielle Nicholls: Oh my gosh, that is a throwback.Ross Ballinger: Oh, that's a good one.Kelly Molson: This is an old one as well. Anyway-Ross Ballinger: Everyone still does rubbers, so we fit in there with you.Kelly Molson: Because I can collect them.Ross Ballinger: Pin badge, magnet, rubber.Danielle Nicholls: We stick together.Ross Ballinger: That's a perfect combo.Kelly Molson: It's like the perfect triangle. We're the perfect gift shop triangle. Okay, all right, next one. If you had to live in a sitcom for the rest of your life, which sitcom would you choose and why?Ross Ballinger: Oh, mine's easy.Danielle Nicholls: I feel like we're going to be the same.Ross Ballinger: Yeah.Danielle Nicholls: Friends.Ross Ballinger: Friends, yeah.Kelly Molson: Aww. Who would you be, if you had to be one of the characters?Danielle Nicholls: I'm like a perfect mix between Phoebe, Rachel, and Monica, I think.Kelly Molson: Nice, okay. Again, another little triangle.Danielle Nicholls: Maybe more towards Phoebe, I'm a bit more hippie, I guess.Kelly Molson: Ross, what about you?Ross Ballinger: I love all the guys. I love for all the guys. Because I just love Chandler because he's so funny. But then Ross is funny as well, when he doesn't try to be funny. But Ross is just such a good actor. And you don't realise, until you watch it 17,000 times, actually how good of an actor he was. I think I'd have to-Danielle Nicholls: Can you be a Gunther?Ross Ballinger: No, no. I think I just have to sway towards Chandler. Just because he was known for being comedic and stupid.Kelly Molson: And now you feel like that's your life role?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I would go and live Chandler's life any day.Kelly Molson: Okay, I love this. All right, good, good answers. It's what I thought you were going to say. This is what I thought.Ross Ballinger: Did you?Kelly Molson: Yeah, I thought it was going to be Friends. All right. If you had to pick one item to win a lifetime supply of, what would you pick?Danielle Nicholls: That is so hard.Ross Ballinger: I know. Probably whiskey, lifetime supply of whiskey, just coming out the tap.Kelly Molson: It's a good choice.Danielle Nicholls: I genuinely don't know. That's really, really hard.Ross Ballinger: It's got to be food or drink, surely.Danielle Nicholls: It's got to be crisps or something like that. You can't beat a crisps and dip combo.Kelly Molson: Yeah. What about a crisp sandwich? How do we feel about crisp sandwiches?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah, yeah.Danielle Nicholls: Oo, I'm not sure about that one.Kelly Molson: What?Danielle Nicholls: I'm not sure.Ross Ballinger: Come one, you're Northern. You can put anything in a sandwich.Danielle Nicholls: I would put crisps inside a cheese sandwich or something like that. But I wouldn't just have the crisps.Kelly Molson: See, I would do it either. I'm happy to have a filling sandwich with crisps in it. Or just a plain crisp sandwich.Ross Ballinger: I'd do either.Kelly Molson: What I really love about you two is how well you get on. And we're going to talk a little bit about this in the podcast today about your roles and what you do at Drayton Manor. But you look like-Ross Ballinger: Is it that evident?Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's that evident. But even from your social media channels... You guys feature quite heavily across Drayton Manor's social media channels. And, honestly, it just looks like you have the best time ever. And I want to hear more about it. But, firstly, I need your unpopular opinions. What have you prepared for us?Ross Ballinger: Okay, do you want to go first?Danielle Nicholls: As Ross alluded, I'm very, very Northern, I think. My accent a little bit, but more like how I am. So mine is, it's not a bap, it's not a bread roll, it's not a cob, it's a muffin.Kelly Molson: What?Danielle Nicholls: A muffin. That's mine.Ross Ballinger: It's a cob, it's a cob.Danielle Nicholls: No, it's a muffin.Ross Ballinger: Cob. You call it a cob.Danielle Nicholls: A muffin.Kelly Molson: No, it's a bun. What's wrong with you all?Ross Ballinger: Do you say bun? A muffin's a cake.Danielle Nicholls: I say batch as well. My partner calls it a batch, which is crazy to me. But muffin, we'll go muffin.Kelly Molson: Okay. For now, we'll accept muffin. Ross?Danielle Nicholls: Moving on.Ross Ballinger: Mine is, I just think soap operas are crap, honestly. I was going to swear, but I can't stand soap operas. And I know there's a lot of people out there that love them. But I just can't, I can't watch them. I just think they're so depressing. And if they're on, if I accidentally get home and the channel's on where it's on, I get anxious. And I have to find the remote as soon as I can to turn it off. What a waste of your life. What a waste of time, honestly. Hours and hours. And you add that up over a week and a year, think what else you could be doing. Honestly, if I turn one on now by accident, it's the same actors that are in it 20, 30 years ago. And I think, "What have they done with their life as well? They've just been in a soap opera for 30 years."Kelly Molson: These are excellent unpopular opinions. Listeners, please let me know if you agree or disagree. Thank you for preparing those for us today. I appreciate it.Ross Ballinger: No problem.Kelly Molson: Right, you guys work together. Tell me a little bit about your roles and what you do there?Ross Ballinger: So my title is design and brand manager. So I'm technically like lead designer for the resort. And the brand guardian. I look after the brand guidelines. So yeah, I'll produce, with me and my little team, everything that goes out graphically or visually across all the channels, website, printed media. So yeah.Danielle Nicholls: You definitely underplayed yourself there.Ross Ballinger: Did I?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. You do so much. You say your little team, you and one other person. You smash everything, literally everything.Ross Ballinger: Aw, thanks, Danielle.Kelly Molson: That's a lot of work for you and your team.Ross Ballinger: It is, because if you think, in the industry, I can imagine people on a parallel with us would have bigger teams, bigger resource. Because basically Drayton Manor is a massive entity. It's not just a theme park, it's a hotel as well. It's a zoo. Then we have Thomas Land, which could be considered as a separate entity. So they're what I consider as four blue chip clients. And then we operate as a little agency within the resort that looks after all those. But then, you've got the resort's departments as well, which could be clusters of clients. So you've got catering, retail, they're the big ones I can think off my head. But they all have their graphical requirements as well, design requirements. So yeah, it's a massive entity and we look after it all.Kelly Molson: And how many... Did you say there's two of you?Ross Ballinger: There's two of us, yeah.Kelly Molson: That's mad. That is mad. So I really resonate with this because I, obviously, come from an agency background. I set up my agency nearly 20 years ago. I feel ancient. But what you're doing is you are essentially a mini agency with loads of clients and two of you. It's crazy. So I can imagine it's quite stressful, but also lots of fun because you get to work on a lot of variety.Ross Ballinger: Yeah. Oh, very varied. Yeah, every day is different. And that is not just a cliche that you can just say. Literally, every day is so different. Because it's an exciting company as well, where there's new things happening all the time, constantly evolving strategies, or new things come in and go in. So yeah, it's very varied.Kelly Molson: Danielle, what's your role? Because the two of you do work quite closely together as well, don't you?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. Yeah, we do. So my role is, the title is senior content executive. So I primarily look after the social media channels, so Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and TikTok. Creating the content, taking the pictures, work with video agents. Sometimes creating a video in-house as well. And all of the community engagement that goes alongside that as well. Whilst also writing any copy, creating the content for the website, and any signage requirements. Literally anything that you see that has text on it, normally, me and Ross have worked together to create that. And with social, it's both paid and organic social media. So all of the adverts you see, alongside all of the organic stuff you see on our feeds. I also help out with PR as well. So we have a PR agency that we work with, but we liaise alongside them. And now, we're getting more into the traditional media as well. So the pair leaflets and out of home magazines, articles. Yeah, little bit of everything now that it's-Kelly Molson: That's mad. I love that you were just glossing over elements of your job that I'm like, "That's a whole person's job there." And we do the social community building and we do this bit and this bit. Wow, yeah, there's a lot. I just think that goes to show, even... We talk to attractions of all kinds of shapes and sizes on this podcast. And I think it just goes to show that even with an attraction that is a big attraction, and it's perceived to be a very big attraction, actually you're working with really small teams here. And there's a lot on each person's shoulder and a lot of responsibility. And I think it's really important that we highlight that, that you're doing a lot there.Ross Ballinger: But the extended team is really good as well. We've got really good team members. So the rapport across the whole team is very tight.Danielle Nicholls: In terms of the marketing side, I report into a digital marketing manager. And she is insane, she's amazing at what she does. And then, alongside me, we also have a digital marketing exec. And how it splits out is, he looks after all of the technical side, so SEO, CRM, that kind of thing. And I look after the creative content. And then we both report in to the digital manager.Kelly Molson: It sounds like-Danielle Nicholls: It's a little team but-Kelly Molson: It sounds like such fun roles as well. Genuinely, they sound really cool. Because I know, Danielle, you are a bit of a theme park... I'm going to say nerd. But you're theme park nut, right? You love theme parks.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah, absolutely, yeah.Kelly Molson: And I'm guessing, Ross, to work in a theme park, you've got to love a theme park.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, absolutely.Kelly Molson: Did you absolutely tailor your careers to make this happen? Was this always your ultimate goals? Like, "I want to work in an attraction."Ross Ballinger: Yes and no, kind of. So I studied to be a graphic designer, went to university for three years. And then I worked as a digital artist while I was at uni. And then I went straight into a local agency, after getting quite a sought after placement in London. And then I worked for an agency for nearly nine years. So I learnt my craft there, really. Worked my way up from a junior, up to a senior creative. And I ended up looking after all the top clients there as well. But almost nine years was enough. I knew I wanted to go in-house because it was at that time, there was a bit of a boom of companies and clients getting in-house designers. Because they knew how cost effective it would be to have your graphic designer in-house. So I started looking about, and I wanted a fun industry. There was no way I was going to go and work for a boiler company. I don't want to bad mouth any other companies out there but something engineering or-Danielle Nicholls: More typically fun.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, I wanted to go full on fun. And I used to come to Drayton as a kid as well so I knew Drayton Manor.Kelly Molson: That's nice to have that connection, isn't it? You know the brand, you've lived it.Ross Ballinger: I've got pictures of me around the park when I'm seven or eight with my mum and dad. So I have that nostalgic connection. And I was a big to a big Thomas fan as well when I was a kid growing up. So Thomas the Tank Engine, I had the wallpaper, had the bedspreads, loved the episodes. So when I knew that the big blue engine was here as well, it was like-Danielle Nicholls: Big boss Thomas.Ross Ballinger: Big boss, yeah, Thomas is your boss, any day. Yeah. So I was a fan of attractions anyway. Who's not a fan of going out on days out? And so it worked.Kelly Molson: Exactly, cool. But, Danielle, you went out and made that happen, didn't you? This was your focus.Danielle Nicholls: It was, yeah. I think, maybe not so much early on, I guess this is different, but from the age of about 13, 14, I knew I wanted to work in marketing. But I wanted to do marketing for a dance company at the time. So I did a couple of placements at some dance companies, Northern Ballet, Phoenix Dance Theatre, places like that. And that was the dream up until about 17, I want to say, when I was at college. I knew that I wanted theme parks. So I went and did a media and marketing degree. And as soon as I got to my second year, I was like, "Right, that's it. I need to find a theme park. I need to get experience. I need to connect with as many people as I can on LinkedIn." And it was my focus.Kelly Molson: That's interesting. Hang on, let me just... Because that isn't a typical 17-year-old's path, is it? They wouldn't necessarily go, "I know that I want to work in this industry, therefore, I need to connect with people that can help me make that happen." That's a really good piece of advice.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. And I was literally on it, messaging people. I think I messaged, at the time, the PR manager for Legoland. And was like, "Hello, anything you can help me with." I was really a bit brutal. But yeah, then I went to uni, and did everything I could whilst I was there to try and get the connections still. I applied for a couple of grad schemes with some other groups and, sadly, didn't make it through to those. So as a bit of a bridge between finishing uni and starting Drayton, I went to work for a tour operator, who sold overseas UK holidays, but also sold theatre, attraction tickets, theme parks. So it was a bit of a gap between the two.And I worked there for a year, and then the job at Drayton came up. And at the time, I was living in York, working for this tour operator. And I was like, "I've got to go for it." It was a marketing officer job, so a little bit different to what I do now. But I had to. So I drove two and a bit hours up, in my little... I had a little C1 at the time.Ross Ballinger: But I feel that we both came in at Drayton in our respective roles as entry level, really. Because I had just started as a graphic designer. I took a pay cut to come here because I really wanted to start here. It was never about anything like that. So I wanted to work at Drayton. So that proves that I wanted to work. And our roles have both escalated over the seasons that we've been here.Danielle Nicholls: Because I did move so far, and away from my family and stuff, it was a big jump. I had three weeks to find a house and somewhere to live as well, which was fun. But I managed to do it and, honestly, I don't regret it. I don't look back at all. It's probably the best thing I've ever done.Ross Ballinger: If you want it, you make it happen, don't you?Kelly Molson: Yeah, totally. And I think it really says a lot about the Drayton Manor brand that you've done that as well. There is a real... It's clear with both of you, how much you love it. And it's amazing that you've... Ross, you've taken a pay cut. You've changed where you live to come and work and be part of what's happening there. So I think that's a real testimony to the brand itself. And that's a couple of things that we really want to focus on for this conversation today. So I'm going to start with the focus on you, Danielle, if that's okay?Danielle Nicholls: Okay, yeah, that's fine.Kelly Molson: Because I think what you mentioned really briefly, when you went, "Oh yeah and we do this kind of thing as well," is what you said around the social community side. So you have built the social community and I want you to explain how you've been able to do that and what that's looked like. So tell us a little bit about that element of your role.Danielle Nicholls: So I've been here just over four years now. And in that time, we've been through so much change but, also, social has changed so much. So when I first started I was looking at social but it was more, "Let's just post and leave it," kind of thing. And see how it is engaged with, see how it works. But, over time, I've tried to hone it so it's more about a social community, rather than we're just talking at them. It's more we're talking with them and we're engaging with them. Like I say, we've grown into different channels. So we were really just focusing on Facebook. We had a little bit of Twitter, and a little bit of Instagram, but it was primarily Facebook. Whereas now, we've brought in more LinkedIn stuff and TikTok as well, which has really helped. I think in terms of building the social community though, there's so many different to-dos that you can stick to. But, for me, it's more about seeing what works for your brand. Because it doesn't always fit the same, it's not just one formula that fits all.Kelly Molson: And I guess, like you said, about bringing in different social channels, you need to work out where your audience is. I guess where you're getting the most engagement as well. And then, you are a small team, how do you then divide up where you spend your time? You've got to spend it in the areas that you're going to get that engagement. So you might then end up dropping certain channels, or not being as... I don't know, not putting as much effort into those ones, just because it's just not where you get the engagement.Danielle Nicholls: I think in terms of the different channels, they all have a different audience, if that makes sense. So Facebook is very family orientated. You get the grandparents, the mums on there. Whereas, Twitter is theme park fans and slightly younger, it's very conversational. TikTok is younger, but the demographics on there are shifting slightly to be everyone at the moment. Because it's where all the trends are and things, there's a big range. Our audience on there is 13 to maybe 35, 40 upwards. So it is very varied. Instagram is a mix between Twitter and Facebook. So you do get the families and the mums on there, but then you get the theme park fans that just want to see pictures of roller coasters. And with the introduction of reels as well, that's trying to tackle TikTok, so that's really important. And LinkedIn is corporate.But we do have a team, like I say, we have a digital manager as well, but she's so busy with all the other things that she's got to look after. So the social, like creating the content and community engagement, just sits with me. So I have a big plan of all the different channels and the different days. And because I know the Drayton brand inside and out, I know what works now. So we tend to post every other day on Facebook, every day on Twitter. And we try to do every weekday on TikTok. Instagram, very similar to Facebook. But there's not really one that I'd prioritise, necessarily. At first, it was TikTok, at the start of this year, because obviously that was where it was taking off. But now, it's just about tailoring the message across, and trying to keep active on all of them.Kelly Molson: Do you have to really tailor what you put out on each of the channels as well? So you don't do, "This is going to go out across all of our socials." You have to really think about how those... Because I guess there's subtle nuances about how people react to certain things on different channels, and how they might communicate back with you.Danielle Nicholls: I think, from what I've been doing this season in particular, is Twitter's been very conversational. So I've not necessarily been worried about always having an image on there, or always having a piece of media on there. Just some text normally works, so long as it's engaging and people feel like they want to respond to it. Whether there's a CTA on there, or it's just something that's humorous, then that tends to work quite well.Kelly Molson: It's no mean feat. That is an awful lot of work that goes into that. And I think it's really interesting to hear about the tailoring as well. And how you're going to get different reactions, from different people, on different social media platforms.Danielle Nicholls: We tend to get, particularly on Facebook, in the comments, they're always really interesting to read. They're so different to Twitter. Because Facebook, sometimes you get some complaints in there. But because our community is so strong now, we get other people responding for us, which is a good... It's amazing, I love it.Kelly Molson: That's phenomenal.Danielle Nicholls: Sometimes you've got to moderate it because they might give an answer that's not necessarily right. But yeah, a lot of the time they'll be sticking up for us. Or they'll be responding to the questions for us, which is interesting.Kelly Molson: That's really impressive, and I didn't know that that happened. Is that part of, because you've put so much work into building your community, they're now backing you to other people?Danielle Nicholls: Exactly, yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. They've become our brand guardians without us making them, if that makes sense. Because they're so loyal to the brand, they just want to do all their best for us.Kelly Molson: How does that happen? Is that a time thing? Is it purely because you've spent so much time investing in those relationships that that happens now? Nobody's ever told me this before, that that happens.Danielle Nicholls: I think it's that but, also, like you say, Drayton is such a strong brand. And particularly since I've been here, we've just gone from strength to strength. So I think that helps as well. We also use user generated content. So particularly at the end of a big campaign, so Halloween, we'll say, "Share your pictures with us and we'll share them on our feeds." And that really gives them a sense of belonging as part of the community. Because they'll be scrolling down their Facebook or Instagram or wherever, and they'll see a picture of maybe their little one. Or they'll see themselves and, yeah, they love it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I love that the whole user generated content is brilliant, because it allows people to see themselves at the place as well, doesn't it?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So from a sales perspective, I think if people can look at something and go, "Oh, well, that family looks just like mine." Or, "That person looks just like me." Or, "They've got this thing, just like I have." Then they're more inclined to maybe buy a ticket to come and see it as well. So it works two ways.Danielle Nicholls: It's about recognising the top fans as well. So I know Facebook has the top fan badge. And, on Twitter, we've got a closed community group which anyone can join. That's just called Drayton Manor Top Fans. And we, every so often, give them a little bit of information early before we give it to everybody else. Or little things like that, that make them feel special.Kelly Molson: So they feel like VIPs.Danielle Nicholls: So it keeps them interactive. Yes, exactly.Kelly Molson: They've got their own mini community. They feel like VIPs because they get to know stuff early. That's brilliant. Again, I've never heard any other attraction talk about doing stuff like that. Do you think that would be... I always ask about top tips, and what you would recommend other people to do that are building communities. Do you think that would be one of your top tips, is really invest in them?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. And also, respond in a personal manner, rather than it being very corporate. Include your tone of voice, wherever you can, and make sure your tone of voice is dead on point, according to your brand guidelines. But also, be bold and brave. We always say that, don't we?Ross Ballinger: Bold and brave, yeah.Danielle Nicholls: If you sway away from your brand guidelines slightly, in order to respond, particularly on Twitter, it works really well. Then don't worry too much about that. It's okay, so long as it's in keeping with your values then it's okay.Ross Ballinger: And it's evident out there as well with all the other big companies. And it becomes a news story, doesn't it, when you get supermarkets battling on Twitter. And it's exposure and engagement at the same time.Kelly Molson: And people love that.Danielle Nicholls: That's another really important thing.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, people love it. It's a comedy show.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah, engaging with other brands helps.Kelly Molson: Yeah, they want to know about the people behind the brands, don't they? And if they realise that your brand face, actually there's a human behind it who's got a sense of humour, I think that goes a really long way.Danielle Nicholls: That's what we try and do.Kelly Molson: You do it perfectly, because I love your Twitter chat. You've got a great Twitter chat. We've talked loads about brand today, and that leads me on to what I want to talk to you about, Ross, which is the Drayton Manor brand itself. Because I think, I might have got this wrong, but it's a 70 year old brand. So Drayton Manor's about 70 years old.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, 1950 was when it first came about, yeah. The Bryan family started it in the 1950s. So George Bryan Sr., had this vision to create an inland pleasure resort for the local community. And I guess, in short story, it escalated from there.Danielle Nicholls: We've got a book all about it in the shops.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah. So yeah, we owe a lot to the Bryan family, really, for escalating such a tiny little brainchild into a massive attraction that we are today. So yeah, I can remember thinking that we needed to rebrand years ago though, when I first started. Because I think it's just one of those that was a little bit... I don't want to say anything bad about it but obviously it needed to change. It was a little bit outdated.Danielle Nicholls: It was a bit archaic, wasn't it?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, it was a bit archaic. It stood the test of time and it did a good job.Kelly Molson: So how long had the existing brand been in place, before you got your mitts on it?Ross Ballinger: I think the last logo that we had in the brand was probably in place for about 20 years. I think it's early 2000s, the last logo.Danielle Nicholls: There was always slight variations, wasn't there?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, there was always a few modifications on it.Kelly Molson: But I can imagine that things had changed quite dramatically over those 20 years as well. So you talk about the need for a rebrand, it was really needed.Ross Ballinger: Absolutely.Kelly Molson: What I always think's quite interesting is how long some of these things take. Because I think that people don't fully understand how long a rebrand can actually take you. So can you remember when those conversations first started?Ross Ballinger: Since I started, it's always been a project that was a pinnacle project that we always wanted to try and get on to. But just in terms of budgets and time, we never got around to it. Obviously, it came to the point, I think it was November 2021, when we first sat down and said, "Now is the time to do it." Because, obviously, we were bought out by a big company, Looping Group, and it was the perfect opportunity to do it. It's obviously a new era so it made perfect sense.Kelly Molson: So when did you launch it? So November, you sat down and went, "Right, November '21, we're going to do this." When did it actually launch?Ross Ballinger: Literally-Danielle Nicholls: Two minutes later.Ross Ballinger: Six months.Kelly Molson: Six months?Ross Ballinger: Six months, yeah. We put a brand team together, firstly. And, honestly, because we're such a small in-house team, we knew that we needed some help. So we got agency help, and we got local agencies to pitch in their best processes. So they were the experts in doing it, and they knew what protocols and procedures to go through. And we chose a really talented local agency in Birmingham. Yeah, started the project in '21, and launched it six months later.Kelly Molson: Wow, that's a phenomenal amount of work in six months.Ross Ballinger: Yeah. In, I don't know, design industry terms and the size of the business, that's no time at all, really.Kelly Molson: No, it's not. I honestly thought you were going to say we started talking about this three years ago and it took two years. It was a two year process.Ross Ballinger: The best thing was, is that we were doing that, alongside launching our brand new Vikings area. So we've got three new rides launch. We're launching a new website at the same time.Danielle Nicholls: We had a new booking system.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, a new ticketing system. As well as the regular day to day work and seasonal campaigns to market. It was literally like all Christmases come at once.Danielle Nicholls: It was. Everything we'd wanted for so long, they just went, "There you go."Ross Ballinger: All at the same time.Kelly Molson: You can have it all, but you need to do it in this amount of time. Wow. That is such a lot to all be happening at the same time. But I'm not going to lie, this happens at attractions. Suddenly, they just spring into action. We have just worked with a client with exactly the same. They did a rebrand, new website, booking system, all at the same time. And you're like, "Ah, the world is on fire. What's happening?"Danielle Nicholls: It was great though.Ross Ballinger: It was good though. We collaborated for most of it. The agency were a bit of a rock, really. And they did a lot of the legwork in terms of the brand personality, putting together the guidelines, creating the initial design concepts. But I did sit alongside them and collaborate with them. It would've just been a too big a task solely, on my own, internally, which it wouldn't have been possible. But I'd like to think I had a lot of input, inspirational design ideas along the way, that probably helped chisel the final outcome and the look of the brand that we've got now.Danielle Nicholls: Just logos in itself, you had sheets and sheets of-Ross Ballinger: Sheets and sheets of logos, yeah, logo concepts and variations. But I know I wanted something that was super flexible in terms of composition and layout. Because I know what I'd created before, it was archaic, but it was flexible. It would work on all different platforms. And then the typeface that we chose for the final logo was one of my early typefaces that I pitched in. And the swirl, that was one of my babies, that was one of my original concepts. So I always wanted to push that.Kelly Molson: Yeah, yeah, yeah. I love that. But that's what makes for a good agency client relationship is that you do collaborate. That's how it should be. And they obviously nailed it. And I know that you would've had so many stakeholders involved in this process as well. So I can imagine how big a challenge that was to actually come to a final, "This is what it's going to be like," and everyone be happy.Ross Ballinger: It was a challenge, but only because we had a lot of passionate stakeholders that wanted valued input. And they had strong views, which was very fair.Kelly Molson: So the bit that ties these two stories together, the things that we've talked about today, is that... I think you alluded to the fact, Ross. That when the brand launched, it's a big change for people. The way that you've talked about the brand is incredibly passionate. I can imagine that local people, people that come to visit every week, every month, they are so... The brand is in their heart. So a big change like this can be quite uncomfortable for people. And when the brand launched, there was a little bit of-Ross Ballinger: Yeah, there was a bit of uncertainty, yeah, and a bit of shock. Yeah, they've had a logo installed in their brain for 20 years. But when we wanted to launch the rebrand, it wasn't just about a logo. We did focus on the logo probably, in hindsight, more than we should have.Danielle Nicholls: I think that's maybe a bit of a learning curve, particularly on social. The asset that we used was the old logo going into the new logo, which we thought was great. But then when we put it out, we were like, "Actually, maybe we should have focused more on..." Like you say, brand personality and visions and values, rather than just the logo.Ross Ballinger: Because the end user hasn't really seen the six months of graft that's gone into creating that. And we did portray it in five seconds.Kelly Molson: So they just get the, "Hey, this is new, you should love it." But they haven't understood about the process of why you've done certain things, and the decisions that have been made.Danielle Nicholls: Exactly, yeah. We had a blog which explained it all perfectly, but you had to click through to the blog. People didn't necessarily do that. They just saw the logo and keyboard-Ross Ballinger: But I like the journey we went through because the people that didn't actually really like it in the beginning and really just sacked it off straight away, they're the people that have warmed to it now. And seen it in execution, and how adaptable it is, and how we can get our messages across. And the fact that they love it now, and I love that, that we've turned them round.Danielle Nicholls: Because the main thing we were trying to do, really, is come away from fun family memories, and turn it to fun for everyone. That was the main message that we wanted to portray, particularly on the social channels, and in brand in general. But I think going forward we're definitely going to achieve that.Kelly Molson: But it's quite interesting because I think what you talked about earlier, Danielle, your social community, they would've played a big part in this when you launched it. So I guess it would've been harder if you hadn't already built those relationships and nurtured that community. Launching something like this, would've been 1,000 times more difficult than actually... All right, there was a bit of a bump in the road, but it wasn't the end of the world. And people, like you say, are now warming to it and loving it. Would that have happened if you hadn't put all that work into the social community aspect?Danielle Nicholls: Possibly not. I think, like I said earlier, there was a lot of people, they had our backs. So there was people like, "This is..." Being very negative. But people were responding saying, "Look, they have to move forward, they've been through this, that and the other. They have to move forward. See the positives," which was good.Ross Ballinger: I think as well, probably because we've got such a good social community, they felt comfortable with saying what they thought about it and being honest.Danielle Nicholls: Which helps because we did run focus groups beforehand, as part of the rebrand process, with suppliers, annual pass holders, staff members, literally with so many people. But until it's out there, you're not necessarily going to get that big, full, wider picture. So it did help us with how we were going to move forward with the rebrand as well, looking at their feedback.Kelly Molson: So you actually took some of their... So obviously from the focus groups, you would've taken on board some of the input that you got from those. When it launched, was there anything that you took on board from the feedback that you were getting at that point? That you could look to, not necessarily change, but I guess look at the ways that you implement it in a different way?Danielle Nicholls: I think the main thing was, like we said, the logo situation. Because everyone was so focused on the logo, we knew that, moving forwards, as we were going to explore the brand even more, we had to make sure it was about the imagery and the personality. And including the shop line there and things like that, rather than... I think that learning curve definitely came from the feedback.Kelly Molson: Brilliant. It is such a huge project to go through a rebrand. And I think there's always that anxious moment when you unveil it to people and they go... It could be a bit Marmite. But I think the way that it's been managed, that's the important part of this story, really. And that comes back to, again, it all fits together about how the two of you work together as well. And I think that's quite an important aspect to take away from this podcast episode as well. It's about, it's a team, this is a team thing that happens here. And it's not just about one person. So the brand has launched and then, suddenly, it's all on Danielle's shoulders to deal with all the stuff that's coming back. It's, this is a team thing.Ross Ballinger: Well, no, it cascaded all the way through the company, didn't it?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah.Ross Ballinger: People would be like... Even engineers, and everyone, and HR, they were like... They felt the same... It was almost a little bit of disappointment that the reaction wasn't amazing. But then, everybody felt it.Danielle Nicholls: But we all came together and-Ross Ballinger: Yeah.Danielle Nicholls: Our director of people bought us a box of Krispy Kremes in the office that day. And was like, "There you go, guys. Are you all okay?" And we were like, "Yeah, it's all good."Ross Ballinger: But there's obviously horror stories of brands doing this and reverting back. But we knew that we'd got something that was amazing that we were going to stick to. And once we knew we could roll it out, that it was going to flourish. So we're just glad that we stuck to our guns and just... We had the negativity at the beginning and, now, people love it.Danielle Nicholls: Like you say, we have people coming up to us, just telling me it's good. Saying, "I wasn't sure at first? But now we love it."Kelly Molson: Ah, see, and that's what you want. You want it to be loved by everybody that sees it now. That's brilliant. You just reminded me of something that I saw a few weeks ago. Have you seen the video when Staples changed their logo, they put out?Danielle Nicholls: Yes.Ross Ballinger: Yes, yes.Kelly Molson: That's just like, as you were talking about it, I was going, "Oh my God, I watched that last week." And it's so crazy.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. And they're all like, "Whoopa." It's amazing.Kelly Molson: "Wow, look at us." And I just didn't think it was amazing either. But I just felt really sorry for the whole team being forced to clap it and, "Yay, a logo." Oh dear, if that's what they thought brand was-Ross Ballinger: I loved it. I just think that's how you should do it, even if it is a bit cringey.Danielle Nicholls: I thought it was hilarious.Ross Ballinger: What they've done is open up the stapler in the logo, and put it on the side. But sometimes that probably would've cost them an arm and a leg just to do that as well.Danielle Nicholls: So much time.Kelly Molson: There's a massive buildup to that happening as well. And I was a bit like, "Wow, that's a massive anticlimax."Danielle Nicholls: A big press conference for it.Ross Ballinger: I just loved everything about it, honestly.Kelly Molson: The next rebrand, that's what you'll be doing, Ross. You'll get everyone in the attraction, you'll launch it on a big screen. I think what you've done, and what you've achieved, is phenomenal. Thank you for coming on the podcast and talking to me about it today. I really appreciate it. As ever, we always ask our guests if they've got a book that they love that they'd like to share with our audience. So you can pick one each.Danielle Nicholls: I think for me... And going back to me being a theme park nerd, this ties in very well. John Wardley, who is-Ross Ballinger: No.Danielle Nicholls: I know, right. John Wardley, who is a big theme park, mainly rollercoaster, designer. He's done work for Merlin, PortAventura, Oakwood, so many. He was really, really big. He worked on things like Nemesis, Oblivion, Katanga Canyon at Alton Towers, was Megafobia at Oakwood. He had an autobiography called Creating Your Nemesis, which basically spanned through his life of how we got into the theme park industry and where we went through. And it's very story based and anecdotal, but it was really inspiring. And helped me create the courage to knock on doors and do that kind of thing.Kelly Molson: Oh, I love that. Great book. Great book choice.Ross Ballinger: That's a really good response to the question. See, I'm a designer so I don't really read. I can read, but I just don't read. I'm very visual, as you can imagine. So I'm just not a fan of reading. I prefer to just scroll through Instagram and TikTok. But I have read books in the past. I remember one book, I think it's probably the only book I have read, was The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. I think it's Dan Brown. But that's only because I was interested in Leonardo da Vinci, who was obviously a scientist or an... He was a bit of an artist and an architect. So I was more interested in his theories, and his Vitruvian Man, I think it is. So I was more interested in his works, really. But other than that, I do own every book by Jamie Oliver, so if a cookbook works.Kelly Molson: I don't know if you should be sharing that.Ross Ballinger: So yeah, I love Jamie Oliver. 5 Ingredients, 30 Minute Meals, brilliant.Kelly Molson: Jamie Oliver gets a bad rap and I don't really know why because he seems like a nice guy.Danielle Nicholls: Are we going back to unpopular opinion?Kelly Molson: Well, I think we should. But also a little story in that. I live in Saffron Walden, Jamie Oliver lives five minutes around the corner.Ross Ballinger: He's down the road.Kelly Molson: He goes to the market in my town every Saturday, and goes and buys his-Ross Ballinger: Oh, I'd love to meet him.Danielle Nicholls: You'd be there for a selfie.Kelly Molson: Ross, join the queue. I'd love to meet him. I've lived here since 2019. I've never seen him once. All my friends have seen him. And now, it's a thing with them. They're like, "Have you seen him yet? Have you seen him?" No. And I feel like, I'm not a Jamie Oliver stalker. I'm not going to go and harass him. I just would like to live in the town and be like, "Oh yeah, I saw him this morning." I've never seen him. My mum has been messaging me once, and she's been in the cafe in Saffron Walden, and been like, "I think Jamie Oliver's on the table next to me. I'm not sure if it's him though. I don't know if it's a fat version of Jamie Oliver, or if it's actually... Oh no, it is Jamie. It's Jamie Oliver."Ross Ballinger: Oh no. I can understand why people don't like him. But he just sploshes his olive oil everywhere, sploshes it around. But he has got that passion for cooking, which is what I resonate with. So he loves what he does, he's so-Danielle Nicholls: You can't knock his passion.Ross Ballinger: You can't knock his passion. So I'm in tune with that.Kelly Molson: All right. Listeners, well, I think that we should scrap Ross's book choice, and I think we should go with the Jamie Oliver book. So if you head over to Twitter, and you retweet this Twitter announcement with, "I want Ross and Danielle's books," then you might be in with a chance of winning Danielle's book and a Jamie Oliver cookbook. Does that sound fair?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, that'd be ace.Kelly Molson: I feel like you were more passionate about that.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah, yeah.Kelly Molson: All right, let's do that then. Thank you. It was lovely to have you both on. I've really, really enjoyed it.Ross Ballinger: Thank you.Danielle Nicholls: Thank you.Kelly Molson: And also thank you for the lovely little tour that I got of the new Vikings area at Drayton Manor, when you hosted the UK Theme Park Awards earlier this year.Danielle Nicholls: I'm glad you liked it.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, we did, yeah.Kelly Molson: It was awesome.Danielle Nicholls: It was amazing.Ross Ballinger: I think that's where you spotted us.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Well, look, I'm not going to lie, you guys were sitting behind me and you were extremely loud. And I thought, "They'll make great podcast guests."Danielle Nicholls: We were whooping everyone.Ross Ballinger: We had so much energy that day though. I was knackered by the end of the day.Kelly Molson: I loved it. No, you hosted it perfectly. It was a brilliant event. But the new area is fantastic, so definitely go on, book your ticket.Ross Ballinger: We're very proud of it.Kelly Molson: And go on and see that while you can. So thanks for coming on, guys.Ross Ballinger: Thank you.Danielle Nicholls: Thank you.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip The Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions, that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more, over on our website; rubber cheese.com/podcast.

Edge of the Web - An SEO Podcast for Today's Digital Marketer
545 | Visual Search Optimization with Crystal Carter

Edge of the Web - An SEO Podcast for Today's Digital Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 46:59


Crystal Carter, Head of SEO Communications at Wix, joins the EDGE to discuss Visual Image Search Optimization. After discussing Visual Image Search on the last episode, she dives head-first into best practices in optimizing for Visual Image Search. Crystal answers this question: How do we ensure our brands and services are part of our customer's visual search? Let's talk visual search optimization… today on the EDGE! Key Segments: [00:04:31] Throwback to Ep. 544 [00:06:35] Associated Intent [00:08:45] Caterpillars, Butterflies, Hummingbirds, Oh My! [00:09:26] EDGE of the Web Title Sponsor: edgeofthewebradio.com/pageonepower [00:10:29] Stats, Stats, Give Me More Stats [00:11:42] Ecommerce Implications [00:13:14] More Rich Images on Your Website [00:14:06] Optimizing for Visual Image Search [00:17:47] LegoLand is Cool / User Generated Content [00:20:32] AI-Powered Local Photos [00:21:40] Let's Find A Burrito [00:22:37] Bridging the Gaps [00:24:37] EDGE of the Web Sponsor: edgeofthewebradio.com/wix [00:25:09] Stock Photography [00:27:17] Infographics [00:28:13] International and Language-less [00:29:41] All Things Logo [00:36:09] Google Visual Search vs. Image Search [00:37:06] MuM Knows Best [00:39:29] Goggles or Googles? [00:43:04] Users Want Google Lens Follow our Guest: https://twitter.com/CrystalontheWeb https://www.instagram.com/crystalontheweb_/ https://uk.linkedin.com/in/crystal-carter-digital https://www.crystalcarterseo.com/ Crystal's Harnessing Visual Search for Optimization Opportunities! https://moz.com/blog/seo-opportunities-visual-search   Thanks to our Sponsors! Page One Power https://edgeofthewebradio.com/pageonepower   Wix https://edgeofthewebradio.com/wix 

TBS eFM This Morning
1115 [News Briefing] with Suh Young Choi

TBS eFM This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 20:41


1. The Firefighters Labor Union accuses Minister of Interior and Safety 이상민 for 10.29 tragedy2. Clashes regarding parliamentary inspection on the October 29th tragedy3. PPP defends 김진태 after Legoland controversy, while DP raises suspicions of intentional bankruptcy4. First Lady 김건희 is criticized for keeping public appearance schedule private5. COVID-19 vaccination rates for this year's winter season are at level6. FTX controversy causes concerns amongst Korean investors, spreading anxietySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Podcast 4 Kids
Episode 73: Nathan Went to Legoland

Podcast 4 Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 11:46


Spencer and Nathan do a speed build of the Legoland Ninjago World Lego set.  Spencer asks Nathan about his visit to Legoland.  You can watch the YouTube speed build video here: https://youtu.be/ekF49GGr3Yk

The Road Less Traveled Show
Ep 86: Harry Nima Zegarra

The Road Less Traveled Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 28:29


Join co-hosts Richard Coyne & Bill Zahller as they interview guests who left successful careers to pursue a different path on the Road Less Traveled Show! In this episode, we spend time with Harry Nima Zegarra!  Harry is a doctor who always had an interest in real estate investing.  Harry started buying single-family homes and turned that side project into an apartment syndication business through Nima Equity. A bit more about Harry: Harry is a Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Physician, real estate investor, entrepreneur, co-founder, and manager of Nima Equity. Nima Equity is a commercial real estate syndication company that helps physicians to earn passive income, lower taxes and achieve financial freedom. Harry has experience in rental properties and currently owns and manages 9 properties across the DFW metropolitan area. Harry is General Partner in 1076 units in 4 different States. Harry met his wife Mitsi in Medical School in Peru and they finished their training in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Harry currently works at a tertiary medical center in Dallas, TX. Harry and Mitsi love the outdoors. They have 2 boys, who love playing basketball and soccer. They love to vacation and travel to Cancun and Florida where they enjoy time at the beach, Disney or Legoland. Harry is also an avid runner.   Contact Harry: Website: www.nimaequity.com Email: harry@nimaequity.com YouTube: NimaEquity   Contact Bill Zahller Phone: 828-275-5035 Email: Bill@ParkCapitalPartnersLLC.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/billzahller   Contact Richard Coyne Phone: 404-245-9732 Email: Richard@ParkCapitalPartnersLLC.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/richardjcoyne   If you would like to learn more about: How Park Capital Partners connects investors with passive income-generating opportunities through real estate, Our Park Capital Value-Add Fund (a 506c fund), Our latest multifamily acquisitions, or The Park Capital Partners Foundation, Inc. (a 501(c)3 non-profit).   Please contact Park Capital Partners LLC in the following ways:  Website: ParkCapitalPartnersLLC.com Email us: info@ParkCapitalPartnersLLC.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ParkCapitalPartners/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/park-capital-partners-llc/   Music by Aliaksei Yukhnevich/Jamendo. Audio and Video production by Kerry Webb.   If you would like to be a guest on our show and have a “path change” story, please reach out to Richard at Richard@ParkCapitalPartnersLLC.com.  We would love to chat with you!

ABCs of Disability Planning
See the Sunshine in Every Child - Sunshine Foundation

ABCs of Disability Planning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 52:05


Sunshine Foundation's sole purpose is to answer the dreams of chronically ill, seriously ill, physically challenged, and abused children ages three to eighteen, whose families cannot fulfill their requests due to the financial strain that the child's illness may cause. Sunshine Foundation's special dreams can be anything from a celebrity meet and greet, a family trip, a shopping spree, or adaptive medical or therapeutic equipment! Our dreamers have requested and received items such as above-ground swimming pools, outdoor play equipment, sensory rooms, and many other amazing dream items. When asked the question, “If you could have one dream, what would it be?” the most common response from the children we serve is to visit the Central Florida theme parks. Our magical dreams may include visits to Legoland, Disney, SeaWorld, Universal, and more. Children get to meet their favorite characters, enjoy the rides, and take in all the amazing sights. Sunshine Foundation has its own Dream Village in Davenport, FL, where families may stay while on a dream trip to Central Florida! The Dream Village features nine fairy tale-themed cottages plus accessible amenities, including a heated zero-entry swimming pool, a mini-golf course, and a playground! Links mentioned: "Josh's World" (book sales support Dreamers) Warm Blanket Hugs Connect to learn more: Web - https://sunshinefoundation.org/ FB - https://www.facebook.com/sunfound Twitter - @SunFound IG - @thesunshinefoundation As an Amazon Associate, I earn commissions from qualifying purchases. For more information about True North Disability Planning: Web: https://truenorthdisabilityplanning.com/ Podcast (ABC's of Disability Planning) - https://anchor.fm/abcs-disability-planning Waypoints - https://waypoints.substack.com/ Facebook: @TrueNorthDisabilityPlanning Twitter: @NeedsNavigator Resource store (free downloads too) - https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/True-North-Disability-Planning --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/abcs-disability-planning/message

Theme Park Rangers
Updated ‘Fantasmic' returns at Disney and Universal plans to close 5 KidZone attractions (Ep. 165)

Theme Park Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:49


Mickey and pirates and scares, oh my! Orlando Sentinel tourism reporters Dewayne Bevil and Katie Rice discuss the return of an updated “Fantasmic” to Disney's Hollywood Studios, Universal Orlando's plans to close five KidZone attractions, an early Halloween Horror Nights announcement and a new opening date for Legoland's Pirate River Quest boat ride. ‘Fantasmic' returns (:31) Intense crowd reaction (5:51) Spectacular changes (7:33) Universal closing 5 KidZone attractions (15:48) Universal announces first HHN 2023 house (24:43) Legoland ride has new opening date (28:23)

Comedy Dynamics Daily
Legoland with Rhys Darby

Comedy Dynamics Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 4:41


Kiwi comic Rhys Darby, (Flight of the Conchords, What We Do in the Shadows, Wrecked, Jumanji), brings silly wonder to the stage in his latest stand-up show. His unique brand of physical comedy combines obscure observations and sound effects as he takes you on a fantastical journey into the world of mysticism, past lives…and birds. YouTube: https://bit.ly/3ymp1to Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ComedyDynamics Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ComedyDynamics TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/J1wucyQ/ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/ComedyDynamics http://www.comedydynamics.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Choose Your Happy Place
Travel to San Diego California with Bonnie Taylor

Choose Your Happy Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 48:44


Join me as I talk to Bonnie from famdiego all about the beautiful San Diego California. Bonnie is a travel influencer, who has every little tip about San Diego you could imagine. She has lived in San Diego for almost 20 years. These are the topics we will cover this week:   Tips for traveling as a solo traveler Logistics of traveling to San Diego (hotels, car rentals, airports) Favorite beaches in San Diego Favorite places to visit in San Diego Amusement park tips (Lego Land, Sea World, San Diego Zoo, Safari Park) Best insider tips Favorite food in San Diego Must see places in San Diego

Much Talk About Nothing: A Show About Movies, Music, and More!
Dave Holder, Former Legoland Australia Master Builder, and Bricker Builds Designer.

Much Talk About Nothing: A Show About Movies, Music, and More!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 37:33


The Grants interview Dave Holder, who is the former Master Model Builder for LEGOLAND in Australia and a current model designer for Bricker Builds! He talks about how he got into Lego modeling, what it was like working at Legoland, and how he came around to designing the Nintendo models for Bricker Builds! Check out our sponsor: Dark Fusion Systems! Check out the Bricker Builds website and use Promocode MUCHTALKLEGO for 5% off your order! Check out our Website! Follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and send us a message! If you want to be a part of the show send us an email at MuchTalkAboutNothing@gmail.com! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mtan/message

KBS WORLD Radio News
News(Top News : Gangwon Province pushes up its repayment schedule for debt incurred by a municipal-linked special purpose company to finance the Legoland theme park amid a liquidity crunch in the bond market.) - 2022.10.27 PM5

KBS WORLD Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022


Last updated : 2022.10.27 The latest news from home and abroad, with a close eye on Northeast Asia and the Korean Peninsula in particular

StoneWars.de LEGO® Podcast
Folge 181: Absurdunum

StoneWars.de LEGO® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 125:27


Es geschehen noch Zeichen und Wunder in dieser Podcastfolge. Diese Episode ist ein Leuchtfeuer für die LEGO Puristen, die sich sonst durch die Timecodes arbeiten oder händisch vorspulen müssen, bis im LEGO News Podcast mal über LEGO gesprochen wird. Durch eine Veranstaltung im LEGOLAND, Tagesausflüge in LEGO Stores und Anekdoten über LEGO Zeitschriften wird dieses Mal selbst vor den wöchentlichen Themen wie Ideas, Nachrichten bis hin zu den fantastischen Leseempfehlungen LEGO groß geschrieben (Pun intended)! Die Timecodes von Folge 181: 0:00:00 Begrüßung 0:01:04 Intro 0:01:21 Knopf oder Zahl 0:02:48 Der Link der Woche KOMMENTARE 0:03:35 Stormy Steinmann: Kicker-Für-und-Wider 0:08:48 MOCingbird: Fettberg-Fans 0:11:37 Marius13: Leicht gekürzt 0:13:35 StarWars-Stefan: Chiemsee-Kurier 0:14:39 Gerrit G.: Klare Kante 0:15:37 Markus: Bangen auf den Katzen-Content THERAPIESTUNDE 0:17:55 Ryk: Legendäres LEGOLAND 1:10:16 Ryk: Store-Story 1:16:58 Ryk: Apfelfit 1:17:57 Lukas: Magazin unbekannt verzogen NEWS 1:21:20 Ideas: Community 1:23:38 Ideas: Die unendliche Geschichte 1:25:28 Ideas: Twoppl Town 1:28:06 Ideas: Ergebnisse der 1. Review-Phase 2022 1:43:20 Icons 2023 (Doublette) 1:45:26 Die große Welle vor Kanagawa 1:49:27 Neue Achterbahn im LEGOLAND 1:54:00 Leseempfehlung: Kostenlose Anleitung für Mini LEGO Hulkbuster 1:55:53 Leseempfehlung: Review LEGO Speed Champions Aston Martin DB 5 (76911) und Dodge Charger R/T (76912) 1:57:33 Leseempfehlung: Classic Review Star Wars 7113 Tusken Raider Encounter 2:00:53 REZENSIONEN 2:03:41 Legendäres LEGOLAND (Reprise) 2:04:43 Abmoderation 2:05:04 Outro Hier geht's zu den Shownotes: https://stnw.rs/folge181

TBS eFM This Morning
1026 [Economic Tutor] Kakao Shutdown: Legoland crisis pushes BOK into dilemma

TBS eFM This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 23:06


Guest: Department of Economics Catholic UniversitySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

TBS eFM This Morning
1025 [News Briefing] with Suh Young Choi

TBS eFM This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 19:41


1. Power struggle and confrontation worsens between the left and right-wing parties due to boycott of parliamentary budget speech 2. Legoland controversy sparks strong criticism about 김진태 from the PPP3. Corporate bonds market stabilizes after announcement of government's liquidity provision plan4. SPC boycott grows as consumers and franchisees are dissatisfied with the company's handling of the worker's death at SPC's 평택 factor5. Public organizations' headcount to be reduced by 6,735 employees by next yearSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Theme Park Rangers
SeaWorld's surfing roller coaster to simulate riding the waves (Ep. 163)

Theme Park Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 25:14


Orlando Sentinel tourism reporters Dewayne Bevil and Katie Rice discuss Pipeline: The Surf Coaster coming to SeaWorld Orlando in spring 2023. The roller coaster's restraint system, surfing stance and inversion will help guests feel like they are riding the waves. Pipeline: The Surf Coaster at SeaWorld (:00) 'Moana' attraction at Epcot (11:51) Tron at Magic Kingdom (14:09) ‘Fantasmic''s official opening date (16:58) Pirate River Quest at LegoLand Florida delayed (20:10) Mardi Gras at Universal Studios (23:10)

Super Hoopers: An NBA podcast
Draymond Punch + Security Guard Millionaires + Legoland Weekend

Super Hoopers: An NBA podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 57:27


Draymond Green punches Jordan Poole in the face and no one knows the leaker???? How rich are these security guards? So rich they could never be bribed? What's a Legoland weekend like? How many legos are needed for happiness? And some NBA talk as well! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Chris Vernon Show
POSITIVITY - 10/6/22

Chris Vernon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 103:29


On today's show: Chris is back and praises two things that everyone complains about + his trip to LEGOLAND (11:00) + his thoughts on the Grizzlies preseason games against Milwaukee and Orlando (27:14) + Grizz Bowl (51:16) + Draymond punches Jordan Poole (1:03:00) + Kelcey has a story coming out that everyone needs to check out (1:22:45) + we'll play Fill In The Blank (1:24:38)

