Meat + Three

Follow Meat + Three
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

A square meal for your ears! This zesty, 15-minute weekly update on food stories and commentary is modeled after the Southern meat-and-three-sides concept: a deep dive and three shorts. Keep up with the latest food trends, the political economy and societal impact of food, health news, and more. Dis…

Heritage Radio Network


    • Dec 30, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • every other week NEW EPISODES
    • 23m AVG DURATION
    • 156 EPISODES

    Listeners of Meat + Three that love the show mention: food news, world of food, anyone who cares, food world, heritage, they've got, tasty, kathy, weekly podcast, policy, clever, new favorite podcast, quick, five stars, covers, production, serious, mix, short, current.



    Search for episodes from Meat + Three with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from Meat + Three

    A Year In Food Policy: Sovereignty, Security, and Sustainability

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 25:26

    With the future of food policy looking murky, we turn to experts in the field to help us understand the realities of the bureaucracy surrounding food security, farming rights, and pesticide regulation. We speak to scientists whose research influences the policy we see on the congressional floor. We hear from nonprofits working to navigate the endless maze of food assistance programs and advocate for those on the receiving end. And, we break down the legislation influencing the future of food sovereignty in the US. There are rarely clear answers or defined conclusions when it comes to the policy surrounding one of humans' most basic needs. But, as we head into the new year, we hope these stories serve as a reminder that there are people working towards a more equitable and sustainable food future for all. Further Reading:To learn more about the current state of debt relief for Black farmers, read this article from Civil EatsTo read up on the latest updates about soil carbon storage, check out this article from The CounterTo read the full language of the amendment and public commentary you can take a look at the Maine election guide from November 2021 as well as the Ballot Pedia pageFor more Maine farming statistics, check out the 2020 state agricultural report.To learn more about the corporations who own the majority of the worlds' seed patents, you can read this Deutsche Welle articleFor stats on hunger in the U.S., go to Feeding America's websiteTo learn how you can get involved and take action on policy regarding school meals, check out FoodCorps' Action Center.To learn more about some of the nutrition provisions in the Build Back Better Act, check out this report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.To learn more about the Natural Resources Defense Council, go to their website here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Diet Culture: Facts and Fiction

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 25:48

    When it comes to diets, there's a world of misinformation out there. Magazines, blogs, and social media promise health and happiness with “superfoods,” juice cleanses, “clean” eating, and more. There's so much information available that it can be hard to cut through the fiction to get to the facts. This week on Meat and Three we dig into diets, differentiating facts and fiction and taking a look at the good, the bad, and the ugly. Zoe Denckla investigates just what the ubiquitous calorie means. Sara Mathes explores how a diet can treat IBS. Briana Brady bravely dives into diet culture on social media and what it means for our brains and our stomachs and Amandha Silva consults an expert on eating anxiety and how we can best cope with it. Further Reading: For more statistics on dieting, check out the CDC report on weight loss attempts among adults in the US between 2013 and 2016. The statistic used in the show was calculated by taking those who reported “ate less” as their method for weight loss and multiplying it by the total percentage who reported trying to lose weight in the study to find the percentage of the whole.To learn about Eric Ravussin and his research on metabolism and diet, check out his profile here. Read even more about the origins of the calorie and atwater's discoveries here. To get a full description of the metabolic chamber, check out this page.Dr. Charlotte Markey is the author of two books for adolescents: The Body Image Book for Girls and Being You: The Body Image Book for Boys. Take a look at some of her research here.For more information on the low-fodmap diet developed at Monash University click here. And for more on Dr. Jane Muir's work, click here.Go here for more info about Katy Zanville and her practice. And if you are struggling with eating anxiety or disordered eating, you can find resources at The National Eating Disorders Hotline.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Community Responses to Food Insecurity: From Fridges to Farmers Markets

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 24:51

    Food insecurity in the U.S. is nothing new, but it has only been exacerbated by the pandemic. As food accessibility conditions shift and problems take on new proportions, communities continue to respond in new ways. Some have implemented matching programs at local farmers markets, others have installed community fridges for neighbors in need of groceries. Join us in this episode of Meat and Three as we explore how people are collaborating to combat food insecurity. Further Reading and Listening:Check out this map of community fridges in NYC.Learn more about the Ridgewood Tenants Union.To learn more about the Center for Regional Food Studies, check out their site. Click here to learn more about the work of Berkeley Food Network. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    It's Not Turkey Day for Everyone: Thanksgiving Across Tables

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 21:22

    The iconic Thanksgiving setting looks something like this: cranberry, Turkey and sides shared at a large table with family. But Thanksgiving celebrations are more varied than we may think. Whether it's at the checkout counter, in a to-go box, or outside the U.S. entirely –– Thanksgiving food may look a little different this year. Further Reading:Visit Barra's website for restaurant information and menus. Check out Braden Perkins' restaurants Verjus and Ellsworth as well as their instagrams for more info on the restaurants' menus.Go here to learn more about the bullwhip effect. To hear from a turkey farmer, watch this videoRead more about holidays' economic impacts on restaurants here. Stats more specifically about thanksgiving can be found here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Iconic Regional Foods: Blue Crabs, Hot Chicken, and Coneys

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:42

    Environment, cultural traditions, gentrification - all of these forces shape what we eat and are deeply rooted in where we are. Regional foods are more than just their flavors and ingredients. They are a culmination of local culture and generations of experience. But how are historic foodways being altered by factors like warming oceans and rapidly evolving urban landscapes? In our increasingly interconnected world, does truly regional cuisine still exist? Join us in taking a look at some iconic regional dishes and the stories behind them. Further Reading:To learn more about the University of Arizona's Center for Regional Food Studies, visit their website here.To learn more about your impact on the Chesapeake Bay, you can check out this tool on the Chesapeake Bay Foundation website here.Want to get in on the Cincinnati Chili debate? Read the original Deadspin article and a 2017 Vice piece defending the dish.To read Rachel Martin's full article chronicling hot chicken's history, you can read her Bitter Southerner article here. You can also read her book, Hot Hot Chicken: A Nashville Story To make reservations and learn more about Komah, Paulo Shin's restaurant, feel free to browse his website here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Goodbye Pumpkin Spice: Rethinking Fall Flavors

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 18:45

    With the first signs of color beginning to emerge on the trees, we're taking a look at tried and true fall food favorites… and flipping the script. This week on Meat and Three, we're shaking up your idea of all things autumn. Moving past the notorious pumpkin spice latte, we'll look at maple syrup's seasonality, apple flavors that are more than just bottled essence, the transcontinental history of squash and more.Further Reading:Let's Get Real: This episode featured Episode 76: Biting into a Pumpkin Spice Flavored Halloween Hershey's Kiss Is Worse Than Biting into a Razor Blade. Listen to more from the archived show Let's Get Real on HRN's website.HRN Happy Hour: This episode featured Episode 99: Spice Up Your Soda. Follow HRN Happy Hour wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS) Eat Your Heartland Out: This episode featured Episode 18: The Sweetness of Midwestern Maple Season. Follow Eat Your Heartland Out wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS) Beer Sessions Radio: This episode featured Episode 566: Cider from the Place of Regenerative Ag and the Case for Reparations in Finger Lakes, NY.  Follow Beer Sessions Radio wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Cooking in Mexican from A to Z: This episode featured Episode 4: The Triple Bounty of Squashes. Follow Cooking in Mexican from A to Z wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcast | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Demystifying Halloween: Chasing Ghosts and Eating Frankenfoods

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 22:50

    This week, we're getting into the Halloween spirit, taking a look at all things spooky. First, we'll learn about the history of the holiday and how candy became so integral. Then we'll learn about haunted inns, and why Frankenfoods aren't really that scary. We'll also explore Día De Los Muertos and some foods associated with the holiday. Further Reading:On the history of halloween: Go here for a more in-depth look at the history of Halloween, and here for a closer look at how candy corn came to be.To learn about the Ear Inn, check out their website. If you want even more New York City history, read this NYTimes article about Early Manhattan and the Ear Inn's origins.For information about Miguel's bakery, visit their website. Check out this article in the NYT to learn more about how they make pan de muerto, or watch this video to see how they make another popular item, conchas. To Learn more about CRISPR technology and other innovations in gene editing, click here. Go here to learn more about Dr. Lippman's work with the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Masked: Fakes, Fees, and Feasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 24:35

    We explore what is masked and hidden in the food world. From culinary imitation and unseen nutritional compounds, to anonymous Mukbang feasts, we pull back the veil. We explore hidden aspects of food production, food composition, and food enjoyment.  Further Reading:From the imitation meat story, read more about Dr. Steven Van Vliet and his research on the nutritional differences between plant-based meat and grass-fed meat.Learn about oxalate content and food alternatives for stoneformers through this Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health resource. Also see this story's guest Dr. Ross Holmes , and his research on dietary calcium oxalates and stoneforming. To read more about the DoorDash & Grubhub lawsuits, check out this McKinsey study  that was referenced in the story. Also read the City of Chicago's press release for the lawsuit, as well as DoorDash's response to the allegations. For a brief overview of mukbang in American culture versus Korean culture, read here. Also, read here for more about the rise of single-person households and emotional well-being. The mukbang sounds in this episode are excerpts from Youtube videos by 문복희 Eat with Boki, Stephanie Soo, and Eat with Que.

    RE: Reimagining Hospitality, Regenerative Agriculture, and Bar Pizza's Renaissance

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:20

    As the looming threat of the climate crisis worsens and the world continues to endure the devastation of Covid-19, industries across the globe have had to pivot. ‘Pivot' entered our daily vernacular during the onset of the pandemic, but discussions around efficiency and equity continually deepen and evolve. This week on Meat and Three we're resurfacing conversations that rethink our food system, reimagine hospitality, and aim to rebuild the restaurant industry. Plus, we look at the rebirth of bar pizza!Further Reading and Listening:Read Joe Fassler's article about regenerative agriculture for The Counter here.Inside Julia's Kitchen: This episode featured Episode 134: Meet Nina Compton. Follow Inside Julia's Kitchen wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)U Look Hungry: This episode featured Episode 59: Rebuilding After the Hurricane with Donald Link. Listen to more from the archived show U Look Hungry on HRN's website.Opening Soon: This episode featured Episode 82: A New Kind of Hospitality Community Space with Libby Willis of KIT. Follow Opening Soon wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS) The Big Food Question: This episode featured Episode 44: What is Regenerative Agriculture, Really? Follow The Big Food Question wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcast | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Pizza Quest: This episode featured Episode 12: The Pizza Yodis Return with Adam Kuban to Make Bar Pizza. Follow Pizza Quest wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcast | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    The Kids Table: Beyond Plain Pasta and Chicken Fingers

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 21:26

    This week on Meat and Three take a seat at the kids table, we promise to serve more than plain pasta and chicken fingers. Beyond the brightly colored boxes and school lunch trays, our team explores pressing questions surrounding the regulations and safety of ‘kids foods'.Further Reading:For to learn more about New York's return to in person learning, check out this civil eats article. Read up on the complexities of lunch and reopening schools in NYC here.  Stats on New York City's school lunch program can be found here and here.  You can hear Bettina Elias Siegel on Eating Matters talking about her book Kid Food: The Challenge of Feeding Children here. Follow Eating Matters on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).More on Bettina Elias Siegel's book Kid Food: The Challenge of Feeding Children can be found here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    From Fermentation to Excavation: The Science of Food

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 23:49

    There's a lot of science involved in our meals -- from how we make food to what we like to eat. Put on your lab coats because this week on Meat and Three, our team looks at the chemistry of cream cheese, how fermented foods can help your immune system, the science behind food preferences, and how archaeologists are discovering what people ate thousands of years ago.Further Reading:Check out Dr. Wastyk's full study of fermented foods and high fiber diets here.The article which inspired Zoe Denckla's archeology segment can be found here. To learn more about Matthew Collins and his research, check out his website. Also special thanks to Dr. Julie Dunne, who provided lots of scientific guidance for this segment. Her works can be found here. Listen to Rob Dunn on Why Food? Here. Follow Why Food? on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode!  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). You can find out more about the book Rob Dunn co-authored here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Acid Redux: Citrus, Vinegar, Coffee, and Grog

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 21:36

    This week on Meat and Three we explore all things tangy, sour, and sharp in an episode about acid. We look at how one bar is finding creative ways to stop wasting citrus. Then we hear from an HRN host who travelled the world to learn about vinegar and we experiment with reducing acidity in coffee. We also continue our conversation about grog, jumping from the 18th century to the present day to discover some refreshing cocktail recipes. Further reading and listening:If you're in NYC, take a trip to Pouring Ribbons to try out their cocktails. You can also make your own citrus stock.Hear more from Michael Harlan Turkell on episode 110 of Japan Eats! Subscribe to Japan Eats!  on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode!  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Plus hear more from Michael Harlan Turkell on his HRN podcasts The Food Seen and Modernist Breadcrumbs. And check out his book “Acid Trip: Travels in the World of Vinegar.Enjoy these Low-acid coffee recommendations.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate.  Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Out to Sea: Sailors, Shellfish and Seaweed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 25:13

    This week on Meat and Three we're diving beneath the waves for an episode all about oceans. We visit underwater farms to learn about the current oyster boom and the benefits of growing kelp. Then, we climb on deck to understand how lobsters and fisherman are being impacted by the changing climate and travel back in time aboard British naval ships to sip on a game-changing cocktail. Further reading and listening:Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Read more from Dr. Emily Rivest about the American lobster and its changing environment, ocean acidification and oysters, health in oyster hatcheries, and the global impacts of climate change, Research for the grog story came predominantly from a book by Tom Standange. To learn about grog and even more about beverage histories check out his book, “A History of the World in 6 Glasses”. Listen to episode 353 of The Farm Report for the full conversation with Josh Rogers about Maine's seaweed farming boom. Subscribe to The Farm Report on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode!  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Bringing the Heat: Hot Sauce, Hot Dogs and Record-High Temperatures

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 21:40

    From hot sauce to hot temperatures, we're bringing the heat this week. We talk about premium peppers from China's Sichuan province and visit a Bay Area tea shop to see what we can learn about staying cool. We bring you a story from a beach in Brooklyn famous for its classic summertime snack and take a hard look at how climate change is affecting growers in the Pacific Northwest.Further reading and listening:For more on Fly By Jing products visit flybyjing.com. To learn more about thermoregulation, check out the University of Sydney's study on body heat storage.To hear the full interview with Michael Quinn, check out Episode 344 of A Taste of the Past. Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode!  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Find Feltman's Coney Island hot dogs here.To check out Durant Vineyards, visit durantoregon.com.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Unseen and Underground: Speakeasies, Additives, and Soil Health

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 25:47

    This week on Meat and Three we're looking at some of the secret and unseen aspects of food. From speakeasies around New York City to what goes on underground in our soil, to little-known sweetening additives in cigarettes, there's alway more to food than meets the eye.Further Reading and Listening:While Threesome Tollbooth is currently closed, you can stay up to date with the bar as they navigate reopening by checking out their website. To hear more from Sother Teague, listen to The Speakeasy on HRN. Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).To learn more about how to get your soil tested in NYC or the soil-related artists and projects The Urban Soils Institute supports, check out their website.To hear the full interview with Deborah Blum, check out Episode 346 of A Taste of the Past. Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). To learn even more about Harvey Washington Wiley and the Poison Squad, check out Deborah's book entitled, “The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century”. Her book is now also a PBS documentary. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Summer Guide: Dinner Parties, To-Go Cocktails, and Local Ag

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 21:27

    Pandemic restrictions are easing and things are changing quickly. We can eat indoors at restaurants again. Host dinner parties. It's exciting to go back to some of our favorite activities, but it can also feel a little nerve wracking. There might even be some pandemic-era changes that are worth keeping around.This week on Meat and Three we bring you a survival guide for re-entering society. We cover tips for hosting a dinner party, what reopening restaurants might mean for communities, the end of to-go cocktails in New York, and advice for continuing to support local agriculture even after the pandemic. Further Reading:Check out the full episodes of the shows featured:The Shameless Chef - How to Be a Shameless Dinner Party HostListen to Michael Davenport's 1970's tips for being a great host from the moment guests arrive to when you're left with the clean up.The Big Food Question - What do Communities Gain When Restaurants Reopen?Doug Mack discusses an article he wrote for The Counter, which examines the social and cultural benefits of gathering spaces like restaurants.The Farm Report - Small Farms and the Post-Pandemic UnknownHost Lisa Held talks to farmer Becky Fullam—of Old Ford Farm in New York's Hudson Valley—about the past year and why she's hoping customers continue to support small farms.Sother Teague runs the Manhattan cocktail bar Amor Y Amargo and is the host of HRN's The Speakeasy. To learn more about the end of to-go cocktails, check out these articles from the New York Times, Grubstreet, and Eater.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    (Mis)Labeling: Branding, Buzzwords and Belcampo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 23:05

    Have you ever heard the saying you should never judge a food by its label? Probably not since labels are supposed to give you useful information about the food within. What happens when that doesn't hold true?This week on Meat and Three we're looking at instances where labels mislead consumers; whether that's claims of environmentalism, beautiful imagery used to obscure real practices, or food deliberately put in the wrong package. Tune in to learn when companies are lying to you and get some ideas for shopping more sustainably. Further Reading and Listening:Listen to MOFAD's full roundtable on food marketing and ethics.Listen to Episode 133 of Eating Matters to hear Jenna Liut's full conversation with Leslie Kruempel of Organic valley. Subscribe so you never miss an episode. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Listen to Episode 197 of HRN on Tour for the full download from Antonella Manuli about quantifying carbon in the world of natural wine. Subscribe so you never miss an episode. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Read Lisa Held's article on Belcampo in Peeled and subscribe to her HRN series The Farm Report (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Reparations and the American Rescue Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 11:50

    When we talk about agriculture in the U.S. there is often an archetypical  American farmer that comes to mind. Perhaps they're in overalls, maybe a cowboy hat, but they're almost always white. The white farmer trope has become a fixture in America's invented agricultural past. However, American agriculture has long relied on  the labor and expertise of Black people, while perpetually writing them out of history. Produced by our intern Tash Kimmell, this episode will explore the fraught history of Black agriculture in the US. From land grabbing, to shady USDA lending practices, to the government's most recent attempts at righting the wrongs of a racist past. Further Reading:To learn more about Dr. Gails non-profit visit farmstogrow.comKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Beauty is in the Eye of the Eater

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 25:41

    How food is presented can shape the way we interact with it. Just take a look at your phone, for instance. Today's world of social media is inundated with pictures of pretty food that make our mouths water. A picture is worth 1000 words, and looking good implies tasting good.This week, we bring you an episode on the ways that food and style play off each other, from culinary photography to fashion to restaurant design. We learn about how trends are changing in food styling and listen to an editor matching her outfits to her drinks. We hear from a New York artist making edible fashion, and explore how restaurant spaces can tell stories. Further Reading and Listening:Linne Halpern is a writer, editor, and illustrator. Her work explores the intersection between style and identity. She is a regular contributor to Architectural Digest, and her work has been featured in Teen Vogue, Refinery29, The Daily Beast, and more. Her debut children's book, Marina and the Mermaids, is out now. Order Mariana Velásquez's recently released cookbook, Colombiana, and see more of her work on her website. And follow Ben Hon's food photography on Instagram at @stuffbeneats.Read Julia Bainbridge's book, Good Drinks. Find the drink-outfit pairing mentioned in the story here.See Nicole McLaughlin's edible clothing designsCheck out Glen Coben's interview on All in the Industry. You can also subscribe to All in the Industry on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode!  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Find Your Own Food: An Introduction to Foraging

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 25:08

    There are edible plants all around us, but without an expert, you shouldn't go tasting random bushes. So where should you start? It may feel daunting, but the ability to find your own food, whether in urban parks or an untouched forest, opens up a world of cultural and culinary opportunities. A plant you may have considered a weed could be a salad for six the next time you have friends over. A mushroom hunting expedition could connect you to a new community. The opportunities are endless.That's why this week, we unpack foraging practices. We'll start small – literally speaking – to learn how smartphone apps are paving the way for a new generation of mushroom foragers. We hear about the significance of foraging on Indigenous North American lands, explore one entrepreneur's resourceful use of foraged ingredients. In our final segment, and offer some safety tips for budding foragers.Further Reading and Listening:Learn more about “Wildman” Steve Brill's foraging tours.Find out about the New York Mycological Society's membership and foraging walks on their website. They use the iNaturalist app to document and identify fungi. Tom Bigelow also highly recommends the app La fonge du Québec.Listeners from Massachusetts can learn more about the Nipmuc Nation at nipmucnation.org. To learn more about indigenous tribes in other parts of the U.S., visit native-land.ca. To support the I-Collective, head to icollectiveinc.org. Listen to the full episode of The Speakeasy with guest, Bianca Miraglia, here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    New Show Spotlight: Pizza Quest

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 65:28

    This week we're featuring an episode of HRN's newest series: Pizza Quest. Before the episode, Kat Johnson speaks with Jeff Michael and Peter Reinhart about the formation of Pizza Quest, the stories they are trying to tell, and how this particular project was born out of quarantine last year.  Pizza Quest is certainly about pizza, but it's so much more!  It's an engaging celebration of artisanship in all its shapes and forms. In this episode, Peter interviews Chris Bianco. Chris is rightfully acclaimed as the poster boy of the artisan pizza movement. Not only is he an important and unfiltered thought leader in the realm of sustainability and right action, but his pizzas represent the benchmark to which all others aspire. Today we take a deep dive into the mind and heart of Chris Bianco of Pizzeria and Pane Bianco.Subscribe to Pizza Quest episodes as they launch! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast. 

    Bug Out: Cicada Chaos and Radioactive Honey

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 24:55

    We might think of insects as pests, annoying little creatures that enter our homes uninvited, that buzz incessantly and bite us without cause. But insects make the world go round. They can be found in nearly every environment, and it's estimated that over 90% of the animal life forms on Earth are insects. The balance of the natural world depends on them. This week, we're putting insects front and center. We unpack the mysterious patterns of cicadas in the US, investigate the presence of radioactive isotopes in bees, meet a self-professed edible insect ambassador, and do some insect cooking of our own. Further Reading and Listening: For more of DJ Armen Hammer's music, check out his Soundcloud.Find professor Raupp's undergraduate lab, the Cicada Crew.To learn more about Paul Volante's study on cesium-137 in honey, you can read the full article in Nature Communications.Learn more about Joseph Yoon and Brooklyn Bugs at brooklynbugs.com or on Instagram. For more on David George Gordon visit davidgeorgegordon.com or on Twitter.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Much Ado About Organics

    Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 31:47

    It’s bought, it’s sold, it’s debated. But what is organic food? This week on Meat and Three, we travel into the world of organics. In the land we now refer to as the “United States,” indigenous communities have been growing their food “organically” for centuries. But “organic food” in the U.S. is now tied to a slew of technical regulations required for certification. The United States Department of Agriculture defines organic food as food produced without the use of antibiotics, pesticides, growth hormones, synthetic fertilizers, bioengineering, or ionizing radiation. This is why organic food can be more costly than food produced with polluting chemicals.When the organic food movement went mainstream in the United States in the 1970s, it wasn’t just about compiling a list of regulations. Its roots dug deep into efforts to protect human health and the environment. Our stories this week explore the meaning of “organic.” We start off with an organic food 101. Then we report on how corporations in the United States have influenced the movement and we hear from the Gorzynski family about why they penned themselves as ornery instead of organic. In our final segment, we bring you a story on how the ties between white supremacy and organic food challenged a farmer’s market to its core.Further Reading and Listening:Hear more from Wythe Marschall and Melissa Metrick on Fields. Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform and never miss an episode!  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).To learn more about corporate consolidation in the organic sector, check out Amanda Starbuck’s recent report for Food and Water Watch.Find the Gorzynski Ornery Farm at the Union Square Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. And read more about the farm, and John’s work at NOFA and the Farm Bureau, here.You can learn more about Abby Ang’s organization No Space for Hate on their website and Twitter. Alison Hope Alkon’s book Black, White, and Green: Farmers Markets, Race, and the Green Economy can be found at your local bookstore. To read more of her work, check out her other publications here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast. 

    The Flavor of Memory

    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 28:07

    In celebration of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we dedicate our episode to memory and how it has shaped AAPI food experiences. Many of us have probably eaten meals where long after the plate has been cleared, the taste still lingers in our mind. But we don’t just remember food — food can spark and capture memory as well. For those who have immigrated across countries, food can act as a vessel through which the flavors and stories of their past live on.Today, our episode explores how the smell, taste, or story behind dishes can inspire art, preserve heritage and forge connections across cultures and continents. First, we visit a family in the Bay Area to learn about how food has evoked nostalgia for them after immigrating from China. Next, we hear from an educational organization based in O’ahu about their mission of promoting environmental preservation. We then head to the backstage of a one-woman play, where we talk to the playwright about her relationship to food as an Indian-American. Finally, we flip through the pages of diasporic Vietnamese cookbooks to discover the narratives embedded within.Further Reading and Listening:Check out the website for the one-woman play, Meera’s Kitchen.Read Jaya Saxena's article about the Lunchbox MomentMonique Truong’s essay, “A Suitcase of Recipes: Diasporic Vietnamese Cookbooks and the Stories They Tell"Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Labor Organizing: The Fight for Better Conditions in Food

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2021 26:34

    In honor of May Day (celebrated world-wide on May 1st), we bring you four stories about workers organizing and unionizing around the country. First, we’ll start in our own backyard: New York City. We dive into the world of  food delivery workers and their efforts to legislate the delivery apps that push them around the City. Next, we’ll move upstate to and look at farm workers fighting for more overtime pay before turning to the Texas Service Industry Coalition. Finally, we’ll end this episode in San Francisco with Anchor Brewing. The brewery is over 100 years old and ratified its very first union contract in 2019. Although not officially recognized in the United States, May Day has its origins in America. On May 4th, 1886, workers gathered in Chicago’s Haymarket square to rally for an eight-hour work day. But a bomb was thrown into the demonstration, and several were killed. May Day commemorates the tragedy of the Haymarket Affair. But really, it celebrates every fight for better working conditions. Further Reading and Listening:There are two versions of our story on farmworker organizing for overtime pay in New York. You can find the Spanish version on Buenlimón Radio. You can also subscribe wherever you get your podcasts: (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Learn more about the Restaurant Organizing Project (ROP) here.Become more involved with the Austin Texas branch of the ROP here. You can find the Dandelion Chocolate Union here.Learn more about the DSA here. Restaurants Workers United is an independent network of food service and allied workers. They hold organizing workshops available to anyone in the industry every Monday at 2 pm ET / 11 am PT. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Presenting The Shameless Chef

    Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 16:11

    This week we're presenting another Heritage Radio Network show, which gives us a glimpse into the culinary culture of the 1970s. The Shameless Chef was developed for public radio in 1977 but many of these audio treasures have never been heard before. The show’s original host, Michael A. Davenport shares his fearless attitude towards food and encourages home cooks to have fun and take risks in the kitchen. The podcast takes us back in time but still has a lot to teach us today. In Episode 2: How to Be Audacious, Michael shares his belief that there’s no excuse for being a ‘meat and potatoes man’ and suggests throwing out the rules to break up the monotony of your meals. He shares recipes for ‘wing dings’ and black olive soup and suggests adding an orange peel to your coffee. Ultimately, Michael subscribed to this sentiment, “don’t react to your prejudices, react to your palette.” Subscribe to The Shameless Chef on your favorite podcast app. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast. 

    BONUS: Eating and Cooking During Chemotherapy

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 26:03

    When someone you love is sick, sending food is often the first way we show our love and support. It can offer satisfaction and heartiness when a hug is not possible.This was definitely true for Eric Poretsky, a close friend of Meat and Three producer and episode host, Dylan Heuer. Eric was diagnosed with cancer a few months ago and talking to him, Dylan noticed that food has played a big role during his treatment. It’s become a marker of his sickness and wellness, of what’s changed and what still feels normal. Eric is an avid home cook and in this episode he brings us with him on the winding path he has traveled to keep food a joyful part of his life.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Exploring South Carolina’s Food Culture – From the Low Country to the Blue Ridge

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 24:37

    For this special episode, we teamed up with Discover South Carolina and Charleston Wine and Food to celebrate the state’s incredible restaurant and agriculture scene. Who better to hear from than the state’s chef ambassadors?Each year, a group of chefs is tapped to elevate visitor awareness about the state’s restaurants, farms, food producers, and tourism locales. We got to speak to this year’s group on two special episodes of HRN Happy Hour. Both are out now, and we’ll link to them in our show notes! In this week’s Meat and Three, we’re bringing you highlights from those conversations. And in the second half of the show, we have some of our favorite moments from Charleston Wine and Food 2020 - one of the last in-person events HRN attended before the pandemic. Further Listening:HRN Happy Hour #131, South Carolina Chef Ambassadors Raffaele Dall’Erta and Jason TuftsHRN Happy Hour #132, South Carolina Chef Ambassadors Kevin Mitchell and Jamie DaskalisHRN On Tour #351, Steve Palmer and Shari BayerHRN On Tour #356, Chef Binta with Harry RosenblumHRN On Tour #334, Champagne RoundtableKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Feasting

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 26:31

    We know and take for granted that foods will look and feel like we expect them to. So it’s especially disorienting when food doesn’t give us that anticipated sensory experience. This week, we’re looking at food that is not as it seems. We’re peeling back the layers of texture, taste and technique that help some foods imitate others. First, we’ll savor the layered and whimsical field of artificial fruit flavoring. We’ll watch as food deceives, in the sinister world of olive oil fraud. And when it duplicates, like the food that’s stamped out of a 3D printer. Finally, we’ll consider some of the ethical choices facing the emerging meat substitute industry, which risks reproducing the same inequalities as “real” meat production.Further Reading:Browse the catalogue or reach out to Joshua Cobos through Dolce Foglia’s website.For more on artificial flavoring, from blue raspberry to snacking, follow Dr. Nadia Berenstein’s work on her website, or follow her on Twitter.To learn more about the 3D printed food projects at BeeHex, check out their website here.For more info on the cell-based meat industry, check out episode 7 of Fields and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Elders: Communities, Rituals, and Legacy

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 23:33

    Many of us probably have family recipes that have been passed down from generation to  generation. These recipes, which have transcended time, are a reminder of how elders in our family tree continue to have lasting influences on our lives, even and especially in a time of isolation.This week, we dedicate our stories to elders, grandparents and family members who came before us. First, we follow a food delivery program for elders on a rural island in Maine as they bridge the distance to build community. Then we  take a seat at the table to learn how retirement home residents are rejoicing in the simple act of dining together. We journey to Georgia, where a farmer is continuing a century-long family legacy and we dive into the various ways food is used to remember ancestors around the world.Further Reading and Listening:Check out Robyn Grant’s research and work with The National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care here. Listen to Jupiter’s Almanac wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).You can pre-order Matthew Raiford’s book Bress 'n' Nyam: Gullah Geechee Recipes from a Sixth-Generation Farmer here.Learn more from Dying to Eat: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Food, Death, and the AfterlifeKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Bursting Bubbles: From Shortages to Seltzer

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 24:55

    When you think of bubbles, what pops into your mind? Is it rainbow colored soap? Carbonated soda? Perhaps even social distancing bubbles? This week, we’re jumping into a world filled with fizz, iridescence and deliciousness. We’re talking about how to make bubbles. How to eat them. And the unexpected ways in which they’ve shaped our culture and history. We’re looking at how the pandemic led to a domino effect from a gasoline decrease to a CO2 shortage and, eventually, a craft beer crisis. But bubbles aren’t just limited to the type that make you burp. Diving to the bottom of a cup of delicious bubble tea, we examine what lies at the core of the popular drink. Finally, we take it back to a bubbly classic, seltzer, and examine its significance in New York City.Further Reading:DJ Armen Hammer’s SoundcloudYou can find Grey Sail Brewing at https://greysailbrewing.com/Check out Robert Ku’s other work on Asian-American diaspora, including “Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA”, hereTo contact Walter Backerman, email mrbubbles105@cs.com. For more information about the history of seltzer, check out the book Seltzertopia: The Extraordinary Story of an Ordinary Drink by Barry Joseph and The Nosher’s “Why Jews Love Seltzer” by Sara Gardner.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Corn to be Wild

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 26:09

    When you think of corn, you might think of the 90s metal band (spelled with a ‘K’ and embodying a raucous explosion of angst and anger). More likely, corn conjures images of a summer barbeque: bright yellow ears grilled, buttered, and eaten straight off the cob.However, the story of corn is more expansive and complicated than these contemporary reference points. Right now, industrial corn farming consumes 96 million acres of United States farmland (the US is the world’s largest producer of the crop). It receives billions of dollars in government subsidies every year, and it has turned the once-rich grassland of the midwest into the industrial corn belt, a vast monoculture with weak, pesticide-ridden soil.This week, we unpack the role that corn plays in our ecosystems, economies, and the experiences of farmers. We start with a story about organic corn being fed to livestock. Then, we dive into the world of ethanol, and learn why it may not be the answer to our energy needs. We explore the complicated politics of corn legislation and how it affects farmers. Finally, we learn about the spiritual history of corn, and how people are keeping that history alive today.Further Reading:If you want to learn more about industrial corn farming, you can check out this article in Mother Jones, or you can read part one of Michael Pollen’s The Omnivore's Dilemma, which is all about corn.To learn more about corn in Oaxaca, check out Yira Vallejo and Jonathan Barbieri’s work on the film Los Guardianes del Maíz.If you’re interested in keeping up with Korn fans, you can check out Patrick’s Korn covers on his YouTube channel. You can also listen to Justin Wilson’s full episode about Korn on his podcast, Deprogrammed.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    New Show Spotlight: Fields

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 41:48

    We’re spotlighting a new show on HRN: Fields. Fields brings you the stories of people who are working in urban agriculture—for money, for fun, to feed the hungry, and for entirely other reasons. In each episode, hosts Melissa Metrick and Wythe Marschall delve into different foods grown in cities. Moreover, they investigate the whys behind getting up in the morning and working as a farmer in the shadow of skyscrapers. You don’t need to be a farmer to enjoy this podcast, or even a foodie! With their expert guests, Melissa and Wythe break down the realities and possible futures of urban farming to their elements.Today we share Episode 5: ‘Shrooms! Indoors, Foraged, and Friendly. Why are mushrooms so popular recently, and who is growing them—and searching for them in the wild—in New York City? To find out, the hosts interviewed a whole bunch of fungi-focused folks. Learn about the cello-inspired origins of the commercial vertical farming startup Smallhold, which grows oyster mushrooms and lion’s mane all over the city. Hear from an entrepreneur on why she started—and then sold—her mushroom farm in Brooklyn.  Melissa and Wythe visit expert forager Wildman Steve—who makes us call him “Wildman”—and try to avoid his bird. And they end with a very fun, philosophical interview of Jie Jin, a mushroom club organizer who makes them rethink our relationship to fungi spores. Subscribe to Fields wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).

    Rethinking Surplus: Innovative Solutions to Excess

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 25:02

    Surplus is usually defined as what’s left over when the demand, or need, of a population has been met. However, in the context of the food system, this definition leaves us with more leftovers than answers. What might be referred to as surplus food faces a core contradiction: while approximately 35% of the food we produce goes to waste, about 50 million people in the U.S. are experiencing food insecurity. This number has increased from previous years due to the Covid-19 pandemic, which begs the question – is it possible to have a food surplus when the need for nourishment is only going up?This week, we rethink the meaning of surplus. We start off with a lesson on embracing the food sharing economy. Then, we walk through the process of upcycling leftover grain from breweries into crackers and learn about eliminating surplus in dairy production as a response to Covid-19. Last but not least, we look at an example of closed-loop manufacturing that turns surplus waste into a common household product. Further Reading and Listening:For more on the sharing economy, check out Michael Carolan’s book The Food Sharing Revolution: How Start-Ups, Pop-Ups, and Co-ops are Changing the Way We Eat.Need a new addition to your charcuterie board? Check out Brewer’s Crackers.Feast Yr Ears: This episode featured “Episode 131: The Food Sharing Revolution.” Subscribe to Feast Yr Ears wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Cutting the Curd: This episode featured “Episode 442: Upcycled Inspiration: A Conversation with Kyle Fiasconaro of Brewers Crackers.” Subscribe to Cutting the Curd wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Eating Matters: This episode featured “Episode 155: Closing the Loop on Food Waste.” Subscribe to Eating Matters wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).What Doesn’t Kill You: This episode featured “Episode 329: Rebuilding Dairy in Pennsylvania” Subscribe to What Doesn’t Kill You wherever you get your podcasts.  (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify| RSS)Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    You Can’t Always Drink What You Want

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 30:09

    From coffee shops to cocktail bars, the world of beverages has been turned upside down by the pandemic. You can’t always drink what you want. And now, more than ever, you can’t always drink where you want. But even before Covid-19, transformations in the production line, farming practices, and workplace inclusivity have affected what we drink. In this episode, splash into the world of beverages – from the drinks we sip on – to the places we imbibe. We’ll investigate the ways access, history, legislation, and simple circumstance may limit the beverages we consume. We’ll explore how to make the most of the ingredients lying around the dustiest of liquor cabinets. And for those who are tired of making at-home drinks, we’ll hear from a North Carolina state representative and bar owners about the state of to-go cocktails. We’ll learn about the future of the American craft cider industry and its potential to diversify the labor force backed behind it. Finally, we’ll delve into the increasingly popular caffeinated drink Yaupon, whose history tells a story of cultural resilience. Additional ResourcesCheck out John DeBary’s flowchart and plenty more cocktail tips in his book, Drink What You Want. If you’re interested in learning more about non-alcoholic drinks, give Proteau a try. Hard Core: This episode featured “Episode 6: What’s Next for American Craft Cider?” Subscribe to Hard Core wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Thirsty? Sip on some Yaupon Brothers American Tea. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Planting the Seed: Time Travel, Shortages and Heirloom Crops

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2021 27:25

    Seeds are the source and symbol of life. In our modern food system, with fewer and fewer people physically involved in the practice of agriculture, it’s easy to forget that our sustenance comes from the heroics of these persistent organisms. With spring just around the corner, we’re sowing the seeds of knowledge and empathy through four unique stories. We dig into why some seed sellers’ shortage of seeds was actually due to an abundance of zealous home-gardeners. We harvest ideas from an episode of Fields, a new urban farming podcast on HRN, on how seeds are the world’s first and only time travelers, and what they can share with us about the future. We forage through the world of invasive species, and how they can be a proxy for migratory groups and sentiments towards immigrants. Finally, we conclude with a story on the cultural importance of heirloom seeds in the Cherokee nation and their historical struggle to attain seed sovereignty. Further Reading:Fields: This episode featured “Episode 1: Seeds and Time Travel.” Subscribe to Fields wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).If you want to learn more about the increased seed demand, you can read Lisa Held’s article in Civil Eats, The COVID Gardening Renaissance Depends on Seeds—if You Can Find ThemLearn more about artist Jan Mun’s work with “invasive” species and mycoremediation – using fungi to break down toxic chemicals – on her website. You can follow Marisa Prefer’s work with weeds and urban landscapes  at invisible labor and Pioneer Works.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Trading Futures: Borders, Automation, the Dark Web, and the New Silk Road

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2021 26:54

    It’s the final episode of our series on global trade, and we’ve got our eyes set on the future.In the past, trade was hindered by distance and limited communication, which today’s internet and fast travel routes have helped to mediate. These days, trade is confronted by new issues: global inequalities that force people to migrate, machines so efficient they’re making human labor redundant, and alarming threats to cybersecurity.We’ll start by looking at the borders that still divide countries, and the people whose profession it is to cross them. Then, we’ll hear about job automation, and why sitting back and letting robots do our work for us may not be as relaxing as it sounds. Next, we’ll dig deep into the dark corners of the internet. And finally, to conclude our series, we’ll travel to the “new” Silk Road.Further Reading:You can find a longer interview with Alyshia Gálvez on a November episode of Meant to be Eaten. To read more about how NAFTA impacts public health and people’s lives in Mexico, check out her book, Eating NAFTA.You can explore the Dark Web more through Robert Gehl’s book. Listen to Eating Matters’ full interview with Robyn Metcalf on Episode 137 and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Global Trade Bites Back: Animals, Sanctions, Dim Sum, and Disease

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 26:51

    So far, our series on global trade has focused on ingredients that are either sweet or spicy, and that shaped international trade routes. As our stories make clear, there are ups and downs when talking about the globalization of our foodways. So this week, we go from sugar and spice to bites! We’re going to talk about the role that animals have played in the history of the food trade. Then, we have two stories about bite-sized foods with global footprints.Note: This series started with episode 100, From the Silk Road to a Globalized World: An Introduction to Trade, and we recommend starting there if you’re just tuning in!Further Reading:Marilyn Noble’s Roundtable on Coronavirus and Meat Consumption for The CounterThe Economic Impact of Black DeathKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Feelin’ the Heat: How Spices Have Flavored Our World

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2021 26:51

    We continue our global trade mini-series with one of the most distinguishing elements of a cuisine: spice. Where would any regional food culture be without its unique blend of spices? Where would Italian food be without oregano, or Thai food without the bird’s eye chili? Historically, spices are associated with a nation, a region, or perhaps a dish. Yet, in our contemporary world, the average home cook can find the world in their spice rack.Although we can’t encapsulate the entirety of historic and modern spice trade and its influence in this episode, we consider four unique stories on the histories and implications of flavoring food. We explain the universal adoption and adoration for the chili pepper, and how its violent historic exchange still shrouds many regional foodways. We take a look at the economics of saffron and why it’s so expensive. Then we explore the perception of well-known flavor enhancer, MSG, and why its controversy may be unfounded. Finally, we examine the impetus for current farmer protests igniting in India and what that may mean for the future of global spice trade. Listen in next week, as we continue our global journey with bites of everything strange, interesting and important in the world of historic and contemporary trade.Further Reading and Listening:Subscribe to Cooking in Mexican wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)Subscribe to A Taste of The Past wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS)You can visit the Vanilla, Saffron Imports company website here. Check out Sarah Lohman’s book, Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine here. Learn more about the sham letter to the New England Journal of Medicine at the origin of MSG’s bad rap here. While you’re at it, check out the FDA’s questions and answers page regarding the facts on MSG as a safe food additive. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Presenting Let's Talk About Food

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2021 20:03

    This week we take a break from our series on trade to present one of HRN's newest shows, Let's Talk About Food. Hosted by Louisa Kasdon, LTAF is a live storytelling event; because everyone has a food story. From our first mouthful of applesauce in front of​ ​our adoring family, to our first bite into a jalapeño pepper, and everything in between, food is at the heart of the human experience. We love it. We need it. Food is family and ritual. Fun and work. Sophistication and guilty pleasure, scarcity and overabundance. Food makes us ecstatic and sometimes crazy. Food delights and disappoints. Can you think of a connector that binds us together more universally or seamlessly than our shared relationships with food? That’s what we do in this podcast: Share entertaining, evocative, celebratory, complicated and funny food stories. Lydia Shire - How much do I want this recipe?Lydia Shire is simply one of the country’s leading chefs. Named to every high honor in the culinary world, including becoming the first female executive chef at a Four Season’s Hotel. Lydia began cooking in Boston at 21, as a young divorced mother with three small children. Her story of her drive, ingenuity and skill is inspirational, allowing her to rise to become one of the first female Executive Chef at a Four Seasons hotel, and launching numerous restaurants in her hometown, Boston including Scampo where she shares the executive chef honors with her son. For more about Lydia Shire, visit www.scampoboston.comAnnie Copps - Singles Awareness Day"Valentine’s Day can be a real clunker for a single person. Twenty years ago I made the mistake of going out for Sunday brunch the morning after Valentine’s Day. You’ve heard of a marijuana haze? This was a post-coital haze. Everyone else in the restaurant had just rolled out of bed with their partner. That’s when I decided to start Singles Awareness Day."Annie is a chef, cook author, writer, cooking teacher and TV and radio personality. In addition to cooking at many restaurants, she has been the food editor of Boston Magazine and Yankee Magazine. To learn more about the irrepressible Annie Copps, visit www.intellibelly.netSubscribe now to get the episodes as they launch! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Sweet Temptations: How Sugar Captivated Tastebuds and Global Trade

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2021 33:54

    The desire for sweetness is biologically hardwired in humans, according to Dr. Gary Beauchamp, longtime former director and president of the Monell Chemical Senses Center. It is an evolutionary response that developed way back when sweet things were hard to find in the natural environment. Now, we can find sweets just about anywhere.  Part of our global trade mini-series, this episode focuses on all things sweet! Ironically, the history of sugar comes with some bitter truths. Stories include the problematic journey of the cocoa bean from West Africa to chocolate products in the U.S., farmers pushing back against “Big Sugar,” cultural appropriation at the National Date Festival, and the intertwined history of Silk Road merchants and the first domesticated apples.Next week, we continue our exploration of food and trade with stories about spice.Further Reading:Get your own copy of “Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat” by Robert Spengler hereRead more about Dr. Leissle’s work hereRead Professor Nestle’s comments on the federal government’s controversial new dietary guidelines. You can follow her critiques of the food industry on her blog, Food Politics, and in some of her recent books, like Unsavory Truth, published in 2018.Learn more about Gilliard Farms on their website. And check out Jupiter’s Almanac, Matthew Raiford’s show on Heritage Radio Network.Learn more about Dandelion Chocolate’s single-origin chocolate here Follow Dr. Sarah (McCormick) Seekatz on Twitter and check out her book, Images of America: Indio’s Date Festival to learn more about the history of California’s date industry.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    From The Silk Road to a Globalized World: An Introduction To Trade

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2021 23:40

    Trade is innately human. Whether it’s baseball cards, lunchbox items or recipes, people have been exchanging goods, services, practices, and ideas since prehistoric times. Driven by curiosity and power, or most commonly money, trade has created the modern, globalized world we know today. To better understand the past, present, and future of trade’s huge web of interconnectivity, we’re traveling back in time with Meat and Three’s first ever 4-part mini-series. We first look at history's most significant trade route: The Silk Road. We explore how the expansive caravan and maritime routes marked the first period of vast global interchange with Najmieh Batmanglij. We then dig into economics with Don Boudreaux to explain the implications of free trade and some central characteristics of our current globalized model. And don’t forget to stick around for the next three episodes as we take a deeper dive into the ingredients that make these routes so delicious. Subscribe to Meat and Three on your favorite podcast app.Further Reading:Get your own copy of “Silk Road Cooking: A Vegetarian Journey” by Najmieh Batmanglij hereKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    New Show Spotlight: Back Bar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 48:23

    This week we're presenting the first episode of Back Bar, a rollicking deep dive into the events, phenomenon, relationships and human foibles that shaped the world’s most iconic drinks. Hosted by food and beverage writer Greg Benson and featuring guest appearances from industry luminaries like Derek Brown, Robert Simonson and Sother Teague, Back Bar’s vaudevillian approach to storytelling is a refreshing cocktail of history and humor.In this first episode, Greg tells the story of the Sazerac, how it changed, adapted, evolved and kept pace with the rest of the cocktail world. Subscribe now to get the episodes as they launch! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). New episodes will be released the 1st and 15th of every month. Keep us on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Past Reflections and Future Aspirations: This Year in Food & Agriculture

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 30:10

    What policies and movements will shape food production in 2021 and beyond? In our year in review, we feature two conversations with Lisa Held – one with Jenna Liut on Eating Matters about the environmental and agricultural implications of four years under the Trump administration, and another with Katy Keiffer on What Doesn't Kill You, about what to expect from the Biden administration on climate and agricultural policy.Dylan Heuer speaks with Colby Duren, a director of the Intertribal Agriculture Council, which aims to advance legislation in the 2023 Farm Bill focused on food sovereignty for native groups. Matan Dubnikov reports on the state of regenerative agriculture and its potential for restoring soil and fighting climate change. Further Reading and Listening:Learn more about the effects of the Trump administration on environmental and agricultural policy by listening to “4 Years of Trump” on Eating Matters here and by reading Lisa Held’s article “How Four Years of Trump Reshaped Food and Farming” here.To learn more about Biden’s potential plans for agriculture policy listen to episode 323 of HRN’s What Doesn’t Kill You here. You can also read Lisa Held’s article “In a Year of Climate Reckoning, Where Does Joe Biden Stand on Climate and Agriculture?” here.To learn more about the Intertribal Agriculture Council, visit indianag.org.To learn more about regenerative agriculture, investing in black farmers and changing the food narrative, check out Kiss the Ground here and the Black Farmer Fund here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Drugs, Declassified: Munchies, Militaries and Magic Mushrooms

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2020 31:39

    Inspired by the passage of Measure 109 in Oregon and Initiative 81 in Washington D.C., this week we're exploring the state of drugs – particularly the agricultural, scientific and culinary aspects of them. Tash Kimmel explores the science behind cannabis and cravings. Ryder Bell ponders the rise and fall of coca, and how the global war on cocaine shrouded the medicinal crop in infamy. Kat Johnson holds a cosmic conversation with the CEO of Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps to learn how his company is advocating for psychedelic medicine to heal the soul. Emily Kunkel digs into some psilocybin gastronomy with a magic mushroom maven. Further Reading:Check out Dr. Bronner’s line of soaps and their Heal Soul campaign hereLearn more about Dr. K Mandrake’s confections and check out his book, The Psilocybin Chef Cookbook, available for order online here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    New Show Spotlight: Cooking in Mexican From A to Z

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 38:00

    Today we’re spotlighting Episode 1 of the new HRN series, Cooking in Mexican from A to Z.  They’re mother and son, but also award-winning celebrity chefs, restaurateurs, and cookbook authors. Aarón Sánchez and Zarela Martínez will take you on a culinary journey featuring regional ingredients that are the soul of Mexican cuisine. From chilis to chocolate and everything in between, Aarón, Zarela and special guests will share stories, tips, techniques, and quintessential recipes in spirited kitchen table conversations.Subscribe to Cooking in Mexican from A to Z wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Decolonizing our Thanksgiving Tables and Food Narratives

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2020 25:46

    With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we’ve been thinking about the many ways this holiday bolsters colonial narratives, as well as opportunities to push back on them. This episode spotlights individual people, dishes and ingredients that are decolonizing our food system. We’re looking at our Thanksgiving plates and beyond to explore efforts to reclaim food sovereignty in Native American culture, the African diaspora, and Puerto Rico. We start by revisiting the Thanksgiving myth and investigating the forces that continue to shape Native Americans’ food access and culinary legacy. Then we’ll share a recipe that brings Geechee culture to the Thanksgiving table. We track the history of a West African rice strain that is reintroducing a rich heritage as well as environmental resilience to American soil. And finally we learn about how one food justice collective is working to bring power and healing to Puerto Rico. Further Reading and Listening:Check out Sean Sherman and his platform,  The Sioux Chef – Revitalizing Native American Cuisine / Re-Identifying North American CuisineSubscribe to Jupiter’s Almanac wherever you get your podcasts. (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Find Matthew Raiford’s Thanksgiving recipe for oyster dressing here.Learn more about Dr. Anna McClung and the Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center here. Find out more about Glenn Roberts and Anson Mills here. Check out Luz Cruz and Cuir Kitchen Brigade here. Here’s an NPR article on the history of Puerto Rican debt, and here’s a 2019 study on the effects of the Jones ActKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    In Flux: Changes in our Social Fabric

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2020 25:25

    This entire year has been one huge change after another, forcing us all to take a deeper look at how we used to live and wonder what the future holds. Our stories this week explore how society is rapidly changing before our eyes.Dylan Heuer looks at how Covid-19 is affecting the way mothers balance work and life. An excerpt from HRN’s Queer the Table featuring Soleil Ho shows how assumptions about the audience for food writing and restaurant reviews are being upended. Alicia Qian ponders pumpkin spice and the implications that come with such “basic” trends. Armen Spendjian brings us a report on how UT Austin’s campus dining program has changed for the Fall semester. Further Listening/Reading:Listen to episode 15 of The Big Food Question: How can Growing Your Own Food Address Issues of Food Sovereignty and Access?Read more from Katherine Goldstein about bailing out American mothers here and anti-mom bias in the workplace here, plus listen to The Double Shift wherever you get your podcasts. Listen to episode 15 of Queer The Table - A New Kind of Restaurant Critic: Soleil HoPreorder Jaya Saxena’s new book, Crystal Clear: Reflections on Extraordinary Talismans for Everyday Life here.Listen to episode 87 of Meat and Three - School Lunch in the Age of Social DistancingKeep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Threeis powered by Simplecast.

    Comfort Food: A Source of Solace Around the World

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 22:14

    We are living through uncertain and unprecedented times. What better way to find a bit of escape and solace than through food? Comfort food is a broad concept that means different things to different people around the world. This week’s episode starts with a look at the history and meaning of comfort food. We learn about a Danish concept revolving around sharing quality time with loved ones over a meal. We take a look at how the world does chicken soup from Turkey to Scandinavia. Finally, we discover the many forms that Japanese donburi can take, and why it's sure to hit the spot every time. There’s no need for an excuse - take a load off and enjoy your favorite meal, whatever it may be!Further Reading:A Taste of the Past: This episode featured “Episode 350: Comfort Food.” Subscribe to A Taste of the Past wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Eat Your Words: This episode featured “Episode 294: Scaandinavian Comfort Food.” Subscribe to Eat Your Words wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). Feast Yr Ears: This episode featured “Episode 189: Chicken Soup Now and Forever.” Subscribe to Feast Yr Ears wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). You can purchase a copy of “The Chicken Soup Manifesto” here.Japan Eats!: This episode featured “Episode 200: Donburi: A Japanese Food as Comforting as Ramen.” Subscribe to Japan Eats! wherever you get your podcasts (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS). You can check out Elizabeth Andoh’s Japanese culinary arts program, “A Taste of Culture”, here. Also, Elizabeth hosts a Facebook group called TSUDOI Project where members from around the world can share ideas and kitchen projects, which you can find here. Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Witches, Brains, Ghosts, and Rats: The Halloween Episode

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2020 23:54

    This week on Meat and Three we’re embracing the spooky spirit of Halloween. From zombies to witches, we’re exploring the odd… the occult… and the taboo in the world of food. First, we’ll delve head-first into real-life brain eating with organ meat expert, and cookbook co-author Michael Harlen Turkell. Then, we’ll learn about the New York rat infestations spurred by Covid-19 with rodentologist Dr. Bobby Corrigan. Ryder Bell takes us into the mysterious world of ghost kitchens and we travel back in time with Tash Kimmell  to uncover what might have been the real culprit behind the Salem Witch Trials. Further Reading:Check out Linda Caporeal’s Ergot theory  here Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Space: Reimagining Where We Live, Work, and Eat

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2020 25:30

    During the pandemic, outdoor and indoor spaces are being reconceptualized to better suit new ways of living, working, and eating. In this episode we’ll explore the ways familiar spaces are shifting to become more hygienic, more profitable, and more accessible. We start with a story about the expansion of outdoor dining into New York City’s sidewalks and streets. Then we travel to outer space to learn how astronauts are abandoning freeze-dried foods for home cooked meals. We wander through a park that aims to forge a healthier relationship between people and plants. And we examine how one vertical farm has reimagined both agriculture and office space. Further Reading:Watch Candace’s explorations in urban foraging on a series of videos on the CURB’s Instagram.Learn more about food in space on Episode 45 of Meat and Three: Houston, We Have Dip n Dots. Listen on our website here or wherever you get your podcasts.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Meat and Three by becoming a member!Meat and Three is Powered by Simplecast.

    Claim Meat + Three

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel