Podcasts about Entomology

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Scientific study of insects

  • 383PODCASTS
  • 1,076EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
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  • Aug 15, 2022LATEST
Entomology

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Best podcasts about Entomology

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Latest podcast episodes about Entomology

Beyond Blathers
Wasps (Part 2)

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 45:32


This week we're sharing even more amazing facts about wasps! There's so much to appreciate about these extremely under-appreciated insects. Listen to learn more! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok! Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game!

Stuff You Missed in History Class
The Developing History of Monarch Butterflies

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 34:56


Monarch butterflies are still in the middle of their story – and it's one that is precarious. Humans are still trying to figure out a lot about them, and aspects of the monarch story have been misrepresented over the years. Research: Monarch Joint Venture: https://monarchjointventure.org/ “Monarch Butterfly.” The National Wildlife Federation. https://www.nwf.org/Educational-Resources/Wildlife-Guide/Invertebrates/Monarch-Butterfly Sutherland, Douglas W.S. and Jean Adams, ed. “The Monarch Butterfly – Our National Insect.” Part of “Insect Potpourri: Adventures in Entomology.” CRC Press. 1992. Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Danaus". Encyclopedia Britannica, 15 Feb. 2018, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Danaus-Greek-mythology Kathleen S. Murphy. “Collecting Slave Traders: James Petiver, Natural History, and the British Slave Trade.” The William and Mary Quarterly, vol. 70, no. 4, 2013, pp. 637–70. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.5309/willmaryquar.70.4.0637 Müller-Wille, Staffan. "Carolus Linnaeus". Encyclopedia Britannica, 19 May. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Carolus-Linnaeus Stearns, Raymond Phineas. “James Petiver: Promoter of Natural Science, c.1663-1718.” American Antiquarian Society. October 1952. https://www.americanantiquarian.org/proceedings/44807240.pdf “Mark Catesby (1683 – 1749).” Catesby Commemorative Trust. 2012. https://web.archive.org/web/20130906122250/http://www.catesbytrust.org/mark-catesby/ Smith-Rogers, Sheryl. “Maiden of the Monarchs.” TEXAS PARKS & WILDLIFE. March 2016. https://monarchjointventure.org/images/uploads/documents/legacy_monarch_catalina_trail_article.pdf Scott, Alec. “Where do you go, my lovelies?” University of Toronto Magazine. Aug. 24, 2015. https://magazine.utoronto.ca/campus/history/where-do-you-go-my-lovelies-norah-and-fred-urquhart-monarch-butterfly-migration/ Hannibal, Mary Ellen. “How you can help save the monarch butterfly -- and the planet.” TEDTalk. April 28, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvJTbegktKc Jarvis CE, Oswald PH. The collecting activities of James Cuninghame FRS on the voyage of Tuscan to China (Amoy) between 1697 and 1699. Notes Rec R Soc Lond. 2015 Jun 20;69(2):135–53. doi: 10.1098/rsnr.2014.0043. “The US Endangered Species Act.” World Wildlife Federation. https://www.worldwildlife.org/pages/the-us-endangered-species-act#:~:text=Passed%20with%20bipartisan%20support%20in,a%20species%20should%20be%20protected. Associated Press. “Beloved monarch butterflies are now listed as endangered.” WBEZ Chicago. July 23, 2022. https://www.wbez.org/stories/beloved-monarch-butterflies-are-now-listed-as-endangered/0f3cf69b-8376-42eb-af0a-9e8b8b4ab6b3 Garland, Mark S., and Andrew K. Davis. “An Examination of Monarch Butterfly (Danaus Plexippus) Autumn Migration in Coastal Virginia.” The American Midland Naturalist, vol. 147, no. 1, 2002, pp. 170–74. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/3083045 “Natural History – Monarch Butterfly.” Center for Biological Diversity. https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/invertebrates/monarch_butterfly/natural_history.html Catesby, Mark. “A Monarch butterfly, with orchids.” C. 1722-6. Royal Collection Trust. https://www.rct.uk/collection/926050/a-monarch-butterfly-with-orchids Daly, Natasha. “Monarch butterflies are now an endangered species.” July 21, 2022. National Geographic. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/monarch-butterflies-are-now-an-endangered-species Walker, A., Oberhauser, K.S., Pelton, E.M., Pleasants, J.M. & Thogmartin, W.E. 2022. Danaus plexippus ssp. plexippus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2022: e.T194052138A200522253. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2022-1.RLTS.T194052138A200522253.en Price, Michael. “Monarch miscalculation: Has a scientific error about the butterflies persisted for more than 40 years?” Science. Feb. 24, 2007. https://www.science.org/content/article/monarch-miscalculation-has-scientific-error-about-butterflies-persisted-more-40-years Jiang, Kevin. “Study sheds light on evolutionary origins and the genes central to migration.” UChicago News. Oct. 6, 2014. https://news.uchicago.edu/story/genetic-secrets-monarch-butterfly-revealed Borkin, Susan Sullivan. “Notes on Shifting Distribution Patterns and Survival of Immature Danaus Plexippus (Lepidoptera: Danaidae) on the Food Plant Asclepias Syriaca.” The Great Lakes Entymologist. Vol. 15, No. 3. Fall 1982. https://scholar.valpo.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1437&context=tgle Cudmore, Rebecca. “SNAPSHOT: Monarchs with big, bright wings arrive in Mexico first.” ScienceLine. June 16, 2014. https://scienceline.org/2014/06/monarch-migration/ Brower, Lincoln P. “UNDERSTANDING AND MISUNDERSTANDING THE MIGRAnON OF THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY (NYMPHALIDAE) IN NORTH AMERICA: 1857-1995.” Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society. Vol. 49, No. 4, 1995. https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/Monarch_Butterfly/documents/Understanding_Monarch_Migration1995-Brower.pdf See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond Blathers

This week we're bringing you part one of our two-parter on what may be the most maligned group of insects in the world: the wasps! In this episode we explain the basics of wasps and try to prove to you why they're actually extremely important and deserving of our respect. So make sure to give this one a listen! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok! Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

AgEmerge Podcast
089 AgEmerge Podcast Dr John Tooker Prof of Entomology

AgEmerge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 64:48


Thanks for joining us, today we welcome Dr. John Tooker. Dr. Tooker is a Professor and Extension Specialist in the Department of Entomology at Pennsylvania State University. We have a great conversation with him as he discusses his research studying relationships among plants, invertebrate herbivores, and natural enemies to understand the factors that regulate populations of herbivorous insects and slugs. Dr. Tooker talks with Monte about how they are helping farmers observe what is happening in but also around their fields and using the power of observation while pausing to explore all the possible factors affecting their system. In addition, the long-term goal of his research is to exploit ecological interactions for sustainable insect pest management. https://ento.psu.edu/directory/jft11 https://ento.psu.edu/research/labs/john-tooker Got questions you want answered? Send them our way and we'll do our best to research and find answers. Know someone you think would be great on the AgEmerge stage or podcast? Send your questions or suggestions to kim@asn.farm we'd love to hear from you.

Dice Tower News
Dice Tower Now 796: August 1, 2022

Dice Tower News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 30:15 Very Popular


This is Dice Tower Now for the week of August 1, 2022. This week, everyone gets a pinball for christmas, Kolossal is Almost Innocent, we Flatout compare Cities to Salads, and I'm in Colorado!   TOP STORIES (2:00) North Star Games rebrands WizKids announces Super Skill Pinball Holiday Special Dice Hunters of Therion coming from Richard Garfield Munchkin Turtle Carnage coming from Steve Jackson Games Marvel Legendary expansions 29, 30, and 31 detailed HeroQuest Frozen Horror expansion on Hasbro Pulse Magic the Gathering UnFinity announced Cranio Creations My Shelfe from Phil Walker-Harding and Matthew Dunstan Dulce coming from Stronghold Games and Julio E. Nazario Almost Innocent from Kolossal Games and designer Philippe Attali Fantasy Flight announces last physical expansion for Journeys in Middle Earth Flatout Games making Point City Galileo Project will be sequel to Ganymede from Hachette Hachette making party game Oh Really Smash Up 10th Anniversary Edition coming from AEG Insecta: Ladies of Entomology coming from Mont Tàber   CROWDFUNDING (14:15) Taverns and Dragons Copperdale Euthia: Fierce Powers Isle of Trains: All Aboard Shu's Tactics   SPONSOR UPDATE (20:20) New hires at Lucky Duck   NEW RELEASES (22:25) Cosmic Encounter: Cosmic Odyssey Campaign by Fantasy Flight Games So, You've Been Eaten by Scott Almes and Ludicreations It's a Wonderful Kingdom by Frédéric Guérard, published by Lucky Duck Viticulture World: Cooperative Expansion designed by Mihir Shah and Francesco Testini, published by Stonemaier Games Ice Hoppers by Oussama Khelifati, published by Blue Orange Games EXIT: The Lord Of The Rings - Shadows Over Middle-Earth by Inka and Markus Brand, published by Thames Kosmos     CONNECT: Follow our Twitter newsfeed: twitter.com/dicetowernow Dig in with Corey at DiceTowerDish.com. Have a look-see at Barry's wares at BrightBearLaser.com.

Lil Dudes Insect Academy
73. Parasites and Pesticides (Feat. Grace Sward)

Lil Dudes Insect Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 17:00


Join the Insect Fun Facts discord: TxUS7marPN Lil Dudes Insect Academy is a non-profit dedicated to teaching the world about the amazing world of Insects (Entomology). We do this through workshops, classes, courses, resources, and online content! We have a free, family-friendly Podcast where Bradon talks with Entomologists, and we also have a Bug of the Week Series on YouTube! Website: lildudesinsectacademy.com Donate to the Academy: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html Find our free Podcast here: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/media/podcast.html ✌️Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lildudesinsectacademy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lil.dudes.insect.academy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lildudesacademy YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDJx_th0guulNsJPE_75sDg Lil Dudes Insect Academy is proud to be registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Our mission is to educate anyone and everyone about the amazing world of Entomology, which is the gateway to all the sciences. Contributions to Lil Dudes Insect Academy are tax deductible, to the extent permitted by law. Our Tax ID is: 86-1976172

Association Transformation
If you're not at the table... How associations can engage on topics of social interest

Association Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 37:56


The Entomological Society of America (ESA) is a non-partisan scientific organization which represents a broad spectrum of opinions united under one principle: the promotion and advancement of scientific inquiry, discovery, and communication. Within the context of its diverse membership, the ESA has devised a successful approach to engaging in topics of broad  social interest, including statements on Why Black Lives Matter to Entomology at the start of the George Floyd movement, the January 6  insurrection (Our Place in Democracy), the Hidden Costs of War (in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine), and the recent ruling from the Supreme Court on Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization (On Women's Pursuit of Science). We contend that a modern membership organization has an obligation to participate in societal debate and to influence social narratives wherever possible; and in Episode 60 of #associationtransformation, Elisa and Andrew are joined by Chris Stelzig, Executive Director of the ESA who explains the organization's methods for addressing social responsibilities through constructive dialogue and informed debate. If you're not at the table, then you're probably on the menu.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 118- The World of Carnivorous Plants Part 2

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022


Today we conclude our deep dive into the world of carnivorous plants. Mike has been reigniting his passion for these bug eating botanical wonders. Join us as we finish the tour of families of carnivorous plants and the different types of traps they have.  Roridula dentata in the wild. Photograph by Nick Helme via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Roridula dentata flowering in the wild. Photograph by Nick Helme via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Roridula flower. Note the sticky hairs on the leaves. Photograph by Sönke Haas via Flickr, used under a CC BY-ND 2.0 license.Pamerida bug amongst the sticky tendrils of a Roridula plant. Photograph by tonyrebelo via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-SA 4.0.Pamerida bug and numerous prey captured by a Roridula plant. Photograph by felix_riegel via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0.Close up dorsal view of a Pamerida bug . Photograph by felix_riegel via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0.Cobra lilies. Note the red fishtail appendages. Photograph by pnwdunning via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Cobra lilies growing in a shaded environment. Photograph by paulexcoff via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY 4.0 licenseDarlingtonia growing in the ditch along a gravel road. Photograph by joysavoie via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 licneseThe last thing an insect sees as it enters the trap of a cobra lily. Note how the fenestra allow light to enter the bulbous portion of the trap and make it much brighter compared to the surrounding plant. Photograph by sethberes via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Heliamphora chimantensis grown in culture. Photograph by Andreas Eils via Wikimedia Commons, used under a GNU Free Documentation License.Heliamphora nutans growing on a cliffside. Photograph by thierrycordenos via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Heliamphora nutans growing amonst grasses and other tall competitor plants. Photograph by pfaucher via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Heliamphora pulchella. Note the downward-facing hairs on the inside of the pitchers that help prevent prey from escaping. Photograph by Fernando J. M. Rojas-Runjaic via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Yellow pitcher plants, Sarracenia flava. Photograph by emmatrum vi iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Yawning mouth of a yellow pitcher plant. Photograph by wag4ag via iNaturalist, used under a  CC BY-NC 4.0 license.A field of yellow pitcher plants. Such sights were once common in the Southeastern United States but have become more and more rare in the as the bogs and swamps that pitcher plants need were drained and degraded. Photograph by smoran3030 via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Hooded pitcher plants (Sarracenia minor) have lids that overhang the mouth, which is different from the open mouths of many Sarracenia species. Photograph by celiabyrnes via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Note the fenestrae at the back of this Sarracenia minor pitcher that allow light to shine through and fool insects. This morphology is convergent to the fenestrae of cobra lilies and Albany pitcher plants. Photograph  by florabundance via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Parrot pitcher plants, Sarracenia psittacina. Note the decumbant (lying along the ground) nature of the traps. Photograph by Andrew Lane Gibson via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Parrot pitchers are the only speices of Sarracenia to regularly become inundated by water and catch aquatic prey. The decumbant traps may be a modification to trap such prey. Photograph by adamhull via iNaturalist, used under CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Green pitcher plants (Sarracenia oreophila) are critically endangered in the wild. Photography by Farren Dell via iNaturalist, used unde a CC BY 4.0 license.White pitcher plants (Sarracenia leucophylla) are amongst the largest and most striking species of American pitcher plants. They are commercially harvested for cut flower arrangements and at risk due to poaching. Photograph by stasialr via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Field of white pitcher plants. Photograph by Jared Gorrell via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea) are amongst the shortest Sarracenia species. The upturned, ruffled lids are distinctive. They are the most widespread Sarracenia species and are found througout the eastern United States and across Canada, nearly to Alaska. Photograph by Scott via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Sarracenia × catesbaei, a naturally occuring hybrid between S. flava and S. purpurea. Note the intermediate characteristics this hybrid had between the two parent species. Photograph by Rich Stevenson via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Byblis liniflora, one of the annual rainbow plant species. Photograph by Geoff Shuetrim via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY 4.0 license.Byblis liniflora in bloom. Photograph by colbourn via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Byblis gigantea, one of the perennial rainbow plant species. Both perennial species are critically engangered. Byblis gigantea is only known from five populations in the wild. Photographs by Jean Hort via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY 4.0 license.Flower stalk of Byblis liniflora, which has captured a small fly. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Philcoxia rhizomatosa growing in white quartitic sand. The underground leaves have been partially exposed by wind. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Philcoxia rhizomatosa. The leaves are usually concealed under the sand. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Closeup of the sticky underground leaves of Philcoxia. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.A common butterwort (Pinguicula vulgaris) in bloom. This species occurs across the Northern Hemisphere in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Russia. Photograph by bjohnston5 via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Pinguicula moranensis, one of the Mexican butterwort species. Photograph by Raymundo Perez via iNaturalist, used uder a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Pinguicula longifolia. Note the long leaves, which are not typical for most butterworts and may be an adaptation to this species' habit of living of cliffs. Photograph by carmensolanas via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.The underground trap leaves of Genlisea bifurcate, with the distal ends being corckscrew shaped, hence the common name "corkscrew plant". Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. The corkscrew-shaped underground leaves of Genlisea are only a few cells thick and very fragile. The traps leaves of this Genlisea filiformis have broken off where they bifurcate. Note the small size of the adult plant. Photograph by Thiago RBM via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Genlisea margaretae. Photograph by Thilo Krueger via iNaturalist, used under a  CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Genlisea grow in aquatic to semi-aquatic habitats and are thought to require water indundating the traps for the traps to function. Note how these plants are growing nearly submerged. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Badder trap of Utricularia gibba. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Common bladderworts found in Pennsylvania. Photograph by Michael Skvarla.Aquatic bladderworts. Photograph by brieaspasia via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0.An epiphytic bladderwort. Photograph by  Dr. Alexey Yakovlev via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.Utricularia pubescens can grow terrestrially or lithophyticly (on rocks). Photograph by Padraic Flood  via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ 

Cannabis Cultivation and Science Podcast
Episode 99: Common Cannabis Pests and Biological Controls with Steven Arthurs

Cannabis Cultivation and Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 89:52 Very Popular


My guest this week is Steven Arthurs. Steven graduated from the Imperial College London with a Masters of Science in Plant Protection and Integrated Pest Management. He also received a Diploma in Applied Entomology and went to get a PhD in Insect Pathology. He did his Post Doctoral work at Texas A and M researched biological pest control for thrips on ornamental plants and investigated insect/virus interactions while conducting greenhouse trials to evaluate new insecticides. From there he worked as a research entomologist with the USDA for 5 years before becoming an Assistant Professor in Entomology at the University of Florida. He is currently a research associate with Texas A & M University and also a Technical Sales Specialist with Biobee USA, a leading provider of biologically based integrated pest management. Biobee is the world's leading producer of persimilis, the most effective natural predator of spider mites.  I'm very excited to announce that in conjunction with this podcast release, KIS Organics has partnered with BioBee to offer their wide array of beneficial insects through our website and will be shipping direct from insectary so as to ensure optimal viability of insects upon arrival. In today's podcast we discuss the many pests we see in cannabis and what some good management options are utilizing beneficial predatory insects. Now on to the show!

Shaye Ganam
Canada's bee colonies see worst loss in 20 years, explosion of mites blamed

Shaye Ganam

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 8:37


Dr. Rob Currie, Professor and Head, Department of Entomology, University of Manitoba

Beyond Blathers
Jewel Beetle

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 31:51


This week we're talking about the beautiful jewel beetle! What causes its iridescent sheen? And how does it help them camouflage? Listen to find out! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok! Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Smart Talk
Penn State researchers ask: Any natural predators for spotted lanternfly?

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 12:20


The spotted lanternfly has made its return to Pennsylvania. The invasive species seems to be everywhere in some places. For several years, there was no known natural predator to the invasive spotted lanternfly. But, as more studies have cropped up, researchers are finding that several animals like to make a meal out of the pests. At Penn State University, one study has asked the public for help.  Researchers say they're using a “community science approach” to gather data about which species of birds and other predators are eating spotted lanternfly.  They're also looking at how frequently they eat them. Kelli Hoover, Professor of Entomology, Centers for Chemical Ecology, Insect Biodiversity and Pollinator Research at Penn State University appears on Tuesday's Smart Talk to discuss the lanternfly and how to control the insect.Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

From the Woods Kentucky
From the Woods Today - Fireflies

From the Woods Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 54:00


In this episode of From the Woods Today, Dr. Jonathan Larson returns to discuss the magic of fireflies. We also have a guest from the Kentucky Division of Forestry share what a service forester does. Our last segment of the show is about steam weeders and how to use one. 7.13.22. Watch Video From the Woods Today

Nature's Archive
#50: Dr. Brian Brown - Phenomenal Phorid Flies, Hyperdiversity, DNA Barcoding, and more

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 52:35


Today's guest is Dr. Brian Brown, Curator of Entomology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. A native of Toronto, Canada, Dr. Brown did his undergraduate and masters work at the University of Guelph. During the latter, under the tutelage of well known entomologist Steve Marshall, Dr. Brown took up the study of the fly family Phoridae. This is a phenomenally diverse family of extremely interesting flies that, of course, we discuss at length today.In 1990, Dr. Brown obtained his doctorate at the University of Alberta in Canada, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution and University of Maryland. In 1993 he took up his current position in Los Angeles.Today we discuss Dr. Brown's work at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County - in particular, the scale and diversity of the collections, and the implications of that on the work that he does. We pretty quickly delve into the aforementioned phorid flies. There are potentially as many as one million species of these flies, but to give you an idea of the diversity and scale of the work, only 4,500 have been described to date. Yes, you heard that right! Dr. Brown discusses the challenges of having so few people studying such an immense diversity of species, and approaches involved such as DNA barcoding.Even among the 4500 described species, there are many amazing natural history stories that we get into, ranging from the aptly named “Coffin Fly” to ant-decapitating phorids.We weave in and out of many fascinating subjects, from research in the Amazon canopy, to surprising discoveries in Los Angeles, to invasive ant species.You can find Dr. Brown through the museum's website at nhm.org, on his blog at flyobsession.net, or his Phorid fly site at phorid.net.This discussion was full of surprises and a lot of fun, and I hope that you enjoy it as much as I did. FULL SHOW NOTESLinks To Topics DiscussedDan Janzen, ecologist cataloging Costa Rican biodiversityflyobsession.net - Dr. Brown's blogNatural History Museum of Los Angeles CountyThe Nature Conservancy - conservation charity recommended by Dr. BrownPhorid.net - Dr. Brown's Phorid resourceRainforest Trust - conservation charity recommended by Dr. BrownSupport the show

Red Dirt Agronomy Podcast
The 2022 Oklahoma Wheat Crop & Planning For The 2023 Crop - RDA Episode 110

Red Dirt Agronomy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 91:24


Amanda Silva Ph.D. https://experts.okstate.edu/silvaaOk State University Wheat Resources http://wheat.okstate.edu/Ok State Wheat Blog https://osuwheat.com/Blister Beetles https://extension.okstate.edu/e-pest-alerts/2022/be-aware-of-blister-beetle-activity-june-27-2022.htmlGrasshopper Management OkState Factsheet https://extension.okstate.edu/fact-sheets/grasshopper-management-in-rangeland-pastures-and-crops.htmlOk State University Pest E-Alert https://extension.okstate.edu/e-pest-alerts/pest-e-alerts-2022.html

Lil Dudes Insect Academy
72. Invasive Pests and Glowing Fungi! (Feat. Sara Lalk and Meredith Bean)

Lil Dudes Insect Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 20:30


Follow APSAF: https://www.facebook.com/appalachiansaf Follow Meredith: https://www.instagram.com/me_red_bean/ CU Forest Health: https://cuforesthealth.weebly.com SEND A KID TO BUG CAMP: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html Lil Dudes Insect Academy was created by me and is ran by me! If you don't know who I am, “Nice to meet you! I'm Bradon”. My passion is to learn more about bugs and teach others about them! In my Podcasts we will be talking about everything bug-related! From best places to visit to putting them in your salad, we will just talk bugs! I will also be interviewing some professional Entomologists! Hope you stick around! Website: lildudesinsectacademy.com Donate to the Academy: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html ✌️Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lildudesinsectacademy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lil.dudes.insect.academy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lildudesacademy

FORward Radio program archives
Sustainability Now! | Doug Tallamy | Nature's Best Hope | July 18, 2022

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 58:09


On this week's show, your host, Justin Mog, brings you a preview conversation with Dr. Douglas Tallamy who will be the guest speaker at a special event on Friday in collaboration with UofL's Sustainability Council and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest. Joining the conversation is Bernheim's Director of Education, Kristin Faurest, Ph.D. Doug Tallamy is the T. A. Baker Professor of Agriculture in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 106 research publications and has taught insect related courses for 41 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book Bringing Nature Home was published by Timber Press in 2007, The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, was published in 2014; Nature's Best Hope, a New York Times Best Seller, was released in February 2020, and his latest book The Nature of Oaks was released by Timber press in March 2021. In 2021 he cofounded Homegrown National Park with Michelle Alfandari. His awards include recognition from The Garden Writers Association, Audubon, The National Wildlife Federation, The Garden Club of America and The American Horticultural Association. Dr. Tallamy will be speaking on Nature's Best Hope on Friday, July 22nd, 6-7:30pm, in UofL's Humanities room 100. General public: $25 Bernheim members: $20 University faculty/staff with valid ID: $10 Students with valid ID: free, but must register for the event Purchase tickets at https://bernheim.org/event/natures-best-hope-with-dr-douglas-tallamy/ Presented by Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest in partnership with the UofL's Sustainability Council. Recent headlines about global insect declines and three billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us. Such losses are not an option if we wish to continue our current standard of living on Planet Earth. The good news is that none of this is inevitable. Dr. Tallamy will discuss simple steps that each of us can - and must - take to reverse declining biodiversity, why we must change our adversarial relationship with nature to a collaborative one, and why we, ourselves, are nature's best hope. A spread of healthy farm-to-table appetizers from Bernheim's Edible Garden and Isaac's Cafe will be available starting at 5:30pm, and attendees will also have the opportunity to purchase Bernheim memberships. Climate-resilient Gardening Takeaways: A walking tour by Bernheim Director of Horticulture and Sustainable Landscapes Renee Frith Saturday, July 23, 10-11:30 a.m This on-site tour highlights landscaping practices at Bernheim that are meant to be replicable in your own back yard. Renee will show you how you can make your yard a more natural and healthy place! Limit: 20 people. Meet in front of the Bernheim Visitor Center and you must pre-register here: https://bernheim.org/event/savor-the-season-positive-vibes-for-summer-2022-07-23/2022-08-27/ As always, our feature is followed by your community action calendar for the week, so get your calendars out and get ready to take action for sustainability NOW! Sustainability Now! is hosted by Dr. Justin Mog and airs on Forward Radio, 106.5fm, WFMP-LP Louisville, every Monday at 6pm and repeats Tuesdays at 12am and 10am. Find us at http://forwardradio.org The music in this podcast is courtesy of the local band Appalatin and is used by permission. Explore their delightful music at http://appalatin.com

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 117: The World of Carnivorous Plants Pt. 1

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


 Over the next couple of episodes we are going to be dipping into a different group of life than we usually do, the plants. Mike has been getting back into carnivorous plant rearing and wants to share all he knows about the world of plants that eat bugs. How the tables can turn!    Darwin's drawings of the leaves and tentacles of a sundew (Drosera rotundifolia), Figures 1, 4, and 5 from "Insectivorous Plants" (1897), in the public domain.  Aphids and other small insects caught in the sticky trichomes of Nicotiana insecticida, a newly described species of tobacco from Australia. Photograph by Maarten Christenhusz, Figure 1 in Chase & Lambkin (2021).   Phylogeny angiosperm plants with carnivorous taxa indicated by numbered circles. Illustration by Andreas Fleischmann, in Fleischmann et al. (2017) "Evolution of carnivory in angiosperms" in Ellison & Adamec (eds) "Carnivorous Plants: Physiology, ecology, and evolution".A wetland in Loyalsock State Forest, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania that is home to temperate sundews. Photography by Nicholas_T via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.  Tropical swamp in New Caledonia, habitat for Drosera neocaledonica. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Utricularia jamesoniana growing as an epiphyte on a tree. Photography by Dr. Alexey Yakovlev via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 licenseUtricularia corunta growing as a dense matt in an aquatic habitat. Photograph by peupleloup via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.Catopsis berteroniana in the Florida Everglades growing as an epiphyte in the upper branches of mangrove trees. Photograph by  Scott Zona via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license.Albany pitcher plant (Cephalotus follicularis) in culture. Photograph by Lucas Arrrrgh via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Wild Nepenthes mirabilis growing in Hong Kong. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Nepenthes albomarginata growing from on a cliff side above a beach. This species has white trichomes around the rim of the pitcher that are attractive to foraging termites. Photograph by Bernard DUPONT via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.Nepenthes ampularia are a species that have adapted away from carnivory and instead capture leaves that fall from the canopy. Photograph by CIFOR via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.A spoon-leaved sundew, Drosera spatulata. This species has a circumboreal distribution with an isolated population also found in the highlands of Borneo. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Forked-leaf sundews (Drosera binata) in the wild. Photograph by Doug Beckers via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license. Oblong-leaved sundews (Drosera intermedia), showing the semi-aquatic habitat of this species. Photograph by Ashley Basil via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Vining sundew showing the round sticky traps along the vine and flowers. Photograph by Jean and Fred Hort via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Wild Venus fly trap in a natural environment. Photograph by NC Wetlands via Flickr, in the public domain.Venus fly traps being sold commercially. Photograph by Mike Mozart via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.A waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa), which have snap traps and are closely related to Venus fly traps. This species is at risk in their native range but have been introduced into North America, where they may be invasive. This specimen was photographed at Fort AP Hill in New York, USA. Photograph by the U.S. Government, in the public domain.Individual Aldrovanda nodes showing the whorl of leaves and snap traps. Photograph by David Short via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.A young dewy pine (Drosophyllum lusitanicum) grown in culture. While this sticky-leaved plant may look like a sundew, they are only distantly related to one another. Photograph by incidencematrix via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Abundant prey captured by a dewy pine. Photograph by incidencematrix via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Young Triphyophylum plants showing the characteristic wavy primary leaves. Photograph by  Carel Jongkind via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Secondary carnivorous leaves of Triphyophylum. Photograph by Lotus-Salvinia.de via Flickr.Tertiary leaves of Triphyophylum, note the the apical hooks. Photograph by  Carel Jongkind via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line
Early Swarming Ants Have Mates On Their Mind

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 7:39


We're seeing flying ants as early as mid June in some places. PJ asks Aidan O'Hanlon, Entomology curator National Museum Ireland why this is and learns why they do it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Sweaty Penguin

The United States has seen numerous waves of lost honeybee colonies in the last few decades, most recently between April 2020 and April 2021 where beekeepers in the United States lost 45.5 percent of their managed honeybee colonies. Bees are facing numerous threats from pesticides, infestations, climate change, and more, and these population declines have a major impact on the agriculture sector, environment, and overall economy. Today, we explore what challenges bees face, why they matter, and how we can better conserve bees moving forward. With special guest Dr. Christina Grozinger, Vergilius Maro Professor of Entomology at Pennsylvania State University. The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise. Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin. CREDITS Writers: Dain Kim, Megan Crimmins, Maxwell Pociask, Ethan Brown Editor: Will Andronico Producers: Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano Ad Voiceover: Maxwell Pociask Music: Brett Sawka The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.

Soybean Pest Podcast
(S13:E5): Stink bugs, a pest of corn and soybeans (and a F.I.T.)

Soybean Pest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 40:21


Part two is an interview with our listener, Dr. Dominic Reisig of North Carolina State University. Dr Reisig is a Professor and Extension specialist in the Entomology and Plant Pathology Department. Dominic develops pest management programs for insects pests of corn, soybean cotton and small grains. https://cals.ncsu.edu/entomology-and-plant-pathology/people/ddreisig/. Hes' a long time listener and first time visitor to the SPP.  We invited him onto discuss stink bugs as pest of corn. The majority of our discussion this week is about four stink bug species (brown, southern green, green and the brown marmorated stink bugs) that can attack corn in the south. Dominic identifies stink bugs as the number one pest of corn in North Carolina. For more details visit this website: https://corn.ces.ncsu.edu/stink-bug-management-in-corn/. We discuss how best to sample stink bugs on corn when there is a risk of feeding on the ear. To see this scouting in action, watch this youtube video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUXf15Q-VuU&list=PLlmI2LdCTo8yP0eWDpUmVZe5gMkkoPzDt&index=11 Finally, we get to a F.I.T. for a Big 12 vs ACC showdown. Erin goes head-to-head against Dominic with a simple question about the etymology of the name for the family of insects to which stink bugs belong, the Pentatomidae.

Smart Talk
Penn State researchers ask: Any natural predators for spotted lanternfly?

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 10:53


The spotted lanternfly has made its return to Pennsylvania. The invasive species seems to be everywhere in some places. For several years, there was no known natural predator to the invasive spotted lanternfly. But, as more studies have cropped up, researchers are finding that several animals like to make a meal out of the pests. At Penn State University, one study has asked the public for help.  Researchers say they're using a “community science approach” to gather data about which species of birds and other predators are eating spotted lanternfly.  They're also looking at how frequently they eat them. Kelli Hoover, Professor of Entomology, Centers for Chemical Ecology, Insect Biodiversity and Pollinator Research at Penn State University appears on Tuesday's Smart Talk to discuss the lanternfly and how to control the insect.Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Soybean Pest Podcast
(S13:E4): A brief round up for the start of July, Part 1

Soybean Pest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 6:46


This week's podcast is a long one that we split into two parts.  Part one is our usual pest round out. Erin gives us a quick summary of the insects active in soybeans. It's the usual for this time of year, Japanese beetles, rootworms in corn, gall midges in soybeans and potato leaf hoppers in alfalfa.    Soybean gall midges are active now and to find more information on what to look for when scouting, visit this website: https://soybeangallmidge.org/ Part two is an interview with our listener, Dr. Dominic Reisig of North Carolina State University. Dr Reisig is a Professor and Extension specialist in the Entomology and Plant Pathology Department. Dominic develops pest management programs for insects pests of corn, soybean cotton and small grains. https://cals.ncsu.edu/entomology-and-plant-pathology/people/ddreisig/. Hes' a long time listener and first time visitor to the SPP.  We invited him onto discuss stink bugs as pest of corn.

Lil Dudes Insect Academy
71. Flies and Fungus (Feat. Frances Nagle)

Lil Dudes Insect Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 0:18


Learn more about The University of North Florida: https://www.unf.edu/coas/biology/faculty/Rossi,_Anthony_M.aspx Check out Tarantula Cribs: https://www.tarantulacribs.com Lil Dudes Insect Academy was created by me and is ran by me! If you don't know who I am, “Nice to meet you! I'm Bradon”. My passion is to learn more about bugs and teach others about them! In my Podcasts we will be talking about everything bug-related! From best places to visit to putting them in your salad, we will just talk bugs! I will also be interviewing some professional Entomologists! Hope you stick around! Website: lildudesinsectacademy.com Donate to the Academy: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html ✌️Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lildudesinsectacademy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lil.dudes.insect.academy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lildudesacademy

Farm and Ranch Report

As farmers and ranchers know, not all bugs are bad. Take for example the lowly dung beetle.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 116: The Splendor of Fireflies

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


Join the Arthro-Pod gang as they get together to talk about the many insects that are taking over summer 2022 in their respective states and the stress that comes with them. But instead of lamenting, they decided to talk about an insect they love and hope you do to, the firefly. We cover the different names these glowing insects can have, their relatives, how they glow and why! Join us won't you?An adult firefly waiting for dusk to settle in so it can begin to flash their bioluminescent lightShow Notes:What do you call the insects that have a glowing rear end? There is data and some maps about the differences in regional names for the US associated with fireflies. Here is a chart that helps to separate out the various patterns that you might see in the night in the Eastern UShttps://www.brandywine.org/conservancy/blog/jewels-nightFemme fatale fireflies and the acquisition of biochemical defenseshttps://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/femmes-fatales-firefliesThe story of collecting fireflies for a penny bountyhttps://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/for-decades-the-ultimate-midwestern-summer-job-was-headhunting-firefliesHow to build firefly habitat in a backyardhttps://www.firefly.org/build-firefly-habitatIf you would like to read a great book all about these nocturnal wonders, we highly recommend this one:https://ugapress.org/book/9780820348728/fireflies-glow-worms-and-lightning-bugs/Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Golden State Naturalist
Entomology (Bugs!) with Ralph Washington Jr.

Golden State Naturalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 69:04 Very Popular


If you're here and you're like "ehhhhh, maybe I'll skip this one," don't! It's seriously so good even if bugs aren't usually your thing. Ralph Washington Jr. is not only a bug genius with a Master's in Entomology from UC Davis and more accolades than you can shake a stick at, but he's also insightful, passionate, and easy to listen to. You'll learn so much from him and may even walk away with new perspective on more than insects. What do we talk about in the episode? Here's an incomplete list: cultivating curiosity, an insect that can see above and below the surface of the water at the same time, the limitations of the scientific method, a fire-detecting California native beetle, how racial justice and insects are related, mosquitoes' role in ecosystems, the very unfair bad wrap urban insects get, bug myths, a very self-compassionate approach to overcoming a fear of insects, how to help native bees, and how caring about things that are so very different us helps cultivate empathy. Here are some links mentioned in the episode: Smithsonian Video on Arthropods History of Oak Park "Climate Justice Can't Happen without Racial Justice" TED Talk California Pitcher Plant (looks like a cobra!) Ground Sloths My Instagram is @goldenstatenaturalist My website is www.goldenstatenaturalist.com You can support me on Patreon and get lots of extras at www.patreon.com/michellefullner The theme song is called "I dunno" by grapes, and you can find the song and Creative Commons license here. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 115: Bed bugs in poultry houses with Maria Gonzales-Morales

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022


At the National Conference on Urban Entomology in May, Jody was inspired by Maria Gonzalez-Morales, a grad student from North Carolina State University, and asked for a chance to interview her! She graciously jumped to the mic and the two of them talked about how urban pests have an impact on agriculture. Maria has spent her time during her PHD studying insecticide resistance and in this interview discusses her work specifically with bed bugs in poultry farms. Maria also talks about her dream for the future, which involves creating an inclusive place for Hispanics to learn and be impowered by the information generated from the entomological research around the world. Take a listen. You won't be disappointed. Maria and her national award! Congratulations to her!!Bed bugs can be quite happy living in poultry housingBed bug eggs on the wooden structure within the poultry housingThe chicken does not look happy to be seeing blood feeding ectoparasites in her homeQuestions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Beyond Blathers
Mole Cricket

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 26:04


This week we're talking about the mole cricket, a hodge-podge of an insect that loves to hide underground and sing at night. Listen to learn more about their taxonomy, where they can be found, and how they produce their song.If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell fun animal stickers and postcards. We're having a 25% off sale until June 19!Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok!Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Just the Zoo of Us
147: Assassin Bugs w/ Ilan Domnich!

Just the Zoo of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 90:03 Very Popular


Join Ellen & special guest, entomologist Ilan Domnich, for a review of a fascinating family of bugs that are always one slow, methodical step ahead of the competition: assassin bugs! We discuss why their bite packs such a powerful punch, how they're able to outsmart both predators and prey with downright machiavellian tactics like corpse armor and spawncamping and trap-setting, and what wonders you'll find when you take a minute to stoop down and appreciate the intricacies of insects. This episode is quite long, but trust the process because this episode is PACKED with mind-blowing revelations about the cutthroat world of bugs.Visit the Bugs 101: Insect-Human Interactions course on Coursera!Follow Ilan on Instagram!Follow Just the Zoo of Us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

Lil Dudes Insect Academy
70. Aquatic Beetles (Feat. Rachel Neff)

Lil Dudes Insect Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 24:03


Follow along with Rachel's twitter here: https://twitter.com/Rachel_n_19 Lil Dudes Insect Academy was created by me and is ran by me! If you don't know who I am, “Nice to meet you! I'm Bradon”. My passion is to learn more about bugs and teach others about them! In my Podcasts we will be talking about everything bug-related! From best places to visit to putting them in your salad, we will just talk bugs! I will also be interviewing some professional Entomologists! Hope you stick around! Website: lildudesinsectacademy.com Donate to the Academy: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html ✌️Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lildudesinsectacademy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lil.dudes.insect.academy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lildudesacademy

Farmer's Inside Track
How insects can help reduce food waste

Farmer's Inside Track

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 12:51


We've all heard the buzz about the black soldier fly that has the ability to transform organic waste into high-quality protein and fertilizer.  Besides being an alternative and smart farming method for farmers, these new innovations aid in the global climate crises, mitigating food insecurity and ultimately dealing with our food waste and that's the focus of this week's edition.   This week we are joined by Professor Abdullahi Yusuf, researcher working in the Social Insects Research Group also known as the Bee Group at the department of Zoology and Entomology at the University of Pretoria.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 114: For the Love of Aphids with Kait Chapman

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022


While traveling to a conference in Salt Lake City, UT from Nebraska, Jody realizes that she doesn't know much about her colleague, Kait Chapman. To her surprise and glee, they get into talking about Kait's MS/PhD research which is all about the fabulous insect-plant interactions involved in the relationship between aphids and their host plants. Take a listen to a discussion about animal-loving beginnings, telescoping generations, aphids on tiny bungee cords, host plant responses, and the love-hate relationship between a grad student and her subject insect.In this closeup of a mama aphid, you can see her offspring inside of her. Those small dots are the eyes of the aphid she will birth. A side by side look at aphid tolerant (L) and aphid susceptible (R) varieties of soybeansAphids can create symptomatic damage like curled leaves, wilting, and copious amounts of honeydew.This cabbage aphid is coated in a white wax material. You can also see it is exuding an alarm pheromone (the yellow colored droplet)Aphids are also quite small, though they add up when in big groups!This aphid is wired and ready for EPGQuestions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Beyond Blathers
An IRL Guide to Catching Bugs

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 37:21


This week Olivia is giving you all the tips to catch bugs this summer! From what to look for in a butterfly net to the ins and outs of pond dipping, we've got you covered so you can live your best Animal Crossing life IRL. We hope this episode  inspires you to get out there and explore the bugs in your neighbourhood! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell fun animal stickers and postcards. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok! Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 113: Why do people want kill praying mantises?

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


The Arthro-Pod gang have had a weird influx of questions from people about how they can best kill Chinese mantises. There has been a lot of concern regarding how they might be invasive and their effects on native species. Join us as we dive in to a complicated topic of parsing through native, non-native, and invasive species and highlight the biology of mantises plus the ways they normally capture our attention. With Chinese mantis, why the hate? What part might anti-Asian sentiment play in the attempts to control them? All that and more in episode 113!An adult Chinese mantis, wondering what the heck we're talking aboutPhoto by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado StateShow notes:Here are some articles highlighting the controversyhttps://www.brandywine.org/conservancy/blog/invasive-mantis-species https://www.insidescience.org/news/lessons-about-love-and-invasion-americas-foreign-mantisesQuestions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 

Lil Dudes Insect Academy
69. A Life Full of Critters (Feat. Dr. Dennis Bartow)

Lil Dudes Insect Academy

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 13:02


Check out the Delaware Center for the Inland Bays here: https://www.inlandbays.org Lil Dudes Insect Academy was created by me and is ran by me! If you don't know who I am, “Nice to meet you! I'm Bradon”. My passion is to learn more about bugs and teach others about them! In my Podcasts we will be talking about everything bug-related! From best places to visit to putting them in your salad, we will just talk bugs! I will also be interviewing some professional Entomologists! Hope you stick around! Website: lildudesinsectacademy.com Donate to the Academy: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html ✌️Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lildudesinsectacademy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lil.dudes.insect.academy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lildudesacademy

From the Woods Kentucky
From the Woods Today - Mussels

From the Woods Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 60:59


In this episode of From the Woods Today, we are joined by Dr. Wendell Haag to talk about mussels. We also have a popular returning guest, Dr. Jonathan Larson, with us to talk about tick prevention and safe removal. 5.4.22 Watch Video From the Woods Today

The Friendship Onion
Billy & Dom Talk to an Entomologist!

The Friendship Onion

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 77:20 Very Popular


Billy and Dom talk to Entomology Professor Richard Zack of Washington State University, in which they discuss how Dr. Zack got involved in the field, insects' connection to the greater ecosystem, all before specifically exploring house flies, mosquitoes, and even hissing cockroaches!  Richard Zack is a professor in the Department of Entomology where he also serves as curator of the M. T. James Entomological Collection.  Rich has received many recognitions including distinguished teaching awards from his college, Washington State University, and several professional societies.  He was named as one of the top five instructors at Washington State University as chosen by the students.   Get your Friendship Onion merchandise at https://www.thefriendshiponionpodcast.com! Tune in every Tuesday for new episodes and please be sure to rate, subscribe, and leave a comment/review! And be sure to follow and add your favorite funky jams to our Spotify playlist "The Friendship Onion." Feel free to leave Billy and Dom a message with your comments, questions, or just to say hello at https://www.speakpipe.com/thefriendshiponion or write us an email at thefriendshiponion@kastmedia.com TFO's IG - @thefriendshiponion Billy's IG - @boydbilly Dom's IG - @dom_monaghan_ Produced by Jon Cvack - IG: @jcvack Go to magicspoon.com/ONION to grab a custom bundle of cereal! And be sure to use our promo code ONION at checkout to save five dollars off your order! Receive 20% off PLUS Free Shipping on your order. Go to DRINKOLIPOP.com/ONION or use code ONION at checkout to claim this deal. Start hiring NOW with a $75 SPONSORED JOB CREDIT to upgrade your job post at indeed.com/onion. Offer good for a limited time. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast
Episode 80 - Dan Herms is Vice President of Research and Development for The Davey Tree Expert Company.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:15


Dan Herms is Vice President of Research and Development for The Davey Tree Expert Company. Prior to joining Davey, Herms served on the faculty in the Department of Entomology at The Ohio State University from 1997 to 2017, serving as Department Chair from 2012 to 2016. His research and outreach programs focus on the ecology and management of trees in forests, urban forests, and ornamental landscapes, including interactions with insects, soils, and climate. He received his B.S. in Landscape Horticulture from Ohio State University in 1982, his M.S. in Horticulture and Entomology from Ohio State University in 1984, and his Ph.D. in 1991 from Michigan State University in Entomology with a specialization in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Major recognition for this work includes the L.C. Chadwick Award for Arboriculture Research and the Richard W. Harris Author's Citation Award from the International Society of Arboriculture, and election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Entomological Society of America. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/plantatrilliontrees/support

The Backyard Naturalists
The Botanical Gardens at UNCC with Dr. Jeff Gillman

The Backyard Naturalists

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 25:09


Welcome to The Backyard Naturalists podcast, the podcast about anything and everything connected with nature. In this week's installment, Debbie and Laurie call Dr. Jeff Gillman, PHD to talk with him about the Botanical Gardens at UNCC.     “Jeff has a Master's degree in Entomology and a Ph.D. in Horticulture from the University of Georgia. He is the author of five books on gardening and the environment, a Contributing Editor to Fine Gardening Magazine, and has appeared on such shows as Martha Stewart and Growing a Greener World.     From 1998 until 2013 he worked as an Associate Professor in the Department of Horticultural Science at the University of Minnesota, but the cold finally got to him! For the past two years he has been an instructor at Central Piedmont Community College, teaching courses on Plant Propagation, Plant Materials, and Hydroponics among others. As of August 2015, he is our new Director of the UNC Charlotte Botanical Gardens.”     Connect with the Backyard Naturalists on the Web, Facebook and Instagram.     Please visit and support our presenting sponsor, Backyard Birds at http://www.thebirdfoodstore.com. A mecca for bird lovers and bird watchers, Backyard Birds is an independent family-owned business located in Matthews, NC (next to Dairy Queen), just southeast of Charlotte.     Thanks for listening to The Backyard Naturalists.  We hope you have a day filled with the wonders of nature. Get outside and take a walk on the wild side! Please don't forget to leave a 5-star review for The Backyard Naturalists podcast.     Production services for The Backyard Naturalists podcast are provided by Downtown Podcasting. To start a conversation on how you can have a podcast, simply send an email to info@downtownpodcasting.com.

Season 3 Episode 4
90 Day Fiancé

Season 3 Episode 4

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 74:24


Listen up! We here at S3E4 love people. We care about people. We want people to live their lives fully and most true to themselves. That's why we are utterly baffled by shows like this! We parse through all the difficulties of these people's lives, we refuse to ever skydive, and we also agree that Entomology is bugs!

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 316 - Victor Babbitt on Tahoe Fly Fishing and the Missouri River

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 56:47 Very Popular


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/316 Presented By: Reyr Gear, Jackson Hole Fly Company, LakeLady Custom Rods, Trxstle Sponsors: https://wetflyswing.com/sponsors Victor Babbitt takes us into the Tahoe area and then over his new gig in Missouri. We talk about Carson Lake, Pyramid Lake, Walker Lake, and Tahoe Lake - how they're all connected to each other and the ocean. Find out how Tahoe fly fishing used to be back in the day and how it is different now with the people and tourism. Victor tells us why he sold the fly shop, Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters, and why he bought 14 acres of land by the river in Missouri. Victor also tells us about his fly fishing hero, Mel Krieger, and what it was like to sit at the same table with Lefty Kreh. Tahoe Fly Fishing Show Notes with Victor Babbitt 05:10 - In 1984, Victor moved to Tahoe 07:20 - Victor and his brother opened up Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters in 1994 - after 28 years, they sold the business to Brendan Burnside and John Brassfield 13:00 - After passing the fly shop, Victor had started fishing in the Missouri rivers, Craig and Cascade 15:30 - Victor tells the story of how they bought that 14 acres of land with lodge on the riverside of Missouri 21:00 - Victor's last couple of years in Tahoe, California, he felt different about the people and tourism there 26:20 - Victor talks about how you can get away from the crowd when fishing Tahoe waters 29:50 - The Truckee River was got dewatered by an extreme drought about 7 years ago but came back to how it used to be - Victor fishes them January 32:45 - He's got a PAC 1300 Outcast Boat 36:00 - Rick Hafeley was on the podcast at WFS 037 where we talked about Entomology and fly fishing 37:30 - Fishing is usually not great 2nd half of November, December, and going to January on the Truckee river - fishing gets good mid-January. We talk about the hatches in different seasons 44:45 - Victor talks about the Carson Lake, Pyramid Lake, Walker Lake, and Tahoe Lake - how they're all connected to each other and the ocean 47:14 - Victor talks about the Heenan Lake back in the days when they caught 30-inch fish 54:50 - He mentions some fly shops in Missouri - Headhunters Fly Shop, The Trout Shop, Trout Montana 58:14 - Victor was a chef when he was younger - he studied culinary and restaurant management 1:02:18 - Parachute Adams, Purple Creys, Purple Wolf are his go-to flies 1:06:24 - Mel Krieger was Victor's fly fishing hero - he did some casting lessons and shows with Mel over the years - scroll below to watch one of his casting videos 1:08:07 - Victor talks about his experience with Lefty Kreh when they used to sit at the same table and listened to his jokes Tahoe Fly Fishing Conclusion with Victor Babbitt Victor Babbitt took us into the Tahoe area. We talked about Carson Lake, Pyramid Lake, Walker Lake, and Tahoe Lake. We found out how Tahoe fly fishing used to be back in the days and how different is it there now. Victor told us why he sold the fly shop, Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters, and his plans for the river side land in Missouri that he just bought. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/316  

Lil Dudes Insect Academy
68. Honeybees and Hormones (Feat. Dr. Sarai Stuart)

Lil Dudes Insect Academy

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 19:00


Follow along with Sarai on Twitter: https://twitter.com/saraihstuart?lang=en Lil Dudes Insect Academy was created by me and is ran by me! If you don't know who I am, “Nice to meet you! I'm Bradon”. My passion is to learn more about bugs and teach others about them! In my Podcasts we will be talking about everything bug-related! From best places to visit to putting them in your salad, we will just talk bugs! I will also be interviewing some professional Entomologists! Hope you stick around! Website: lildudesinsectacademy.com Donate to the Academy: https://www.lildudesinsectacademy.com/donate.html ✌️Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lildudesinsectacademy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lil.dudes.insect.academy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lildudesacademy

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 112: Meet Dr. Val Korneyev, Ukrainian Entomologist

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022


In this episode, Michael and Jonathan speak with Dr. Val Korneyev, professor of entomology and head of the Entomology Department at the Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology in Kyiv, Ukraine. Topics discussed include his work with tephritoid fruit flies, the 6 million specimen collection at the institute, and evacuating important type specimens from Kyiv to Berlin, Germany during the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine. Other anecdotes include coming of age as a scientist in the USSR during the 1980's and dealing with the KGB, the view of Ukrainian science to some in Western Europe and the Americas, as well as the future of Ukrainian entomology after the war. Viktor Baranov (left, guest in Episode 108) and Valery Korneyev (right). Photos courtesy of Viktor Baranov via Twitter. Bags containing boxes of type specimens being evacuated from Kyiv to Berlin during the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Photos courtesy of Viktor Baranov via Twitter.If you want to learn more about Val's scholarly work, here are his Google Scholar profile and Research Gate profile, as well as presentations he's given on Old World Pyrgotidae and “Parasitic Fruit Flies”: Pyrgotidae, Ctenostylidae, Tachiniscidae.Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk
The Pollinator Pandemic

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 59:26


Honeybees seem to attract the spotlight but our pollinators in general are in a bind. We aren't helpless though. Everyone has the capacity to be a huge help to our bee populations, both native and introduced, but first we must discuss what's threatening them and why we need to act. Join us in this special Earth Day conversation with Dr. Sammy Ramsey, founder and director of the Ramsey Research Foundation. Alongside his research focused on predatory and parasitic insect behavior, Dr. Sammy dedicates much of his time to making his work and other entomological efforts more accessible to the community at large. He has generated a significant online following through platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube in the process of making STEM more inclusive, equitable, and diverse. About Dr. Sammy Dr. Sammy, founder and director of the Ramsey Research Foundation, graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Entomology from Cornell University in 2011, and focused his research on Predatory & Parasitic Insect Behavior. He cultivated an interest and expertise in the close relationships between insects and other creatures (symbioses), and dedicated his doctoral research to understanding a parasite killing honey bees globally (Varroa destructor). In Dr. Dennis vanEngelsdorp's Honey Bee lab at the University of Maryland, College Park; he completed his formal education. . . Do you believe in the importance of international education and connections? The nonprofit World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth is supported by gifts from people like you, who share our passion for engaging in dialogue on global affairs and building bridges of understanding. While the Council is not currently charging admission for virtual events, we ask you to please consider making a one-time or recurring gift to help us keep the conversation going through informative public programs and targeted events for students and teachers. Donate: https://www.dfwworld.org/donate

Beyond Blathers
Madagascan Sunset Moth

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 27:12


This week we're talking about the absolutely beautiful Madagascan Sunset Moth! From their striking colours to their pesky caterpillars, there's a lot to talk about! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok! Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

The Decibel
How Edmonton hopes to get mosquitos to buzz off

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 17:07


Warmer weather means summer, picnics, camping … and mosquitoes. Edmonton is particularly famous for their mosquito season. But with a focus on environmental sustainability, the city is ditching the pesticide spraying they've used for years to control mosquitoes, instead turning to a more natural solution – bats and dragonflies.Dr. Ken Fry is an Entomology Instructor in the School of Life Sciences & Business at Olds College in Alberta, and grew up in Edmonton. He studies pest control management and mosquitoes, and tells us why it's so hard to get rid of these pesky bloodsuckers – and why learning to live with them is the better solution.

ECO CHIC
175: Bees, Butterflies, + Native Gardens | Dr. Gail Langellotto

ECO CHIC

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 34:07


The episode all about pollinators! We're joined by Dr. Gail Langellotto, professor of Horticulture, Entomology, and Master Gardener Program at Oregon State University. We learn about healthy gardens, the value of native plants, and what we really mean when we say “save the bees!”. This conversation is friendly and value-packed for the novice (read: me,Read more The post 175: Bees, Butterflies, + Native Gardens | Dr. Gail Langellotto appeared first on ECO CHIC.

Two Bees in a Podcast
Episode 97: Evaluating European and American Foulbrood Diagnostic Methods

Two Bees in a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 47:18


In this episode of Two Bees in a Podcast, released on April 6, 2022, Dr. Jamie Ellis and Amy Vu speak with Meghan Milbrath, Assistant Professor of Entomology at Michigan State University, about English and American foulbrood diagnostics. This episode ends with a Q&A segment.

Just the Zoo of Us
138: Phasmids w/ Shakara Maggitt!

Just the Zoo of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 47:16 Very Popular


Join Ellen & special guest, entomologist and animal scientist Shakara Maggitt, for a review of the gentle giants of the insect world: phasmids! You may know them as stick bugs, leaf insects or any of their other many common names.  We discuss learning to love bugs, what makes the abundantly diverse stick bug family so weird and wonderful, and even why you might want to consider incorporating bugs into your own culinary repertoire.Follow Shakara on Twitter or Instagram!Follow Just the Zoo of Us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!Cover photo: Chris Rogers via Getty images