The Investor Relations Real Estate Podcast
IRR 132: I Only Had One Source Of Income, and That Became Very Scary To Me

The Investor Relations Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 31:40


The Investor Relations Real Estate Podcast Episode 132  - I Only Had One Source Of Income, and That Became Very Scary To MeHost: Jonny Cattani Guest: Harry Nima ZegarraProducer: April MunsonJonny Cattani is joined by Harry Nima Zegarra to discuss: Finding other ways to put your money to work Coming from Peru to US to practice medicineResidential real estate (long term rentals)Real estate syndications (apartment complexes)Harry Nima Zegarra, MD, FCCPCo-Founder and Manager of Nima EquityHarry is a Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Physician, real estate investor, entrepreneur, co-founder and manager of Nima Equity, a commercial real estate syndication company where he helps physicians to earn passive income, lower taxes and achieve financial freedom. Harry has experience in rental properties and currently owns and manages 9 properties across the DFW metropolitan area. Harry is General Partner in 784 units in 4 different States.Harry met his wife Mitsi in Medical School in Peru and they finished their training in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Harry currently works at a tertiary medical center in Dallas, TX.Harry and Mitsi love the outdoors. They have 2 boys, who love playing basketball and soccer. They love to vacation and travel to Cancun and Florida where they enjoy time at the beach, Disney or Legoland. Harry is also an avid runner.Linked material referenced during the show: Book: The Gap And The Gain - Dan Sullivanhttps://www.amazon.com/Gap-Gain-Achievers-Happiness-Confidence/dp/B09HN6GKNY/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1P4JQKHRO427T&keywords=the+gap+and+the+gain+dan+sullivan&qid=1664853042&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjk3IiwicXNhIjoiMS42OCIsInFzcCI6IjEuODgifQ%3D%3D&sprefix=the+gap+and+the+gain%2Caps%2C144&sr=8-1Connect with Harry! Website: www.nimaequity.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/nimaequity/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBYyErh18CHP_78YzuNoKqgConnect with Jonny!Cattani Capital Group: https://cattanicapitalgroup.com/Invest with us: invest@cattanicapitalgroup.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathan-cattani-53159b179/Jonny's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonnycattani/IRR Podcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theirrpodcast/TikTok:https://www.tiktok.com/@jonnycattani?lang=enYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCljEz4pq_paQ9keABhJzt0AFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.cattani.1

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Conversations That Make a Difference with Teresa Velardi

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 57:10


The Four-Fold Formula for All Things Wellness Andee Scarantino is a Mindset and Transformational coach specializing in identity work. Andee has an M.A. in Sociology from Columbia University. Her work incorporates how macro-level systems contribute to individual arrested development. She is the creator of Get the F*ck off and host of The Get the F*ck Off Podcast. https://www.facebook.com/andee.scarantino La-June Persephony is a writer and editor who loves to travel and explore other cultures. She currently works as a technical writer in the IT industry. After walking through a difficult season, she now has a strong desire to help those who are not ready to speak up for themselves, find their voice. As a result, she is working on launching her first blog, “Pivoting Perspectives” where she plans to explore the joy and purpose that can arise from challenging circumstances. lajunepersephony@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/lajune.persephony https://www.instagram.com/ajunepersephony/ Peggy Willms has been a certified personal trainer, sports performance nutritionist, personal and executive health, wellness, and life coach for over thirty years. Peggy is an entrepreneur, author, and host of The Coach Peggy Show. She is also the executive producer of Coach Peggy Real Time, a transformation docuseries. Peggy hosts wellness retreats, is a featured contributor for BizCatalyst360, an international online magazine. She spent more than twenty years in corporate wellness and has managed multi-million-dollar medical clinics. Her unique business and work-site wellness programs have earned her multiple awards. She has two sons and one grandson. She loves all things beach and sunshine and lives in Florida with her better half.  Linktr.ee/coachpeggy peggy@allthingswellness.com https://peggywillms.com/ Keith Zygand aka Ziggy Salvation is a husband, father, and Master Barber with over 20 years' experience. When he is not behind the barber chair, he is often found spending time with his family, taking day trip to Legoland with his wife and kids, and live streaming video gameplay on Twitch. ziggysalvation@gmail.com https://www.twitch.tv/ziggysalvation https://twitter.com/ziggysalvation Video Version: https://youtu.be/rdcdYGEukNY Call in with a comment or Chat with Teresa during Live Show with Video Stream: Call 646-558-8656 ID: 8836953587 press #.  To Ask a Question press *9 to raise your hand. Or click YouTube icon to write a question Learn more about Teresa here: www.webebookspublishing.com http://authenticendeavorspublishing.com/

Skip the Queue
How to create truly unique visitor attractions, with Robbie Jones

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 43:08


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.katapult.co.uk/https://www.linkedin.com/in/mrrobbiejones/https://www.katapult.co.uk/creating-unique-visitor-destinations-in-a-crowded-market/ Robbie is Insights Analyst Lead at Katapult. He works on providing data-driven audience and market trends, as well as operational insights, to assist the design team in creating immersive, commercially-successful experiences. Robbie has over 10 years' experience in the leisure and tourism industry and has worked with iconic brands, theme parks, family entertainment centres, museums and visitor attractions around the world. He is a dedicated Board Member of his local art and cinema centre, Derby QUAD. Katapult designs themed attractions and experiences that amaze and engage visitors globally. Our work is enjoyed by 50 million visitors, at 81 attractions, in 18 different countries, every year. As well as increasing guest experience, we thrive on helping you generate more income, more fans and bring the vision for your attraction to life. Legoland, Sea Life, Twycross Zoo, Alton Towers. Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode I speak with industry experts from the attractions world.In today's episode, I speak with Robbie Jones, Insights Analyst Lead at Katapult. We discuss how to create a unique visitor attraction, what you need to know before you start, and what the leisure and attractions market is looking like post-COVID.If you like what you hear, subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.We're back, I hope you've all had really busy summers full of lovely visitors. I'd really like to know how it's been for you. So feel free to get in touch. You can always email me at kelly@rubbercheese.com. Can you believe this is season four of Skip the Queue Podcast? I cannot believe that we've been running for so long now. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for sticking around and for supporting us. We have a whole season full of really brilliant guests booked in, and I know that you're going to absolutely love them. We'll be covering topics on innovation, pricing, filming, and even aromas. Yeah, you heard me right, all the smelly stuff. But we are kicking off in style with the team at Katapult. Kelly Molson: Robbie.Robbie Jones: Hello. Hello.Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue. I'm really excited to have you on today. Thank you for joining me for the first episode of season four.Robbie Jones: I know. What an honour, what an honour. I can't believe that I've been chosen first.Kelly Molson: You're the chosen one. Well, you say it's an honour now, but you might not appreciate it after I've got you with these icebreaker questions.Robbie Jones: All good.Kelly Molson: I've actually got some new ones this season. So I've been asking our lovely former guests and our Twitter followers to send me in some new ones because I felt like the old ones were getting a bit tired. So I'm going to whack you with some of the new ones and see how we get on.Robbie Jones: Okay. Here goes.Kelly Molson: I have to say, this is one of my favourite ones.Robbie Jones: Okay.Kelly Molson: It might date us slightly as well. You can only save one of the Muppets, which one do you choose and why?Robbie Jones: I think Kermit.Kelly Molson: Okay.Robbie Jones: He's just iconic, isn't he? My first memory of Kermit is when they did their version of A Christmas Carol. The thought of Kermit doing that was amazing. So it's got to be Kermit, it's got to be Kermit.Kelly Molson: Yeah, he's a classic. He's a classic, isn't he? He's quite legendary. All right. Good. Okay, good answer. Next one. If you could enter the Olympics for anything, what would you be Olympic level at? And we are not just talking sports here. This could be baking, moaning. What are you saying?Robbie Jones: I think I see myself as a bit of a jack of all, a master of none. Maybe I'm a decathlete, something like that, where I'm good at a few things but I'm not amazing at one big thing.Kelly Molson: When we go back to sports day at school, what was the thing that you would do at sports day?Robbie Jones: It was probably the long distance running. I seem to do a lot of cross country, we used to call it in our school, which went from tarmac to a muddy path in about five minutes. So I don't know how cross country that was. But yeah, long distance running. I can't stand it now. I can't stand the noise of breathing, heavy breathing as I struggle up a hill. That's just not a sound anybody wants to listen to.Kelly Molson: Oh, you really make me laugh. So the only thing I can think about when I'm running is breathing and now all I'm going to hear is myself breathing and think about Robbie and not wanting to do it. Okay, final one.Robbie Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: What movie can you rewatch over and over and over again? And how many times have you watched this movie that you're about to tell me?Robbie Jones: So I think for an absolute nostalgia, it'd have to be Dumb and Dumber because the amount of bonding that me and my younger brother have done over that film is just immense. I think we reference it every time we speak to one another, it's just become part of our psyche, part of our relationship. So we've probably watched it dozens of times between us, but it gets referenced at least three times a week.Kelly Molson: Oh, it's a great film.Robbie Jones: Jim Carrey, brilliant.Kelly Molson: He's great, isn't he? Are you going to do... So if we do the song, Mock-Robbie Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: ... ing-Robbie Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: ... bird.Robbie Jones: I can't believe I'm doing this. I can't believe I'm doing it.Kelly Molson: This is the level that the show has gotten to, folks. This is what we got up to on our summer break. And I love that film and my friends were really obsessed with Ace Ventura films as well, Jim Carrey.Robbie Jones: Yes.Kelly Molson: Cannot beat.Robbie Jones: Yeah, comedy icon. Amazing. I love him to pieces.Kelly Molson: Robbie, I can't believe I just made you do that. I'm so sorry. I've lost it now. Right. Unpopular opinion. What've you got for us?Robbie Jones: Right. I don't think eating chocolate and fruit should go together. It's not right. I'll draw a line, fruit and nut in terms of a chocolate bar, dried fruits, I'm okay with. But when it's fresh, juicy things like grapes and strawberries going with chocolate, I just can't stand it at all.Kelly Molson: Oh, what? Not a little fondue at a wedding? A little chocolate fondue? No?Robbie Jones: No, just no. You wouldn't mix milk with water and drink it. And that's kind of what I feel like when I'm eating chocolate and fruit together. So yeah, whoever has got the largest fondue rental company, please stop because I don't like it.Kelly Molson: Wow. Okay. I feel like that's quite controversial. The milk and water thing actually turned my stomach. When you said that, I was like, "Oh, no, you wouldn't, would you?"Robbie Jones: There you go. Again, the next time you eat a fondue, just think of me and start gagging probably as I would.Kelly Molson: Wow. What a note to start the podcast on. We've really taken this to a whole new level today, haven't we? Excellent. Right, Robbie, you are the lead insights analyst at Katapult. And I want to come back in a minute to talk about what your job entails, but first Katapult itself. So a little story for you. So years ago, you know when you were at school and you'd have to pick work experience? My granddad had a business and his next door neighbour's business made props for films.Robbie Jones: Nice.Kelly Molson: So I bagged myself work experience at this place and I got to make loads, I just got to make some weird stuff that then ended up in films. And I remember going to the cinema, watching the film going, "I made that Hessian box there. I sewed that. Whoa, that was really good." If I could go back now and go, "No, this is where I want to go and do work experience," I would choose Katapult without a doubt because you do incredible things. Tell the listeners what Katapult does, it's so cool.Robbie Jones: Yeah, sure. So we design themed attractions and experiences. We do it the world over and it could be as something as small as a little popup street food courtyard that we did a couple of years ago right to a large scale, full theme park design and everything in between. And it is, it's great, it's really, really fun. We get to work with some amazing clients, some amazing brands and IPs where the design team are just in their element. They're able to work with brands like LEGO that they've grown up playing with since they was small boys and girls. So it's fantastic for us all to carry on being a kid really, in essence, being creative, being surrounded by colour and fun and entertainment. Don't get me wrong, there's a lot of hard work that goes into it. A lot of extended hours, red-eye flights across the world. But it's amazing. It's amazing to be a part of and design some pretty amazing things that are either coming soon or already open. So yeah, we do a lot and we're very thankful.Kelly Molson: It's so exciting. I feel like you played it down a little bit there as well. You were like, "Yeah, we design attractions and experiences." I was like, "Yeah, you do. It's really exciting." What do you do specifically there? Lead insights and analyst is your job title.Robbie Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So you are kind of the data that sits behind that, the research that sits behind it.Robbie Jones: Yeah, absolutely. So I think something that we've been in the industry for over 20 years now and gradually that we've seen that actually it's really good to make sure you've got some sort of insights, believe it or not, to make a very good decision. And it was something that was kind of lacking within the industry. There was lots of big thinking, feasibility reports, people telling you what the commercial outcomes would be to improve a visitor attraction or even to open a new attraction. But no one was really saying, "Well, hold on a minute, who is it that you're trying to get through the doors and what is it that they actually want? And have they actually got the money to spend that you are charging for?"Robbie Jones: And that's the bit of the insights gap that I, and we at Katapult, fill. We understand the sheer importance of having that insights. We can't just design something from scratch, full stop, regardless of whether we are working with an IP or not. You've got to have an idea of who are the people coming through the door. So that sheer responsibility lays flat on my shoulders to make sure that whatever the design team designs next, it is fully in lined, not just commercially, but from a guest point of view as well that they are going to love it from the moment they walk in. So yeah, pretty big responsibility. But it's fantastic to set the design team up to let them creative minds go wild.Kelly Molson: It is fascinating what you do. And I think that it's really similar to probably the bit that I do in our business, because my role is to understand what the client's challenges is. And so you are asking all of the questions around, "Well, who's your consumer? What do they spend? Where do they do? Where do they go? What do they read?" Et cetera, et cetera. And then you translate. The designers, they get to do the fun bit. But I think that the research bit is the fun bit, to be honest. They would probably argue with me. So how do you start that process? What are the kind of things that you're asking?Robbie Jones: Well, I guess it depends on the client, depends on the project. But the way we typically start for existing visitor attractions is we kind of do a mystery shop, or we call it a guest experience audit. But we don't just go around and have fun, that's the second part of the day. The first part of the day is thinking about if you've got signs telling interpretation and you're a museum, are they at the right height for kids to read it? If it is, is it the right level of language required for a five, six, seven year old to be able to read it? And everything in between. It's is the staff levels good? Are there plenty of vegetarian options within the cafe facilities? All of these things where we want to make sure every touchpoint that every guest that comes through is satisfied and our audit goes in, it pulls out the good stuff, but more importantly for the operators, it pulls out the stuff where they could probably do a little bit better. It's the things that are probably mentioned more than often on TripAdvisor.Robbie Jones: And so it gives us the chance to go, "Right, yes, we did find these issues. These need solving as soon as possible so let's get to work. Let's get to work in figuring out what we can do." And sort of 75% of the time, those things that we highlight, they can pretty much be done by the attraction themselves. It's only the other 25% where we go, "Right, your guests aren't staying for four hours and you want them to stay for four hours. They're only staying for two. What can we do to make the experience last twice as long? What can we do to keep them there and engaged and immersed for double the amount of time that they are before?" And that's obviously when we get the design team's creative juices flowing and start to think about what can we do to improve the attraction. So yeah, in a roundabout way, the guest experience audit helps to unlock the insights, helps to give us the ammunition we need to improve the attraction, and also look to work on some bigger projects for the clients as well. So yeah, that's a roundabout way in terms of how we do it with the audit.Kelly Molson: I love that. So from your perspective, it's not just about creating new, it's not just about adding on. It's about looking at it from a holistic perspective. Where are you already? How are you performing? Okay, well, look, this is doing really well. That's great. These things need to improve. And then, okay, so now let's look at the new stuff. Because I guess there's always that excitement about, "New, new, new, new," isn't there? Oh, a new attraction, a new, I don't know, show that you're going to put on within it. And that's what gets everyone excited. Sometimes they forget to take that step back and go, "But what needs to improve with what we already have?"Robbie Jones: Yeah, absolutely. And the greatest assets that visitor attractions have probably got are sat there already, they just need discovering. And what we tend to find is if it's not something tangible, like a ride needs improving or an experiential walking trail needs improving, it falls down to the narrative or the storytelling of the attraction. That seems to be the thing that we are coming across at the moment, which probably leaves a little bit left to be desired. People don't explain their stories enough. Why are they unique? Why are they telling us this story when you go into a museum? Or why has this art centre got this curation of art? People aren't very good at telling stories that guests want to listen to. So you're right. It's not always about the new, it's about the existing, but extrapolating what's good about that experience in the first place.Kelly Molson: You wrote a really good article that I read a couple of weeks ago called Creating Unique Visitor Destinations in a Crowded Market. So I'm going to put a link to this in the show notes, but it's on Katapult's website as well.Kelly Molson: You said that attractions need to capitalise on what is unique about them. And that's not just from the perspective of, "Hey, we've got this mascot," or, "this is how we're going to put it around the site." Is the location unique? Is the food offering that you have based on that location? What is it about you that really stands out that guests can't get anywhere else and they're not going to get the same story anywhere else? I thought that was such a great way of looking at the uniqueness of each attraction.Robbie Jones: Yeah, and I think there's always going to be a place for attractions that have got the fastest thing, the tallest thing, the biggest thing. That does a lot to pull a crowd. But when it comes to trying to fight your corner, if you're medium or smaller size visitor attraction, you've got to pull on your unique. There's a finite source of money and time so you're going have to try and get your visitors and your guests a slightly different way. The article came from an issue that was within two strands of the industry. The first being museums and art galleries that were struggling from a values perspective to say, "We can't take this donation because it doesn't fit in with our values." Or museums having to give away certain artefacts back to countries because of the connotations of it being stolen in what is in today's society. So they're under huge pressure to say, "Well, what is our story? What is our narrative?" And for places like that, it is very much rooted in the locality. What is your city about? What is your region about? And curating around that.Robbie Jones: The second strand is around experiences that have got a blueprint and are looking to create dozens of the same attraction all around the world. Again, there is absolutely a place for that in this world. We've got countless clients who do the same thing. But where there needs to be a differentiation is how the local market impacts what that attraction is. You can't just say, "We're going to have an indoor attraction that's going to have a soft play and a cafe and that's kind of it. And then we're going to put it throughout 40 different countries around the world." It's not going to wash. You can't just put a badge on the front of that indoor attraction and say, "Welcome to Tokyo. Welcome to Orlando." It's just not going to work. It's not going to wash. It is not unique enough.Robbie Jones: So for those attractions, it's about, "Yes, you've got a blue blueprint, but what can you do differently based on the people, the profile, the guests that are going to come through that door to make it slightly tweaked in terms of things that they might not have from a local competitor point of view?" Or just making sure that you replicate their stories within the attraction. I've seen some really good stuff that Crayola have done in the US where they're starting to onboard local artists for their entertainment centres. That's amazing. You could be in the US, go to the two different Crayolas and have a different experience. So being able to create that unique experience is twofold, but it's one that everyone's got to look at quite a bit now.Kelly Molson: So one of the things I thought was quite interesting is the scale of the projects that you work on at Katapult. So for example, I think you mentioned earlier, the Derby Market Place project, which is a popup marketplace, and then you've worked with organisations like the SEA LIFE London Aquarium. They're really different experiences. Do you look at the same approach when you are working with that kind of scale of client?Robbie Jones: Yeah, absolutely. I think with those two examples, there was a very clear commercial goal for both of them. For SEA LFIE it was about adding an experience that makes the ticket price value for money, but it's also there to increase photographic and merchandise sales as well. So there was a very clear understanding of what the commercial goal was. For Derby Market Place, that was actually a popup courtyard that was set up in 2020 just after the first lockdown of the pandemic in the UK. Derby is our home city and we was approached by the city council to do something that will support the local businesses because there was obviously restaurants, cafes going bust because they simply couldn't do a takeaway service or they didn't have the outdoor catering. So for that, we created a courtyard.Robbie Jones: So as a result, they both had commercial goals and we both started them pretty much the same way, which is, "Right. Well, who is it that's going to come through the door?" Who is it? What do they want? Is it a family of four? Is it a couple? How much money have they got? What sort of experience are they used to? How long are they going to stay? What information are they going to want? All of this information that I guess sometimes we take for granted in the attractions industry, feed it into the design and ultimately come up with exactly what we did for the marketplace and SEA LIFE. So yeah, I think by and large, we kind of stick along the same path, very much insights driven design. We do the insights, we design it based on that, and then we hope it reaches the commercial goal.Kelly Molson: So you mentioned Crayola a minute ago. That is a brilliant example of really using the locality to make that attraction individual. What other great examples of really truly unique attractions can you think of?Robbie Jones: Well, I think I mentioned it in the article you've already mentioned. But Meow Wolf, particularly the first one in Santa Fe, that is an absolute benchmark that I use in terms of how you use local talents, local immersion to help make Santa Fe a destination in it's own right. It's amazing how much one attraction can pivot the way that a region is seen, a city is seen, and turns it into a place that people are staying overnight for two or three nights to just to go to Meow Wolf. So definitely that, in terms of creating a destination.Robbie Jones: But I do want to pull out another example as well, and it's not necessarily unique as such, but it's the feeling is unique, and that is Paultons Park. So for those that have been to Paultons, Peppa Pig World is there, which is a massive pull. They've got some great rides, they've got some really good food and beverage outlets, a good smattering of live performances. But what makes the park stand out is how immaculate it is when it comes to public realm. The gardens are fantastic, the landscaping's amazing. You'd be hard troubled to find a piece of litter on the floor. And the staff are so incredibly attentive with attention to detail that actually, when I've gone a few times now, it's the one thing that always stands out to me. And it's the benchmark for just cleanliness. You could be forgiven for being in a communist China, it's very clean and orderly and focused. But actually when we think about visiting a theme park, we want it to be glossy and clean and not a bother in the world. And it's little things like that, for me, that have made Paultons an absolute benchmark as well for us.Kelly Molson: Because I always think back to Disney about that and no litter, beautiful gardens and that, for me, is the level. I haven't had the pleasure of Paultons Park yet. I think I've got a couple more years and then it'll be on the list.Robbie Jones: Yeah, absolutely. You'll find out just much you can spend in that store with Peppa Pig.Kelly Molson: Oh God. Yeah, I can imagine. Let's talk about summer and let's talk about what the attractions market looks like at the moment. So I know that you've had an incredibly busy summer and as we are recording this, we're still at the tail end of it. So I can imagine that you are looking forward to a little bit of a rest-Robbie Jones: Yes, definitely.Kelly Molson: ... come September-October time. How is the attractions market looking at the moment to you post-COVID? Because we've moved on, so to speak, from COVID or the majority of people have moved on from it, but I think it's really difficult with attractions because we are still seeing a slight decline in visitor numbers, but there's obviously other factors going on at the moment in terms of the energy crisis and things like that. So what's your view of the leisure and attractions market at the moment?Robbie Jones: I think post-COVID, if we think about the start of the year, I think it was incredibly buoyant. I think attractions have seen the opportunity to invest now. The staycation market has absolutely boomed during the times when international travel around the world was banned. So it means that there's been a strong staycation market, which is really, really good. I think for the UK in particular, it's making sure, and this isn't just the attractions industry, I think this goes across the whole staycation market of the UK, don't get so greedy. There's a lot of... I understand that demand is high and you want to capitalise on it. But if we want to keep the UK as a staycation destination, you can't be charging silly prices compared to what they could probably do as an all inclusive for 10 days in Mallorca, as an average in terms of what the family's going to do. You've got to offer some sort of value for money.Robbie Jones: And the cost of living is the big thing now. I think that's what we are seeing. COVID is there in the background and it's obviously affected things, but the cost of living is the one that's really starting to bite a little bit more now. And I think it's because although we saw a lot of drop in wealth during the COVID pandemic, actually the cost of living now is probably a harder time for a lot of people because the savings have already been taken up by making sure they've got income coming in or topping up furlough or whatever it was. So yeah, the cost of living is the big thing. People aren't going to go out and spend, I don't know, 200, 300 quids on a day at a theme park. I can't see it happening. If they do, they'll have to forgo something else and I think that's something that's going to be in the minds-eye of visitor attractions.Robbie Jones: And I think we're starting to see a homogenised view of what we mean by leisure and attractions. Shopping centres now want to get in on the act and have lots of entertainment. You've got places like Butlins and Pontins in the UK, so typical caravan hotel resorts that have built live entertainment and experiences around them. They are in direct competition with theme parks and visitor attractions because they're offering entertainment. So the more experiences are spread throughout our sphere of what we can and can't do, the less money there is to go around. So even more of a need for people to be a little bit more unique and think about it's not just what's going to get me to this theme park, it's why would they choose the theme park over X, Y, and Z. And as they always say, option Z could be sitting at home and watching Netflix. You've you've got to do something to get people off the sofa.Kelly Molson: I'd not considered the option Z could be Butlins or Pontins though. That has just blown my mind because the whole way through the pandemic, we've been saying, "Your competition is Netflix, it's Disney+." But I hadn't even considered that now people are looking at how they spend that excess cash and how they spend their holiday time. Butlins is a competitor for Alton Towers.Robbie Jones: Yeah, in that comparison, absolutely. It's just that they've gone about things in opposite directions. Butlins went from accommodation to experiences and Alton Towers, vice versa, but they are very, very much competitors these days. And if you had £500 as a family to spend for a weekend, where would you go? And actually you look at the offers of both of those examples and depends on what sort of family you are and what sort of things you like to do. It might be a hard decision to make, but ultimately it'll be the one, it won't be the both.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. Okay. So you said that you have seen attractions investing in new rides and experiences to capitalise on that staycation. What do you think attractions should be doing right now based on what we've just discussed, this competitive state that you are in?Robbie Jones: It sounds really cliche, but I think just have a long term view on things. I can say this from doing insights here at Katapult, but when we are looking at data and trends and audiences, we are not just looking over the last 12 months. We're looking five or 10 years in the past and five and 10 years in the future to get a really good outlook in terms of, "Well, what do we think people are going to do?" Obviously you can't always guess what's going to happen. I think the last few years have taught us that. But you can have some sort of a vision in terms of where you want to go. Where do visitor attractions want to be in 10 years time? I'd love to know how many attractions know that answer.Robbie Jones: If they know it, then that's fantastic because they'll be gradually building towards that. But what we've seen from our side at Katapult is that we've gone to a lot of visitor attractions around the world that are doing a fantastic job at iterating, whether they've got a theme park or museum or whatever it is, but it's all bundled together in a big mound of plasticine with lots of different colours attached and different shapes. And it does a job, but it doesn't feel like the same place. And if we're treating that as the elixir of the visitor attraction, then that you need to get to the point of, "Well, what is your 10 year goal?" If you know that, you know what you're going towards. And I'd certainly focus on that, if you've got a little bit of spare time.Kelly Molson: Yeah, they're not busy at the minute. It's just been through summer. They should be resting now, the summer's done. That's really hard though, isn't it? So an example of that locally, to me, so I live near a vineyard, there's a lovely vineyard, about 15 minute walk from my house called Saffron Grange. Just give them a little plug because it is phenomenal. They've been selling their wines since 2019. However, the vineyards were planted like 11 years before that. And so they have had to have the vision of whatever they were planting and however they were designing that plot of land that they have. It's phenomenal the things they had to think about. What trees they would plant, because that's how high they would grow that would shield those vineyards from the wind and those vineyards from the frost. And just the granular level of planting that's had to go into that place to make the wine and the grapes now to be at the best they possibly can, it blows my mind.Kelly Molson: But it's the same thing at a visitor attraction. You've got to have that vision to go, "Well, this is my idea and this is how we're going to develop it over that time." But you've got the factor of not really knowing what your customers are going to want at that point. With the vineyard, at least they know relatively, other than wind and rain influences and weather that you can't predict, they kind of know how those vines are going to grow and what they're going to get at the end of it. With an attraction, you've got multiple different audiences with multiple different opinions on what they want and what their needs are, throw in a global pandemic. Just how do you even do that? I can't comprehend how you do that.Robbie Jones: I think we get caught up sometimes in thinking that a 10 year vision or a goal, or whatever you want to call it, has to be numerical or it has to be very definitive in terms we want to be the number one theme park in the world. Those sorts of things, you are almost hamstrung by. But what about if you said that you wanted your visitor attraction to be the most inspiring creative place for kids under 10? That is a vision. That is a vision that you can build towards. And if things change, whether it's your audience or your local competitors or whatever it is, you can still build towards that vision because that's what you believe in.Robbie Jones: It's about having a sense of what your values are as a business or as an attraction, standing by them, making that vision a reality by saying, "All right, we're going to do this because we believe in it." And that, again, ties really nicely back into what creates a unique attraction. It's your values. And I think it's the same for every business. We're seeing it a lot more now in the wider business community where people are making a choice over values instead of cost. Although the cost of living is obviously exacerbating that slightly. But people are making choices on green energy instead of fossil fuels, for example. So visitor attractions are only going to go the same way. So it's a big one. Yeah, you're right. 10 years. If you don't know your 10 year vision, then you don't know how to get there over the next 10 years.Kelly Molson: I love that.Robbie Jones: So, it is sorted.Kelly Molson: Yeah, so just put that to the top of the list, attractions. Yeah. Now I guess that's a really good place to be now, isn't it? You've just gone through that really, really hectic summer period. Now, the run up to Christmas, bar a few events and things that'll happen, it's a time for planning for next year. So now is a really good time to be able to take that step back and go, "Okay, well, what is our vision? Do we need to revisit our values and vision?" And then that will make the planning for 2023 a hell of a lot clearer. Okay. One last question on this, because what if attractions are already doing really well at the moment? Because we've got attractions, outdoor attractions that have been smashing it.Robbie Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So what if your attractions are at capacity, what then do you do? So you are looking at things like planning, the expansions, things like that. What can they do?Robbie Jones: I think there's one of two route that are seeming quite popular at the minute. I think one is to, if you look at places like Gravity and Puttshack and a few others that have escaped my mind, by almost franchising, if you think you've got a concept that is completely unique and can be spread throughout the UK, Europe, worldwide, then now's the opportunity to look at it. It needs some careful consideration. As we said before, you can't just copy and paste. But if you think you've got something pretty amazing, then go for it. Well, why not open a second or a third or a fourth? You've proven it can work, so try it. It's worth a go.Robbie Jones: And the second thing, and this is something where I think the bigger museums during the pandemic have really led the chase on this, so I think it was one of the museums in London, I can't remember what, but they introduced lates, Museum Lates where they did silent discos around the exhibits. This is a perfect time to try completely different things. If you've got an out of season or you've got low throughput days or weeks or weekends, then what can you do to bring in another audience? Let's try and fill up your throughput and your dwell time of your attraction 100% of the year round. If you can do that, then you're making more from the asset that's already making your money. So try it out. Find new guest profiles, find new groups of audiences that might want to visit, and consider doing something very special for them. And you never know. If it works out, then you've got an extra revenue stream that you didn't think you had. So they'd be my preference, if I was in that fortunate position, to go down one of those two routes.Kelly Molson: Great advice. Thank you. We're going to put all of Robbie's contact details, et cetera, all in the show notes. So if you fancy a chat with him, you want to find out a little bit more about what Katapult do, you want to book yourselves one of those... Oh God, I've forgotten the words. One of the-Robbie Jones: Audit.Kelly Molson: Audit, audit, audit is the word. If you'd like to book one of those audits. So you can do that. I would love to know about a book though, Robbie. So we always offer up a guest's book choice as a prize and it's can be something that you love, it can be something that's helped shape your career in some way. What do you have for us today?Robbie Jones: Gosh, can I pick two?Kelly Molson: It's double my marketing spend, but why not? What's the first one?Robbie Jones: Oh, good, fantastic. So I think one that's a personal one is by Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises. It's a lovely in depth read about the twenties and thirties where cafe culture was rife and artists and poets were making adventurous trips to France and Spain to soak up the culture. And it's a wonderful, wonderful story that really makes me want to live 90 years from now and really enjoy it. I think that's the first part. The second part is that Ernest Hemingway used to be a journalist so his descriptions of the characters are very matter of fact and I think that's seeped into my audience profiling that I do as part of my job. I like the matter of fact, I like the facts that make the people real, and then start to tell the story of what we think they're going to do in an attraction. So I think Ernest Hemingway has certainly had an influence on me.Robbie Jones: And then the second book is called Superforecasting, which is by Philip Tetlock and Dan Gardner. Now this, it came to prominence a little bit when Dominic Cummins was advisor to Boris Johnson in his ill-fated stay at 10 Downing Street, and it speaks about the art and science of prediction and getting things right. And I read it from end to end. I completely soaked this book up. It's a little bit courty in places so you've got to take a bit of pinch of salt. But it's good at kind of teaching you to say, "Right, can you be a super forecaster?" And funny enough, I think it was February or March this year, they put out a bold statement that Vladimir Putin was not going to enter Ukraine under any circumstances, at least for the next six to nine months and then I think it was about two weeks later and he invaded. So I think that example of the book, it kind of comes with a moral, I think, which is you can super forecast or try and super forecast as much as you want, but you've got absolute no way of deciding what's going to work. There's a difference between a good and a bad decision and a good and a bad outcome. And I think that's what that book's taught me.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that example did not sell that book for me at all. However, that sounds great. That sounds like a really good book. You've absolutely blown my marketing budget again, which everybody always does.Robbie Jones: So sorry.Kelly Molson: No, I love the example of Ernest Hemingway and I love how it's infiltrated the way that you do your work as well. I haven't read either of those books so they're going to go on my list. And actually, listeners, we do compile a list of all of the books that all of our guests suggest and you can find that over on the Rubber Cheese website, rubbercheese.com, go to the insights, it's in there. Robbie, thank you. As ever, if you want to win Robbie's books, if you go over to our Twitter account and you retweet this show announcement with the words, "I want Robbie's books," then you will be in with a chance of winning both of them. I've loved our little chat. Thank you. Thank you for indulging in my little song.Robbie Jones: Oh gosh. I'm just glad that you didn't get me to do the scene where he's peeing into a bottle in Dumb and Dumber. Very well.Kelly Molson: I don't think that would've worked very well on the podcast. Do you?Robbie Jones: No, no. I'm sure you can add some trickle sounds in.Kelly Molson: Yeah.Robbie Jones: If you wanted to.Kelly Molson: Let's end there, shall we? It's been a pleasure. Thank you, Robbie.Robbie Jones: Thank you so much.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.

North County News
Legoland, NEW Burgeon Cans, and Local Oysters - Episode #177

North County News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 62:13


Hey North County San Diego! This week Chris went to Legoland and Cassidy enjoyed sports with the fam. There are some interesting MLB rules coming up next year. And did you know that we have local oysters in Carlsbad? Enjoy!

All In San Diego
Brick or Treat and Beyond at Legoland Ca.

All In San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 20:31


It's Halloween Time at Legoland! What's the brand new Monster Party? Where can you dance with the Zombie Cheerleaders? What's new with Brick or Treat and the brand new 4D movie? We'll answer all of those questions and more as we get you ready for the most popular time of the year at Legoland Ca. !

NINETYONEOCTANE: The Podcast
#231 - Benihana Cooks are Named Beni-juana and Legos are Plucking Car-Guy Heart Strings

NINETYONEOCTANE: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 102:34


Jon and Randy cover a few follow up topics from Monterey Car week. Randy visits Legoland to talk about the Ferrari Legoland experience and Jon brings up all the nostalgia of Lego toys. Lastly, the guys play a car gameshow with the movie "Used Cars" starring Kurt Russell. 

The Lunchroom
Is It Your Gooch or Your Taint?

The Lunchroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 51:11


The show must go on! Kurt was in the hospital with a cystic gooch he acquired at Legoland resulting in our first episode without the full Lunchroom crew. Kevin refuses to get in the ice bath/cold plunge at the studio and confesses his love for the Dominican MC of his upcoming comedy show. Jesse talks about the stress he gets from WebMD when he goes down a rabbithole. Jon's producing a new podcast about two girls in their 30's and their dating stories which has led to him to. We took a few weeks off without talking too much about the male anatomy but we are back strong! See you all next week! Follow The Lunchroom on YouTube - TikTok - Instagram Follow Only Raising Kings on TikTok - Instagram - Website - Merch Follow Viola Media on YouTube - TikTok - Instagram - Website --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-lunchr00m/support

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson
Visit LEGOLAND New York Resort; Video Tutoring with Pearson+ Channels ; Mental Health First Aid; Cotton Incorporated

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 38:15


Matt Besterman is the Public Relations Manager at LEGOLAND® New York Resort. He talks to Michelle about all the things there are to do at the park this fall and throughout the season. LEGOLAND New York Resort is the ultimate LEGO theme park destination for kids age 2-12 and their families, celebrating its first full season in Goshen, NY, just 60 miles from NYC. The park and hotel make for a great two day visit! Johnny Betancourt is co-founder of a company that has helped more than two million students improve their learning outcomes through video tutoring. Now he's teamed up with the leading textbook publisher to bring books and video together in time for Back to School.Dr. Bregman and Linda Corley address Mental Health First Aid with their guest this week. How do you spot someone in a metal health crisis and what to do about it.Director of Corporate Strategy and Insights for Cotton Incorporated, Melissa Bastos talks about how consumers' perspectives on inflation shape their back to school shopping plans. In addition, she shares details on what to do with old, out-grown clothing to keep it out of landfills.

Jim and Them
Weird Voice Bad Sketch Show - #738 Part 1

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 95:10


New Mixer: New mixer means new EFFECTS for your boys to play around with and bring out some brand new CLASSIC characters!Racist Theme Parks: The fallout of the Sesame Place Rosarita incident continues! First we have a Woody going above and beyond and then we have some potential problematic behavior from Rapunzel.Corey Feldman: Corey is out celebrating the 35th Anniversary of The Lost Boys by trampling over any legacy the movie has by plugging his terrible music.DADDY!, DATING!, DANGER!, NATHAN FOR YOU!, TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES!, WHY WOULD IT WORK!?, RODE PROCASTER PRO 2!, PATREON!, BOSS NASS!, TRANS!, GAY FROG!, YOUTUBE!, WAYOOO!, COMMENTS!, CENSOR!, BEEP!, SELF CENSOR!, NEW FEATURES!, VOICE EFFECTS!, DEEP VOICE!, GAY ROBOT!, CUM!, HELIUM!, DIFFERENT ROBOT!, MR ROBOTO!, WELL!, MEGAPHONE!, HOSTAGE!, BUY A NEW DICK!, GAY DEVIL!, BLINK 182!, MARK TOM AND TRAVIS SHOW!, HIGH PITCHED DEVIL!, REGULAR DEMON!, LISTENER!, HEADPHONES!, TRASH!, JARED LETO!, DC!, WARNER BROS!, TIME TRAVELLER'S WIFE!, BATGIRL!, FUNKO POPS!, REUNION!, GUESS WHICH ONE!, CHIPMUNK VOICES!, TEARS!, BABY MCMAHON!, ICARUS!, WEIRD VOICES!, BAD SKETCHES!, ECHOES!, IN YOUR ASS!, I'M ON THE RADIO!, INTERNS!, BUTTON!, EXTINCT!, STRAIGHT SEX!, SPUNK!, NEIL YOUNG!, PONO DIGITAL SERVICE!, TIDAL!, APPLE MUSIC!, SPOTIFY!, WOODY!, JESSIE!, PARADE!, BLACK FAMILY!, TOY STORY!, HUG!, RAPUNZEL!, GALAXY'S EDGE!, JUST LIKE THE ELMO!, ROSARITA!, LEGOLAND!, DANCING!, RACISM ROBOT!, MEET AND GREETS!, MOMMA CAN YOU SQUIRT!?, HIP HOP!, DABABY!, HUSTLING!, RAPPING FOR MONEY!, 10!, TALMBOUT!, CONSEQUENCE!, LOST BOYS!, ANNIVERSARY!, PIER!, CONVENTION!, JASON PATRIC!, EDWARD HERMANN!, LOVE BELOW 2.1!, HOSPICE!, GHOST RIDER!, GET SMOKED LIKE THAT BLUNT!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Dumb Dad Podcast
1, 2, 3...You're Underwater

Dumb Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 47:58 Very Popular


Evan tries to show his kids the inside inner workings of a hamburger phone and instead shows them the inside inner workings of his finger.  Meanwhile Kevin and his family spend a full day at Legoland that started with traumatizing a 6-year-old on a roller coast and ended looking for chicken nuggets on a military base. Also, a Dumb Dad Moment User Submission! We are excited to partner with Little Otter Health - Exceptional mental health care for children and families! For more Dumb Dad Pod, follow us on social - https://bit.ly/3t6tE9M We've got DUMB DAD MERCH!  And we're on CAMEO! We'd love to send a message to a dad (or anybody) in your life who needs a Dumb Dad pick-me-up! CHEAT CODES - BETONLINE - Use our Promo Code: BLEAV to receive your 50% Welcome Bonus on your first deposit. Thanks to Chris Verdú for our show music! Check out Verdú on SoundCloud!

Annual Pass
Legoland - Building the Dream

Annual Pass

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 50:51 Very Popular


Jack, Geoff, and BK head off to Legoland to learn about the building blocks of this family theme parks focused on the construction toy system Lego. Join the Discord: Join the Discord! https://discord.gg/6MU6jQ6Chm  Check Out The Park Map Here: https://www.legoland.com/california/media/kylhxu2k/llcr-park-map-2022_map_11x17_web.pdf Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jim and Them
Sesame Place - #736 Part 2

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 84:51


Young Miz: Forget Young Rock! Jim has been watching old seasons of The Challenge and finds young, drunk Miz! Let's go ya ninnies!Sesame Place: Is Sesame Place racist? The video footage keeps stacking up, but is it out of context!?Heat Stroke: Our poor UPS and USPS people are suffering out in this heat with no AC! Is it worth it?! Are you happy with your pack of batteries from Amazon!?HE WAS FUCKING FAT IN HIGH SCHOOL!, PLAYERS!, GOOD RIDDANCE!, UNITED CIGAR!, CARRY ON MY WAYWARD SON!, GAY!, STRAIGHT!, MTV'S THE CHALLENGE EXPERT JIM!, REAL WORLD ROAD RULES CHALLENGE!, 37 SEASONS!, WAR OF THE WORLDS!, DIRTY 30!, BATTLE OF THE SEASONS!, THE MIZ!, WWE!, WRESTLING!, THEO VON!, SATURN!, DRUNK!, BITTER!, ANGRY!, YELLING AT YOURSELF!, ICE SCULPTURE!, BELIGERENT!, DISTURBED!, GODSMACK!, ADEMA!, SLIPPING AWAY!, DEAD EYES!, 9/11!, CABO!, FEAR!, ABANDONED HOSPITAL!, CT!, A LEGEND!, AMERICAN GLADIATORS!, AMERICAN NINJA WARRIOR!, GINA CARANO!, LASER!, GUTS!, INTERNET ISSUES!, ROUTER!, EXPENSIVE!, ORBI!, NIGHTHAWK!, COX CABLE!, ZOINK!, THE M&M STORE!, COCA COLA STORE!, LEGO STORE!, LEGOLAND!, DERRICK!, SESAME PLACE!, RACIST!, IGNORED!, BLACK GIRL!, CHILDREN!, WAVE OFF!, REASONING!, VIEW FROM COSTUME!, MOUTH!, BERT AND ERNIE!, KNOCK DOWN!, HANDS UP!, ELMO!, STEP UP!, BLOW OFF!, ASIAN KID!, HIGH FIVE!, DENIABILITY!, PRIVILEGE!, HEAT STROKE!, UPS!, USPS!, AIR CONDITIONING!, PASS OUT!, GLOBAL WARMING!, CLIMATE CHANGE!, HUNGOVER!, STROKE!, TEST!, JESUS!, 1,000 YEARS!, ON FIRE!, SPAIN!, FRANCE!, FARMER!, MEXICAN!, TEQUILA!, BEER!, MIX!, GAY!, KISS!, YO NO SOY GAY!, TEMPLE OF DOOM!

No Agenda
1467 - "Ninja Variant"

No Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 195:14 Very Popular


No Agenda Episode 1467 - "Ninja Variant" "Ninja Variant" Executive Producers: Sir Anonymo of Sarcasmo Island Sir Don Marotta Sir Goose the Silly Roderick Pauw Sir Yuri Meows-A-Lot Mary Schwan John Buell Kellie Saliba Alan Dix Gifford Alexander Silvana Gentile Erik C Dame Mariella Ross Johnson Sir Robert, Knight of the Naughty Bits Associate Executive Producers: Certified Millennial Dan Gehring Aggy Latsis Chad Finkbeiner Mr. Clayton Moses of Anchorage Peter Campbell Talia Deupree Douglas Seth Morgan Kristine Hynes Sir Salmonspawn John Studebaker Become a member of the 1468 Club, support the show here Boost us with with Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx - Podstation - Curiocaster - Fountain Knights & Dames Courtney -> Black Dame Courtney of the Chicken Coop Don Marotta -> Sir Audra Mathews -> Dame Audra of Legoland! Kellie Saliba -> Dame Kellie of AxeHeadWatch.com Cole Hill -> Sir Goose The Silly Art By: Dame Kenny-Ben End of Show Mixes: Sir Michaelanthony - GWFF - Tom Starkweather Engineering, Stream Management & Wizardry Mark van Dijk - Systems Master Ryan Bemrose - Program Director Back Office Aric Mackey Chapters: Dreb Scott Clip Custodian: Neal Jones NEW: and soon on Netflix: Animated No Agenda No Agenda Social Registration Sign Up for the newsletter No Agenda Peerage ShowNotes Archive of links and Assets (clips etc) 1467.noagendanotes.com New: Directory Archive of Shownotes (includes all audio and video assets used) archive.noagendanotes.com RSS Podcast Feed Full Summaries in PDF No Agenda Lite in opus format NoAgendaTorrents.com has an RSS feed or show torrents Last Modified 07/10/2022 16:58:16This page created with the FreedomController Last Modified 07/10/2022 16:58:16 by Freedom Controller

Mile Higher Podcast
209: Dumbest Criminals Pt. 3 - Max Berry Airplane Meltdown, Legoland License Man, Empty Safe Heist & More!

Mile Higher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 53:59 Very Popular


https://milehighermerch.com/  https://bit.ly/3R6eTj0  0:00- Eye friends! 5:50 -Stealing empty safe 9:25 - The most generous thief 15:02 - Party of 1 23:57 - Legoland driver 25:55 - Maxamillions 34:06 - The Sofa King 40:25 - Tossing mom's ashes 23:10 - Burning the wean car 46:25 - DB Cooper copy cat Support our Sponsors!  Dipsea https://bit.ly/3ODGnLm | Express VPN https://bit.ly/3ueFj8j | Hello Fresh https://bit.ly/3NBX9Ji |StitchFix https://bit.ly/3AotBvQ   Check out our vlog channel https://www.youtube.com/c/Kendaily Check out our other podcasts! The Sesh https://bit.ly/3Mtoz4X Lights Out https://bit.ly/3n3Gaoe Planet Sleep https://linktr.ee/planetsleep Higher Love Wellness Co https://higherlovewellness.com/ Get 10% Off by entering code: homies Higher Love Wellness IG: @higherlovewellnessco Higher Love Wellness TW: @higherlovecbd MHP Merch: http://milehighermerch.com Join our official FB group! https://bit.ly/3kQbAxg Join our Discord community, it's free! https://discord.gg/hZ356G9 MHP YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qaDWGf Are You Subscribed On Apple Podcast & Spotify?! Support MHP by leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcast :) https://apple.co/2H4kh58 MHP Topic Request Form: https://forms.gle/gUeTEzL9QEh4Hqz88 Merch designer application: https://forms.gle/ha2ErBnv1gK4rj2Y6 You can follow us on all the things: @milehigherpod Twitter: http://twitter.com/milehigherpod Instagram: http://instagram.com/milehigherpod YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/milehigherp... Hosts: Kendall: @kendallraeonyt IG: http://instagram.com/kendallraeonyt TW: https://twitter.com/kendallraeonyt YT: https://www.youtube.com/c/kendallsplace Josh: @milehigherjosh IG: http://instagram.com/milehigherjosh TW: https://twitter.com/milehigherjosh Producers: Janelle: @janelle_fields_ IG: https://www.instagram.com/janelle_fie... TW: https://twitter.com/janelle_fields_ Karelly: @karell.y IG: https://bit.ly/2TcxnoD  TW: https://bit.ly/3f9ngcN ✉ Send Us Mail & Fan Art ✉ Kendall Rae & Josh Thomas 8547 E Arapahoe Rd Ste J # 233 Greenwood Village, CO 80112 Music By: Mile Higher Boys YT: https://bit.ly/2Q7N5QO Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/0F4ik... Sources: https://pastebin.com/KLBwn0ip Welcome to the Mile Higher Podcast hosted by wife and husband duo Kendall Rae & Josh Thomas! Our show is focused on Crime & Conspiracies but we delve into many other topics including unexplained phenomena, metaphysics, futurism, ancient civilizations, and news stories the mainstream media doesn't cover. Our guests include experts in these topics as well as like-minded individuals who share our passion for uncovering the truth and exploring the mysteries of our universe. We never changed, we just woke up and so can you. Come chill with us every Monday and prepare to take your mind a mile higher!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
10 years of Speaking + Conferences

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 61:53


In this episode of Syntax, Wes and Scott talk about their experiences speaking at conferences, why they've done it, how they prepare talks, and tips for anyone interested in wanting to give talks. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax Show Notes 00:02 Welcome 01:38 Stanley Cup update 03:13 Legoland update 04:09 Topic introduction Nicole Sullivan Tweet looking for questions 05:03 Why speak at conferences? 08:56 Travelling for free 09:50 Getting paid to speak at conferences 12:23 Doing in person workshops 14:55 How do you get into speaking? 19:25 Meetups 20:30 Sponsor: Linode 21:15 What should you speak about? 26:27 Something you did a deep dive on 29:21 Sponsor: Freshbooks 30:04 Flight protection and travel insurance 32:59 Idea: update to a library 33:28 How to get conferences to invite you to speak? 36:03 How do you prepare for a talk? 42:40 How to find conferences looking for speakers 44:09 How to create a topic that will get picked 46:59 Sponsor: Sentry 48:06 Software for your slides Slides.js Slides.com MDX Deck Notion Figma Google Slides Lydia Hallie Keynote 56:28 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Risk for iOS Wes: Barrina LED T5 Integrated Single Fixture Shameless Plugs Scott: LevelUp Tutorials Wes: Wes Bos Tutorials Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets