Podcasts about Student affairs

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Best podcasts about Student affairs

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Latest podcast episodes about Student affairs

The Krista Escamilla Show
31 - Dr. Becky Spurlock -Senior Vice President of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management at UTPB

The Krista Escamilla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 44:24


  “You don't have to figure it all out,  just do the next best thing.” - Dr. Becky Spurlock   In today's episode we sit down with Dr. Becky Spurlock. Dr. Spurlock is the Senior Vice President of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management at UTPB. We talk about authenticity, education, listening to your gut and making a difference in the lives of others! Dr. Spurlock also shares the one piece of advice she shares with every student who comes to orientation. Thanks Dr. Spurlock for your time and pouring into our community   Thank you to our sponsors Rig-ID, www.joincapclub.com and Midland Cap Co.   Thanks for hitting the subscribe button and sharing our show with someone you love   Please follow @kristaescamilla on LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook for daily motivation!   Dream Big~Believe~Never Give up YOU make it a great day   #believe #thekristaescamillashow #podcasts #community #permianbasin #payitforward #spotify #amazon #google #youtube #apple #encourageothers #inspire #smile #beagoodhuman #passion #makingwesttexasbetter #utpb #bekind #smile #teachersrock #education #authenticity #makingadifference #dontsufferinsilence #letitgo #dothenextbestthing    

UCSC Slugcast
Let's Explore: Año Nuevo's Elephant Seals!

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 8:20


Are you into nature? Jennifer gives us a tour of the Año Nuevo reserve, where you can experience amazing views and animals. Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

UCSC Slugcast
Slugcast Goes Outside

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 9:14


Slugcast podcasters hang out outside and converse with each other about daily life as UCSC students. In addition, the podcasters chat with UCSC community members and ask them about the best part of their day.Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

SA Voices From the Field
Financial Aid and EFC changes

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 37:19


This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Justin Draeger, President & CEO of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. Today we talked to Justin about all of the upcoming Financial Aid and EFC changes that are coming in the next few years.  Justin Draeger serves as the primary voice of NASFAA and as the liaison between the association members, the U.S. Congress, federal agencies, and the media. Most of Justin's career has been devoted to assisting disadvantaged populations in achieving their educational goals and better their communities. Since 2002, Justin has been engaged in either administering, interpreting, communicating, or developing student financial aid policy. His prior experiences include working as a financial aid director, regulatory and policy analyst, and spokesperson. He has held senior positions overseeing government relations, communications, and policy work. Justin has testified in multiple Congressional hearings on student financial aid, college access, student loan policy, and the interplay between federal agencies and colleges and universities. He is frequently quoted in the press and has appeared on The Today Show on NBC, National Public Radio, APM's Marketplace, Fox Business News, CNBC, and C-SPAN, and is often quoted in national news outlets. Justin serves on several boards of directors that promote health and education. He earned his undergraduate from Brigham Young University and his MBA from Baker College. Justin lives in Fairfax, VA, with his wife and three children. In the interview Justin regarding FAFSA simplification and federal methodology and you can find that resource here: https://www.nasfaa.org/fafsa_simplification Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

UCSC Slugcast
Writing Center

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 1:21


David gives a snapshot of the writing center, where students get help with all stages of writing.Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

UCSC Slugcast
What is Slug Support?

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 2:03


What is Slug Support? Isabel explains this wonderful resource available to students. Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

UCSC Slugcast
Cows on Campus

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 2:00


In this episode, Gwen explores why we have cows on campus. Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

UCSC Slugcast
Laptop Kiosks! What and Where?

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 3:30


Laptop kiosks are now available at both McHenry and Science and Engineering libraries. In this episode, Jennifer walks us through how the laptop kiosk works.Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

UCSC Slugcast
Hispanic Heritage Month: UCSC as a Hispanic-Serving Institution

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 6:28


Let's look into how UCSC is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and what that means for Hispanic/Latinx and non-Hispanic/Latinx students. Jennifer, highlights the excellent Hispanic/Latinx clubs and organizations on campus.Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

Xicana Code Switchers
Transition to an L&D Career

Xicana Code Switchers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 60:11


In this episode, we had the pleasure of having Mitzi Martinez discuss how she transitioned out of Student Affairs to a career in Learning and Development (L&D). You can connect with Mitzi on LinkedIn or her website. BIPOC Business Shoutout: Eauso Vert For all our listeners, you can email us at xicanacodeswitchers@gmail.com and send us your BIPOC business, conference, and event shout-outs and listener letters. You could also record a listener message on the Anchor app and that way we can include your recorded message in our future episodes. Follow us on Instagram @XicanaCodeSwitchers and on Twitter @XCodeSwitchers. If you want to support this podcast, you can Venmo/CashApp us @XicanaCodeSwitchers and/or become a Patreon contributor. Thank you all for tuning in to this week's episode and until next time. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/xicana-code-switchers/message

Journey to Jupiter: Discover the Life You'll Create
How Taking a Leave of Absence Led to a Career in Student Affairs: Meet Nicholas Sapp

Journey to Jupiter: Discover the Life You'll Create

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 65:25


Born and raised in Atlanta, GA, Nicholas Sapp grew up in the city's Cascade neighborhood. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a major in Comparative Human Development. While on a leave of absence from his undergraduate studies, Nicholas' interest in Student Affairs was sparked by the programming offered by Georgia State University's Office of Black Student Achievement. Currently, he spends his 4th year working at Emory University with the goal of providing similar programming opportunities to its student population. Outside of work, Nicholas is passionate about Black American street dances and is eagerly learning, competing, and teaching. In this episode, Nicholas shares: How he ended up attending one of the top universities in the United States (University of Chicago)   His thought process when deciding to which colleges to apply and ultimately which school to attend   Why he took a leave of absence from college, and how that time away helped him discover the students affairs career path   The importance of talking about how to succeed in college just as much as it is to discuss attending college   How taking a job just to “get your foot in the door” can be a path that leads to your desired job   Connect with Nicholas via email at nsapp612@yahoo.com and LinkedIn! ----- Sign up for my contact list to be the first to know about new offerings and to receive my weekly note on all things!   You can also stay connected with Journey to Jupiter via..... Email: jetaun@jetaundavis.com Website: jetaundavis.com Instagram: @JourneyJupiter Twitter: @JourneyJupiter Facebook: @JourneyJupiter ----- Produced by Ken Inge of Dead End Hip Hop

SA Voices From the Field
Title IX Keeps Changing and its' impact on your campus

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 39:54


This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Courtney Bullard, Founder of Institutional Compliance Solutions about the many Title IX changes that are coming about and their impact on your own college campus.  Courtney Bullard has over ten years of experience representing institutions and organizations in matters involving sexual misconduct, including 8 years as a University system attorney. As in-house counsel, she served as a trusted advisor to the Chancellor, Vice Chancellors, Athletic Director, Director of Office and Equity and Diversity, Title IX Coordinator, Provost and other top level administrators on all legal matters affecting the institution. Her breadth of knowledge and familiarity with the unique aspects of a college campus provide a distinctive approach to partnering with institutions and school districts to assist with their legal needs. She excels in advising clients on all aspects of institutional compliance, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization amendments to the Jeanne Clery Act, and specializes in providing legal advice to institutions during sexual misconduct, stalking and relationship violence investigations. Courtney regularly provides Title IX and Clery training to organizations, attorneys, institutions and school districts, serves as an external investigator into allegations of sexual misconduct, and provides expert witness testimony on matters dealing with institutional response to allegations of sexual misconduct, bullying and hazing in litigation. Courtney is the host of The Law & Higher Ed Podcast and is nationally recognized for her contributions to news media, including the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and VICE news on HBO. Courtney is the creator of Title IX University, an on-line digital platform that provides Title IX training. Courtney received her undergraduate degree from Indiana University in 1998. She graduated from the University of Memphis School of Law in 2001, where she served on the law review as a Comments Editor. Prior to serving as Associate General Counsel for the University of Tennessee, she worked for Baker, Donelson, Bearman & Caldwell and Husch & Eppenberger. Courtney also teaches Business Law as an Adjunct Professor for the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, and Southern New Hampshire University. Courtney is a member of NACUA and Workplace Investigations Group and is recognized as Lawyer of Distinction in Higher Education.  Courtney has two girls, Charlotte (9) and Campbell (13), and two bonus children, Austin (17) and Tyler (14). In her free time, you will find her with her husband, Todd, cheering on their children in all of their events and activities. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

UCSC Slugcast
STARS

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 19:36


It's National Transfer Week! So let's look at STARS, or Services for Transfer and Re-entry Students, their resources, and the greater community available to transfer students. Let's also hear from some Transition Mentors about STARS and the greater transfer and re-entry student community. During National Transfer Week, STARS is holding an event this Friday, October 21st. Check them out on Instagram or Facebook @ucsc_stars.Website: https://stars.ucsc.eduDisclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone, and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

How to Talk to [Mamí & Papí] about Anything
She Walked Away from Her Dream Job, Now Needs to Explain Why

How to Talk to [Mamí & Papí] about Anything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 20:09


After years of working toward a career as a tenure track professor, Sylvia left this path in academia under duress. And getting her Peruvian parents to understand her decision also proved challenging. And Dr. Michelle Espino Lira, who studies Latinos in higher education, speaks with Juleyka about connecting our bold acts of self-advocacy with the grit and resolve our parents modeled for us.Our expert this week is Dr. Michelle Espino Lira, Professor of Student Affairs at the College of Education at the University of Maryland. Learn more about her work here and about her podcast Latinx Inteligentsia . If you loved this episode, listen to Taking a Break from Grad School, Then Telling Her Parents and Is Tenure the End or the Beginning (from our sibling podcast, How to Talk to [High Achievers] about Anything.We'd love to hear your stories of triumph and frustration so send us a detailed voice memo to virginia@lwcstudios.com. You might be on a future episode! Let's connect on Twitter and Instagram at @TalkToMamiPapi and email us at hello@talktomamipapi.com. And follow us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.

UCSC Slugcast
Latino Heritage Month: Influential UCSC Latinx alumni and professors

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 9:35


In honor of Latinx heritage month, Isabel starts a series on influential Latinx alumni and professors at UCSC. This episode focuses on bestselling author Reyna Grande and her time at UCSC, plus her success after graduating.Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

UCSC Slugcast
UCSC Community Archivist

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 16:18


David interviews Rebecca Hernandez, the former director of UC Santa Cruz's American Indian Resource Center (AIRC), who is now the university's first community archivist.Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

Pivoting Out of Edu
#58 "Student Affairs to L&D at Deloitte" Featuring Dan Wehr

Pivoting Out of Edu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 20:24


Dan Wehr's story will resonate with many of our listeners because worked in housing, student activities, AND orientation! Now he is working in learning and development at Deloitte. Check out his story!

SA Voices From the Field
Concealed Carry on Campus

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 38:06


This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Dr. Scott Peska, Dr. Katie L. Treadwell, Dr. Joseph Pickering about their recent article in NASPA's Leadership Exchange magazine about Concealed Carry on Campus. Dr. Scott Peska serves as the Assistant Vice President of Student Services and Alumni Relations at Waubonsee Community College in Sugar Grove, IL  where he oversees a number of Student Development departments, serves as the Chair of the Campus Assessment Team, and is a Deputy Title IX Officer.  Dr. Peska previously worked at Northern Illinois University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Illinois State University.    In NASPA, Dr. Peska is actively part of the Campus Safety and Violence Prevention Knowledge Community, specifically with the Enough is Enough campaign against violence. He serves as a reviewer for the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice and has previously served as the Region IV-E Public Policy Division Representative, Region IV-E Community College Division Representative, and a member of the 2017 Annual Conference Planning Committee.  Dr. Katie L. Treadwell researches and writes extensively about the aftermath of university crises and the subsequent experiences of campus first responders. Katie developed her professional identity in higher education through roles in Oklahoma City, Waco, Texas, and New York City, three cities deeply altered by terrorism and the aftermath of disaster. Inspired by her own experience with campus and community tragedy, Katie primarily researches the personal experiences of higher education administrators who encounter high-profile campus disasters. Her research portfolio includes in-depth investigations of intentional violence, terrorism, natural disasters, and accidents that forever change a campus community. Katie's work appears in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Encyclopedia of Strategic Leadership and Management, Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, About Campus, and other higher education publications. She frequently consults with campus leaders on issues of preventing violence and improving campus safety. In collaboration with higher education leaders across the country, Katie co-edited Crisis, Compassion, and Resiliency in Student Affairs. Katie currently serves as Assistant Vice Provost for Student Affairs at the University of Kansas, as well as chair of the NASPA Campus Safety and Violence Prevention Knowledge Community. Dr. Joseph Pickering is a student affairs professional with 15 years of experience in the field. His ongoing research portfolio focuses on the impact of concealed carry legislation on Texas universities and colleges, particularly campus leaders' and law enforcement perspectives. Dr. Pickering is a triple Gator, graduating with his B.A. in History, Masters in Student Personnel in Higher Education, and his Doctorate in Higher Education Administration, where his research focused on the impact of concealed carry legislation in the state of Texas. Dr. Pickering comes from a family of Law Enforcement officers, his grandfather helped start the police department at Rutgers University, his father served as a Military Police Officer and a police officer. Dr. Pickering is also an alumnus of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, the site of a tragic 2018 Valentine's Day shooting. Dr. Pickering remains connected with students and fellow alumni from Stoneman Douglas and continues to support a variety of efforts to help schools and institutions learn from and better prepare for mass casualty/safety incidents. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

UCSC Slugcast
The Loop Bus

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 4:31


Isabel explains how the loop bus works on campus. Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

On Campus - with CITI Program
Student Engagement: Colleges and Universities - On Campus Podcast

On Campus - with CITI Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 12:17


Amy Haggard is the Associate Director of Alumni and Student Engagement for the Division of Undergraduate Studies at Florida State University (FSU). She received a BS in Recreation and Sport Management from Coastal Carolina University, an MS in Student Affairs in Higher Education from Colorado State University, and is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Higher Education at FSU. Amy has worked in higher education for 11 years working with a variety of different student groups. Her background in collegiate athletics, academic affairs, alumni relations, and student affairs education lends to her dedication to the development of student success and wellness.Student engagement is a vital part of the college and university experience, ranging from activities at the student union to international coffee hours and much more across an institution's landscape. Student engagement allows students to interact with one another and form meaningful connections and immerse themselves in experiences which will prepare them for life during and after college. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, the way in which students engage on campus has shifted, with an increase in student demand for online and hybrid activities at an institution. Administrators, faculty, and staff can support students through creating, fostering, and supporting meaningful engagement opportunities which meet students where they are at.Learn more about CITI Program: https://about.citiprogram.org/ 

UCSC Slugcast
TA tips

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 1:06


David provides quick tips on TAing for graduate students. Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

The Leadership Educator Podcast
Mentoring Student Affairs Professionals with Dr. Wanda Lewis-Campbell

The Leadership Educator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 48:54


In this episode, Dan and Lauren meet with Lauren's mentor, Dr. Wanda Lewis-Campbell. Wanda shares her entrance into Student Affairs and the powerful impact Phyllis Marshall had on her becoming an empowered leader in higher education. The trio discusses advice for keeping students at the center of your work in college.

Student Affairs One Thing
24. Dr. Monica Burke

Student Affairs One Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 7:18


We chat with Dr. Monica Burke, a faculty member in the Department of Counseling and Student Affairs at Western Kentucky University. Background info on our guest plus a full transcript is available at studentaffairspodcast.com/ot24 This podcast is sponsored by Alcohol101+, a cost-free digital alcohol education program developed by Responsibility.org. Designed to be used by colleges and universities, the course includes interactive and quick pace programming covering core alcohol education topics. To learn more about visit https://www.alcohol101.plus.

Let's Talk UNLV
“Design the Life You Want with Career Service”

Let's Talk UNLV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 29:51


On this episode of Let's Talk UNLV hosts Keith and Tanya sit down with Professional Development Specialist, Dr. Darren Vetter. As a leader in Career Service, Dr. Vetter is passionate about helping students and alumni find the best career for them. Dr. Vetter shares several resources available to students and alumni from workshops to an interviewing tool that scores your interview skills! Tune in to learn more and catch Dr. Vetter at the next UNLV Career Fair happening October 26th!

Anette On Education
Encouraging College Students Every Day --Denese Skinner

Anette On Education

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 32:26


Anette visits with long-time friend and educational leader, Denese Skinner, Vice-President of Student Affairs at Amarillo College. Denese Skinner has 29 years of leadership experience in higher education as well 7 years of successful public school service as a teacher and a coach. At Amarillo College, Denese coordinates the efforts of the talented team within the Division of Student Affairs to ensure student success by enhancing the classroom experience through purposeful co-curricular activities and support services.Denese has prior higher education experience at West Texas A&M University where she served in various leadership roles: the director for Career Services, the interim vice president of Student Affairs, the interim dean of Enrollment Management, the senior director of Enrollment Management, and the director of Student Counseling Services.A few of Denese's professional honors include: twice receiving the WTAMU Clarence E. Thompson Staff Excellence Award; recipient of the WTAMU President's Community Service Award; honored with the Texans Caring for Texans recognition given by State agencies in the Panhandle region. Also on Denese's list of accomplishments, you will find that she was a head coach of a state championship girls' basketball team that, at that time, set a national record of 12 state championships. Denese is a graduate of and past board member for Leadership Amarillo & Canyon. Denese was also a part of the efforts of Panhandle Twenty/20.Denese is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Supervisor as well as a Certified Professional Vocational Counselor.   She is certified as a Six Sigma Black Belt as well as a Gallup-certified CliftonStrengths coach.  Denese holds a M.Ed. in School Counseling from West Texas A&M University and received her B.S. in Education from Texas Tech University. Episode produced by Darwin Carlisle. Music by Bret Boyer.

Start By Listening
Brescia University - Understanding How Trauma and Overwhelm Shows Up on Campus, Especially During a Global Pandemic

Start By Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 66:26


Welcome to Start By Listening! We are excited to have you on this journey with us toward healing and transformation.  Start By Listening is a podcast about sexual harm, trauma and advocacy.  Season Three - Hodge Podge - We are taking SBL to the community and speaking with various groups and people on the traumas they encounter in their part of the community and asking how they may want their organization to address trauma survivors in the future. This season, we will be delivering exceptional conversations and creative ideas while creating a safe space for connection and thoughtful experiences. We are going beyond sexual harm and really asking, "What does trauma look like and what does this experience look like for the Western Kentucky communities we serve?" We will be talking with various community members, and delving into difficult conversations where trauma intersects our communities and people. Season Three finds us growing and changing how we do our work. Our goal is to drop 2-3 podcasts per month on Fridays and you will find most of our episodes on YouTube as well! Yes, New Beginnings has a YouTube channel.In this episode, New Beginnings podcasters Jennifer, The Friendly Therapist, and Shelby, Victim Advocate have a very authentic conversation with an amazing group of individuals who keep Brescia University running. We had the opportunity to sit down with three very unique and beautiful people, all focused on helping college students maneuver adulthood, graduate and find their career, while also tending to the needs of those who have experienced trauma.Frather Larry Hostetter - Father Larry Hostetter has been President of Brescia since 2007, previously serving as a member of the faculty teaching theology and ethics. Ordained a priest of the Diocese of Owensboro in 1987, he has spent most of his ministry as an educator, most recently extending his love of teaching into the world of podcasting with his own show called “Fighting Catholic Jetlag.”Patricia Lovett - Patricia Lovett is the Interim Vice President of Student Affairs/Dean of Students at Brescia University. She received her B.S. in Dietetics and her M.S. degree in Human Development and Leadership from Murray State University. She currently serves on the board for the Western Academy at the Neblett Center and the Postsecondary Education Administration Advisory Council for Murray State University. Patricia has worked in various areas of higher education for over 22 years. When not at work, she enjoys spending time with her husband and daughter.Morgan Russelburg -Morgan holds a Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice from Kentucky Wesleyan College and a Master's Degree in Student Affairs in Higher Education from Western Kentucky University. She currently serves as the Director of Career Services at Brescia University. In this role, she assists students with multiple aspects of preparing for their careers after graduation and teaches a career readiness course. Morgan has been happily married to her husband for five years and loves spending time with her two sons."Brescia University is focused on producing servant leaders whose lives exemplify leadership capabilities balanced with the responsibility of service. It is what we call the Brescia Difference: Respect for the Sacred; Devotion to Learning; Commitment to Growth in Virtue; and Promotion of Servant Leadership. The Latin word for love is Caritas and the effort to find meaning in this call to love is often called “Caritas Theology.” https://www.brescia.edu/YOU WON'T WANT TO MISS THIS EPISODE. Remember to subscribe to our Podcast - Start By Listening - found on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, Deezer and more!YouTube Link for today's episode: https://youtu.be/TEwCRRJfatgAlso subscribe to our New Beginnings YouTube channel!! - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxT9OQkPpCPSAgcUhhqUkmQStart By Listening will drop on Fridays, 2-3x monthly, bringing you an interesting and intriguing look into the work we do, while educating about trauma and healing. If you would like to reach out and contact Jennifer or Shelby, please email at SBL@nbowensboro.org. Finally, a few shout outs. If you liked our jingle jingle, hop on over to www.uriahwilde.com and talk with Seth Hedges. He created the beautiful music for our podcast. Thank you SETH! Another special thank you to Rodney Newton, he helped us learn how to put this Podcast together and create a beautiful thing. Thank you RODNEY!!!To find local resources for sexual abuse please visit www.RAINN.org or call the National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673, 24/7/365

UCSC Slugcast
Field Work

UCSC Slugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 5:11


Field Work is a common way in Anthropology to get experience doing research. Gwen retells her experience in a primatology field school in Costa Rica. Disclaimer: Sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and Success and produced by our student podcasters, UCSC Slugcast supports free expression of ideas. Please be aware that the views and opinions expressed by speakers are that of the speaker alone and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Similarly, views and opinions of University employees or students are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Slugcast, the Division of Student Affairs and Success, or the University.

SA Voices From the Field
ACHA and affirming healthcare for student in the wake of Roe v Wade overturn

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 41:43


This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Dr. Jessica Higgs about some of the ramifications of affirming healthcare for students following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Jessica Higgs is a Family Medicine physician with a certificate of additional qualification in Sports Medicine. She completed medical school at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and Family Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria. She completed her Sports Medicine fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh. Since 2008 Higgs has been the director of Bradley University Health Services, a private university of about 5000 students, and team physician at Bradley since 2011. Dr. Higgs is currently serving as President of the American College Health Association after serving 4 years as a member at large to the board and two years as vice-president. She also currently serves as chair of the Sports Medicine Committee for the Missouri Valley Conference.  Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

Outlook on Radio Western
Outlook 2022-10-03 - The Blind Leading The Blind With Alex & Jessica From COBD

Outlook on Radio Western

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 59:26


The blind leading the blind. One of our guests this week on Outlook says: “That is like the best idea ever!” On our first episode of October's Blindness Awareness Month (or what we like to call BAM) we're speaking with Alex Jurgensen and Jessica Gladysz from the Canadian Organization of the Blind and Deafblind (COBD) - Alex is director of operations and community engagement with the Camp Bowen Division and Jessica is Director of Programs and Student Affairs for the Pacific Training Centre Division and has been of the Camp Bowen Division in various roles. Out on the west coast, a short 20 minute boat trip off west Vancouver there is an island, the home of a community of blind Canadians for over 100 years since the CNIB was there. They created a camp for blind children and Camp Bowen on Bowen Island is where many blind children, including our guests, met and discovered friendship and common ground. There, they weren't isolated or blocked by barriers. Instead, they were welcomed and found out, many for the first time, that it was okay to be blind. And on the show today, we learn about the history of Bowen Island and Camp Bowen and the impression it left on so many, about how the Pacific Training Centre for the Blind in Victoria and Camp Bowen (Camp Bowen Working Group) came together with their programs for teaching blind Canadians the skills they needed, in many cases for the first time, for success, and the kinds of programs offered as the Canadian Organization of the Blind and Deafblind was formed and is rapidly and over time expanding. Now Camp Bowen and COBD offer summer camps, braille literacy camps for kids, and music camps for children and adults and provide a glamping situation, alongside activities such as horseback riding, swimming, boating, self-defense, boardgames, camp fires, and movie nights. They have received federal funding for a 4-year plan, access to a beach front with 11 thousand square feet on 2 and a half acres, and will offer 8 camps in summer and are now running a 10-month intensive independent skills program (eventually for up to 38 people) where students are taught cane travel, braille instruction, assistive tech training, cooking and home skills, and employment preparedness. We're no longer being taken care of (by CNIB or others) - the program is Blind People In Charge and they really are, including (for the first time in Canada) the Deafblind community right there in COBD's name. Blind and Deafblind Canadians have been a major part of Bowen Island for a century, a solid part of the culture, and have big plans for the future. So check out everything they offer on their website, including 21 programs, (some virtual), a tech loan bank, and blind hub with lots of resources. Also consider making a donation if you have the means as these programs are all so important here in Canada and require funding to continue. https://cobd.ca

Student Affairs NOW
Identity Interconnections: Pursuing Poststructural Possibility in Student Affairs Praxis

Student Affairs NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:27


This conversation features the two editors of the new book, Identity Interconnections. Lisa Delacruz Combs and Dr. Aeriel A. Ashlee discuss concepts and connections from their book, including compassionate cautions, liminality, threshold theory, healing and transformation, paradox and nuance, aspiring allyship, and even a Rihanna quote.

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)
The Vice Provost of Student Affairs at Dalhousie University addresses the problem of student street parties. We hear a portion of the prime minister's funding announcement in Dartmouth today. And on the phone-in: Chef Craig Flinn

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 53:06


Rick Ezekiel, the Vice Provost of Student Affairs at Dalhousie University discusses the problem of student street parties. We hear a portion of what the prime minister announced in Dartmouth today in terms of storm relief funding. And on the phone-in: Chef Craig Flinn. We also hear about a pumpkin house in New Brunswick.

Let's Talk UNLV
"The Latest on Monkeypox and Covid"

Let's Talk UNLV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 24:54


On this episode of Let's Talk UNLV hosts Keith and Tanya are joined by the show's most frequent guest Dr. Brian Labus to provide listeners with an update on battling Covid19. Dr. Labus also debunks all the things you THINK you know about monkeypox. Tune in for another informative episode full of safety tips, resources, and more information on what to expect next."

Higher Ed ReWired
Refocusing Basic Needs: The Student Housing Crisis in Higher Education

Higher Ed ReWired

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 23:45


About This Episode:The current housing crisis for students cannot be ignored. A survey conducted in 2019 found on-campus that most students in California have experienced some type of housing insecurity with the highest risk being students from marginalized communities. The traditional on campus basic needs centers are not enough to help the students in this crisis and universities are now trying to adapt their programs to be able to further help students and keep them in college. In this episode, we speak with the executive director of the Center for Equitable Higher Education at CSU Long Beach about the current student housing crisis; a student who shares his real-life experiences with the struggle to find housing; and a former case manager who created the Crisis Assistance and Resource Education Support program at Sacramento State by using data and personal stories from students in need. Featured on This Episode:Rashida Crutchfield is an associate professor in the School of Social Work at California State University, Long Beach. She earned a Master of Social Work at the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis and her Doctorate in Educational Leadership from CSULB.  She worked for the National Conference for Community and Justice in Long Beach and the American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern Missouri before serving on the Covenant House California staff. She is currently the executive director of the Center for Equitable Higher Education. Danielle Munoz is a licensed therapist and case manager who was working on Sacramento State's behavioral intervention team. She earned a bachelor's degree in sociology from UC Davis and a Master's of Marriage and Family therapy from CSU Sacramento.  Marissa Islas is one of the Basic Needs Housing and Education Coordinators at the UC San Diego Basic Needs Center. She earned a Bachelor in Global Health, Psychology Minor from The University of California, San Diego.  Kameo Quenga is a Basic Needs Housing & Education Coordinator at the UC San Diego Basic Needs Center. She earned a Bachelor of psychology from San Jose State University and her Master of Higher education and Student Affairs from the University of San Francisco. Resources for This Episode:Center for Equitable Higher EducationCalifornia State University, Long BeachUC San Diego Basic Needs CenterCSU Student Well-Being and Basic Needs

How to Be Awesome at Your Job
804: A Recruiter's Insider Tips for Acing the Job Search with Zeinab Kahera

How to Be Awesome at Your Job

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 41:33


Zeinab Kahera shares the best job search practices learned from her decade of experience in recruiting, interviewing, and hiring in multiple industries. — YOU'LL LEARN — 1) A behind-the-scenes look into what recruiters want to see 2) Powerful questions to identify your unique expertise 3) The most important thing to communicate in your resume Subscribe or visit AwesomeAtYourJob.com/ep804 for clickable versions of the links below. — ABOUT ZEINAB — Zeinab Kahera is a career specialist, who specializes in working with people to amplify their voice while utilizing expert techniques to build a cover letter and resume that is professional, strong, and best represents them. Her professional expertise comes from a decade of experience in recruitment, interviewing, and hiring in multiple industries. She has also served in Human Resources and various management roles including for a Fortune 500 company. Zeinab earned her Bachelor in Business Management from Georgia State University and a Master of Education in Counseling with a concentration in Student Affairs from the University of West Georgia. • Email: zeinab@zeinabkahera.com • LinkedIn: Zeinab Kahera • Website: ZeinabKahera.com — RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE SHOW — • Tool: Grammarly • Tool: Calendly • Assessment: Needs & Values Program • Book: The Big Leap: Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level by Gay Hendricks • Book: The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom, A Toltec Wisdom Book by Don Miguel Ruiz — THANK YOU SPONSORS! — • Storyworth. Give the fathers in your life something special at StoryWorth.com/awesomeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Albany Law School Podcast
Claire Stratton ‘23 - SBA President, Sci. Tech. Journal EIC, Student Advocate

Albany Law School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:46


Claire Stratton does it all at Albany Law School, but we will just stay out of the way and let her speak for herself! A fixture among the current students, she is the Executive President of the Student Bar Association and the Editor-in-Chief of the Albany Law Journal Science and Technology Vol. 33. Coming to the school all the way from Texas amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic, Claire Stratton loves it on New Scotland Ave and the school owes a debt of gratitude to the high school counselor that directed her toward a path in law. Albany Law School Student Bar Association: https://albanylawsba.org/ Albany Law Journal of Science & Technology: https://www.albanylawscitech.org/ Albany Law on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/albanylaw/albums Keenan Loder ‘23 - Editor-in-Chief of Albany Law Review, Vol. 86: https://soundcloud.com/user-952955809-873766748/keenan-loder-23-editor-in-chief-of-albany-law-review-vol-86 Jenean Taranto selected as Associate Dean of Student Affairs: https://www.albanylaw.edu/about/news/jenean-taranto-selected-associate-dean-student-affairs Rosemary Queenan selected as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs: https://www.albanylaw.edu/about/news/rosemary-queenan-selected-associate-dean-academic-affairs

SA Voices From the Field
Celebrating National Student Parent month with Kimberly Steed-Page

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 38:43


This is season seven, public policy in action, where we will explore public policy issues impacting higher education today and how this will impact the work that you do on a daily basis. This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Kimberly Steed-Page about some of the unique issues that student parents are dealing with as well as looking at policy and best practice concerns when it comes to the needs of these students.  A higher education professional with over 20 years of experience, Kimberly Steed-Page believes that when student parents succeed, their children and families succeed. Diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging center her work at MSU. As director of the MSU Student Parent Resource Center, she is dedicated to helping college students, children and families reach their greatest potential. Her goals as director are to increase campus and community awareness of student families and their experiences at MSU, expand services and support for student families, improve outreach to area schools and teen parents regarding college opportunities; and to engage  student families in advocacy. Kim earned her bachelor's degree in social work from the University of Texas El Paso and master's in social work from Michigan State University. She is also a clinical faculty member in the MSU School of Social Work and teaches  a variety of social work courses. Kim balances work with raising two boys, Bryson age 8, and Jayden, 17 with her husband, Rodney.   Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

The Empowerment Podcast By Naga
Decolonization and Empowerment Self Defense. An Interview with Magdalena Dircio Diaz

The Empowerment Podcast By Naga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 53:00


Colonization is all around us and even lives inside of us. We can find it right now as we look at our politics, power, spirituality, daily life, familiesand , relationships— it's literally everywhere. How do we become aware of it? And once we see it, how do we start to pull it apart? Join this interesting and wide-ranging discussion about decolonization and what it takes to deconstruct the predominant cultural and social paradigm. It's personal, it's lived and it's ours to become aware of and to move through. As people who are interested in empowerment and self-defense, how does this important topic impact the way we show up for ourselves and for others? ABOUT OUR GUEST: Magdalena Diaz works at the Office of Student Affairs at Cal State. She grew up undocumented which had a huge impact on her family life, her education and the choices available to her. Hear the story about a moment that changed the trajectory of her career and propelled her forward in her empowerment journey. Book Recommendation: The Revolution Starts at Home Find Magdalena: @soulwarriors_esd Special thanks to my producer, Collin Taber (@that2ndtaberkid, collintaber@gmail.com) Support this important work: Buy Me a Coffee  Donate through my website  Thank you! Join “The Empowerment Project” Group on Facebook. For everyone's safety, please know that if you don't answer the questions, we will not accept you into the group. #theempowermentpodcast, #theempowermentproject, #emowermentselfdefense, #selfdefense, #nagacommunity, #decolonization Connect with Silvia 

Let's Talk UNLV
"UNLV Service Day w/ SLL"

Let's Talk UNLV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 29:27


"On this episode of Let's Talk UNLV hosts Keith and Tanya are joined by Service Learning and Leadership's Jenny Stiles and Erick Ochoa. Tune in to hear all about this year's Service Day event, and to get involved with the community. Service day is taking place Friday, October 7th!”

Let's Talk UNLV
"Take What You Need Events w/ SLL"

Let's Talk UNLV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 27:44


"On this episode of Let's Talk UNLV hosts Dr. Tanya Crabb and Dr. Keith Rogers are joined by Basic Needs Coordinator, Ash Xander Quinn. Ash is a passionate advocate for service and being a resource for those in their community. Ash shares more about Service Learning and Leadership's Take What You Need (TWYN) event, including the resources available at the event, the history, how these events have impacted students and more. Tune in to learn more and spread the word about the TWYN Events taking place September 22, October 17th and November 15th!"

Student Affairs One Thing
23. W. Houston Dougharty

Student Affairs One Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:51


We chat with W. Houston Dougharty, Vice President for Student Affairs at Hofstra University. Background info on our guest plus a full transcript is available at https://www.studentaffairs.com/podcast/onething/s2/23-w-houston-dougherty/. This podcast is sponsored by Alcohol101+, a cost-free digital alcohol education program developed by Responsibility.org. Designed to be used by colleges and universities, the course includes interactive and quick pace programming covering core alcohol education topics. To learn more about visit https://www.alcohol101.plus.

Kōrero EAG - Start Local, Go Global
Kōrero EAG, S3, E5 - Romero Jalomo

Kōrero EAG - Start Local, Go Global

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 47:39


Romero Jalomo is the Vice President for Student Affairs at Hartnell College. He has served in this capacity for over nine years. