Podcasts about A Clockwork Orange

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Best podcasts about A Clockwork Orange

Latest podcast episodes about A Clockwork Orange

Ojai: Talk of the Town
Beckett McDowell Takes Show on the Road

Ojai: Talk of the Town

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:33


Ojai singer-songwriter Beckett McDowell is a hometown prodigy on the cusp of his career. He has been opening for Dave Mason, of Traffic fame, as his first two singles, "Weirdo," and "Pale Blue Eyes" rack up views and downloads by the thousands. Though only 18, McDowell has put in the hours, playing 300 shows at The Vine on Mondays, for the "Young Ones" open mic night, as well as coming out on stage to sing with Eric Burdon of the Animals. He also sang "Jailhouse Rock" at age 5 in front of a thousand fans at Libbey Bowl. His homegrown talents have been helped by Mason and Burdon, as well as Pierre Bouvier of Simple Plan fame, who wrote "Weirdo" with Simple Plan bandmates. The video of his original song, "Pale Blue Eyes," features his famous father Malcolm, in "Pale Blue Eyes," a tearjerker of a song with Malcolm overflowing with emotion up as Beckett sings poignant lyrics. Something told me it was over / when you didn't even call me / Now I'm out and alone forever / And I'm tired. McDowell comes on the Ojai podcast, Talk of the Town, to talk about his new eight-song EP, hanging with his famous father, Malcolm, and growing up in Ojai. Once described as Ed Sheeran's "handsomer little brother," Beckett has been on the road for a slate of shows in May and June. We also talked about Bob Dylan, rare guitars, Ojai pizza and his having not ever seen "A Clockwork Orange." We did not talk about dolphin mimicry, NLP or Rumi's poetry. You can check out Beckett on Youtube, where he has a series of performances filmed at Norman's Rare Guitars in Los Angeles, and his Instagram @beckettrex.

Gay Girls in Paradise
A Clockwork Orange (Beethoviana)

Gay Girls in Paradise

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


Klassik für Klugscheisser
Klappe, die Erste: Filmmusik

Klassik für Klugscheisser

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 44:32


Wenn jemand Beethoven vom Sockel holen kann, dann Stanley Kubrick in "A Clockwork Orange". Bei Luis Buñuel wird zu Wagner am Zeh gelutscht und Prokofiew komponiert Mucke für einen der großen russischen Propagandafilme. Laury und Uli gönnen sich mit Euch eine Tüte Popcorn auf die Meister der großen Emotionen. Sie klären, warum die frühen Filmpioniere auch gleichzeitig die ersten DJs waren und sie lernen vom Filmkomponisten Mathias Rehfeldt, wie man für Film und Fernsehen schreibt. Also Licht aus, Film ab!

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast with Paul Hutchinson Episode 56

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:53


Welcome to Episode #56 This show is recorded live each week from the studios of SMC in Essex where the show goes out every Thursday night 7-9pm UK time. YOU CAN WATCH THE SHOW LIVE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT - WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #561.Monolink - Father Ocean (Ben Bohmer Mix)2. Michael Henderson - Riding3. Moodena - A Glass Of Kool Aid4. Jamie Jones - My Paradise5. Jonk & Spook - Buckle UpTRACK OF THE WEEK:6. Yooks, Hannah Khemoh - Try My Love7. Groove Committee - Dirty Games (Odyssey inc remix)8. Soul Avengers - If You Want My Love9. Sean Finn - Pasilda (Cassimm Remix)10. Mighty Mouse - The Get Down11. Ten City - That's The Way Love IsHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOWTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrighton Music Conference - Paul Hutchinson speaking in Theatre One 26th May 10.30amhttps://www.brightonmusicconference.co.uk/bmc22_theatre1/Brunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsClockwork Orange // Clockstock // Ibiza : www.clockworkorange.coStreet Eats n Beats Festival:https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=eats+beats+streets&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8Link to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:Rockin Social Media Agencyhttps://www.rockinsocialagency.com

Cinema Spectator
A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Cinema Spectator

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 83:21


Warning: the following movies content is extremely mature and shocking. We don't usually recommend listening to our podcast before viewing, but in case, it might be helpful before you consider watching this film. Isaac and Cameron continue Stanley Kubrick month with one of his most notorious movies. Following the life of horrific delinquent (Malcom McDowell), A Clockwork Orange poses questions about free will and moral choice. But can the deeper themes relate to a more casual viewer? Is the dark imagery worth that exploration?  Cinema Spectator is a movie podcast hosted by Isaac Ransom and Cameron Tuttle. The show is executive produced by Darrin O'Neill. The show is recorded and produced in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. You can support the show at patreon.com/ecfsproductions. You can follow us on Youtube, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter ECFS Productions (@ecfsproductions). Thank you for your generosity and support. 

Middle Class Film Class
Gab & Chatter: One Cut Of The Dead / I Love You Now Die / The Sixth Sense / Signs / Muppets From Space /

Middle Class Film Class

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 67:39


On this episode: Jason Statham to star in the sequel to Bee Movie and Netflix CEO says TikTok is ruining their business just like it's ruining Tyler's life. Plus incoming George Carlin documentary, Marvel bootlicking on Twitter, and overdue listener mailIn news: Tik Tok, Don't Tell a Soul, Safe, Temple of Doom, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Shawshank Redemption, Bee Movie, Willy Wonka, Jason Statham, The Beekeeper, David Ayer, The Transporter, The Accountant, Matt Damon, The Wicker Man, John Wick, Kurt Wimmer, Bill Block, Miramax, Fury, Training days Bright, Antoine Fuqua, Harsh Times, The Tax Collector, Suicide Squad, God of War, hallucinogenic monk honey, Weird Al movie, A Clockwork Orange, Thor: Love and Thunder, Don't Worry Darling, Harry Stylers, Olivia Wilde, Florence Pugh, Daniel Radcliffe, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Wilt Chamberlain, I Think You Should Leave, Tim Robinson, Power of the Dog, Reed Hastings, Don't Look Up, CODA, PewDiePie, Markiplier, Happy Gilmore, George Carlin, Seinfeld, Judd Apatow, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, Everything Everywhere All At Once, Sam Raimi, Benedict Cumberbatch, Elizabeth Olsen, The Northman, The Lighthouse, Avatar, The House That Jack Built, Toy Story, Jennifer Lopez, Owen Wilson, Marry Me, Ben Affleck, Marc Anthony, Bruce Purkey, Eric Holmes, Greg Srisavasdi, Find your Film, Randy Newman, Godfather Part 3, Joel Shinneman, http://www.MCFCpodcast.comEmail us at MCFCpodcast@gmail.com    Leave us a voicemail (209) 730-6010Joseph Navarro    Pete Abeytaand Tyler Noe    Streaming Picks:I Love You Now Die - HBO MaxThe Sixth Sense - Amazon PrimeSigns - Amazon PrimePhone Booth - HBO Max

Classic Album Sundays
Classic Album Sundays Podcast: Wendy Carlos ‘Clockwork Orange' with Greg Wilson

Classic Album Sundays

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 46:42


British DJ and journalist Greg Wilson joins Colleen to discuss Wendy Carlos' score to the film ‘Clockwork Orange'. Wendy Carlos is what you might call a true genius in the world of twentieth century music. She has always been ahead of her time…expanding boundaries and challenging listeners and herself. Her dramatic score for the legendary Clockwork Orange motion picture is an interesting collection of solid, dark, electronic proto-new age music. Greg began DJing in 1975 and is regarded as one of the most important figures on the UK dance scene. He enjoyed hugely popular residencies in the early eighties at Wigan Pier and Manchester's majorly influential Legend, having originally started out in his hometown of New Brighton. He was a pioneer of mixing in the UK and in 1983 he became the first ‘dance music'specialist hired for a regular weekly session at Manchester's now legendary Haçienda club. Greg was instrumental in breaking the new electronic, post-disco records coming out of New York, a sound he has dubbed ‘Electro-Funk'. Read more about your favourite albums here: classicalbumsundays.com

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 55 with Special Guest Danny Clockwork

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 60:00


Welcome to Episode #55 with a very special Interview with Danny Clockwork.This show is recorded live each week from the studios of SMC in Essex where the show goes out every Thursday night 7-9pm UK time. YOU CAN WATCH THE SHOW LIVE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT - WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #551. GROOVE COMMITTEE - I WANT YOU TO KNOW (VICTOR SIMONELLI)2. JACK BACK - FEELING3. TRACK OF THE WEEK - SAISON & MISS YANKEY - MAKIN SHAPES (SCOTT DIAZ REMIX)4. MATTEI & OMICH - LET NO MAN PUT ASUNDER5. MILK & SUGAR - YOU CANT HIDE FROM YOURSELF (CASSIMM REMIX)Interview with Danny Clockwork6.History feat QT - Africa7. A Guy Called Gerald - Emotions ElectricHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOWTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrighton Music Conference - Paul Hutchinson speaking in Theatre One 26th May 10.30amhttps://www.brightonmusicconference.co.uk/bmc22_theatre1/Brunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsClockwork Orange // Clockstock // Ibiza : www.clockworkorange.coDanny's Book: Gould Blimey : https://www.amazon.co.uk/GOULD-BLIMEY-01-DANNY/dp/1078493448Link to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:Rockin Social Media Agencyhttps://www.rockinsocialagency.com

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast
A Clockwork Orange with Gillian Hills

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 89:54


Episode 53 : A Clockwork Orange with Gillian Hills Gillian Hills is an actress, singer, songwriter, poet, artist and Illustrator, she really is the definition of the term Renaissance Woman. Born in Egypt, Gillian spent her early years in France, where she was discovered at the tender age of 14 by Roger Vadim, the director of And God Created Woman and Barbarella. Vadim described her as the next Brigitte Bardot and cast her in his version of Dangerous Liaisons, released in 1959. In 1960, at 15, Gillian was cast in the lead of the British film Beat Girl with co-stars Adam Faith, Christopher Lee and Oliver Reed. That same year, Gillian recorded her first records with Henri Salvador, for the French record label Barclay, and In 1961, she appeared at the Olympia Theatre in Paris on the bill with Johnny Hallyday. Serge Gainsbourg wrote his first duet for Hills, which they sang together on French TV in 1963. She was soon signed up to the AZ record label and continued to record her self-penned songs as well as cover versions of the latest pop songs. Then another string of films followed, appearing in Michelangelo Antonioni's first English language film, the classic 1966 Blowup, The film version of John Osborne's Inadmissible Evidence (1968), The Owl Service (1969), a television adaptation of the Alan Garner novel, Georges Franju's La Faute de l'abbé Mouret, and she replaced Marianne Faithfull in the 1972 horror Demons of the Mind for Hammer Film Productions. Gillian then moved to New York and enjoyed a successful career as a book and magazine illustrator. In recent years her music has been featured in the film “Mesrine Part One: Killer Instinct” with Vincent Cassel, the Season 5 premiere of Mad Men in 2012, and The Queen's Gambit in 2020 …and she has just released her new self-penned album, Lili, which reflects on her early years aged between 11 and 19. But, this is Kubrick's Universe, and so we must tell you that Gillian also appeared in A Clockwork Orange, as one of the two young ladies that Alex picks up at the record store… so come with uncle, and hear all proper, hear angel trumpets and devil trombones… YOU ARE INVITED! Production Credits : Hosted by Jason Furlong /  Written by Stephen Rigg and Jason Furlong / Original music written and performed by Jason Furlong / Produced and edited by Stephen Rigg. Music : The Immediate Pleasure by John Barry The William Tell Overture by Rossini Spécialisation by Gillian Hills and Eddie Constantine Zou Bisou Bisou by Gillian Hills NeferTiti by Gillian Hills The Off Beat by John Barry Links : Gillian Hills Website : http://gillianhills.com/ipad/ Kubrick's Universe Podcast (KUP) - Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/KubricksUniverse The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/TSKAS/ The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - YouTube Channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/TheStanleyKubrickAppreciationSociety1 The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - Twitter Page : https://twitter.com/KubrickAS Contact : stephenrigg.skas@gmail.com  

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Episode 54 Interview & Guest Mix Illyus & Barrientos

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 59:55


Welcome to Episode #54 with a very special Interview with one half of Illyus & Barrientos Illyus.This show is recorded live each week from the studios of SMC in Essex where the show goes out every Thursday night 7-9pm UK time. YOU CAN WATCH THE SHOW LIVE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT - WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #541. DJ JAZZY JEFF - ROCK WIT U2. TENOBI - WHAT YOU NEED (RICHARD EARNSHAW)3. TRACK OF THE WEEK - DAVE LEE - STARLIGHT4. ASAP UK - MY SWEET FATE5. JOHN DAVIS & THE MONSTER ORCHESTRA - UP JUMPED THE DEVILInterview with Illyus from Illyus & Barrientos6. Illyus & Barrientos - Takin Over7. Mighty Dub Katz - Let The drums speak (Butch Remix)HERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOWTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrighton Music Conference - Paul Hutchinson speaking in Theatre One 26th May 10.30amhttps://www.brightonmusicconference.co.uk/bmc22_theatre1/Brunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsFor tickets Clockwork Orange: www.clockworkorange.coLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:Rockin Social Media Agencyhttps://www.rockinsocialagency.com

DT Radio Shows
Ministry Of Breaks - Hosted By Blaze Episode 9

DT Radio Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 59:00


Ministry of Breaks – Hosted by Blaze DJ – Episode 9 Monthly show, bring the best Breaks, Bass and Bleeps from around the globe. Including tracks from Distorsion Records, Elekroshok, Clockwork Orange, Xclubsive Recordings, 13monkeys Records, Time Is Now Records and exclusives from Nipponeer & ONE7AUDIO. Tracklist The Brainkiller Out Of My Head Axion Jaxon Wasted (Odeed Remix) Justin Jay, Denham Audi Swarm (Original Mix) FUNBOX WobzB6 Kristin Velvet Frequency (Original Mix) The Darrow Chem Syndi He Is My Baby (Khoiser Re Jason Laidback & Jem St Jason Laidback & Jem Ston Blaze DJ London Bass Row-EX Go! (Original Mix) Analog Hustlers Real O.G. (Original Mix) Basstyler Classic (Original Mix) The Darrow Chem Syndi Turn Me On (Perfect Kombo Sekret Chadow I Love You Mommy (Instru Blaze DJ Ain't No Other Bootleg Shades Of Rhythm Sweet Sensation (Origin8a Stanton Warriors XTC Firestorm Ruffage (Original Mix)

Screaming in the Cloud
Data Analytics in Real Time with Venkat Venkataramani

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 38:41


About VenkatVenkat Venkataramani is CEO and co-founder of Rockset. In his role, Venkat helps organizations build, grow and compete with data by making real-time analytics accessible to developers and data teams everywhere. Prior to founding Rockset in 2016, he was an Engineering Director for the Facebook infrastructure team that managed online data services for 1.5 billion users. These systems scaled 1000x during Venkat's eight years at Facebook, serving five billion queries per second at single-digit millisecond latency and five 9's of reliability. Venkat and his team also created and contributed to many noted data technologies and open-source projects, including Facebook's TAO distributed data store, RocksDB, Memcached, MySQL, MongoRocks, and others. Prior to Facebook, Venkat worked on tools to make the Oracle database easier to manage. He has a master's in computer science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and bachelor's in computer science from the National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli.Links Referenced: Company website: https://rockset.com Company blog: https://rockset.com/blog TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's promoted guest episode is one of those questions I really like to ask because it can often come across as incredibly, well, direct, which is one of the things I love doing. In this case, the question that I am asking is, when you look around at the list of colossal blunders that people make in the course of careers in technology and the rest, it's one of the most common is, “Oh, yeah. I don't like the way that this thing works, so I'm going to build my own database.” That is the siren call to engineers, and it is often the prelude to horrifying disasters. Today, my guest is Venkat Venkataramani, co-founder and CEO at Rockset. Venkat, thank you for joining me.Venkat: Thanks for having me, Corey. It's a pleasure to be here.Corey: So, it is easy for me to sit here in my beautiful ivory tower that is crumbling down around me and use my favorite slash the best database imaginable, which is TXT records shoved into Route 53. Now, there are certainly better databases than that for most use cases. Almost anything really, to be honest with you, because that is a terrifying pattern; good joke, terrible practice. What is Rockset as we look at the broad landscape of things that store data?Venkat: Rockset is a real-time analytics platform built for the cloud. Let me break that down a little bit, right? I think it's a very good question when you say does the world really need another database? Don't we have enough already? SQL databases, NoSQL databases, warehouses, and lake houses now.So, if you really break it down, the first digital transformation that happened in the '80s was when people actually retired pen and paper records and started using a relational database to actually manage their business records and what have you instead of ledgers and books and what have you. And that was the first digital transformation. That was—and Oracle called the rows in a table ‘records' for a reason. They're called records to this date. And then, you know, 20 years later, when all businesses were doing system of record and transactions and transactional databases, then analytics was born, right?This was, like, the whole reason why I wanted to make better data-driven business decisions, and BI was born, warehouses and data lakes started becoming more and more mainstream. And there was really a second category of database management systems because the first category it was very good at to be a system of record, but not really good at complex analytics that businesses are asking to be able to guide their decisions. Fast-forward 20 years from then, the nature of applications are changing. The world is going from batch to real-time, your data never stops coming, advent of Apache Kafka and technologies like that, 5G, IoTs, data is coming from all sorts of nooks and corners within an enterprise, and now customers in enterprises are acquiring the data in real-time at a scale that the world has never seen before.Now, how do you get analytics out of that? And then if you look at the database market—entire market—there are still only two large categories of databases: OLTP databases for transaction processing, and warehouses and data lakes for batch analytics. Now suddenly, you need the speed of OLTP at the scale of batch, right, in terms of, like, complexity of compute, complexity of storage. So, that is really why we thought the data management space needs that third leg, and we call it real-time analytics platform or real-time analytics processing. And this is where the data never stops coming; the queries never stopped coming.You need the speed and the scale, and it's about time we innovate and solve the problem well because in 2015, 2016, when I was researching for this, every company that was looking to solve build applications that were real-time applications was building a custom Rube Goldberg machine of sorts. And it was insanely complex, it was insanely expensive. Fast-forward now, you can build a real-time application in a matter of hours with the simplicity of the cloud using Rockset.Corey: There's a lot to be said that the way we used to do things after the first transformation and we got into the world of batch processing, where—in the days of punch cards, which was a bit before my time and I believe yours as well—where they would drop them off and then the next day, or two days, they would come back later after the run, they would get the results only to figure out syntax error because you put the wrong card first or something like that. And it was maddening. In time, that got better, but still, nightly runs have become a thing to the point where even now, by default, if you wind up looking at the typical timing of a default Linux install, for example, you see that in the middle of the night is when a bunch of things will rotate when various cleanup jobs get done, et cetera, et cetera. And that seemed like a weird direction to go in. One of the most famous Google April Fools Day jokes was when they put out their white paper on MapReduce.And then Yahoo fell for it hook, line, and sinker, built out Hadoop, and we've been stuck with this idea of performing these big query jobs on top of existing giant piles of data, where ideally, you can measure it with a wall clock; in practice, you often measure the calendar in some cases. And as the world continues to evolve, being able to do streaming processing and understand in real-time what is going on, is unlocking different approaches, at least by all accounts. Do you have an example you can give me of a problem that real-time analytics solves for a customer? Because I can sit here and talk all day about how things might theoretically work, but I have to get out of my Route 53-based ivory tower over here, what are customers seeing?Venkat: That's a great question. And I want one hundred percent agree. I think Google did build MapReduce, and I think it's a very nice continuation of what happened there and what is happening in the world now. And built MapReduce and they quickly realized re-indexing the whole world [laugh] every night, as the size of the internet is exploding is a bad idea. And you know how Google index is now? They do real-time indexing.That is how they index the wor—you know, web. And they look for the changes that are happening in the internet, and they only index the changes. And that is exactly the same principle behind—one of the core principles behind Rockset's real-time analytics platform. So, what is the customer story? So, let me give you one of my favorite ones.So, the world's number one or number two buy now, pay later company, they have hundreds of millions of users, they have 300,000-plus merchants, they operate in, like, maybe 100-plus countries, so many different payment methods, you can imagine the complexity. At any given point in time, some part of the product is broken, well, Apple Pay stopped working in Switzerland for this e-commerce merchant. Oh God, like, we got to first detect that. Forget even debugging and figuring out what happened and having an incident response team. So, what did they do as they scale the number of payments processed in the system across the world—it's, like, in millions; first, it was millions in the day, and there was millions in an hour—so like everybody else, they built a batch-based system.So, they would accumulate all these payment records, and every six hours—so initially, it was a day, and then afterwards, you know, you try to see how far I can push it, and they couldn't push it beyond every six hours. Every six hours, some batch job would come and process through all the payments that happened, have some statistical models to detect, hey, here are some of the things that you might want to double-click and follow up on. And as they were scaling, the batch job that they will kick off every six hours was starting to take more than six hours. So, you can see how the story goes. Now, fast-forward, they came to us and say—it's almost like Rockset has, like, a big red button that says, “Real-time this.”And then they kind of like, “Can you make this real-time? Because not only that we are losing millions of potential revenue dollars in a year because something stops working and we're not processing payments, and we don't find out about that up to, like, three hours later, five hours later, six hours later, but our merchants are also very unhappy. We are also not able to protect our customers' business because that is all we are about.” And so fast-forward, they use Rockset, and simply using SQL now they have all the metrics and statistical computation that they want to do, happens in real-time, that are accurate up to the second. All of their anomaly detectors run every minute and the anomaly detectors take, like, hundreds of milliseconds to run.And so, now they've cut down the business observability, I would say. It's not metrics and machine observability is actually the—you know, they have now business observability in real-time. And that not only actually saves them a lot of potential revenue loss from downtimes, that's also allowing them to build a better product and give their customers a better experience because they are now telling their merchants and their customers that something is not working in some part of your e-commerce footprint before even the customers notice that something is wrong. And that allows them to build a better product and a better customer experience than their competitors. So, this is a very real-world example of why companies and enterprises are moving from batch to real-time.Corey: With the stories that you, and frankly, a lot of other data analytics companies tend to fall back on all the time has been stories of the ones you're telling, where you're talking about the largest buy now, pay later lender, for example. These are companies operating at massive scale who have tremendous existing transaction volume, and they're built out already. That's great, but then I wanted to try to cut to the truth of some of these things. And when I visit your pricing page at Rockset, it doesn't have what I would expect if that were the only use case. And what that would be is, “Great. Call here to conta—open up a sales quote, and we'll talk to you et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.”And the answer then is, “Okay, I know it's going to have at least two commas in it, ideally, not three, but okay, great.” Instead, you have a free tier where it's, “Hey, we'll give you a pile of credits, here's some limits on our free account, et cetera, et cetera.” Great. That is awesome. So, it tells me that there is a use case here for folks who have not already, on some level, made a good show of starting the process of conquering the world.Rather, someone with an idea some evening at two in the morning can wind up diving in and getting started. What is the Twitter for Pets, in my garage, spare-time side project story for using something like Rockset? What problem will I have as I wind up building those things out, when I don't have any user traffic or data yet, but I want to, you know for once in my life, do the smart thing in advance rather than building an impressive tower of technical debt?Venkat: That is the first thing we built, by the way. When we finish our product, the first thing we built was self-service. The first thing we built was a free forever tier, which has certain limits because somebody has to pay the bill, right? And then we also have compute instances that are very, very affordable that cost you, like, approximately $1 a day. And so, we built all of that because real-time analytics is not a need that only, like, the large-scale companies have. And I'll give you a very, very simple example.Let's say you're building a game, it's a mobile game. You can use Amazon DynamoDB and use AWS Lambdas and have a serverless stack and, like, you're really only paying… you're kind of keeping your footprint very, very small, and you're able to build a very lively game and see if it gets [wider 00:12:16], and it's growing. And once it grows, you can have all the big company scaling problems. But in the early days, you're just getting started. Now, if you think about DynamoDB and Lambdas and whatnot, you can build almost every part of the game except probably the leaderboard.So, how do I build a leaderboard when thousands of people are playing and all of their individual gameplays and scores and everything is just another simple record in DynamoDB. It's all serverless. But DynamoDB doesn't give me a SQL SELECT *, order by score, limit 100, distinct by the same player. No, this is a analytical question, and it has to be updated in real-time, otherwise, you really don't have this thing where I just finished playing. I go to the leaderboard, and within a second or two, if it doesn't update, you kind of lose people along the way. So, this is one of actually a very popular use case, when the scale is much smaller, which is, like, Rockset augments NoSQL database like a Dynamo or a Mongo where you can continue to use that for—or even a Postgres or MySQL for that case where you can use that as your system of record and keep it small, but cover all of your compute-heavy and analytical parts of your application with Rockset.So, it's almost like kind of a CQRS pattern where you use your OLTP database as your system of record, you connect Rockset to it, and so—Rockset comes in with built-in connectors, by the way, so you don't have to write a single line of code for your inserts and updates and deletes in your transactional database to get reflected in Rockset within one to two seconds. And so now, all of a sudden you have a fully indexed, fast SQL replica of your transactional database that on which you can do all sorts of analytical queries and that's fully isolated with your transactional database. So, this is the pattern that I'm talking about. The mobile leaderboard is an example of that pattern where it comes in very handy. But you can imagine almost everybody building some kind of an application has certain parts of it that is very analytical in nature. And by augmenting your transactional database with Rockset, you can have your cake and eat it too.Corey: One of the challenges I think that at least I've run into when it comes to working with data—and let's be clear, I tend to deal with data in relatively small volumes, mostly. The stuff that's significantly large, like, oh, I don't know, AWS bills from large organizations, the format of those is mostly predefined. When I'm building something out, we're using, I don't know, DynamoDB or being dangerous with SQLite or whatnot, invariably I find that even at small-scale, I paint myself into a corner by data model design or how I wind up structuring access or the rest, and the thing that I'm doing that makes perfect sense today winds up being incredibly challenging to change later. And I still, in production and have a DynamoDB table that has the word ‘test' in its name because of course I do.It's not a great place to find yourself in some cases. And I'm curious as to what you've seen, as you've been building this out and watching customers, especially ones who already had significant datasets as they move to you. Do you have any guidance around how to avoid falling down that particular well?Venkat: I will say a lot of the complexity in this world is by solving the right problems using the wrong tool, or by solving the right problem on the wrong part of the stack. I'll unpack this a little bit, right? So, when your patterns change, your application is getting more complex, it is demanding more things, that doesn't necessarily mean the first part of the application you build—and let's say DynamoDB was your solution for that—was the wrong choice. That is the right choice, but now you're expanded the scope of your application and the demand that you have on your backend transactional database. And now you have to ask the question, now in the expanded scope, which ones are still more of the same category of things on why I chose Dynamo and which ones are actually not at all?And so, instead of going and abusing the GSIs and other really complex and expensive indexing options and whatnot, that Dynamo, you know, has built, and has all sorts of limitations, instead of that, what do I really need and what is the best tool for the job, right? What is the best system for that? And how do I augment? And how do I manage these things? And this goes to the first thing I said, which is, like, this tremendous complexity when you start to build a Rube Goldberg machine of sorts.Okay, now, I'm going to start making changes to Dynamo. Oh, God, like, how do I pick up all of those things and not miss a single record? Now, replicate that to another second system that is going to be search-centric or reporting-centric, and do I have to rethink this once in a while? Do I have to build and manage these pipelines? And suddenly, instead of going from one system to two system, you actually end up going from one system to, like, four different things that with all the pipes and tubes going into the middle.And so, this is what we really observed. And so, when you come in to Rockset and you point us at your DynamoDB table, you don't write a single line of code, and Rockset will automatically scan your Dynamo tables, move that into Rockset, and in real-time, your changes, insert, updates, deletes to Dynamo will be reflected in Rockset. And this is all using Dynamo Streams API, Dynamo Scan API, and whatnot, behind the scenes. And this just gives you an example of if you use the right tool for the job here, when suddenly your application is demanding analytical queries on Dynamo, and you do the right research and find the right tool, your complexity doesn't explode at all, and you can still, again, continue to use Dynamo for what it is very, very good at while augmenting that with a system built for analytics with full-featured SQL and other capabilities that I can talk about, for the parts of your application for which Dynamo is not a good fit. And so, if you use the right tool for the job, you should be in very good place.The other thing is part about this wrong part of the stack. I'll give a very kind of naive example, and then maybe you can extrapolate that to, like, other patterns on how people could—you know, accidental complexities the worst. So, let's just say you need to implement access control on your data. Let's say the best place to implement access control is at the database level, just happens to be that is the right thing. But this database that I picked, doesn't really have role-based access control or what have you, it doesn't really give me all the security features to be able to protect the data the way I want it.So, then what I'm going to do is, I'm going to go look at all the places that is actually having business logic and querying the database and I'm going to put a whole bunch of permission management and roles and privileges, and you can just see how that will be so error-prone, so hard to maintain, and it will be impossible to scale. And this is what is the worst form of accidental complexity because if you had just looked at it that one week or two weeks, how do I get something out, or the database I picked doesn't have it, and then the two weeks, you feel like you made some progress by, kind of like, putting some duct tape if conditions on all the access paths. But now, [laugh] you've just painted yourself into a really, really bad corner.And so, this is another variation of the same problem where you end up solving the right problems in the wrong part of the stack, and that just introduces tremendous amount of accidental complexity. And so, I think yeah, both of these are the common pitfalls that I think people make. I think it's easy to avoid them. I would say there's so much research, there's so much content, and if you know how to search for these things, they're available in the internet. It's a beautiful place. [laugh]. But I guess you have to know how to search for these things. But in my experience, these are the two common pitfalls a lot of people fall into and paint themselves in a corner.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: A question I have, though, that is an extension is this—and I want to give some flavor to it—but why is there a market for real-time analytics? And what I mean by that is, early on in my tenure of fixing horrifying AWS bills, I saw a giant pile of money being hurled over at effectively a MapReduce cluster for Elastic MapReduce. Great. Okay, well, stream-processing is kind of a thing; what about migrating to that? Well, that was a complete non-starter because it wasn't just the job running on those things; there were downstream jobs, and with their own downstream jobs. There were thousands of business processes tied to that thing.And similarly, the idea of real-time analytics, we don't have any use for that because of, oh I don't know, I only wind up pulling these reports on a once-a-week basis, and that's fine, so what do I need that updated for in real-time if I'm looking at them once a week? In practice, the answer is often something aligned with the, “Well, yeah, but you had a real-time updating dashboard, you would find that more useful than those reports.” But people's expectations and business processes have shaped themselves around constraints that now can be removed, but how do you get them to see that? How do you get them to buy in on that? And then how do you untangle that enormous pile of previous constraint into something that leverages the technology that's now available for a brighter future?Venkat: I think [unintelligible 00:21:40] a really good question, who are the people moving to real-time analytics? What do they see? And why can they do it with other tech? Like, you know, as you say… EMR, you know, it's just MapReduce; can't I just run it in sort of every twenty-four hours, every six hours, every hour? How about every five minutes? It doesn't work that way.Corey: How about I spin up a whole bunch of parallel clusters on different timescales so I constantly—Venkat: [laugh].Corey: Have a new report coming in. It's real-time, except—Venkat: Exactly.Corey: You're constantly putting out new ones, but they're just six hours delayed every time.Venkat: Exactly. So, you don't really want to do this. And so, let me unpack it one at a time, right? I mean, we talked about a very good example of a business team which is building business observability at the buy now, pay later company. That's a very clear value-prop on why they want to go from batch to real-time because it saves their company tremendous losses—potential losses—and also allows them to build a better product.So, it could be a marketing operations team looking to get more real-time observability to see what campaigns are working well today and how do I double down and make sure my ad budget for the day is put to good use? I don't have to mention security operations, you know, needing real-time. Don't tell me I got owned three days ago. Tell me—[laugh] somebody is, you know, breaking glass and might be, you know, entering into your house right now. And tell me then and not three days later, you know—Corey: “Yeah, what alert system do you have for security intrusion?” “So, I read the front page of_The New York Times_ every morning and waiting to see my company's name.” Yeah, there probably are better ways to reduce that cycle time.Venkat: Exactly, right. And so, that is really the need, right? Like, I think more and more business teams are saying, “I need operational intelligence and not business intelligence.” Don't make me play Monday morning quarterback.My favorite analogy is it's the middle of the third quarter. I'm six points down. A couple of people, star players in my team and my opponent's team are injured, but there's some in offense, some in defense. What plays do I do and how do I play the game slightly differently to change the outcome of the game and win this game as opposed to losing by six points. So, that I think is kind of really what is driving businesses.You know, I want to be more agile, I want to be more nimble, and take, kind of, being data-driven decision-making to another level. So that, I think, is the real force in play. So, now the real question is, why can they do it already? Because if you go ask a hundred people, “Do you want fast analytics on real-time data or slow analytics on stale data?” How many people are going to say give me slow and stale? Zero, right? Exactly zero people.So, but then why hasn't it happened yet? I think it goes back to the world only has seen two kinds of databases: Transaction processing systems, built for system of record, don't lose my data kind of systems; and then batch analytics, you know, all these warehouses and data lakes. And so, in real-time analytics use cases, the data never stops coming, so you have to actually need a system that is running 24/7. And then what happens is, as soon as you build a real-time dashboard, like this example that you gave, which is, like, I just want all of these dashboards to automatically update all the time, immediately people respond, says, “But I'm not going to be like Clockwork Orange, you know, toothpicks in my eyelids and be staring at this 24/7. Can you do something to alert or detect some anomalies and tap on my shoulder when something off is going on?”And so, now what happens is somebody's actually—a program more than a person—is actually actively monitoring all of these metrics and graphs and doing some analysis, and only bringing this to your attention when you really need to because something is off, right? So, then suddenly what happens is you went from, accumulate all the data and run a batch report to [unintelligible 00:25:16], like, the data never stops coming, the queries never stopped coming, I never stop asking questions; it's just a programmatic way of asking those things. And at that point, you have a data app. This is not a analytics dashboard report anymore. You have a full-fledged application.In fact, that application is harder to build and scale than any application you've ever built before [laugh] because in those situations, again, you don't have this torrent of data coming in all the time and complex analytical questions you're asking on the data 24/7, you know? And so, that I think is really why real-time analytics platform has to be built as almost a third leg. So, this is what we call data apps, which is when your data never stops coming and your queries never stop coming. So, this is really, I think, what is pushing all the expensive EMR clusters or misusing your warehouse, misusing your data lakes. At the end of the day, is what is I think blowing up your Snowflake bills, is what blowing up your warehouse builds because you somehow accidentally use the wrong tool for the job [laugh] going back to the one that we just talked about.You accidentally say, “Oh, God, like, I just need some real-time.” With enough thrust, pigs can fly. Is that a good idea? Probably not, right? And so, I don't want to be building a data app on my warehouse just because I can. You should probably use the best tool for the job, and really use something that was built ground up for it.And I'll give you one technical insight about how real-time analytics platforms are different than warehouses.Corey: Please. I'm here for this.Venkat: Yes. So really, if you think about warehouses and data lakes, I call them storage-optimized systems. I've been building databases all my life, so if I have to really build a database that is for batch analytics, you just break down all of your expenses in terms of let's say, compute and storage. What I'm burning 24/7 is storage. Compute comes and goes when I'm doing a batch data load, or I'm running—an analyst who logs in and tries to run some queries.But what I'm actually burning 24/7 is storage, so I want to compress the heck out of the data, and I want to store it in very cheap media. I want to store it—and I want to make the storage as cheap as possible, so I want to optimize the heck out of the storage use. And I want to make computation on that possible but not efficient. I can shuffle things around and make the analysis possible, but I'm not trying to be compute-efficient. And we just talked about how, as soon as you get into real-time analytics, you very quickly get into the data app business. You're not building a real-time dashboard anymore, you're actually building your application.So, as soon as you get into that, what happens is you start burning both storage and compute 24/7. And we all know, relatively, [laugh] compute and RAM is about a hundred to a thousand times more expensive than storage in the grand scheme of things. And so, if you actually go and look at your Snowflake bill, if you go look at your warehouse bill—BigQuery, no matter what—I bet the computational part of it is about 90 to 95% of the bill and not the storage. And then, if you again, break down, okay, who's spending all the compute, and you'll very quickly narrow down all these real-time-y and data app-y use cases where you can never turn off the compute on your warehouse or your BigQuery, and those are the ones that are blowing up your costs and complexity. And on the Rockset side, we are actually not storage-optimized; we're compute-optimized.So, we index all the data as it comes in. And so, the storage actually goes slightly higher because the, you know, we stored the data and also the indexes of those data automatically, but we usually fold the computational cost to a quarter of what a typical warehouse needs. So, the TCO for our customers goes down by two to four folds, you know? It goes down by half or even to a quarter of what they used to spend. Even though their storage cost goes up in net, that is a very, very small fraction of their spend.And so really, I think, good real-time analytics platforms are all compute-optimized and not storage-optimized, and that is what allows them to be a lot more efficient at being the backend for these data applications.Corey: As someone who spends a lot of time staring into the depths of AWS bills, I think that people also lose sight of the reality that it doesn't matter what you're spending on AWS; it invariably pales in comparison to what you're spending on people to work with these things. The reason to go to cloud is not because it is the cheapest possible way to get computers to do things; it's because it's a capability story. It's about unlocking capacity and capabilities you do not have otherwise. And that dramatically increases your feature velocity and it lets you to achieve things faster, sooner, with better results. And unlocking a capability is always going to be more interesting to a company than saving money on it. When a company cares first, last, and always about just save money, make the bill lower, the end, it's usually a company in decline. Or alternately, something very strange is going on over there.Venkat: I agree with that. One of our favorite customers told us that Rockset took their six-month roadmap and shrunk it to a single afternoon. And their supply chain SaaS backend for heavy construction, 80% of concrete that are being delivered and tracked in North America follows through their platform, and Rockset powers all of their real-time analytics and reporting. And before Rockset, what did they have? They had built a beautiful serverless stack using DynamoDB, even have AWS Lambdas and what-have-you.And why did they have to do all serverless? Because the entire team was two people. [laugh]. And maybe a third person once in a while, they'll get, so 2.5. Brilliant people, like, you know, really pioneers of building an entire data stack on AWS in a serverless fashion; no pipes, no ETL.And then they were like, oh God, finally, I have to do something because my business demands and my customers are demanding real-time reporting on all of these concrete trucks and aggregate trucks delivering stuff. And real-time reporting is the name of the game for them, and so how do I power this? So, I have to build a whole bunch of pipes, deliver it to, like, some Elasticsearch or some kind of like a cluster that I had to keep up in real-time. And this will take me a couple of months, that will take me a couple of months. They came into Rockset on a Thursday, built their MVP over the weekend, and they had the first working version of their product the following Tuesday.So—and then, you know, there was no turning back at that point, not a single line of code was written. You know, you just go and create an account with Rockset, point us at your Dynamo, and then off you go. You know, you can use start using SQL and go start building your real-time application. So again, I think the tremendous value, I think a lot of customers like us, and a lot of customers love us. And if you really ask them what is one thing about Rockset that you really like, I think it'll come back to the same thing, which is, you gave me a lot of time back.What I thought would take six months is now a week. What I thought would be three weeks, we got that in a day. And that allows me to focus on my business. I want to spend more time with my stakeholders, you know, my CPO, my sales teams, and see what they need to grow our business and succeed, and not build yet another data pipeline and have data pipelines and other things coming out of my nose, you know? So, at the end of the day, the simplicity aspects of it is very, very important for real-time analytics because, you know, we can't really realize our vision for real-time being the new default in every enterprise for whenever analytics concern without making it very, very simple and accessible to everybody.And so, that continues to be one of our core thing. And I think you're absolutely right when you say the biggest expense is actually the people and the time and the energy they have to spend. And not having to stand up a huge data ops team that is building and managing all of these things, is probably the number one reason why customers really, really like working with our product.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time to talk me through what you're working on these days. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Venkat: We are Rockset, I'll spell it out for your listeners ROCKSET—rock set—rockset.com. You can go there, you can start a free trial. There is a blog, rockset.com/blog has a prolific blog that is very active. We have all sorts of stories there, and you know engineers talking about how they implemented certain things, to customer case studies.So, if you're really interested in this space, that's one on space to follow and watch. If you're interested in giving this a spin, you know, you can go to rockset.com and start a free trial. If you want to talk to someone, there is, like, a ‘Request Demo' button there; you click it and one of our solutions people or somebody that is more familiar with Rockset would get in touch with you and you can have a conversation with them.Corey: Excellent. And links to that will of course go in the [show notes 00:34:20]. Thank you so much for your time today. I appreciate it.Venkat: Thanks, Corey. It was great.Corey: Venkat Venkataramani, co-founder and CEO at Rockset. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting crappy comment that I will immediately see show up on my real-time dashboard.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

BookTok
Honor - Part 1 (chapters 1-8)

BookTok

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 28:52


We are BACK baby! This episode covers the first section of Honor by Thrity Umrigar. Next week, we are reading chapters 9-19! --- Other books mentioned in this episode: A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess Sooley by John Grisham On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong Open Water by Caleb Azumah Nelson Pure Colour by Sheila Heti Stay and Fight by Madeline Fitch Educated by Tara Westover Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens There's No Such Thing as an Easy Job by Kikuko Tsumura Milk Fed by Melissa Febos Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune Haruki Murakami (author) Verity by Colleen Hoover The School for Good Mothers by Jessamine Chan

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 53 Special Guest Darryl Wright

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 118:32


Welcome to Episode #53 with a very special Interview with the other half of Slavziihouse Darryl Wright, Darryl also finishes the show with a one hour guest mix.This show is recorded each week from the studios of SMC in Essex where the show goes out live every Thursday night 7-9pm UK time. YOU CAN WATCH THE SHOW LIVE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT - WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #531. Moodena & Soul central - A glass of kool aid2. Cher Boogie - Funky strokes3. TRACK OF THE WEEK: DAVID MORALES - LIFE IS A SONG (PHILLY MIX4. Sebb Junior - You don't have to leaveDarryl Wright Interview5. The Cube guys - No way back6. Rodney & Andy Joyce - Reachin (Scott Diaz)Darryl Wright Guest MixHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOWTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsFor tickets Clockwork Orange: www.clockworkorange.coLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:Rockin Social Media Agencyhttps://www.rockinsocialagency.com

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 52 with special Guest Fil Straughan

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 80:51


Welcome to Episode #52 with a very special Interview with Singer Songwriter & Starstruck finalist Fil StraughanThis show is recorded each week from the studios of SMC in Essex where the show goes out live every Thursday night 7-9pm UK time. YOU CAN WATCH THE SHOW LIVE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT - WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #521. Marc Evans - The way you love me2. TRACK OF THE WEEK: Matt D & Claudio Deeper - Living my life3. The Shapeshifters - Bring on the rainFIL STRAUGHAN INTERVIEW4. Lala Hathaway - Heaven Knows5. Fil Straughan - On my knees6. Philis Hyman - You know how to love me7. Paul Hutchinson & Fil Straughan - My Heartbeat8. Andy Allwood - In this house9. Micky Moore & Andy T- Do I DoHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOWFil Straughan Website: https://www.filstraughanmusic.comTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsFor tickets Clockwork Orange: www.clockworkorange.coLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseLocal Legends Of House Gig at Acanteen, Chelmsford: https://ravingfrog.comSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:Rockin Social Media Agencyhttps://www.rockinsocialagency.com

What's Real?
Episode 113: Orange Clockwork

What's Real?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 163:17


Welcome back to the "What's Real?" podcast! It's episode 113! In this week's "Variety Hour" the guys discuss Bruce Arians' sudden retirement, the NCAA Championship, Bruce Willis retiring from acting, the latest fallout with the Will Smith/Chris Rock controversy, the release of a new George Romero short film, the release of Marko Stunt, the inside story of Tony Khan buying AEW, and the return of the WR? "Sneaker Check". Then, the WR? podcast "Mania Season" coverage concludes. It's back-to-back segments on the results of both nights of WWE Wrestlemania 38! The show continues with the return of the original/unoriginal segment, "The Movies That Made US". This week is Hey Ed's pick with 1971's Stanley Kubrick classic, "A Clockwork Orange"! As always, the show closes out with a gut-busting "Goofs R' Goofs". Enjoy responsibly. PRESENTED by churchillpictures.com Timestamps: 0:00:00 - Bruce Arians' Retirement, NCAA Championship, Bruce Willis Leaving Acting, Will Smith/Chris Rock Fallout, New George Romero Short Film, Release or Marko Stunt, Tony Khan Buying AEW, and WR? "Sneaker Check" 0:58:22 - Wrestlemania 38 (Part 1) 1:25:46 - Wrestlemania 38 (Part 2) 2:00:00 - The Movies That Made US - A Clockwork Orange (1971) 2:35:08 - Goofs R Goofs Thanks for Listening!

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 51 with Lenny Fontana

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 119:11


Welcome to Episode #51 with a very special Interview and guest mix from New Yorks Finest Lenny Fontana, talking about how his career started, his incredible True House Stories series and his forthcoming UK tour. This show is recorded each week from the studios of SMC in Essex where the show goes out live every Thursday night 7-9pm UK time. YOU CAN WATCH THE SHOW LIVE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT - WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #511. Frankie Knuckles - Tears2. Saliva Commandos, Ron Carroll - The Wonder Years3. KPD - Disco's Revenge4. Cosmo's Midnight - Can't do without my baby (David Penn Remix)TRACK OF THE WEEK:5. Booker T, Kings of soul, Michael Gray - If you take my loveCLASSIC TRACK OF THE WEEK:6. Paul Reid - Le Vote Le Soilel (Paul Whites Island re-work)LENNY FONTANA INTERVIEW7. Lenny Fontana - Chocolate Sensation (Lenny's 2015 Mix)8. SSrmn - She Said (Paul Hutchinson Remix)9. Supafly, De Funk - Pleasure LoveGUEST MIX - LENNY FONTANAHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOWLenny Fontana Website: https://www.lennyfontana.comTrue House Stories on Youtube: True House StoriesLenny Fontana Tour Dates: https://www.lennyfontana.com/events/Ticket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsFor tickets Clockwork Orange: www.clockworkorange.coLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseLocal Legends Of House Gig at Acanteen, Chelmsford: https://ravingfrog.comSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:

Front Row
A Clockwork Orange, the National Poetry Competition winner announced, Slow Horses and Coppelia reviewed

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 42:18


Critics Sarah Crompton and Abir Mukherjee review Slow Horses, the brand new series from Apple TV+ starring Gary Oldman, Kristen Scott Thomas, Olivia Cooke, Jack Lowden, Saskia Reeves and Jonathan Pryce. Slow Horses is based on the novel of the same name by Mick Herron, which is part of the author's Slough House series. It tells the story of a team of British intelligence agents who have all committed career-ending mistakes, and subsequently work in a dumping ground department of MI5 called Slough House. New ballet film Coppelia is an innovative family feature with an original score by Maurizio Malagnini, performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra. Choreographed by Dutch National Ballet artistic director Ted Brandsen, it combines 2D and 3D animation with live action dance and features a blend of musical influences from classical to electronic. Based on the original 19th century tales of E.T.A. Hoffmann this modern adaptation tells the love story between Swan and Franz, which is jeopardised by Dr. Coppelius and his uncannily beautiful protégée Coppelia. With a diverse and world-class cast, including Michaela DePrince, Darcey Bussell, Daniel Camargo, Vito Mazzeo and Irek Mukhamedov, the adaptation is created by filmmakers Jeff Tudor, Steven De Beul and Ben Tesseur. Sarah and Abir review. Professor Andrew Biswell, Professor of Modern Literature at Manchester Metropolitan University and Director of the International Anthony Burgess Centre, marks the 50th and 60th anniversaries of ‘A Clockwork Orange' by looking into its history, controversy, and legacy. Front Row will be announcing the winner of the National Poetry Competition this evening. Previous winners include former Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy, and distinguished poets Tony Harrison, and Jo Shapcott.

Opening Weekend
Episode 72: Romancing The Stone - Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes: March 30, 1984

Opening Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 105:32


The King of the podcast Jungle is back! This week the boys swing by March 30th, 1984 for the releases of ROMANCING THE STONE and GREYSTOKE: THE LEGEND OF TARZAN, LORD OF THE APES.  It's Episode 72: The Legend of Opening Weekend, Lord of The Podcasts!Me Tarzan, you Gene. March 30, 1984: A time of adventure and exploration.  A time when Cabbage Patch Kids and RPG nerds and middle school Mathletes ruled the jungle known as the Tri-State area. Just as Ian Holm's Belgian-French-Hobbit-explorer is teaching Christopher Lambert's Tarzan-Not-Tarzan the ways of British civility and decorum, Fred's 6th grade babysitter is teaching him the ways of British black-comedy (The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy) and depravity (A Clockwork Orange). Terrycloth robes may or may not be involved.While Michael Douglas does his best to wear the mantle of Indiana Jones and sweet-talk his way into Kathleen Turner's heart and bed, he's no match for the 7th grade Cassanova of Calculus, the Man-Beast of the Mathletes: Jason “Abacus Finch” O'Connell.  (Cue Glenn Close ADR'ing a young female Mathlete  moaning and groaning) And Dan's call-back to his sister's Cabbage Patch Kid sends Fred into a deep spiral of repressed memories, dark secrets, and possible Furby-Fetishim.  Jeffrey Parker, Jr ain't afraid of no ghosts! And two old friends call in to Romance the boy's Stones and possibly pitch some new business ideas.  Bon Ape-Tit!

Binge Movies: Movie Reviews & Rankings
Stanley Kubrick, Ranked

Binge Movies: Movie Reviews & Rankings

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 120:29


EPISODE 118: Right up the road from sunny and tropical Akron, Ohio sits the crown jewel of the great lakes, Cleveland. Deep in the Land comes film critic, podcaster, and wrestling announcer Phoenix! This week we dive into the career of the enigmatic and influential genius Stanley Kubrick!     Films Fear and Desire (1953) Spartacus (1960) Dr. Strangelove (1964) A Clockwork Orange (1971) Full Metal Jacket (1987)     Host: Jason Guest: Phoenix  Binge Movies comes to you from the last video store in the universe. Store manager Jason and his guests rank and review movies to determine which are most worthy of preservation for all time. At Binge Movies the very strange, deeply analytical, and highly ridiculous meet to make a movie review show unlike any other.    Elite Patrons: Chris Williams Heather Sachs Joe Buttice  Pete  Nerdrovert  Sponsor Your Own Episode Become a Patron Binge Movies Merchandise 

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast
Anthony Burgess and A Clockwork Orange with Andrew Biswell

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 67:50


Episode 52 : Anthony Burgess and A Clockwork Orange with Andrew Biswell Andrew Biswell was always interested in the works of British author Anthony Burgess, going back to when he was a 15-year-old schoolboy and first discovered Burgess's novel A Clockwork Orange. He went on to write his doctoral thesis on Burgess's fiction and journalism. He then wrote a Burgess biography, entitled The Real Life of Anthony Burgess, published in 2005. He is also the editor of A Clockwork Orange: The Restored Text, published in 2012. All this eventually lead to him being offered the position of the director of the International Anthony Burgess Foundation. He is also a Professor of Modern Literature at Manchester Metropolitan University. Production Credits : Hosted by Jason Furlong /  Written by Stephen Rigg and Jason Furlong / Original music written and performed by Jason Furlong / Produced and edited by Stephen Rigg. Music : Pomp & Circumstance March No. 1 by Edward Elgar Burt Cramer Classic Pop Society Links : The International Anthony Burgess Foundation : https://www.https://www.anthonyburgess.org Kubrick's Universe Podcast (KUP) - Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/KubricksUniverse The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/TSKAS/ The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - YouTube Channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/TheStanleyKubrickAppreciationSociety1 The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - Twitter Page : https://twitter.com/KubrickAS Contact : stephenrigg.skas@gmail.com

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 50

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 59:53


Celebrating Episode #50 with a very special Live recording, my first show streaming live on SMC Radio. This is going to be where the podcast is recorded and aired live every Thursday from now on 7-9pm UK time.  The Podcast will also be available here as always each week, and you can watch the show live using the link below:WATCH HEREEach week I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.TRACKLISTING FOR SHOW #50Hotmood - Disco FlavaThe Shapeshifters - YoloTRACK OF THE WEEK: Deeplomatik, Darya S - DancinJB Boogie - Street DiscoS.A.M. feat Sarah Ikumu - SpotlightThe SOS Band - Just get ready (Michael Gray Remix)CLASSIC TRACK OF THE WEEK: Negrocan - Cada VezBlaze - Most precious love (Michael Gray Remix)Ten City - That's the way love isThe Shapeshifters - You aint loveHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOW For tickets Clockwork Orange: www.clockworkorange.coTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties: https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie: https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseLocal Legends Of House Gig at Acanteen, Chelmsford: https://ravingfrog.comSMC Radio: https://www.smc.todayThis is where you can tune in and watch the show live every Thursday from 7-9pm UK TimeThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Connect here with all my social media channels"Website: http://www.paulhutchinsondj.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulhutchinsondj/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulHutchinsonDJTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@paulhutchinson_djSHOW SPONSOR:Rockin Social Media Agency Showing you how to do social media "THE RIGHT WAY"

Really, 007!
Behind The Camera - Katharina Kubrick interview

Really, 007!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 56:26


Really, 007! speak with draughtsman, prop designer and artist Katharina Kubrick about her fascinating career and an insight into life as the daughter of a visionary director. Katharina worked as a draughtsman and production designer on The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker - designing the famous metal teeth worn by Jaws. She also tells us about her wider career working on classic films such as Barry Lyndon, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining and The Dark Crystal. Host Tom Pickup is joined fellow Bond and classic cinema enthusiast Christopher Goldie. Thanks for listening - we think you'll love it too! Disclaimer: Really, 007! is an unofficial entity and is not affiliated with EON Productions, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and Danjaq, LLC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 49

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 44:42


Back for 2022 the Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast hosted by Paul Hutchinson. Every fortnight I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.Check out the tracklisting below for this weeks show:Firefly - Love is gonna be on your side (Michael Gray Remix)Mattei & Omich - Let no man put asunderTRACK OF THE WEEK:NYs Finest, Odyssey Inc, Victor Simonelli - Do you feel me (Odyssey Inc Remix)Dennis Cruz - What u doing (Mousse T Remix)Lee Wilson & El Funkador - Complicated (Richard Earnshaw Remix)Jamiroqui - Too young to die (Conan Liquid Remix)Silicone Soul - Right on, Right onHERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOW For tickets Clockwork Orange:www.clockworkorange.coTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie:https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseLocal Legends Of House Gig at Acanteen, Chelmsford https://ravingfrog.com/?fbclid=IwAR2cjCBEwzVIKFuRoKMo_AMB8FsUjWkJfHCJkPekGlsNvTRYUEC3qFcl7CAThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Rockin Social Media Agency Showing you how to do social media "THE RIGHT WAY"

IN-OUT-DELETE
Cyrano & A Clockwork Orange

IN-OUT-DELETE

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 53:29


Hello In-Out-Deleters! Welcome back! In this episode the gang watch the latest musical/romance movie: "Cyrano" starring Peter Dinklage! and Ricardo's pick for "Movie's based on books we read" theme: "A Clockwork Orange" Listen to find out who's IN-OUT-DELETE!!!

Subliminal Jihad
[PREVIEW] #105 - DEVIL MODE: Del Close and the Improv-Industrial Complex

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 33:22


Dimitri and Khalid say “yes, and!” to a deep dive on the Chief Suslord of North American Comedy, Del Close, including: Del's puckish pranks in high school, invoking demons for improv class, creating psychedelic light shows for the Grateful Dead and Frank Zappa, becoming a witch, doing LSD astronaut experiments for the US Air Force, getting devoured by the Spider King on LSD at a mysterious mental hospital, hanging out with L. Ron Hubbard pre-Scientology, becoming “chief metaphysician” at SNL in the early 80s, switching into “Devil Mode” and reveling in evil, encouraging John Belushi to do more speedballs, getting the “Clockwork Orange treatment” at the Schick Clinic, writing “Wasteland” for DC Comics, the disturbing “Retroactive Abortion” story, Del's confusing definition of “sick humor”, becoming the Sewer Rat, dissecting your son's biology teacher, Trump getting possessed by a Catman, the pandemic-era collapse of UCB and ImprovOlympic, and why Big Improv is probably going to be on the wrong end of the vibe shift. For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad.

The Eventful Entrepreneur with Dodge Woodall
#76. Danny Gould: Ibiza Promoter, 30 Years of Parties & Drug Addiction

The Eventful Entrepreneur with Dodge Woodall

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 39:14


Throwing parties around the world over 3 decades, Danny Gould has seen it all.In a pre-internet world, he used old school flyering and in-your-face-promo to build on his ‘Clockwork Orange' brand, which hosted parties from London to Ibiza. He became a big figure in the 90s clubbing scene.But along with this success and a 24/7 party lifestyle, came drug addiction and mental health battles, leading to spells of severe psychosis.Danny is not only open and honest about his history, he's one hell of a storyteller, and a massive character.Website: DodgeWoodall.comInstagram: @Dodge.WoodallLinkedIn: Dodge Woodall See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

100 Things we learned from film
Episode 68 - The Blues Brothers with Deadbeat Punk from WTFDYW

100 Things we learned from film

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 105:18


This week the boys are welcoming Deadbeat Punk from WTFDYW Podcast to discuss the only film he'll watch without being in that chair from A Clockwork Orange, it's The Blues Brothers.  We include why John Landis is no longer allowed to hire a Helecoptor and what James Brown and Boris Johnson have in Common. --- The Basis of WTFDYW is cracking! Every Monday a guest tells Punk What The F*** They Want. Simple concept for a simple podcast. Get it anywhere you find your podcasts you C***s! --- The Blues Brothers is a 1980 American musical comedy film directed by John Landis.[4] It stars John Belushi as "Joliet" Jake Blues and Dan Aykroyd as his brother Elwood, characters developed from the recurring musical sketch "The Blues Brothers" on NBC variety series Saturday Night Live. The film is set in and around Chicago, Illinois, where it was filmed, and the screenplay was written by Aykroyd and Landis. It features musical numbers by rhythm and blues (R&B), soul, and blues singers James Brown, Cab Calloway (in his final feature film role), Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Chaka Khan, and John Lee Hooker. It features non-musical supporting performances by Carrie Fisher, Henry Gibson, Charles Napier and John Candy. The story is a tale of redemption for paroled convict Jake and his blood brother Elwood, who set out on "a mission from God" to save from foreclosure the Roman Catholic orphanage in which they were raised. To do so, they must reunite their R&B band and organize a performance to earn $5,000 needed to pay the orphanage's property tax bill. Along the way, they are targeted by a homicidal "mystery woman", Neo-Nazis, and a country and western band—all while being relentlessly pursued by the police. Universal Studios, which had won the bidding war for the film, was hoping to take advantage of Belushi's popularity in the wake of Saturday Night Live, the film Animal House, and The Blues Brothers' musical success; it soon found itself unable to control production costs. The start of filming was delayed when Aykroyd, who was new to film screenwriting, took six months to deliver a long and unconventional script that Landis had to rewrite before production, which began without a final budget. On location in Chicago, Belushi's partying and drug use caused lengthy and costly delays that, along with the destructive car chases depicted onscreen, made the final film one of the most expensive comedies ever produced. Due to concerns that the film would fail, its initial bookings were less than half of those similar films normally received. Released in the United States on June 20, 1980, it received mostly positive reviews from critics and grossed over $115 million in theaters worldwide before its release on home video, and has become a cult classic over the years. A sequel, Blues Brothers 2000, was released in 1998 to critical and commercial failure. In 2020, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

ESO Network – The ESO Network
Metal Geeks 214: A Clockwork Geekery

ESO Network – The ESO Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 97:35


Cary the Metal Geek, George, and Brutal Dave convene like clockwork for this brand new episode of the Metal Geeks Podcast. We discuss Elden Ring, Horizon Forbidden West, The King’s Man, the Ghost/Volbeat concert, Bruce Dickinson’s spoken word show, Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser, Star One, Hammerfall, The Scorpions, audiobooks including A Clockwork Orange, Joyland, and … Metal Geeks 214: A Clockwork Geekery Read More » The post Metal Geeks 214: A Clockwork Geekery appeared first on The ESO Network.

Metal Geeks Podcast/MSRcast Metal Podcast
Metal Geeks 214: A Clockwork Geekery

Metal Geeks Podcast/MSRcast Metal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 97:35


Cary the Metal Geek, George, and Brutal Dave convene like clockwork for this brand new episode of the Metal Geeks Podcast. We discuss Elden Ring, Horizon Forbidden West, The King's Man, the Ghost/Volbeat concert, Bruce Dickinson's spoken word show, Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser, Star One, Hammerfall, The Scorpions, audiobooks including A Clockwork Orange, Joyland, and more. Our topic for this week tackles video game movies including Uncharted and Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City, and our thoughts on the past and future of video games in filmed entertainment.  Join the Metal Geeks Society today on Facebook and join in on all the geekery! Join us on our website at http://www.metalgeekspodcast.com or http://www.metalgeeks.net to keep up with all the geekery. Email us your opinions and ideas at msrcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter, @metalgeeks, and @msrcast. You can now find us on Instagram, @metalgeeks. Find us at Facebook/MetalGeeks. Subscribe to Metal Geeks Podcast on iTunes, and please leave a 5-star review on iTunes and a like us whilst you are there. You can also find us on Stitcher as well as on Google Play. We are now also on Spotify, so jam us into your playlist! Don't forget to pay a visit to all of our affiliates including ESOnetwork.com, where you can find all of the killer shows that make up the ESO Podcast network. You can now get some killer Metal Geeks merchandise over at redbubble.com/people/metalgeeks including t-shirts and more!

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast Episode 48

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 40:07


Back for 2022 the Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Podcast hosted by Paul Hutchinson. Every fortnight I will be bringing you a selection of my favourite House & Nu Disco tracks along with updates on all forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa Parties and Clockwork Orange updates.Check out the tracklisting below for this weeks show:Roberto De Carlo - You are the one for me (Ken@work 2022 remix)Mike Dunn - It's a groove thang (Black Glitter LB Extended Mix)TRACK OF THE WEEK: Dave Leatherman & Bruce Nolan - So full of love Mark Lower - All eyes on youPeter Brown - Dance SymbolPraise Cats - Shined on me (Les Bisous Remix)Paul Hutchinson & Fil Straughan - Live Live LiveJocelyn Brown & Dr Packer - Picking' up promises (Dr Packer Remix)HERE ARE ALL THE LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS WEEKS SHOW For tickets Clockwork Orange:www.clockworkorange.coTicket information for my forthcoming Mi Casa Es Tu Casa parties:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/micasaestucasaBrunch n Beats at The Lower Street Brasserie:https://www.lowerstreetbrasserie.co.uk/eventsLink to my new DJ Course:https://www.paulhutchinsondj.com/product-page/how-to-be-a-professional-dj-the-ultimate-guideUSE CODE : EARLYBIRDVIP to get £25 off the price of the courseThanks again for listening this week and please remember to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.

Release Date Rewind
A Clockwork Orange

Release Date Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 90:17


Mark brings back friend, screenwriter, and film student for life C.C. Webster on a little droog trip to early 1970s London to discuss Stanley Kubrick's controversial hit A Clockwork Orange for its 50th anniversary this month. They share thoughts on the strange title, to symbolism in the characters' clothing, to differences between the film and the book by Anthony Burgess. And is Euphoria the new Clockwork? They wonder what a remake of this controversial classic could be like today, and could Patrick Bateman from American Psycho be a "brother" to Alex DeLarge?

Arrow Video Podcast
122 - Savage Three

Arrow Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 62:08


For the most part the powers that be are functionally useles, society is crumbling because of a lack of infrastructuyre spending and society will inevatibly birth the Savage Three! Join Sam and Dan as they wallow in the inevitable decline of society. (Please note this episode was recorded before the start of WWIII.) Spoiler level: 1/5 For their cinematic pairings, Sam and Dan also recommend films such as Clockwork Orange and Curfew, plus also talk about films they've seen recently including Santo and Blue Demon Vs. Dracula snd Wolfman and Shot. Next time Sam and Dan will be discussing the only film they left undiscussed in Henenlotter's prime trilogy: Basket Case! Email the Arrow Video Podcast hosts for any comments, suggestions or questions at arrowvideopodcast@arrowfilms.co.uk Or pester Sam and Dan on Twitter: Sam - https://twitter.com/samashurst?s=20 Dan - https://twitter.com/13fingerfx?s=20 And on instagram: Sam - https://www.instagram.com/samashurst23/?hl=en Dan - https://www.instagram.com/13fingerfx/?hl=en

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast
A Clockwork Orange with Simon Fay

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2022 59:01


Episode 51 : A Clockwork Orange with Simon Fay In this episode, we delve into Anthony Burgess's 1962 novel A Clockwork Orange, as we continue to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Kubrick's film adaptation. Simon Fay is a writer and video essayist and author of multiple novels, he also runs the Youtube channel ‘Content Lit' where he discusses the best books of the 20th century. As a stalwart Kubrick fan, his latest series, 'Kubrick's Books," takes a deep dive into the director's work and into the novels that inspired him. Production Credits : Hosted by Jason Furlong / Analysis written by Simon Fay / Written by Stephen Rigg and Jason Furlong / Original music written and performed by Jason Furlong / Produced and edited by Stephen Rigg. Music : Pomp & Circumstance March No. 1 by Edward Elgar Burt Cramer Classic Pop Society Links : Content Lit with Simon Fay : https://www.youtube.com/c/ContentLitwithSimonFay Kubrick's Universe Podcast (KUP) - Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/KubricksUniverse The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/TSKAS/ The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - YouTube Channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/TheStanleyKubrickAppreciationSociety1 The Stanley Kubrick Appreciation Society (SKAS) - Twitter Page : https://twitter.com/KubrickAS Contact : stephenrigg.skas@gmail.com

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Friday, February 25, 2022

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 5:00


"Every grain of experience is food for the greedy growing soul of the artist." -- Anthony Burgess (1972), best known as the author of the dystopian novel “A Clockwork Orange.”

Cinema D'Amore
A Clockwork Orange

Cinema D'Amore

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 85:00


We end this month's Stanley Kubrick theme with a glass of milk, a bit of Ludwig van, and A Clockwork Orange (1971). Hosted by Justin Morgan and Charles Phillips. Mixing and QA by Scratchin' Menace with Music by Ludwig van Beethoven. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates. Available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and a dozen other popular platforms. Please subscribe, rate and review us. Every little bit helps, and more importantly, thank you for listening!

Bíóblaður
#158 Topp 10 með Jóhanni Leplat

Bíóblaður

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 180:59


Jóhann Leplat Ágústsson er stofnandi Facebook grúppunnar Kvikmyndaáhugamenn og hann kíkti til Hafsteins til að ræða sínar topp 10 bíómyndir.   Í þættinum ræða þeir meðal annars hversu fullkomin mynd The Shawshank Redemption er, Jurassic Park og framhaldsmyndirnar, hversu mikil snilld A Clockwork Orange er, hvort að Fargo sé besta Coen myndin og margt, margt fleira.   Þátturinn er í boði Subway, Sambíóanna, Celsius Energy og Popp Smells frá Nóa Síríus.

WhatCulture
10 Movies That DEMAND Your Attention Immediately - A Clockwork Orange! The Godfather! Gone Girl! Scream?!

WhatCulture

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 10:10


These movies locked you in their grip from the first moment. Jules Gill presents 10 Movies That DEMAND Your Attention Immediately... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hold Up
A Clockwork Orange

Hold Up

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2022 75:02


In 1971, Stanley Kubrick brought us the dystopian futuristic flick, A Clockwork Orange.

Moonman In The Morning Catch Up - 104.9 Triple M Sydney - Lawrence Mooney, Gus Worland, Jess Eva & Chris Page

Giving birth on a Tinder date, the real reason MG turned down survivor. And enjoy some awful abuse to your ears as we hear the top 5 worst attempts at singing by some of the worlds biggest celebrities.  The Sunday Edition Of Triple M Breakfast #sydney #triplem See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Middle Class Film Class
Gab & Chatter: The House / Fantastic Fungi / The Fly / A Clockwork Orange / Shrek: The Musical / Aladdin

Middle Class Film Class

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 70:25


Eight is enough for Kenneth Branagh, Netflix is done with Marvel, and The Patman may or may not be a DJ on valium. Plus! Get Out's alternate endings, Joesph is back from COVID leave, and we're joined by 2 amazing guests. In news: Netflix, Marvel shows, Disney+, Daredevil, Punisher, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, Arrow, the CW, DC comics, The Simpsons, Star Trek The Next Generation, Gilmore Girls, Seinfeld, Cop Car, The Oscars, Don't Look Up, Dune, Ron Perlman, Josh Brolin, Nightmare Alley, Robert Pattinson, Ben Affleck, The Batman, Christian Bale, Kenneth Branagh, Belfast, George Clooney, Alfonso Cuaron, Walt Disney, Warren Beatty, Thor, Natalie Portman, Titanic, Return of the King, Mad Max, Lala Land, All About Eve, Russell Peters, Source Code, The Quest for no Trailers, Flux Gourmet, Men, A24, Alex Garland, Jordan Peele, Nope, Steven Yuen, The Dropout, Lightyear, Jurassic World: Dominion, Chris Pratt, San Neill, Jeff Goldblum, Laura Darn, Ana De Armas, Get Out, The Hunt, Bradley Whitford, Lil Red Howrery, Valium, Norway, Inception, Twilight, press junket, Eric Holmes, Find Your Film Bruce Purkey, Greg Srisavasdi, Will Smith, Alien, MCFC Movie Trivia Game, Cornovirus, Contagion, Shaun of the Dead, Outbreak, 28 Days later, Jerry Maguire, My Sister's Keeper, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Princes Bride, Tombstone, Val Kilmer, Resident Evil, 28 Days Later, Planet of the Apes, Requiem for a Dream, 3 Ninjas, Me Earl and the Dying Girl, Kurt Russell, Kevin Klein, Bill Paxton, Sam Elliott, Billy Bob Thornton, 3:10 to Yuma, Muppets Christmas Carol, Incendies, In Bruges, Adam Murphy, Nick 48 Hours, Point Break, Gary Busy, Tropic Thunder, Phantom Thread, Warrior, Affliction, The Prince of Tides, Paradise Lost, The Mandalorian, Noah, Tom Wopat, Drizly, Producer JustusListen to Eric Holmes on Find Your FilmApplehttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/find-your-film/id1524946883Spotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/6PTrmiCLSXEYyhzSA2pZbJ?si=7c62435f2e11418ahttp://www.MCFCpodcast.comEmail us at MCFCpodcast@gmail.com    Leave us a voicemail (209) 730-6010Joseph Navarro    Pete Abeyta   and Tyler Noe    Streaming Picks:Fantastic Fungi - NetflixShrek: The Musical - NetflixThe Book of Boba Fett - Disney+The Fly - Amazon PrimeThe House - NetflixA Clockwork Orange - HBO MaxAladdin - Disney+

Running Out of Movies
11 - Valentine's Day Special: Eyes Wide Shut

Running Out of Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 98:54


Join hosts Seth Fried and Julia Mehoke as they discuss Eyes Wide Shut (1999), starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. Other movies discussed include In the Bedroom (2001) and A Clockwork Orange (1971). Seth and Julia also talk about horny movies in general and Seth's private theory that 1999 was like the 2003 of the 90s.  Recorded January, 28th 2022

Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast
Shark's Pond- A South Park Podcast #206: Coon 2: Hindsight

Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 27:31


Welcome to a brand new episode of Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast. Join Bill as this week he begins the "Coon & Friends Trilogy" with the season fourteen episode "Coon 2: Hindsight". Topics discussed include the members of Coon & Friends, what BP CEO Tony Hayward has been up to since leaving BP, Bill's thoughts on A Clockwork Orange and much more.Theme song courtesy of Joseph McDade https://josephmcdade.com/Follow the show on Twitter https://twitter.com/sharkspond97Join the shows Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/sharkspond/

House of Crouse
Mark Critch + Malcolm McDowell + Benjamin Evan Ainsworth

House of Crouse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 38:51


This week on the Richard Crouse Show we'll meet the cast of a new CBC Television show called “Son of a Critch.” If you are a fan of the political commentary and social satire of “This Hour Has 22 Minutes,” you already know Mark Critch. Since 2003 he has starred on the political parody show. He's photo-bombed Justin Trudeau, offered Pamela Anderson a million dollars to stop acting, and poked fun at characters like Rex Murphy, Don Cherry and Donald Trump. His latest project is much more personal. A couple years ago Mark wrote a warm and funny look back at his formative years, growing up in St. John's, Newfoundland in the 80s called “Son of a Critch: A Childish Newfoundland Memoir”. That bestseller is now the basis of Son of a Critch, which airs on CBC television and CBC Gem on Tuesday nights. Later in the show we'll meet Benjamin Evan Ainsworth, who plays the eleven year old Mark on the show, and we'll spend some time with the legendary actor Malcolm McDowell, the star of “A Clockwork Orange” and so many other films, and who plays Mark's grandfather. McDowell talks about his new found love of Newfoundland and offers advice to young actors.

The Richard Crouse Show Podcast
Mark Critch + Malcolm McDowell + Benjamin Evan Ainsworth

The Richard Crouse Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 38:52


This week on the Richard Crouse Show we'll meet the cast of a new CBC Television show called “Son of a Critch.” If you are a fan of the political commentary and social satire of “This Hour Has 22 Minutes,” you already know Mark Critch. Since 2003 he has starred on the political parody show. He's photo-bombed Justin Trudeau, offered Pamela Anderson a million dollars to stop acting, and poked fun at characters like Rex Murphy, Don Cherry and Donald Trump. His latest project is much more personal. A couple years ago Mark wrote a warm and funny look back at his formative years, growing up in St. John's, Newfoundland in the 80s called “Son of a Critch: A Childish Newfoundland Memoir”. That bestseller is now the basis of Son of a Critch, which airs on CBC television and CBC Gem on Tuesday nights. Later in the show we'll meet Benjamin Evan Ainsworth, who plays the eleven year old Mark on the show, and we'll spend some time with the legendary actor Malcolm McDowell, the star of “A Clockwork Orange” and so many other films, and who plays Mark's grandfather. McDowell talks about his new found love of Newfoundland and offers advice to young actors.

A Second Helping of Hannibal
S3 E10 - And The Woman Clothed In Sun (Part 1)

A Second Helping of Hannibal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 114:54


Wherein Beth and Matt discuss the best date ever, Bedelia and Will's stunning snot-off, Marie Samuels, and various tail-swallowing circular arguments. William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience at Project Gutenberg Liam Gavin's A Dark Song Morbid Anatomy classes A Clockwork Orange Murder Scene (graphic) Marion Crane's alias in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Ken Russel's Altered States Red queen scene from John Frankenheimer's The Manchurian Candidate Alien reveal scene in M. Night Shyamalan's Signs Brian De Palma's Dressed to Kill Deckard gives Rachael the Voight-Kampff test in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner Marion Crane's alias in Psycho The mouth image from A Clockwork Orange's murder scene Matt's gift to Beth: A "Murder Wives" Hoop from WitheringSlights' Etsy shop Beth's gift to Matt: A Kim Atlin painting from the Bugera Matheson Gallery

A Second Helping of Hannibal
S3 E5 - Contorno (Part 2)

A Second Helping of Hannibal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 73:37


Wherein Beth and Matt discuss rewatching A Clockwork Orange through the Hannibal lens, Hannibal's tacky shirt, North by Northwest, and Alana's performative table-setting. Nice links: A Clockwork Orange North by Northwest The Lady Vanishes Finally, here's the recipe for "Pappardelle sulla lepre" from Florence The Art of Cookery, the book Matt and his wife received from an Italian bookseller as a honeymoon gift. Preparation time: 40 minutes. Cooking time: two hours. One carrot one onion one stick of celery 4 tbsp extra-tirgin olive oil parsley 2 kg hare (or rabbit) 500 g fresh pasta one glass red wine 2 tomatoes one lemon Parmesan salt Wash, peel and finely chop the carrot, onion, celery, and parsley. Fry over a medium heat in a large pan. Cut the cleaned hare into large pieces and add to the vegetables. Increase the heat and brown on all sides; add the glass of wine and let it evaporate rapidly. When the hare is well cooked. remove it from the pan, bone then chop the meat and return it to the rest of the sauce. Add a glass of warm water and the peeled, chopped tomatoes and salt. Cook over a low heat for ten minutes. If liked, add some grated lemon rind, though be careful to avoid the pith, as this lends a bitter flavour to the meat. Cut fresh pasta into broad strips (pappardelle) and cook in boiling, salted water. When cooked, drain and tip into the pan on top of the sauce. Toss gently for a minute and serve, topped with grated Parmesan, in a large bowl, warmed with some of the pasta water. Domenico Romoli wrote: "Hare with papardelle...use fine, soft lasagne to line the bowls and pour the meat sauce on top, flavoured with pepper". Pellegrino Artusi suggested adding "a pinch of nutmeg" but added, "I think enhances the flavour, but if you don't like it then don't bother". In Florence, the pappardelle are traditionally placed on top of the sauce and then gently mixed through and not vice versa, as this method tends to spoil the subtlety of the flavours.

Filmmaker’s Compass Podcast
FCP - Total Rewind: A Clockwork Orange - Ep #31

Filmmaker’s Compass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 32:35


Fun discussion on this week's “Total Rewind” as we take a look at the Stanley Kubrick class “A Clockwork Orange”. The film features Kubrick's signature cinematography, ups the violence level and film, and deals with heavy dystopian themes. The question is…does it still hold up?

The Present Age
Writer and comedian Sara Benincasa is getting by with a little help from her friends (podcast + transcript)

The Present Age

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021


Parker Molloy: So, I was on your podcast, Well, This Isn't Normal, back in April of last year. And I think at the time I was still under this impression that this was all going to be somewhat temporary, in terms of pandemic-related stuff, that by the fall things would return to a sense of normalcy. And now more than a year later, it seems like we're just starting to get back to whatever normal is. So, I know that the pandemic hasn't exactly helped my mental health, but I'm doing my best to power through. It was wondering, how are you holding up these days?Sara Benincasa: I am doing pretty well, but so much of that is not of my own doing. It's of my own doing in the sense that I've gotten help, I've asked for help and gotten help. But what I mean by that, is that it's not internally generated. I haven't done it all on my own. I am a member of a 12 step program, and I am a person who goes to therapy every week, talk therapy with somebody who specializes in addiction, and also does a lot of stuff with mindfulness, she's also a mindfulness meditation teacher. And then I see a psychiatrist once a month. And all of this happens online, although I did go to an in-person 12 step meeting, which was very cool. For the first time in a long time, that was very special to get to do that.But I've also got family and friends who are engaged in their own self work, whether it's through the work of sobriety, through the work of talk therapy, through fitness for their mental health, whatever, and obviously physical health, too, whatever it may be. I've just started doing pilates, which is very helpful with breathing and just being in my body, which for a lot of people, I know it's hard if you were... Either if you're dealing with some difficult memories of trauma that caused you to disengage from being in the physical body, or if you simply are somebody who mostly has gotten positive feedback from stuff you do with your brain, which your body is your brain too, but you know what I mean. If you got all your pats, and love, and approval from say, getting good grades, maybe the physical aspect of health was not emphasized, or whatever. So what I'm saying is through teachers, facilitators, mentors, sponsors, things like that, that it is a village of humans who help me stay on point. But I also, Parker, cannot believe that was April of last year.That's the thing, I had to look it up, and I was like, oh no. It has been so long, it's been a year and three months, I guess. So, time flies when you're living through a once-in-a-generation pandemic, I guess.Time is different now. Time is absolutely, there's somebody who I met in person after talking to them for four months, and it was the first time we hung out, or maybe the second time we hung out. People said, "Oh, how long have you known each other?" And we said, "Oh, this is just our second time hanging out." And then we said, "Oh, but we talked to each other for four months online. We became friends," and then it made sense. And other people shared stories of the same. Emotional time is different from chronological, calendar time, isn't it?Yeah, that's an interesting way to think about it. Because yeah, I'm trying to rework pre-internet days, or where I would make friends in the physical space, where it would be like, yeah, you hang out with someone once a week and then over the course of several months, yeah, you get to know them. But online, you could talk to someone every single day. It's almost like you have a coworker sort of relationship, it's like oh, going into the office today, and by the office I mean Twitter.Yeah. And you have these almost old-fashioned, Victorian era, or pre-invention of the telephone, epistolary relationships. Like it's all going to be in a Ken Burns documentary in a sepia filter, but it's over emails and texts instead. So much of it is through words, where we don't get the visual cue. Right now, you and I are using video, which is great because I can see your visual cues and the movement of your face. But there are still some pieces of information that we could only pick up from each other by being in person. I don't know, like if there's a loud sound. To me, it's not going to sound the same as it does if I were in the room with you, and I could see how you react to that.And I wouldn't intellectually be parsing that, but I would notice, oh, okay. That sound really startled Parker, maybe Parker really just doesn't like that kind of sound. Or maybe it would startle me too, like oh yeah, a bomb exploded down the block, nobody was hurt, in this theoretical example. I'm just pulling real-world experiences from s**t the LAPD did recently, like blowing up a bunch of fireworks and horribly damaging things. But you know what I mean? There's some things, like what if I smell really bad to you? You don't know that right now, you could just think I'm great. And then in person you could be like, this is terrifying.Be like, “oh my God, I can't believe I've been friends with her. She smells so bad, I'm so embarrassed.”“I invited her to my wedding, or the baptism of my eighth child” or something. Or I told my family, "You're going to love her so much," and she smelled terrible.“She's so great, and I bet she smells nice.” That was a weird assumption to make.It is true though for dating, people have said to me multiple times, you have to see if you guys like the way the other person smells. Which I think that's so gross to say it like that, but I also think it's very true.Yeah, that's probably true. Because if someone or something smells, that kind of throws off the entire vibe.Yeah, and pheromones too. I think it might not even be... I might have a perfectly nice perfume or whatever, but there is something chemical that happens that we know about, where people just pick up on cues about each other, and you fit or you don't. And I think that can sort of, it's chemistry. You don't know if you have chemistry, chemistry of friendship, chemistry of romance. I have a friend with whom I have great creative chemistry, it's not a sexual chemistry. Although sexual chemistry is creative, but we get excited about pitching ideas back and forth. And it's fun, and it feels like, kids playing in a sandbox is what it feels like. Very pure delight.And on that note, in terms of pitching ideas and stuff, what have you been working on? You're always working on something cool and different, and it's, oh, she's comedy, writer, on Twitter, and writing books and stuff like that. What have you been up to lately?Thank you.Any cool professional things, or just kind of-Well, I did my buddy Chris Gethard's podcast, which is called New Jersey Is The World. And Chris was saying... First of all, I wish I had Chris's career. Chris's career is above and beyond what I have done in my opinion creatively, which I know we're not supposed to compare, but I'm just prefacing this. Chris said in the podcast, he was like, "I feel like you are a person who has a career that's really similar to mine, in that people are like, 'Are you a writer, a comedian, you act once in while? What do you do?'" We both are very, I think he would probably agree that we are very fortunate to have gotten to have careers like the respective ones that we've had.And Chris is an incredible performer. I am much more of a writer, but I do enjoy performing once in a while. I have a day job, one of my books is called Real Artists Have Day Jobs. So I work in nonprofit digital marketing, which is really fun. And as a sober person, oh my God, what a change. It helped influence me to get sober, just because oh, suddenly my job wasn't showing up to make jokes at 10:00 PM in a club, And then getting wasted and getting paid with booze. It was like, oh, your job is to be on the phone at a very specific time of day, and figure out how to help out people in a certain way that they really need. That's real important. The nighttime stuff is cool too, but if you're hung over at 7:00 AM on that call, that call's not going to go great, and people will suffer. The people we serve through the nonprofit will suffer.So, that was one of the... I still didn't get sober for another year and a half, but it was one of the things that made me go, maybe puking and having hangover diarrhea is not the best move, when I'm having a pretty important phone call. So that was very helpful. But also, a paycheck is great and health insurance. And also I find a lot of meaning in that work. And then I wrote on a couple of episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000, which is super fun and exciting. Just joke, joke, joke, joke, joke, pitching. Like, oh wow, just being on Zoom for hours with 10 hilarious people, just pitching jokes for robot puppets and a human to say, so that was super duper fun.And juggling that with a day job was obviously something else. But there is a benefit to being based on the East coast when you're interested in Hollywood type stuff, which is that if you can do it remotely, if you've got a normal times job on the East coast, chances are you can do your West coast work after hours. You know what I mean? Because of the time difference, sometimes it works out.Yeah, sure. And see, then there's me in the middle in the Central time zone.You're in the middle.I'm just in the middle of everything. I'm close to nothing, but not too far from anything, if that makes any sense. It's like I can actually out West for two hours.Yes, it's perfect And Gethard and I were talking about this on his podcast, New Jersey Is The World, on this most recent episode. Which I don't know when this podcast episode will come out, but this episode of his podcast dropped in, I guess July 17th, something like that, 2021. Anyway, we were talking about things that are Jersey-ish, because we're both from New Jersey and so are the other hosts, Mike and Nick on the show. And I said, Chicago is not the New Jersey of the Midwest. It's like the Manhattan, or the Paris, or the something. But there is an affinity that I often feel for people, this goes from Minneapolis too, but it's more for Chicago, because I think people from Chicago, or who have spent a significant amount of time there, tend to have a little more directness. They still have Midwest nice, but it's not Minnesota nice. You know what I mean?Yeah, that makes sense.It's a little more direct. And for whatever reason, I just tend to vibe with people who are from Chicagoland area or have spent a significant chunk of adult time there. They don't have to live there. And Chris was saying the same, and the other guys on the podcast seem to agree. I don't know what it is, there's something down to earth maybe? I don't know.Yeah. I think a lot of it comes down to this not being New York, but still being a big city, that kind of attitude. Where it's just like, yeah, Chicago, it's gigantic and there are a few million people here, but we're not the big city that everyone talks about all the time. We don't appear in Marvel movies. That's how I judge things.We don't get all of the attention that the other guys get, so we get to develop our own thing. Not in contrast to what is considered the standard, but in and of ourselves. And Jersey obviously is so much closer to New York, so Jersey is always the weird stepbrother to Philly, and then the definitely not as cool at all younger sibling to New York City somehow, like the forgotten one. And so, Jersey is full of people who have something to prove all the time, but then also are just really happy to be from Jersey. When where you're from gets s**t on a lot, you probably defensively get some pride around it. But also Jersey, it's the most densely populated state, it is the third smallest state, it is so diverse. So diverse, so many languages, so many countries of origin, so many different areas.Also, it's a blue state, but I grew up in a very red pocket. So, there are parts of Jersey that are extraordinarily progressive and parts of Jersey that are super, super conservative. And then you've got everything in between, although the state as a whole tends to vote Democrat. In general elections anyway, for the presidency.Yeah. And it's kind of the same here in Illinois. I grew up in the Southwest suburbs of Chicago, in an area that was super red, but it's like you go an hour North to Chicago and suddenly everything is super blue. It's just a total flip. But I like it here, so I've lived here my whole life, and my big reason for staying in the Midwest has always been, well, if climate change destroys the coasts, we will be kings.I think you're correct. I think that's what's going to happen. I think it's a hundred percent correct. I think California's worse, but New York's going to have its issues.Yeah. And then I read a New York Times article recently that was like, "Oh yeah, B-T-dubs, Lake Michigan is going to destroy Chicago," and I'm like, God dammit. My plans fall out the window. I guess I have to care about this stuff.Yeah. If you're near water, you're fucked, but if you're not near water you're also fucked. Part of my decision, I bought a place in Brooklyn, and part of my decision to do that, first of all had to do with the fact that I absolutely... There was no other time in my life where it would have been possible based on mortgage rates, and based on what homes were going for, also based on the fact that I have been sober for a few years now, so I started to make better decisions and undo some long-term damage and stuff. So I bought a tiny, tiny place compared to what somebody, honestly, from Chicago would be like, "Are you kidding?" And to me I'm like, it's a palace. I can reach out my hands on either side. This is glorious, and the person I bought it from-“I can twirl!”Yeah. And I think, I'm not sure, I don't want to speak for him, but I'm pretty sure the person I purchased from probably went to their other house, or their other, other house, or their other, other, other house. I don't know if this place was a rounding error, but they took an offer that was a lot lower than they needed to, and I'm very glad about that. But anyway, so I bought a place in part because fire season last year was so horrible, this year it's on track to be even worse. Between that, and having been so far from my family for a while, and a desire to see my nephews grow up, and to be closer to my family as my parents get older. I know that this place could very well be underwater, literally underwater, in 10 years. But it's probably not going to be on fire, knock on wood, at least from a wildfire. It could be on fire from something else.But I'm not somebody who's like, "F**k, get out of California. Everything else is better." But it was just like, all right, I love LA very, very much, but I'm waking up coughing and with my eyes swollen all the time, three months out of the year now, and I just don't like that. And my air filter is really good, but there's only so much it can do. So why don't I go home, buy a place that when I tell friends from other parts of the country what it costs, they have a heart attack, but when I tell other people in New York what it costs, they're like, "Oh my God, you're so lucky." Go into f*****g real long-term debt, more debt than I've ever been in, but have something that, God forbid I expire prematurely, I can leave it to my nephews. Or if I expire right on time, I can leave it to my nephews.And that was a real long discussion, I'm babbling a lot. But honestly, if I had tried to buy this place even a month later, I couldn't have done it. Because by then the mortgage rates were going up, and the housing values in this area were going up. I mean, New York lost one percent, not through death from COVID, they lost a lot of people death from COVID. But in the early months of the pandemic, they lost one percent of the population of people moving. And I don't even know how many more people left after. So, I feel very grateful, very fortunate, but also probably we should all move to Indiana.Indiana.I know that's an insane thing to say to somebody from Chicago.It is.Indiana is the New Jersey of Chicago.That is either being way too mean to New Jersey or way too kind to Indiana. One of those two, probably a little of both. But yeah, similarly Kayla and I just moved to a new place in Chicago. Our rent kept going up, and up, and up, and we got to that point where we were like, a mortgage is cheaper.Did you buy a place?We did!Don't tell me how much, because you wouldn't anyway, but how many square feet is it? So I can kill myself. Not really kill myself, jokes about suicide are not usually okay. I'm sorry.It's fine. I think it's like... It's pretty small, it's like 1,500 square feet. [Edit: looked it up after the podcast, and I overestimated. -pm]Excuse me, my place is 523 square feet.Are you kidding me? How, how?I am serious, 1,500 square feet! I'm screaming at the cat, the cat is asleep and doesn't care. God bless, that is so cool, oh my God.It's so exciting. We just moved in, what was it, like two weeks ago? We just moved into this new place two weeks ago, and it's so great. We're still getting unpacked, as you can see. This is my office, I have an office.You have an office? That's so amazing, I'm so happy for you guys. And you're in the city of Chicago?In the city.What an investment. That's awesome.It's kind of funny. It's in the city, but it's like way on the edge. It's like, oh cool, we have a Chicago mailing address and Chicago taxes.Yay. Still counts as Chicago.But when it comes to getting to anywhere in the city that is fun, it is not exactly an easy trip. But yeah, so we did that. And then I also just, was it in June? I left my full-time job.Wow.I've just been floating around.Bought a place, left the full-time job, living the dream. Not in a coastal city that either just had wild floods in some of the subways, or is on fire a lot of the year. You're making good choices.I hope so. We'll see.Look, if we're going to be indoors a lot of the time, which we still are sometimes where we want to have... Well, in Chicago first of all, of course you're going to be indoors. You will freeze for part of the year if you're outdoors.If you're fortunate enough to, through various circumstances, be able to have a place, whether you're renting it or purchasing it, and my mortgage is considerably less than what I would pay in rent on this place, which is nuts. And if you're in a position where that happens, and you can make that happen, or people help you, or however it happens. For anybody who's listening, however it happens, feel blessed and happy about it. And don't do what I did, which is feel guilty that you were able to do a nice thing for yourself, and then potentially your family in the midst of a terrible thing. Because you know what people really hate? I think what people hate more than somebody celebrating their privilege, is people being like, "I feel so bad. I'm so lucky, I feel so bad." That's the most obnoxious thing you can do as a human.Well, also when you remember that 20 years ago, houses were super, super cheap. So even if you got a great deal today, it's still not as good as it used to be. So, there is that.Even buying this place from somebody who I think had three other houses, I don't know. But if he's listening, sir, I don't know if you have three other houses. But even though this person did very well for themself, chose a career where people make lots of money, a.k.a. not a writer, and just unloaded this place for, if you adjust, not much more than they bought it for many, many years ago... I was going somewhere with that. What I will say, is that my family is like, "Wait, that's what you got?" They like it, they're like, "Oh, it's so lovely," but I can feel them trying not to say like, "This is like you got a..." There's midweek hotel suites in Vegas that are three times the size of this, probably.But it's also not just about that. It's like, are you in a place where you feel comfortable? I feel, one reason I wanted to move back to Brooklyn, I've lived in Brooklyn a few times over the past 15 years, and one of the reasons I wanted to move back was that I wanted to live in a neighborhood where when I go on the street, I see everybody from babies to grandmas. If it's a neighborhood where there are people starting families and where there are elders, where there are new people, where there are old people, people from... That sounds funny, it sounds like I'm saying young people are new people. But where you've got families that have been there for generations, you've got people who are starting families new there. I like that, where there's people putting time and energy into the community, that is a community that I would like to contribute to long-term.Yeah, definitely. That makes total sense. I'm happy with how things are, and I think we're in similar situations as far as our housing setups are.Yeah, we don't have the Delta variant yet, that we know of.Fingers crossed.Fingers crossed, knock on wood. It's really, and I know it's hitting the people who are hospitalized and dying from it are un-vaccinated overwhelmingly. I also know that some people who are vaccinated can get it, but they're suffering much, much less. And I feel fortunate that we're vaccinated, and I'm assuming both of us are vaxxed up?Yeah, yeah. Oh, definitely. As soon as that was a possibility for me, I was running to the Walgreens to get it.Jersey made it so easy. They were like, "Oh, do you smoke? Have you smoked?" Jersey was like, they made it the regulations so simple. The BMI is fucked up, it is grounded in not just fat shaming and fatphobia, but in racism and classism and so many different things. It doesn't make sense, it's not scientific, it's stupid. The one time I think anybody I know has benefited from the BMI's dumb ass existing, was that we all were like, "Oh, really? You ate a hamburger once? Time to go get that Rona shot." I was like, f**k it. Let's go. We were like, whatever we need to use as our quote unquote, excuse or reason. You looked at a cigarette once, come on, just go get it. And it makes life better. If you haven't gotten vaxxed up yet and you can, please go get that s**t. I'm sure most of the people who listen to this podcast have, but if you can, go get it.”Do it, just do it.” It's so funny to think about just a few months back, you'd see people constantly being like, "Oh, someone jumped in line, and they got a shot before they were supposed to." And now, you can't really give them away. You're like, please, please go get vaccinated. It's for your sake, and for all of our sakes. Because yeah, there's the Delta variant now, but then-There will be other s**t.If this s**t's bouncing around, what if there's a really scary one down the line that the unvaccinated help create? So, don't be part of the problem. Be part of the solution.My brother is in school, he used to be a nurse, he's in school to get his master's in public health. And I want to find, I'm going into the family group chat to find something he said, because I shared what's happening in Los Angeles County right now, which is really, really bad, with my family. Which is, "LA county hits 10,000 coronavirus cases in a week," this is from the LA Times newsletter. "LA county is now recording more than 10,000 coronavirus cases a week, a pace not seen since March, 2021, an alarming sign of the dangers the Delta variant poses to people who have not been vaccinated." Dot, dot, dot, "LA Times data analysis found LA County was recording 101 weekly coronavirus cases for every 100,000 residents, up from 12 per 100,000 residents for the same seven day period ending June 15th."So, that's pretty bananas. So I shared that with my family, and my brother who's in school getting his master's in public health, said, "Shows how contagious new virus variant is. The so-called Spanish flu went away because of herd immunity, and it weakened. This thing isn't getting more deadly, but it isn't weakening. Only more transmissible. Mask life forever."Well, because in LA they re-implemented the mask mandate, right?They did. And my friend Alex Winter, who's a documentarian and he's an actor, he posted something on Twitter where he was like, basically, I'm paraphrasing. He said, "The only person who's happy that we're working from home again," and it was his cat, his family's cat. Because I know he has a documentary filmmaking company, and they were able to be in the office, and that's really cool for a little while. And my buddy Sam out in Colorado was like, I forget what he does but it's like a tech, web thing. He's like, "Well, we got a full week back in the office before somebody tested positive. So, now we're back at home again.”It's so frustrating. Because at this point, at this point, so much of it is preventable. It's like, we can choose, if we collectively choose to not have it be this way, to not let the virus run free, we could get rid of it. But I guess we're all just doing the best we can, which is how I try to, in my mind, keep from having a rage blackout, thinking about people who make selfish decisions. It's like, well, they're trying the best they can.Yeah. When I think about people who are... I have a friend who is Latinx, was like, "Sara, it's not just," I was ragging on white, con spirituality people, people who think crystals will heal it, or people who are obviously super right wing or whatever. And this friend who's Latino was like, "Listen, it's not just that. There's hesitancy in the Latinx and Black communities." And I was like, "I fully get that, of course I understand. As a white lady, it's a lot..." I didn't say it in so many words, but I was basically like, "I can hold space and understanding for communities that have been directly impacted by medical racism, by experimentation, by the US government, by being treated like s**t at the doctor's office for a lot of different reasons."And I'm not trying to be a condescending, white liberal or whatever. I'm just saying like, if you have people in a room and I'm like, "Eat this peanut butter sandwich," and one person's like, "Somebody forced fed my grandma a peanut butter sandwich and traumatized her forever," and somebody else was like, "Every time I go to the peanut butter store, somebody tells me I'm stupid," and then another person was like, "Oh yeah, peanut butter has never done anything wrong to me. I'm going to eat that sandwich." I'm looking at the person eating the peanut butter sandwich and going, "Yeah, that's cool." And if their cousin is like, "I won't eat it, it's full of poison." I'll be like, "What? F**k you." Basically just white people being like, "Whatever, man. If we just all breathed..." Shut up, get out of here. Jesus is not going to help you with this.And that's what gets me, it's like if there was some... Because I understand not wanting to be the first people to get-Correct, I got that a hundred percent. See how it plays out over six months with these other people.That's the thing when it was like, oh, well here's phase one, phase whatever, and the vaccines. I'm like, well, I don't qualify yet, but that's not bad. That's okay, I'll just kind of watch. And then a couple months passed or whatever, and I was able to get it, and that was great. And now, we've gotten to the point where there have been, I looked it up the other day, something like three billion doses of vaccine that have been administered. I think it's safe to say that it is safe, probably, hopefully.Some people, you're going to always have with any kind of medication, you're always going to have some cases of bad reactions. I got the, back in the day they used to do the MMR, the measles, mumps, rubella vaccine for babies. I think it's called something else now. I got that, all the babies I know got it, all my baby friends.Got it. And if you look at a hundred thousand people taking anything, you're going to have a few who have a poor reaction, and unfortunately, sometimes it can result in death, but these are the risks we are taking. I know people who are allergic to penicillin.My mom is.Yeah, my dad's allergic to it. I know somebody who is allergic to latex. People have allergies that can be very inconvenient, and even life-threatening, nothing in life is a hundred percent safe. So, if the overwhelming chances are that you're going to be all right, go for it.Yeah, the one thing that depresses me about just the collective response to COVID overall, has been just realizing that there are some people that given, they're watching relatives die, and friends die from this preventable thing, and they're, they're still digging their heels in saying, "No, I will not do," whatever small thing, whether it's wearing a mask or distancing or whatever, they will not do it. And I'm thinking to myself, how do we come together to fight these other problems that aren't as fast, and direct, and obvious to us, like with climate change? That's a whole frustrating thing to think about, is just the fact that there are people who when confronted with this thing that is affecting them extremely directly, they're saying no. It's like, how are we going to get so many people on board to take whatever actions necessary, whatever sacrifices are necessary to successfully combat climate change?And that's why I have so much respect for people who work on climate change, or work in trying to find solutions to that. But it's hard to not just be really depressed thinking about it, thinking about how much of a challenge it is.There are people who... My friend's grandma died of COVID, and there are people who read her post about her grandma dying, about a wonderful young man at the hospital, a hospital volunteer who learned her favorite old Mexican songs, Mexican popular songs from the forties and fifties, and learned how to play them for her, saw a post about her saying how the family said goodbye, and who still don't think COVID is real because they are the most selfish people in the world. And there are a lot of people who are real pieces of s**t, who it could happen to their own Grandma, but what's more important to them is their ego. And so, I think that you can't cure selfish. That's what's hard, you can't cure selfish.You can just keep presenting as many... You can penalize selfish. You can say, "Okay, you can't work here." I'm so glad that for a limited time at least, Hollywood productions are banning anybody from set who is not vaccinated. That's very important, because those are hotspots, and there were a lot of productions that had to shut down over time because of COVID outbreaks, and then come back. And so, I think workplaces where you got to be vaccinated to be there, good. Yeah, you can pick what you put in your body, but that doesn't mean that I have to accept it. If you show up to work drunk, I can send you home. If you show up to work unvaccinated, might make people sick and take down the workplace, I can send you home.I think that there are things we can do with communication, with gentleness and compassion, but it doesn't have to mean tolerance always. Not tolerance of potentially harm. Yeah, you can go, "Oh, okay. I can see why you believe that way. You are a racist white person who was raised by racist, white people. You had a lot of early trauma in your life, and you're in pain, and you found a home on the internet among anti-vaxxers, and so that's what you're down for. Cool, cool. Still can't come to work. Go work on yourself, hope things turn out for you." I don't have to curse you out, I don't have to tell you you're dumb. I'll just go, "Oh, okay. See that in context, you're not welcome here."That's why those... There are a few states that are implementing these laws where it's like, oh, you can't force someone to... Come on. If I walk into a business, or for example in Florida, they did that. And the cruise industry which, one, I cannot imagine taking a cruise right now.It's gross.Yeah. So, I took a cruise in December, 2019. It was the first and only cruise I've ever been on. Because my parents were like, "Yeah, we want to take a big family vacation while everyone's still around." And I was like, "That's great, sure." Wasn't thrilled about the cruise, because I'm really weird about germs generally, which has made this whole thing a really interesting time for me.Yeah, because it's confirming all your fears, which is not always healthy.Yeah. But we went on the cruise and it was fun. And I was like, oh, that was a great time. That was fun. But now, I cannot imagine doing that. Just because first off, COVID's still going around. But also in Florida, they're trying to fight to make it so cruise ships can't require passengers to be vaccinated, if they want. I could understand if a cruise company wanted to be like, "Hey, we're just going to be the free for all cruise where you can be vaccinated or not. We don't care." That would be fine, if that's the choice they want to make.Oh, the sexy cruise, "We're the wild and sexy cruise."Yeah, "We're, the virus cruise."That's hot, let's do it. Hey, some people would be very into it for various reasons.Yeah, yeah.I just want to compliment you though. Parker. I know I'm moving around and making audio weird right now, but hey, guess what everybody? I'm plugging in a lamp, because my laptop was dying and now I'm reviving it. But I do want to just compliment you, as somebody with agoraphobia, for somebody who has, if you say weird about germs, I'm not making it a phobia. I'm just saying for somebody who has high anxiety around anything, to challenge that by doing something that's fun, is awesome, and I think you should be proud of yourself that you did that.It was so difficult. For weeks leading up to it, I was in therapy really trying to prepare myself. I was like, "I know this thing will be fun, and it will probably be fine, and I'll survive and we'll get home. And I'll be like, 'That wasn't so bad.'" Because that's how I approach everything in life. I freak out leading up to it, and then every single time I'm like, "Oh, that wasn't as bad as I thought it would be." That's what happens with any time I agree to do a speaking gig. I don't know if I want to go, I don't want to take an airplane by myself, and I don't want to have to stay in a hotel, and I don't want to have to be in front of a big group of people. But then I get there, and I do the thing and it's fine.And that's anticipatory anxiety. It's once you actually do it, you're fine. And I think that in some cases, not to endorse or recommend developing anticipatory anxiety, anybody, but... Not that you can really-I would choose not to, if possible.Yeah. You'd have to reverse A Clockwork Orange yourself, or something real weird and be like, "I'm going to make myself afraid of this." But I think sometimes there is more enjoyment as a result, because you're like, oh, I was so scared, and now this isn't so bad. And it helps you for the future. Every time you challenge, even a tiny bit challenge an anxiety thing…Talia Lavin writes a lot about how she deals with agoraphobia right now, and I'm always saying to her privately, I don't think she would care if I said this publicly, "Holy s**t, you're challenging it," because she posts about running and stuff, "You're [crosstalk 00:44:19]." When I was in my worst agoraphobia, I was afraid to leave my bedroom to go into the bathroom to pee. I was urinating in bowls. It's in my memoir, Agorafabulous! If that's your thing.I like that book!Thank you very much.It's very good.So I'm like, "Talia, you're running." Yes, at first it was just one route. She would show me the image of it, and it was just like back and forth across this block. Now it's expanding. Every single day that she runs outside her home, she's challenging a debilitating psychiatric disorder that she's also working on in other ways. And again, I would not share any of this if it wasn't stuff that was shared publicly already, of course. But even if she f*****g walks outside for five minutes, that's like a really big deal. So, the fact that you went on a cruise?I went on a cruise, stuck there for... See, I think the one benefit that I have in life, is that I'm married to an extremely amazing person, who completely understands and completely accepts all of my mental issues. And that's something that, I'm very lucky. Kayla is great, she is wonderful. And she helped me get through the issue with the cruise. She helped me the whole time, just making sure that things were okay. Didn't pressure me into doing the off the boat excursion type things, which was one of my fears. I stayed on the boat for a couple of those, which was still kind of fun. It's nice when everyone else is off the boat, and you're just like, "Ooh, I have the whole thing to myself."If I ever go on a cruise, I might do what you just described. Because I'm listening through it, instantly whenever I hear about a cruise, my agoraphobia brain kicks in. So, it's not making me anxious, it's just I start thinking about it through that disordered lens. But because I have so many years of cognitive behavioral therapy, and mindfulness and stuff, and medication, it still flares up but you get back on the horse, so to speak. And when I hear, I listened to it through that, and then I think oh, well, how could I make modifications so that I could enjoy it? And I never thought about that, but that would be a Night At The Museum, like an empty, magical place. That would be kind of cool.It's like, I'm going to keep going to that soft serve ice cream machine, and no one's going to stop me. No one's going to be like, "You've had five."I'd be like, "Well, I've had a Prozac and now I'm going to have other Prozac, which is what I call that machine inside my head." That's awesome, whoa. But probably, you will never go on a cruise again at least until you're older, considering the concerns about the Rona, Miss COVID.It was a good time. By the end of it, I was actually so okay with the state of things that I just kind of like, "Maybe we should do this again." And then this hit.Immediately it was like, maybe not.Several steps backwards.But maybe one day you will, when it's safer. And it will be safer eventually, we'll just be old as hell by that point.Which those are the people who seem to have the cruises down the most, the elderly who end up on there. They're the ones with these little booklets, like, "This is my 20th cruise, that's all I do for my life now." Which that sounds awesome if that's what you're into, just traveling constantly.Yeah. And the fact that whatever they've dealt with in their life, whatever they've been through, that now they get to enjoy the open sea, and they get to have fun. I do think that, I'm a bit older than you, I'm 40.I'm 35.Okay, so you can run for president now, thank God. So this might apply even more for you. For my generation, which is the same as... Well, you're a full millennial and I'm like a Zennial, on the cusp. But I was in high school when the hit major motion picture Titanic came out, and I think that it definitely made some people I know for into our twenties, I remember a few friends being like, "Yo, my grandma wants to go on a cruise, but I think about Titanic." And I feel like for some of us, it was burned into our minds. Maybe people who tend to be anxious anyway, we were like, "Oh my God. But what if that happens?" And then people seem to have gotten over that, but the indelible performance of a young Leonardo DiCaprio and Ms. Kate Winslet, it really did something for me.It's still so awkward for me. I went and saw a Titanic with my mom, and I was like... I don't know.You were in middle school maybe, you were little.Yeah, like 12 when that came out. And it was just weird, because it was like, oh, and now he's going to sketch her naked. And I'm just like, this is fine, this is fine. Everything is cool.Everything's normal. And then there's the part where they have sex, and you just see the hand up, and you're like, what's happening there?Yeah, and I just have to just keep going, pretend nothing weird is happening on screen. As my mom is kind of, I could see her glancing at my brother and me, my brother was three years younger than me even. And I was just like, no, no, everything's cool.It's cool. My buddy Jenette is in that movie, Jenette Goldstein, she's an actress and she owns my favorite lingerie shop, Jenette Bras. Which you can visit, they've got more than bras, you can visit them in many places in Los Angeles, but also in Atlanta now. But Jenette is an actress, and she's been in a bunch of James Cameron movies. She was John Connor's step-mom in a Terminator deux. And she was Vasquez in aliens, Private Vasquez who was hot and butch. And she was in, in a bit part in Titanic. I think she plays, it wouldn't have been an elderly person because her age wasn't right. But she plays a mom to dying children, where they're like, I think she's the one who's like, "Okay, kids," and puts them to bed and reads them a story as they all die.Oh, God.Yeah. That part, obviously I didn't know her back in my teens, but that part stands out to me. And the old people holding each other. But anyway, we don't have to worry about that so much as we have to worry about coronavirus.Yeah, we just have to worry about the air that we breathe giving us an infection that kills us. Which is cool, that's cool that that's just floating around out there.Yeah, it's a real different kind of bananas. I've noticed in New York City right now, a lot of people wearing masks on the street. Some people don't, but when you go into stores, some stores right now have signs up that say, "You have to wear a mask," other stores don't. We have indoor dining, we have outdoor dining. Some restaurants will say, "Please put on your mask when you go to the restroom," others don't.I think it's going to get more restrictive, because I think that as with climate change, the first time around New York was the canary in the coal mine for this thing, that the rest of the country should have paid attention to and didn't. And LA got to horrific levels of suffering as a result, that were absolutely unnecessary. This time around as with climate change, I think California is the canary in the coal mine, because they got the Delta variant first, so they have gone back into... I think they still have indoor dining as of this recording, but you have to wear masks, and they have a stronger anti-mask contingent out there. They just do, and it's a problem. I don't know, I'm glad that we live in places also where it gets cold, because it's very comforting to have that mask on anyway, in the cold months.Yeah. That's something that in the winter it's like, oh well, that's a cool idea anyway. I am more than okay wearing a mask, especially in the winter. The summer, I get it. I get that masks can be annoying.Yeah, it can. You're schvitzing. I got one of those lighter ones, a restaurant that I went to in Manhattan, Balthazar, I ate outside and then I went in the bathroom, and they had all these free masks and free latex gloves, and anybody could take them and it was really cool. And they had the kind of mask that it looks a little bit like an accordion, and it's very lightweight, but it still does the job and it's not as heavy. And I took one, I wanted to take more, but I was like, no Sara, you can just buy them. Don't take them from the restaurant. And that one is so much more comfortable than the heavy cloth mask. Although I love a heavy cloth mask with a fashion moment for the wintertime, those light ones are really nice for the summer.Yeah, just leaving the restaurant with a handful of masks and some ketchup packets or something.“Hey, sorry, you're in the industry that arguably got hit the worst by this whole thing. Nice to see you surviving, let me steal your things.” People love that.Yeah, “What else can I get for free?”People really connect to that.Yeah, that's their jam. But on that delightful note-Don't steal masks.Don't steal masks, that's going to be the lesson from this podcast. But Sara, thank you so much for stopping by and chatting with me.Yeah, this was awesome. It's so rad to hang out with you.Yeah, of course. We should speak more than once every 15 months or so.On Twitter is cool, but it's also just nice to actually talk to you and see your face and stuff.Yeah, definitely. And that's why we're recording this. I have it set up where it records what we say, but not what we see. Because I just like to be abl