Podcasts about Entomology

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Scientific study of insects

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  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
Entomology

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Best podcasts about Entomology

Show all podcasts related to entomology

Latest podcast episodes about Entomology

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
124: Virginia Creeper Leaf Hopper in Vineyards

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 29:47


While many growers are familiar with the Western Leafhopper, they may not know as much about the Virginia Creeper Leafhopper. Houston Wilson, Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Department of Entomology at UC Riverside and Director of UC Organic Agriculture Institute has been studying the Virginia Creeper Leafhopper and potential biological controls. Leafhoppers are pierce and suck feeders. The insect removes small amounts of plant material causing a stippling effect on the leaf. This damage reduces the photosynthetic capacity of the vine and can reduce yields. The Virginia Creeper Leafhopper was recently introduced into the North Coast of California where it was discovered that it has no biological controls. Additionally, its life stages are different from the more well-known Western Leafhopper so growers must utilize different management practices to control the pest. References: February 18, 2022 | Avoiding Winter Kill in Young Vineyards Webinar Cal-West Rain Houston Wilson Landscape diversity and crop vigor influence biological control of the western grape leafhopper (Erythroneura elegantulaOsborn) in vineyards Review of Ecologically-based Pest Management in California Vineyards SIP Certified UC IPM Leafhoppers

Two Bees in a Podcast
Episode 87: Enzyme Microparticles and Reducing Toxicity in Managed Hives

Two Bees in a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 52:10


In this episode of Two Bees in a Podcast, released on January, 19, 2021, we are joined by Scott McArt, assistant professor in the Department of Entomology at Cornell University and James Webb, founder of Beemmunity to discuss enzyme loaded microparticles and reducing toxicity in managed hives. In the 5 Minute Management segment, Jamie and Amy discuss queen rearing and establishing the kind of hives you need. This episode is ended with a Q&A segment.

Conversations
The butterfly effect — collecting in the Torres Strait

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 43:24


Entomologist Dr Trevor Lambkin says the main thing butterfly collectors need is a sense of adventure — something he has honed over 40 years of travel to the Torres Strait

Cannabis Cultivation and Science Podcast
Episode 90: University Fungicide Trials on Powdery Mildew with Rufus Akinrinlola

Cannabis Cultivation and Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 62:03


My guest this week is Rufus Akinrinlola. He is a Ph.D. Candidate and Graduate Research Assistant in the Entomology and Plant Pathology Department at the University of Tennessee Knoxville. He works in the research programs of UT Specialty Crops and Field Crop Pathology, focusing on Sustainable Disease and Integrated Pest Management Systems, where he's co-mentored by Drs. Heather Kelly and Zachariah Hansen. Rufus has an MS degree in Agronomy (Plant Pathology) from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a BS degree in Microbiology from Adekunle Ajasin University, Nigeria. His areas of interest include management of field and specialty crops with emphasis on the improved adoption of integrated pest management and natural products in crop protection. Rufus was recently (2021) awarded a Developing Emerging Agricultural Leader and Talent grant (DELTA Award) by Corteva Agriscience in recognizing his potentials as an emerging crop protection future leader. Now on to the show! https://www.kisorganics.com/blogs/podcast/episode-90  

Beyond Blathers
Evening Cicada with Ferf Brownoff

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 34:14


This week we're talking about the evening cicada with hardcore cicada-lover Ferf Brownoff. Join us for a celebration of these amazing insects and lots of fun cicada stories!  If you haven't listened to our first episode on the cicada, make sure to give it a listen here for lots more information and fun facts! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 103: Merging Global Health and Entomology with Chris Hayes

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


Howdy, howdy bug lovers! On today's episode of Arthro-Pod, we welcome Chris Hayes, from NC State. Chris is a PhD student and graduate teaching and research assistant in Dr. Colby Schal's lab. Chris met Jody at Pest World a few months ago and we were excited to invite him on to the program. Chris's work is focused on the intersection of entomology and global health. His work has been multidisciplinary through the years and he has tons of unique and awesome stories to share. Tune in to hear more!You can find Chris on the web at: YouTube: TedXNCState Chris Hayes  Leaving a Legacy: The Realities of Conducting Research in Complex Areas  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uxmugn3UV7E&t=624s   LinkedIn: Christopher Hayes (not the MSNBC guy!)  Instagram: amanonamosquito  Website: cchayes.wordpress.ncsu.edu Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

The Allusionist
148. Bonus 2021

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 25:24


I've been saving them up all year, and now it's time for the annual selection box of Bonus Bits! Things this year's guests said that couldn't fit into their episode, or weren't related to language, but ARE related to being a bonus bit. We've got percussive pan protests; the mating habits, and male-killing habits, of ladybirds; Icelandic aunts/uncles/cousins/wait which member of the extended family are you referring to?; Morse code machines; and a surprisingly heated topic, the semantics of salad. Links to all the original episodes featuring these guests are at theallusionist.org/bonus2021, plus a transcript and the full dictionary entry for the randomly selected word. The show will return in February 2022, but sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist for patron-exclusive livestreams in January! The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow.  Visit theallusionist.org/merch to obtain your Potato Fugue State sweatshirts and multidenominational Wintervalwear. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs at palebirdmusic.com or search for Pale Bird on Bandcamp and Spotify, and he's @martinaustwick on Twitter and Instagram.  Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor an episode of the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Catan, the building and trading board game where no two games are the same. Allusionist listeners get 10 percent off the original base game at catanshop.com/allusionist. • BetterHelp, online therapy with licensed professional counsellors. Allusionist listeners get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/allusionist. • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a sleek website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free 2-week trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code allusionist.  Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nature Revisited
Episode 58: Doug Tallamy - Bringing Nature Home

Nature Revisited

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 23:10


Doug Tallamy is a professor of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he studies the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. In his book 'Bringing Nature Home', Tallamy explains why everyone with access to a patch of earth can make a significant contribution toward sustaining biodiversity by simply choosing native plants. This episode- pulled from an interview conducted during the production of the film 'Negotiating with Nature'- expands upon these ideas and alarming facts. Doug's website: https://homegrownnationalpark.org/ Doug's Book: https://www.workman.com/products/bringing-nature-home/paperback Negotiating with Nature Film: https://noordenproductions.com/negotiating-with-nature-film Also available on your favorite podcast apps Website: https://noordenproductions.com/nature-revisited-podcast Nature Revisited is produced by Stefan van Norden and Charles Geoghegan. We welcome your comments, questions and suggestions - contact us at https://noordenproductions.com/contact

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 102: Untangling Insect-Bird Food Webs with Dr. Ashley Kennedy

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021


 Howdy bug lovers! Today, we are honored to be joined by Dr. Ashley Kennedy the Delaware Tick Biologist in the state Division of Fish and Wildlife! However, we are not recording with her to talk about ticks! Instead she shares with us her graduate experiences focused on birds eating bugs. Her research included an interesting angle of recruiting the public to send in images of birds eating. What insects do birds like to eat the most? You'll have to tune in to find out!Show NotesArticle about Ashley in Entomology Today (June 2021) “Coming Full Circle: How an Entomologist's Experience with Vector-Borne Disease Inspired her to Study Them” https://entomologytoday.org/2021/06/22/entomologist-vector-borne-diseases-inspired-study-ashley-kennedy-standout-early-career-professional/  When one goes to the ESA meeting near Halloween, it's best to be prepared with an awesome costume!  Facebook Community Page: What Do Birds Eat? https://www.facebook.com/WhatDoBirdsEat/ Crowd-source photos and resources about birds-insect food web interaction  YouTube: Ashley's video was one of five finalists for the ESA Video Contest in 2018. Great visuals of birds and insects.  What do bluebirds eat? 

Learned Lag
Etymology vs. Entomology

Learned Lag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 13:35


The stuff is named for the bug, but the bug might be named after a number, or a color, or the number might be named for the bug because it was that color... it's all a mess.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
A study done by researchers from the University of Pretoria finds that SA hand sanitisers are often substandard.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 6:03


Dr Yusuf Abdullahi Ahmed, Senior lecturer in Entomology in UP's Department of Zoology and Entomology  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Islam
Hand sanitisers in and around Tshwane substandard: UP study

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 8:55


According to a scientist from the University Of Pretoria (UP) Commercial, off-the-shelf hand sanitisers used by the general population in Gauteng and Tshwane, do not have the recommended alcohol concentration, and are frequently mislabeled according to local and international norms. According to Dr Abdullahi Ahmed Yusuf, Senior Lecturer in Entomology in UP's Department says, preparing alcohol-based hand sanitisers using the WHO's instructions for local formulations remains a superior choice than purchasing poor off-the-shelf goods in the absence of suitable quality control procedures

Science Night
Let's Talk About Stress Baby

Science Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 48:50


STRESS! Everyone experiences it, and most of us aren't the greatest at dealing with it. The question our guest, Dr. Zane Thayer from Dartmouth College, is trying to learn more about stress. Mainly how a history of stress can lead to long-term health effects. You'll also learn a few tips for dealing with stress in a healthy way. The news segment will definitely build those stress levels as we talk about bees that will make you think twice about where your honey comes from and a new biological robot that will probably not herald the end to civilization as we know it. Our Guest Dr. Zane Thayer is a biological anthropologist interested in understanding how (biological mechanisms) and why (evolutionary origins) environmental experiences shape patterns of human biology and health. One important application of this interest is understanding how social inequalities create health inequalities. As such, her research has focused on evaluating how factors such as poverty, racism, and historical trauma affect health. Her overall research goal is to contribute findings of interest to both evolutionary anthropologists and public health professionals. She is strongly motivated to increase public understanding of evolution, developmental plasticity, and how the social construction of race/racism can create health inequities. Your Hosts Steffie Diem (https://twitter.com/SteffiDiem) Jason Organ (https://twitter.com/OrganJM) James Reed (https://twitter.com/James_Reed3) Credits Editing-James Reed Mastering- Chris Goulet Music: Intro and Outro- Wolf Moon by Unicorn Heads | https://unicornheads.com/ | Standard YouTube License Additional Sounds- Inside a Computer Chip by Doug Maxwell |https://www.mediarightproductions.com/ | Standard YouTube License The Science Night Podcast is a member of the Riverpower Podcast Mill (https://riverpower.xyz/) family www.scinight.com

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 101: Dealing with Invasive Beetles and Spiders with Dr. David Coyle

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


 Howdy bug lovers! We're back after our 100th episode celebration and the Arthro-Pod gang is joined by Dr. David Coyle of Clemson to talk about some problematic invasive species. The first is Asian longhorn beetle, a wood boring pest that can cause extensive issues for city landscapes and forests. David ended up with this big beetle in his state last year during the early stages of the pandemic, further complicating the problem. We also discuss the latest on the Joro spider, a problematic arachnid that seems to like the state of Georgia. Will it be the next "murder hornet" that captures everyone's attention? Tune in and find out!Show NotesClemson Profile: https://www.clemson.edu/cafls/faculty_staff/profiles/dcoyle  Forest Health Southern Regional Extension Forestry http://southernforesthealth.net/ Asian Longhorn beetle https://www.clemson.edu/public/regulatory/plant-industry/plant-pest-regulations/state-plant-pest-information/pest-alerts/alb.html Joro Spider A Joro spider chilling on Dr. Coyle's handUGA Scientists confirm first North American record of East Asian Joro SpiderUGA Today https://news.uga.edu/first-north-american-record-east-asian-joro-spider-0315/ Nephila clavata L Koch, the Joro Spider of East Asia, newly recording from North America (Araneae: Nephilidae) 2015 Hoebeke, Huffmaster, Freeman https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4327315/ Asian Joro spiders are starting to populate across SC, other Southeastern states https://www.postandcourier.com/environment/large-asian-joro-spiders-are-starting-to-populate-across-sc-other-southeastern-states/article_1e06cdf4-40b8-11ec-ba76-ef0783436c4d.html Bradford Pear Bounty: https://news.clemson.edu/clemsons-campaign-against-invasive-bradford-pear-adds-new-location-in-second-year/ Dr David Coyle's Contact Info: Twitter: @DrDaveCoyle Instagram: drdavecoyle TikTok: drdavecoyle Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0David Coyle, model of safety

Highlights from Moncrieff
Can insects feel emotion?

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 11:18


Professor of Entomology at the University of Oxford Geraldine Wright, joined Sean on the show to discuss whether insects can feel emotion... Listen and subscribe to Moncrieff on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify.    Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

Teaching Beyond the Podium Podcast Series
Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences

Teaching Beyond the Podium Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 19:36


Making connections between your research and teaching undergraduate courses is not always as easy as we would like. Fortunately, teaching and research do not have to be mutually exclusive! Dr. Anthony Auletta, lecturer in the Entomology and Nematology department at UF, has successfully merged his passions for teaching and research into a Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) that his students love! Listen as he shares ideas for starting a CURE in your courses. Music: Motivational by Scott Holmes

Scientific Sense ®
Prof. Bruce Hammock of University of California, Davis on insect Biology and Mammalian Enzomology

Scientific Sense ®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:26


Insect Biology, Mammalian Enzomology, Metabolomics and Mass Spectrometry, and Immunoassay and Biosensor Scientific Sense ® by Gill Eapen: Prof. Bruce Hammock is Professor of Entomology & Nematology at the University of California, Davis. His Research Interests span Immunochemistry, Insect Research and Mammalian Research --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scientificsense/message

Beyond Blathers
Goliath Beetle

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 20:47


This week we're going to talk about the huge (and not-so-terrifying) goliath beetle! Tune in to learn more about where they live, what they eat, and why it's so hard to figure out the real weight of insects! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. We're having a holiday sale where you can get 30% off everything in our store until December 15, so make sure to take a look! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Unfold
Cockroaches for Dessert

Unfold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 18:54


Just when you thought Unfold was done for the season, we decided to bug you with one last episode. UC Davis boasts one of the largest insect collections in North America, so how could we not take you on a tour? The Bohart Museum of Entomology holds more than 7 million specimens, from the beautiful to the downright terrifying. Its entomologists have even helped homicide investigations, thanks to the bug scrapings left behind. You'll hear about beautiful butterflies, jewel beetles, murder hornets and cuckoo wasps — as well as why we're calling this episode “Cockroaches for Dessert.” In this episode:  Lynn Kimsey, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and director of Bohart Museum of Entomology

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 100: Let's Celebrate 100 Episodes!!

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Hello bug lovers! Arthro-Pod has finally reached that 100 episode milestone. To celebrate, we hope you will indulge us with some time to talk about what we are grateful for with the show and to share some of our most wholesome and happy entomology memories. If you stick around after the outro song, you can also hear some great outtakes that Jody has collected over the years!Thank you for your support and here's to 100 more episodes!We deeply appreciate everyone who has written to us, taken time to leave a review or a rating, and tune in on a regular basis! If you want to learn more about gratefulness, we encourage you to listen to this episode of Ologies from last year: https://www.alieward.com/ologies/awesomeologyQuestions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

New Hope PDX
The Gospel & Creation with Dr. Rick Lindroth

New Hope PDX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 51:22


In the penultimate week of The Good Life teaching series, Pastor John Rosensteel is joined by special guest, Dr. Richard Lindroth, to discuss God's creation and our role as its caretaker. Dr. Lindroth is a professor of ecology in the Department of Entomology at University of Wisconsin-Madison. His expertise lies in global change ecology in forest ecosystems. Our scripture reading for the day is Genesis 2:4-15. If this is your first time joining us, welcome! We're excited for you to join us online. We believe that a weekly rhythm of gathering with other followers of Jesus is a key component of doing life together - and we want to gather with you on Sundays! When you're ready, you have an open invitation to join us in-person, at 9:15am or 11am. ________ Stay connected with us throughout the week: Website | Facebook | Instagram ________ Download the New Hope App to access teachings, event information, and to receive push notifications. Apple | Android

Knick Knack News
KKN Episode 184: Ketchup, Entomology, Apple-1

Knick Knack News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 34:41


In this week's episode, we talk about Martian condiments, invading spiders, old computers, and much more!New episodes of Knick Knack News are released every Friday. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more! Follow us on Twitter at @KnickKnackNews, Facebook at https://facebook.com/KnickKnackNews, Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/knickknacknews, and buy merch at http://bit.ly/KKNshop.Anthony's Stories This Week: Ketchup: https://bit.ly/3qqba54Apple-1: https://n.pr/3qs9pUYSpeech: https://engt.co/3wEDiCnAlex's Stories This Week: Entomology: https://bit.ly/3H81thsScreens: https://bit.ly/3F09BiiVaccine: https://bit.ly/3c4pt76Breaking News: Vodka: https://bit.ly/30kHvQ5Sleep: https://bit.ly/3ktQuFv See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Beyond Blathers
At the Beaty Biodiversity Museum

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 24:02


Come along with us as we explore the Beaty Biodiversity Museum at the University of British Columbia! We're on the hunt for the insects, fish, and fossils you can find at Blathers' museum. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Olivia is also open for commissions for adorable pet portraits, pins, and custom illustrations — take a look at the highlight on our Instagram! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Bug Talk
Ep. 77: Hannah Burrack

Bug Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:46


This episode features Dr. Hannah Burrack, incoming chair of the Department of Entomology at Michigan State University (https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/canr-names-new-chair-to-lead-department-of-entomology). This new position starts on Jan. 1, 2022, and in this episode we chatted about her background and thoughts on leadership. Thanks to Jason Roedel for improving the sound quality, Matt Grieshop for the music and Ellie Darling for designing the Bug Talk logo!*Contact us @bugtalkpodcast on Instagram or Twitter.*Visit us on our YouTube channel.

Beyond Blathers
Queen Alexandra's Birdwing

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 35:34


This week we're talking about the huge and beautiful Queen Alexandra's Birdwing Butterfly! Join us as we talk about this butterfly's biology, and go off on tangents into conservation and the fascinating Wikipedia page of Walter Rothschild.  If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Olivia is also open for commissions for adorable pet portraits, pins, and custom illustrations — take a look at the highlight on our Instagram! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

From the Woods Kentucky
From the Woods Today - Creepy Things in the Forest

From the Woods Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 58:05


This episode of From the Woods Today is a Halloween special. This show features some things from the forest that we commonly view as spooky, such as bats, spiders, and other creepy crawlers. We also have our tree of the week segment as well as an update on our upcoming programs. 10.27.21. Watch Video From the Woods Today

The Leading Voices in Food
Farmer-scientist Measures the Real Benefits of Regenerative Agriculture

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 18:30


Today's podcast is part of our Regenerative Agriculture series of podcasts. We're talking with agroecologist Dr. Jonathan Lundgren, CEO for Blue Dasher Farm in South Dakota, and also founder and director of the ECDYSIS Foundation. Dr. Lundgren connects the worlds of science and agriculture, and his working regenerative farm is also a scientific research hub. And he has a humble goal to foster a revolution in our food system, and demonstrate feasibility and sustainability of regenerative agriculture. Interview Summary   So Blue Dasher Farm in South Dakota sounds like a fascinating place. Can you tell our listeners a little bit about it?   Blue Dasher Farm is an operating demonstration farm and regenerative ag, located here in the middle of kind of nowhere, South Dakota. We wanted to be on the front lines of where change needs to happen, and we're at this great interchange here between corn, soybean, row crop ground, as well as rangeland systems, but also this is where a lot of the nation's honeybees ended up being too. We've got this kind of trifecta of crop lands, orchards, rangelands and honeybees. What this is intended to do is not only be a regenerative farm and integrated into a farming community, but also be a training ground for the next generation of scientists in practicing hands-on, get your fingers dirty agriculture, and that's really important. That firsthand perspective really shapes the questions that we ask, and how we ask them in science.   Tell us about what's grown on the farm. Is it animal agriculture, plant-based agriculture, both?   It's an integrated system. You know, it's not a very large farm with 53 acres, and half of that is actually a native, unbroken prairie that's one of the finest that I've seen. We also have a lot of wetlands that are integrated into this matrix here too. We have sheep. Our biggest moneymaker is honey. We have 200 beehives this year. We have an orchard, chickens, an egg production, as well as a number of other poultry products. We raised a couple of pigs this last year. We have some annual and perennial crops that we harvest for seed, especially native grasses, and things like that, and it's all fused into one big farm that presents us with consistent, unpredicted hurdles and opportunities.   So the concept of integration here is really important. Sounds like each of these pieces you've mentioned, and there are a lot of them, work together, and that if anything were just taken out and done by itself, it wouldn't work as well as having all these things together, and that's the overall concept here, isn't it?   That is absolutely correct. The integrated system is intended to increase the resilience of the farm, but also provide stacking of enterprises that increases the likelihood of success.   Our listeners will vary, because people come from lots of different backgrounds, and some will know a lot about agriculture, but others less so. Can you give us an example or two of something on the farm where the integration really helps?   We have annual crop ground that we are working on right now. We don't spray. We're not certified organic, but we don't spray anything, and we also don't till, and those are two really important premises of regenerative Ag, if you ask me. And so we use our sheep as ways of managing vegetation out there, and then we work with the land, and so in the case that we don't end up getting, like this last year, the drought was horrible in South Dakota. We ended up not getting an annual crop to establish in there, but perennial plants, the prairie ended up coming in, and so off of that piece of ground, instead of an annual crop, we took meat from the sheep, and honey from our bees.   That's a fascinating example. So the no-till is an interesting concept, and I'd like you to describe a little bit more about that. I know that a goal of yours is develop and evaluate ecologically-based test and farm management solutions, and you do this in order to reduce disturbance. I'm assuming that has to do with a no-till, but I'm not entirely sure, and then that you want to increase biodiversity in crop and livestock production. Can you explain this concept of disturbance?   Pests are never the problem within a food system, right? Pests are always a symptom. The pests are trying to correct what we have monkeyed up from a natural system. They're trying to reset the balance in the biological community, and until you solve the underlying issues with that system, you're going to continue to battle pests, and you're going to have to spend more and more money on input costs like pesticides. So what we determined is what the underlying problem is, is a lack of diversity, lack of life on the farm, and too much disturbance, and disturbance comes in many ways. Tillage is a disturbance, agrochemical use is a disturbance, and so when you start to eliminate that disturbance, you find that life ends up doing a lot of the things that we've been trying to replace with technology. Regenerative farming is much more knowledge-intensive, and less technology-intensive.   So what's the problem with tilling?   Tillage is one of the worst things that you can do to your farm or garden. What happens when you do that is number one, you break down organic matter in the soil, which is the soil's fertility, and you disrupt the balance of nutrients within that soil. The only way that you can replace that organic matter is with life, right? Be it worms, or insects, or microbes, or fungi, that's where the soil's fertility ends up coming from. And the one-two punch with tillage is that not only does it disturb the nutrient balance of the soil, but it also kills most of the life from the soil, and so it removes your ability to recover. We end up seeing a lot of farmers, you know, they want to do the right thing, and they're faced with this conundrum, do I spray or do I till? And boy, I think I'd pick, and I don't like either of those options, and we don't use either of those options on our farm here at Blue Dasher, but I would pick spraying over tilling any day of the week.   Thanks for that description. So let's turn our attention for a moment to science, because you were trained as a scientist, and you've done lots of science yourself over the years, and you support science on your farm. So with your permission, I'd like to read a little quotation from your website, because I think it captures your approach to science, and then like to talk about a little bit. So here's the quote,   "Scientists have to become farmers to increase the relevance and credibility of their research. Scientists also have to become part of the farming community, and farmers need to be intimately involved in producing scientific research. The metrics that scientists assess their success by have to be reinvisioned to incorporate outcomes that farmers care about."   So explain a little bit about why science is so important, and maybe you could give us some examples of some science that's been done on the farm, or even some things that might be underway.   Regenerative agriculture science is essential. Stories are really important, right? Anecdotal examples of, "This farmer did this, and it worked super well, or didn't work at all." Those are really, really important foundations for science, but until we replicate it, and use consistent methods for measuring the outcomes of these different systems, those are anecdotes, right? And so science is going to be essential for us to take and increase the credibility of this regenerative movement to show that it always works, where it works, where it doesn't work, what aspects of it are driving the success of those farmers, and there really isn't a whole lot of primary data that's being generated on regenerative farming right now, and we saw that niche, and decided we needed to be a part of that.   Just to give our audience a sense of what kind of outcomes might be important here, let's just say somebody is doing a study where they're randomizing a hundred acres here, a hundred acres there, using a regenerative versus traditional ag. What sort of outcomes would one be looking for? What are the most important things that people doing research on regenerative agriculture need to show?   Regenerative food systems increase soil health, and improve biodiversity, while producing nutritious food profitably, and so outcomes that need to be measured in these systems fall within those general four categories, soil health, being carbon sequestration, water balance in the soil, micronutrient availability, biodiversity being life, be it microbial life, or insects, or worms, or plants, birds, all would fall into that category, nutrient density, nutritious food yields. We actually have to feed the planet. We've lost 40% of the nutrient value of our food over the last several decades through our farming practices and destruction of our natural resource base. We need to restore that. Food isn't as nutritious as it used to be, and then finally profit. All of this as well and good, but if the farm goes out of business in the interim, then it didn't work. We're showing these on actual farming operations all over North America right now. We have boots on the ground science that is generating the data that shows that this does work in all of the systems that we've examined so far.   You know, Jonathan, with these podcasts, I always have a series of questions that we prepare in advance, but you've stimulated so many interesting ideas, I'm going off-script like crazy. So there are a couple of things I really wanted to dive into here. When you were mentioning outcomes, I assume one outcome is how many external inputs are needed, like pesticides, and herbicides, and fertilizers, and things like that, and I'm assuming that that's important for a number of reasons. I'm imagining profitability as one, because if you can produce crops without having to buy those things, you're able to be more profitable. But I'm assuming these things are really important for the environment as well. Is that true?   So with regenerative farming, it ends up being a win-win for just about everybody in the situation. By improving the resilience of their operation, and the profitability of the operation, the farmer wins, right? By reducing the environmental exposure to agrochemicals, their families win, communities win, conservationists win. We find that increasing the nutrition of food, suddenly the medical field wins, society wins. We can use this to combat many planetary-scale problems. One estimate is that by changing to regenerative grazing lands across the U.S., we can largely offset, if not completely replace most of our carbon emissions, while producing healthier beef, and making healthier rural communities. That makes a heck of a lot of sense.   Do you think there would ever be a time when instead of measuring productivity as yield per acre, number of bushels, let's say, and people might change that to think about nutrition per acre?   We have found that corn farmers in our area get prizes if they are the top-yielding corn producer, right? And we found in one of our studies, the first one that was published that used regenerative Ag, and compared those two systems from a primary literature standpoint showed that yields were actually not correlated with profitability. You know what was correlated with the profitability of the farm was how much soil organic matter they had generated on their farm, yeah. So I think that that's going to be a really important metric, and, you know, as these soils start healing, the nutrition of food comes from the soil. It's not from a jug that the farmer is putting on the plants, right? It comes from the soil itself.   You know, I've often thought in this context about whether consumer pull for certain types of products might help drive this market. So for example, let's say you have two carrot farmers, and one is using conventional methods. The other uses a different set of methods along the lines of what you're talking about, and that farmer produces a more nutritious carrot. Could consumers be attracted to the carrots with the most nutrition? Might, is there any talk about this in the farming community?   Oh, absolutely, farm to table and farm to school programs are really important. I think we talk about labels. We talk about all kinds of ways of increasing the value of regenerative. Regenerative has to be cost-competitive with conventional if it's going to be successful, and it is. In every system that we've studied it is. It's cost-superior. These producers are more profitable, and that doesn't necessarily have to be associated with a premium. At the end of the day, what is incorruptible is consumers knowing their farmer, and that is the answer to so many of these issues within our food communities right now is people starting to learn who their farmers are, and that relationship-building, and that trust, and that's going to put a lot of value on a food item.   I can second that. As a person involved in this field, and a consumer, like everybody else, that does really make a difference. So my colleagues and I at the World Food Policy Center have spent a fair amount of time on farms and meeting farmers, and I really want their products, because I know who they are, and those personal connections mean everything. So I totally agree with what you said. It's interesting to hear that that's part of your perspective as well. Speaking of honey, let's go back to the bees for a minute. You mentioned this early on in the podcast. Why are honeybees so important?   Honeybees are a character, at the end of the day, and what we're trying to show is the massive extinction event that the planet is currently facing right now. We are undergoing a massive evolutionary experiment, and we're losing species at a rate that the planet has never experienced before. Honeybees are a character that people understand, and they see the benefits, and even if they've been stung a few times, they still love these little insects, right? The honeybees are dying at a really rapid clip, and the reason that they are is because they're such a good bellwether for what's going on in the environment. I mean, they forage for up to five miles from their nest, or their colony, their hive. They sample multiple plant species, numerous, if not hundreds of species of plants, and they pull all of the chemistries that are out there in the environment, and bring it back to the nest, and most of agrochemicals are actually lipophilic in that they like fat. Guess what their hive is made out of? Wax. And so they end up aggregating a lot of agrochemicals. Those agrochemicals make them sick, and stressed, and diseases come in, and pests come in, and wipe them out. But on the flip side of that, regenerative systems provide a tremendous opportunity for conserving life, and we've been working on trying to demonstrate that with the honeybees and tell that story.   Do I recall right, you said you have 200 hives? Wow, so how much honey can you produce from that number of hives?   Well, this year, not much at all, but last year, I think we got a thousand pounds, or something like that. You know, people that go to the grocery store, and buy honey at the grocery store, they don't know what honey tastes like. That's not real honey. A lot of that is actually adulterated rice sugar from Asia that they ended up circumventing U.S. trade restrictions on, and most people tell me, "I don't like honey, but I really like your honey, John." And I'm like, "Well, that's because it's made from prairie flowers, it's got no additives whatsoever, and it comes out with this breadth of flavor that most people have never experienced before."   It sounds so good. I want some right now. So let me ask you one final question. This often comes up in the context of discussions of regenerative agriculture, and has to do with how scalable it is. People might say that, okay, the results from regenerative agriculture are impressive, but you still need the feed the world, and can that model be used on a big enough scale to accomplish feeding the world? So how do you respond to that?   If you want to feed the world, grow food is the first step in the process, and right now we have about what is it, 176 million acres in the continental U.S. that's devoted to corn and soybeans that we really don't eat? And so if you want to feed the world, let's start there. Can regenerative farming feed the world? We have shown that yields are equivalent in regenerative systems, if not superior, and the caloric content of products that are generated off of a regenerative farm versus a monocrop of a conventional farm are pretty superior, actually. So we really need to be measuring actual food production, things that humans are eating directly, and the efficiency of that system, as well as how stacking enterprises increases the resilience and efficiency of a farm.   You mentioned just now that there are vast amounts of acreage that are devoted to corn and soybeans that we don't eat. What do you mean we don't eat them?   Well, when's the last time you went down and grabbed a handful of corn, yellow number five, and took a bite? We end up burning it in our cars. 40% goes into ethanol production. We end up putting another 40, 50% of that into cattle that would rather be eating grass, and so when we hear arguments against beef production because of the methane production that's ended up being produced there, that's not an artifact of the cows. That's an artifact of poor management of the cows, and if you put them on grass, and manage them correctly, cattle production is a carbon sink. It's not a source.   Bio   Dr. Lundgren is an agroecologist, Director ECDYSIS Foundation, and CEO for Blue Dasher Farm. Lundgren's research and education programs are helping applied science evolve in ways that foster the movement in regenerative agriculture. He received his PhD in Entomology from the University of Illinois in 2004, and was a top scientist with USDA-ARS for 11 years. Lundgren received the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering by the White House. Lundgren has served as an advisor for national grant panels and regulatory agencies on pesticide and GM crop risk assessments. Lundgren has written 129 peer-reviewed journal articles, several book chapters, authored the book “Relationships of Natural Enemies and Non-prey Foods”, and has received more than $6 million in grants. He has trained 5 post-docs and 15 graduate students from around the world. One of his priorities is to re-envision how science is conducted to help fuel a revolution in regenerative agriculture. He regularly interacts with the public and farmers around the world regarding ecologically intensive farming and how diversity fuels the resilience and productivity of an agroecosystem and rural communities.   

This is Democracy
This is Democracy – Episode 170: Biology of Democracy

This is Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


In this episode, Jeremi and Zachary talk with special guest Dr. Mark Moffett about human biology and how it affects the development of societies. Zachary sets the scene with his poem entitled "You Don't Really Wish You Were on a Mountainside" Called “the Indiana Jones of entomology” by the National Geographic Society, Dr. Mark Moffett is a modern-day explorer with more than a little luck on his side, having accidentally sat on one of the world's deadliest snakes, battled drug lords with dart guns, and scrambled up trees to escape elephants, all part of his mission to find new species and behaviors in remote places. Presently Mark is studying the stability of societies across animal species and in humans right up to the present day, an outgrowth of his research for his fourth book, The Human Swarm: How Our Societies Arise, Thrive, and Fall. He received a Lowell Thomas Medal from the Explorers Club for his studies climbing into forest canopies around the world. Mark is one of only a handful of people to earn a doctorate under the Harvard sociobiologist and conservationist Edward O. Wilson. This episode of This is Democracy was mix and mastered by Karoline Pfeil.

Bawdy Storytelling

Hey, It's an ugly word for a beautiful thing, so get back in there! Award winning science fiction essayist Meg Elison weaves a hypnotic true tale that takes us from Musicology to Entomology to Homology to Sexology, with a splash of playing doctor for good measure. Recorded live at the Courtyard Cabaret in San Francisco, this was Meg's first time on the Bawdy stage - but it won't be her last!  #LifeSciences #Inorganic #Epidermis #Scientist   Song: ‘Tattoo' (Girlfriends)   Episode Links Helix: Ready for better sleep? Helix Sleep has a quiz that takes just two minutes to complete and matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. Helix was awarded the #1 best overall mattress pick of 2020 and by GQ and Wired Magazine. Just go to HelixSleep.com/Dixie, take their two-minute sleep quiz, and they'll match you to a customized mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life.  Special Offer: right now, Helix is offering up to $200 off all mattress orders AND two free pillows to listeners of the Bawdy Storytelling podcast. That's HelixSleep.com/Dixie for up to 200 dollars off and two free pillows!   Like A Kitten: Has your sex fallen into the same old, dull routine? Break those boring habits with a fun sexy box from Like A Kitten. This month they're helping you choose your own adventure with their BYOB box. A.K.A., Build Your Own Box! You get to choose one item out of each of their 6 categories: Toys, Beauty Products, Lubes and Cleansers, Games, Sexy Accessories, and Lingerie. Within each category, you have 8 or more products you can choose from, so you can customize your kit. The box only costs $69, and some of the vibrators alone retail for more than that. & Right now, Like A Kitten is offering our listeners 20% off AND free shipping when you go to https://likeakitten.com/Dixie And/or enter the code Dixie at checkout. And I love that that a portion of all sales goes to charities that focus on women's empowerment, education, and health. So, you can feel good about feelin' good!   Patreon: Become a member of our Patreon community & You can get free livestream tickets, get access to all the livestream replays, be connected to other Bawdy fans, and so much more. Sign up for The Hookup ($10/month) or higher means that you receive free tickets to special events, Free tickets to our Livestream shows, access to the livestream replay, ad-free episodes of the podcast & more. Our Patreon has new patron tiers like the Confidante, the Concierge & more. Our Patrons have kept Bawdy going during COVID and as we struggle with re-entry, we're saying Thank you to all of you with Insider Info and exclusive access. While other events have gone away, Patreon (and you) are allowing us to continue to produce the Bawdy podcast, livestreams and live shows. We're offering great rewards on Patreon,  so become a Member Now at https://www.patreon.com/Bawdy   You can also Support Bawdy by sending your one-time donation to: Venmo: Venmo.com/BawdyStorytelling Paypal: BawdyStorytelling@gmail.com Zelle: BawdyStorytelling@gmail.com (& Thank You in advance!)   Want the perfect gift for your favorite Bawdy podcast fan? Dixie has created her own fragrance: You'll love #BawdyGotMeLaid perfume, scented with amber, ylang ylang, warm vanilla and golden honey. There's also our (scented or unscented) creamy Bawdy Butter, Hair & Bawdy Oil, & more. Bawdy Merchandise means you can deliver your own great smelling Motorboats while supporting Dixie and Bawdy. Get yours today at https://bawdystorytelling.com/merchandise Cameo/Custom Dixie video: Need the perfect gift? I've been having so much fun making customized videos for you! Send your friends and lovers a custom ‘Cameo' video from Dixie (with or without applause tiddies), it's a great way to send love from far away to a Bawdy fan… For just $69, you and I can have a short zoom call, you can tell me all about the recipient, and I'll make a custom video from you for their special day. Find out more by emailing dixie@BawdyStorytelling.com #CustomVideo #Gift   Ready to tell your story, and change your life? I'm now offering Storytelling for Self-Discovery to help you customize your stories. Anxious about navigating what's next? Are you writing a book, or working on your brand storytelling for your business?  No matter what you're up against, I can help you communicate with calmness & clarity - and I'd love to help you find your story. Email me at dixie@BawdyStorytelling.com for more info - we can book a short discovery call, and I'm happy to answer any questions.   Check out our Bawdy Storytelling Fiends and Fans group on Facebook - it's a place to discuss the podcast's stories with the storytellers, share thoughts with your fellow listeners, & help Dixie make the podcast even better. Just answer 3 simple questions and you're IN! https://www.facebook.com/groups/360169851578316/ Subscribe to our email list & you'll be notified of all upcoming Livestreams, Podcasts and Special Events first - it's at  https://bawdystorytelling.com/subscribe   Thank you to the Team that makes this podcast possible   Team Bawdy is:   Podcast Producer: Marty Garcia Sound Engineer: David Grosof Archivist / Video: Joe Moore Bawdy Livestream pre-show video by Donal Mooney Storytelling support by Mosa Maxwell-Smith & Bawdy Creator & Podcast Host Dixie De La Tour & Thank you to Pleasure Podcasts. Bawdy Storytelling is proud to be part of your sex-positive podcast collective! 

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 99: Spinetingling Tales of Parasitic Flies with Dr. Erica McAlister

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Welcome to our annual spooktacular! We like to try and find a topic every year that will fit the Halloween season and we are honored that Dr. Erica McAlister, senior curator at the Natural History Museum in London, could join us for a recording session. Her book “The Secret Life of Flies” is one of the top sellers in entomology on Amazon and she was the keynote speaker at ESA in 2019. We cover Chapter 9 of her book which is focused on parasitic flies! Tune in for Dipteran appreciation, body horror, and most importantly, bot flies!Show notes: Check out "The Secret Life of Flies" to read along with us for this episode! You can find Erica on twitter @flygirlNHMor read about her work with the NHM hereA horse bot fly by Sturgis McKeever, Georgia Southern University, Bugwood.org Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  We're also on Stitcher!This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Inland Edition
10/27/2021 - Dr. Erin Wilson Rankin Discusses Recent Research On Hummingbirds

Inland Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 20:29


Dr. Erin Wilson Rankin is Associate Professor of Entomology with the College of Natural & Agricultural Sciences at UC Riverside.

Two Bees in a Podcast
Balanced Diet in Bees & Bottling Honey

Two Bees in a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:53


In this episode Two bees in a Podcast, released on October 27th, 2021, we are joined by Christian Pirk, a Professor in the Department of Zoology and Entomology at the University of Pretoria to discuss the behavior of Cape/African Honey Bees. In the 5 Minute Management segment, Jamie and Amy discuss bottling honey. This episode is ended with a Q&A segment.

Food Safety Matters
Ep. 106. Dr. Brittany Campbell: What's Bugging Your Facility?

Food Safety Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:23


Dr. Brittany Campbell is the Director of Technical Services for the National Pest Management Association (NPMA). NPMA is a global association supporting the pest management industry and its commitment to protecting public health, food, and property. Brittany earned her master's degree in Entomology from Virginia Tech and her Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Florida. In this episode of Food Safety Matters we speak with Brittany [20:49] about: Overview of National Pest Management Association Training and background of pest management professionals Pest Control versus integrated pest management (IPM) Common pests in food plants and the potential impacts Pest identification Controlling rodents and birds Signs you have an infestation Top three things every plant should do to prevent pest issues Advice for starting or updating your pest management program News and Resources: FDA Announces Findings from Sampling of Romaine Lettuce in Yuma, AZ [3:44] FDA Studies Effectiveness of Whole-Genome Sequencing Program [7:17] Bob Ferguson of Strategic Consulting shares insights from his discussion with the authors of the FDA study. We Want to Hear from You! Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@foodsafetymagazine.com

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 600 (10-25-21): The Wide Reach of Viruses, Including Through Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology.  We start this week with three mystery sounds, all related to a very numerous group of disease-causing, or pathogenic, microbes that have enormous impacts on human health.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if know this microbial group.  And here's a hint: big hits on social media are said to spread like this group. SOUNDS – ~19 sec If you guessed viruses, you're right!  You heard a person coughing due to a viral disease; handwashing, an important method of reducing viral transmission; and a spray bottle of isopropyl alcohol, an effective disinfectant against many kinds of viruses.  With attention focused this fall both on the COVID-19 coronavirus and the annual influenza virus season, we explore in this episode some basic information about viruses and some viral connections to water.  Here are 10 key points about viruses. 1.  Viruses are one of four groups of microbes responsible for human disease, along with bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, which are single-celled animals.  As a group, viruses are the smallest of these microbes, although some are larger than some bacteria. 2.  Viruses aren't made up of cells, but instead exist as particles composed primarily of molecules of protein and nucleic acids, that is, DNA or RNA.  They require a cellular host for reproduction, called replication. 3.  Viruses are more abundant than all of the cellular-based living things on earth. 4.  All living things are infected by viruses. 5.  Viruses don't always cause disease in infected hosts, but many kinds do cause significant diseases in humans, other animals, and plants. 6.  Viral disease can result from viruses taking over or inhibiting their host's cellular biochemical processes, or by cell destruction as new virus particles exit cells after replication. 7.  Depending on their type, viruses can be spread through air, in water, from surfaces, by animal vectors, or through exchange of blood or other body substances. 8.  Water-related spread of viruses can occur through water contaminated with human waste, and through animal vectors connected to water, particularly mosquitoes. 9.  Significant human diseases from water-borne viruses include intestinal disease, particularly diarrhea; hepatitis, or liver inflammation; inflammations of the brain, spinal cord, or heart; and possibly cancer.  Viral diseases spread by mosquitoes include Yellow Fever, Dengue, West Nile, and others. And last, but not least, handwashing with clean water and soap is important for reducing the spread of viruses through objects and surfaces—collectively called fomites—with which humans come into contact. Thanks to Freesound.org user n__audioman for making the coughing sound available for public use.  Here's hoping we all hear less of that sound and more of the handwashing and other preventative measures that keep viruses—water-borne and otherwise—somewhat at bay. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thanks to Dr. Sally Paulson, Virginia Tech Department of Entomology, for her help with this article. The coughing sound was recorded by user n__audioman (dated December 14, 2015), and made available for public use by Freesound.org, online at https://freesound.org/people/n_audioman/sounds/331068/, under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0  For more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. The handwashing and alcohol spraying sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio on October 21, 2021. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Female Aedes japonicus mosquito (also known as Ochlerotatus japonicas), photographed from a colony at Notre Dame University.  Photo by Frank Collins, accessed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Public Health Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/default.aspx; specific URL for this photo was https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=7886, as of 10-25-21.  According to CDC caption for this photo, this Asian mosquito, first collected in the United States in New York and New Jersey in 1998, is a suspected transmitter for West Nile virus. “Wash Your Hands in 24 Languages” poster from the Minnesota Department of Health, online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/people/handhygiene/wash/washyourhands.html. SOURCES Used for Audio John B. Carter and Venetia A. Saunders, Virology: Principles and Applications, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, United Kingdom, 2013. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Tracking the COVID-19 Economy's Effects on Food, Housing, and Employment Hardships,” updated October 13, 2021, online at https://www.cbpp.org/research/poverty-and-inequality/tracking-the-covid-19-economys-effects-on-food-housing-and. Dorothy H. Crawford, Viruses: A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2018. Aimee M. Gall et al., “Waterborne Viruses: A Barrier to Safe Drinking Water,” PLOS Pathogens Vol. 11, No. 6 (June 25, 2015), online at https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article/authors?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1004867. Johns Hopkins University & Medicine/Coronavirus Resource Center, “Global Map,” online at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html. Microbiology Society, “Microbes and Disease,” online at https://microbiologysociety.org/why-microbiology-matters/what-is-microbiology/microbes-and-the-human-body/microbes-and-disease.html. Minnesota Department of Health, “Waterborne Illness,” online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/waterborne/index.html. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), “Global economic recovery continues but remains uneven, says OECD,” News Release, September 21, 2021. University of New Hampshire/Casey School of Public Policy, “COVID-19 Economic Crisis: By State,” by Michael Ettlinger and Jordan Hensley, October 1, 2021, online at https://carsey.unh.edu/publication/COVID-19-Economic-Impact-By-State. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html. U.S. CDC, “Mosquito-Borne Diseases,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/outdoor/mosquito-borne/default.html.  U.S. CDC, Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice, Third Edition: An Introduction to Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics, November 2011, “Glossary,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/glossary.html. U.S. CDC, “Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Public Water Systems,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Waterborne Hazards Control Programs,” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/waterborne-hazards-control/. Water Quality Association, “Bacteria and Virus Issues,” online at https://www.wqa.org/learn-about-water/common-contaminants/bacteria-viruses. World Health Organization (WHO), “Waterborne Pathogens and Their Significance in Water Supplies” (table), online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/gdwqrevision/watpathogens.pdf. WHO, “Emerging Issues in Water and Infectious Disease,” 2003, online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/emerging/emerging.pdf. WHO, “Microbial Fact Sheets,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/GDW11rev1and2.pdf. For More Information about Water and the Human Body Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 598, 10-11-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21,Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment, including that water is important for agriculture, power generation, and public health.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment, including that major health and safety issues are associated with air and water quality, Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory, including that cell structure and organelles support life processes.LS.3     – There are levels of structural organization in living things, including that similar characteristics determine the classification of organisms.LS.10 – Organisms reproduce and transmit genetic information to new generations. BiologyBIO.4 – Bacteria and viruses have an effect on living systems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government CourseGOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th gradeEpisode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).

new york food health science bay housing humans university agency asian female photo principles natural earth political state saunders audio college accent dark tech water web index organisation rain united states pond research global ocean government education economy budget public vol new jersey chesapeake snow reach environment dna viral organisms images skeleton johns hopkins university disease public policy crawford domestic depending languages freesound effects viruses msonormal stream oxford normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens bacteria arial united kingdom environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology cdc entomology wide civics gall grade nutrients colorful tracking microbes chichester signature bio rna scales govt human body watershed transcript wg centers disease control significant virginia tech epidemiology neurological ls atlantic ocean glossary natural resources grades k oxford university press name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes applications water supplies wash your hands prevention cdc biostatistics msohyperlink dengue world health organization who oecd sections life sciences john wiley second edition public health practice stormwater infectious diseases yellow fever policymakers bmp john b emerging issues new standard acknowledgment minnesota department west nile policy priorities muscular microbiology society virginia department economic co notre dame university cripple creek cumberland gap news release sols aedes tmdl development oecd geological survey mayo clinic health system united states history vus circulatory living systems virginia standards water center contaminants audio notes covid-19
Inside OSU Podcast
Where Have All the Insects Gone? The Recent Decline of Pests in Wheat

Inside OSU Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 23:32


This week's guest is Dr. Kris Giles, Regents Professor in Entomology and Plant Pathology Over the past 25 years, three factors have interacted and resulted in a decline of insect pests in wheat: climate change; new strategies in wheat breeding; and the conservation of beneficial insects. Dr. Giles will describe the complex interaction of these factors....

Business Daily
Bug burger anyone?

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 17:29


Is the Western diet ready for farmed insects in food? Although insects are consumed by more than two billion people worldwide, acceptance of them in the Western diet is still low, but could that be changing? With climate change, a growing population and an increased demand for protein all putting pressure on our food system, insects offer an interesting and more planet friendly alternative to meat and fish. Malena Sigurgeirsdottir is the co-founder of Hey Planet which has just launched a meat substitute using buffalo beetle powder (that's the lesser mealworm or Alphitobius Diaperinus), in Denmark, Germany and Sweden. She tells us how great insects taste, especially when they're ground up. Professor Matan Shelomi, from National Taiwan University, Department of Entomology outlines how farming insects can have a much lower carbon foot-print than farming animals. Meanwhile in the UK, Kieran Olivares Whittaker has received millions of dollars in funding for his Entocycle project, researching the optimum way to farm black soldier fly larvae to feed fish and poultry instead of using soy and fishmeal which causes deforestation and overfishing. And we meet Aly Moore of Bugible who makes a living from eating and promoting bugs as a source of protein. Produced and presented by Clare Williamson. (Image credit: HeyPlanet burger; Credit: Hey-Planet.com)

Lab Out Loud
Pumpkin Science, Facts and Surprises

Lab Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:11


To answer their questions about pumpkins, the Lab Out Loud podcast connects with a pumpkin expert. From the University of Rhode Island, Dr. Rebecca Brown joins co-hosts Brian Bartel and Dale Basler to talk about growing pumpkins, the surprising results of pumpkin breeding, and the pumpkin industry in the United States. About The Guest: Rebecca Brown is an assistant professor at the University of Rhode Island in the Department of Plant Sciences and Entomology, where she conducts research in the areas of sustainable vegetable production and laser scarecrows. Show notes at: https://laboutloud.com/2021/10/episode-253-pumpkins/

WCSUMedia
@WCSU - A biologist with a job!!!

WCSUMedia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 52:47


Rayda took over... again! This time to discuss her collaboration with fellow WCSU professor Jack Tom on the seventh edition of Entomology and Pest Management. Paul is joined by the second of our three new student co-hosts, Devin Moran, to discuss sports and how he plans to contribute to the... ahem... award winning podcast.

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 98: Spotted Lanternfly Summer

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


 This summer, the invasive spotted lanternfly (SLF) was in the news multiple times after being found in Indiana, in a new Ohio location, and in a 4-H insect collection from Kansas. So, the Arthro-Pod gang decided to sit down and talk about this beautiful yet devastating insect. Tune in to learn about the biology and development of SLF, how the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has combated it for the last few years, and the damage to crops and property that can be expected from SLF. A beauty and a beast, SLF impacts numerous crops by sucking the life out of them with its piercing-sucking mouthparts. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org. Show notesUSDA Where is the threat and where to report https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/resources/pests-diseases/hungry-pests/slf/spotted-lanternfly Up to date maps of SLF infestation: https://nysipm.cornell.edu/environment/invasive-species-exotic-pests/spotted-lanternfly/spotted-lanternfly-ipm/introduction-native-range-and-current-range-us/  Map of potential distribution in US: https://entomologytoday.org/2019/10/03/invasive-spotted-lanternfly-large-potential-range-united-states-beyond/. There is also a map of potential worldwide range. ESA collection of research https://www.entsoc.org/spotted-lanternfly-research-accelerates-effort-contain-invasive-pestThe life cycle of SLF, courtesy of the PA Department of Agriculture Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  We're also on Stitcher!This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Arts & Ideas
Green Thinking: Health

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:16


Climate change presents new challenges to human health. As temperatures rise, tropical and sub-tropical diseases are already becoming more widespread. While climate change has consequences on human health, engaging with the natural world can also have benefits for physical and mental health. But, how do we best communicate and explain these issues and the choices we face. Des Fitzgerald talks to Samantha Walton and Christopher Sanders about their research and discuss the challenges the climate and nature emergency presents to human health, and how we might respond. Dr Christopher Sanders is a Fellow in Entomology, Epidemiology and Virology at the Pirbright Institute funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), which is part of UK Research and Innovation. His research focuses on the physiological and behavioural attributes that enable an insect species to transmit a pathogen. Since 2006, his work has explored the behaviour of Culicoides biting midges, a type of small insect which has the potential to be transported over long distances on prevailing winds, carrying viruses with it. https://www.pirbright.ac.uk/users/dr-christopher-sanders Dr Samantha Walton is a poet and Reader in Modern Literature at Bath Spa University. Her research explores psychology and environmentalism; experimental poetics, fiction of the 1920s-30s; and the Scottish novelist and nature writer, Nan Shepherd. Walton is the author of The Living World: Nan Shepherd and Environmental Thought, and the forthcoming Everybody Needs Beauty: In Search of the Nature Cure. Between 2016-2018, Walton was an Early Career Leadership Fellow working on the AHRC-funded project, Cultures of Nature and Wellbeing: Connecting Health and the Environment through Literature. This project involved working with environment and health policymakers and wellbeing practitioners, and original research into what literature tells us about our emotional and ethical entanglements with the living world. You can read more about the project here: https://culturenaturewellbeing.wordpress.com Professor Des Fitzgerald is a New Generation Thinker based at the University of Exeter. You can find a new podcast series Green Thinking: 26 episodes 26 minutes long in the run up to COP26 made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI, exploring the latest research and ideas around understanding and tackling the climate and nature emergency. New Generation Thinkers Des Fitzgerald and Eleanor Barraclough will be in conversation with researchers on a wide-range of subjects from cryptocurrencies and finance to soil and sustainable transport. The podcasts are all available from the Arts & Ideas podcast feed - and collected on the Free Thinking website under Green Thinking where you can also find programmes on festivals, rivers, eco-criticism and the weather. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 For more information about the research the AHRC's supports around climate change and the natural world you can visit: https://www.ukri.org/our-work/responding-to-climate-change/ or follow @ahrcpress on twitter. To join the discussion about the research covered in this podcast and the series please use the hashtag #GreenThinkingPodcast. Producer: Ruth Watts

The Tom Flip Key West Podcast
#78 Uli Bernier

The Tom Flip Key West Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 138:22


Uli Bernier is retired and living in Key West, but once upon a time his job title was the National Program Leader NP104 veterinary, medical, and urban Entomology at USDA-ARS, whatever that means. We discuss working yourself to almost death, living in my old house, mosquito control in the Keys, the handling of the covid response leading to confusion and distrust, type O Negative blood, getting the double vaccine and catching the virus after, the data is not being reported correctly, media mass manipulation, mask policy, vaccine cards, working out that immune system, good health will always help and more.Thanks to my sponsors@www.keyscoffee.co @www.22andco.com@www.pokeintherear.com@www.generalhorseplay.com

Beyond Blathers
Violin Beetle

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:11


This week we're diving into the violin beetle, an insect that is as cool as it is mysterious! Not a ton is known about these critters, but we get into what has been discovered. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Big Picture Science
Home Invasions (rebroadcast)

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:31


As we struggle to control a viral invader that moves silently across the globe and into its victims, we are also besieged by other invasions. Murder hornets have descended upon the Pacific Northwest, threatening the region's honeybees. In Africa, locust swarms darken the sky. In this episode, we draw on a classic science fiction tale to examine the nature of invasions, and what prompts biology to go on the move. Guests: Peter Ksander – Associate professor at Reed College in the Department of Theater. Producer of the spring 2020 production of War of the Worlds Eva Licht – A senior at Reed College, and producer and director of War of the Worlds Chris Looney – Entomologist with the Washington State Department of Agriculture, where he manages its general entomology laboratory Nipun Basrur – Neurobiologist at The Rockefeller University Amy Maxmen – Reporter at the journal Nature, in which her story about pandemic war games appeared. Originally aired August 31, 2020  

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 97: The Caterpillar that ate 2021 with Dr. Katelyn Kesheimer

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Hello bug lovers! Tune in today to learn all about the fall armyworm outbreak of 2021. Our guest is Dr. Katelyn Kesheimer of Auburn University. Katelyn has dealt with FAW for the majority of the summer and has worked tirelessly to produce extension materials and provide information to growers on how to confront this hungry, hungry caterpillar. We cover how the outbreak started, possible reasons why this year was so bad, and how entomologists work together to provide timely info to their home states!Dr. Kesheimer works on many different kinds of commodities and crops, including hemp!Fall armyworms have an inverted "Y" on their head and four black dots on their rear that form a square. Photo by Jim Kalisch, University of Nebraska. Show notesYou can learn about fall armyworm from the many extension publications dedicated to it online. https://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/field/fall_armyworm.htmhttps://www.aces.edu/blog/topics/farming/management-of-fall-armyworm-in-pastures-and-hayfields/  http://extension.msstate.edu/publications/fall-armyworms-hayfields-and-pasturesKatelyn was interviewed by the Washington Post on the 2021 outbreakhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/09/17/armyworms-agriculture-outbreak-farming/ As fall armyworms march, they feed, leaving behind widespread brown turf in lawns, sports fields, and golf courses. Photos by Katelyn Kesheimer.  Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  We're also on Stitcher!This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Bug Talk
Ep 74: Katja Poveda

Bug Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 41:57


In this episode, Zsofia and Jen chat with Dr. Katja Poveda, associate professor of Entomology at Cornell University. Dr. Poveda studies plant-insect interactions from the plant to landscape scale in agroecosystems. We chat about her global research in Malawi and Kenya, her teaching interests, and some of the awesome research she has done! You can follow the Poveda lab on Twitter @PovedaLab to stay updated with Dr. Poveda's current research! Thanks to Jason Roedel for improving the sound quality, Matt Grieshop for the music and Ellie Darling for designing the Bug Talk logo!*Contact us @bugtalkpodcast on Instagram or Twitter.*Visit us on our YouTube channel.

Tackle Talk
The Bait Breakdown: Episode 3 - Aquatic Insects with Dr. Sally Entrekin

Tackle Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 51:07


Welcome to Episode 3 of the Bait Breakdown, a multipart series were we take a look an in-depth look at the 4 main types of a bass's natural forage: Baitfish, Crawfish, Aquatic Insects, and Reptiles & Amphibians. Today's episode is all about Aquatic Insects with special guest Aquatic Entomologist Dr. Sally Entrekin! Brought to you by: American Legacy Fishing & Outdoors www.americanlegacyfishing.com Dark Horse Tackle www.darkhorsetackle.com Use code "TACKLETALK30" at checkout

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 169: Do Dog Things

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 64:37


Quizmasters Lee and Marc are joined by Kyle Anne to meet to ask, suss and answer a general knowledge quiz with topics including Birthstones, Starring Roles, Mythological Creatures, Art Museums, Curses, Holidays, Entomology, Fast Food Menu Items, Album Covers and more! Round One BIRTHSTONES - Amethyst is the birthstone of which month? ALSO KNOWN AS… - Irish musician David Evans is better known by what name? PERFORMANCE GEAR - Based on the Hungarian word for “peak”, a shako is an item of clothing commonly worn during what kind of musical performance? STARRING ROLES - The 1993 film What's Love Got to Do With It starred which actress as Tina Turner? FAMOUS CHARACTERS - Performers Judith Hoag (1990), Paige Turco (1991 and 1993), Megan Fox (2014 and 2016) and by Malina Weissman have all portrayed which pop culture character who first debuted in a 1984 comic book? MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURES - What is the name for a mythical dragon with two legs and a barbed tail? Round Two ART MUSEUMS - The Institute of Arts in what American city almost had to auction off its collection of paintings and sculptures to pay debts when it went into bankruptcy? CURSES - Sometimes known as the Chamberlain Curse, what English expression is thought to be related to the Chinese expression “Better to be a dog in times of tranquility than a human in times of chaos”? HOLIDAYS - Vesak is a holiday celebrating the birth of what deity? ENTOMOLOGY - The Figeater beetle and European chafer are also known by what common name (which is also a nickname for professional racecar driver Dale Earnhardt, Jr.)? FAST FOOD MENU ITEMS - What fast food eatery introduced mac and cheetos in 2016? ARTISTS - What performance and conceptual artist wrote and directed the films Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005), The Future (2011) and 2020's Gajillionaire, and who also authored the novel The First Bad Man (2015)? Final Questions MOTTOS - Adopted in 1927, what news organization adopted the motto "Nation shall speak peace unto nation"? ALBUM COVERS - Produced by T. Bone Burnett, what 1993 album cover features handwritten lyrics to its title song (which does not actually appear on the album)? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges September 29th, 2021 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EDT September 30th, 2021 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Ollies Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EDT You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Tommy (The Electric Mud) and Tim (Pat's Garden Service) Thank you, Team Captains – Skyler, Dylan, Shaun, Lydia, Gil, David, Aaron, Kristen & Fletcher Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Moo, Tim, Nabeel, Patrick, Jon, Adam, Ryan, Mollie, Lisa, Alex, Spencer, Kaitlynn, Manu, Mo, Matthew, Luc, Hank, Justin, Cooper, Elyse, Sarah, Karly, Kristopher, Josh, Lucas Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Hbomb, Alex, Doug, Kevin and Sara, Tiffany, Allison, Paige, We Do Stuff, Mike S., Kenya, Jeff, Eric, Steven, Efren, Mike J., Mike C. If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support." Special Guest: Kyle Anne.

The Exotic Pet Collective
Social Spiders & Communal Tarantulas w/ Dr/ Linda Rayor

The Exotic Pet Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 115:47


Today we are talking to Dr. Linda Rayor from the Entemology Department at Cornell University who has spent most of her career studying Social Behavior in spiders like the Huntsman Spider. She also studies communal tarantula species like the Monocentropus balfouri, Neoholothele incei and Hysterocrates gigas. We even discuss Amblypygi like the Tailless Whip Scorpion and how someone becomes an arachnologist! Request Naturalist Outreach Presentations by Cornell students https://blogs.cornell.edu/naturalistoutreach/presentations/request-a-presentation/https://exhibits.library.cornell.edu/arachnophiliaSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/The_Tarantula_Collective)

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: India's festive season, “fan-plastic” food wrap, tennis wonder, Ig Nobel prizes

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 21:06


Cannabis Cultivation and Science Podcast
Episode 84: Biocontrols and Cannabis - What's New in 2021 with Suzanne Wainwright Evans

Cannabis Cultivation and Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 90:11


Our guest this week is my good friend, Suzanne Wainwright-Evans also known by many as The Bug Lady. She is an Ornamental Entomologist specializing in integrated pest management.  Suzanne has been involved in the Green Industry for more than 25 years with a primary focus on biological control and using pesticides properly.  She is a graduate of the University of Florida with degrees in both Entomology and Environmental Horticulture.  She has worked throughout the United States and internationally consulting to greenhouses, nurseries, landscapers and interiorscape companies.  She is the owner of Buglady Consulting, now in business for over 21 years.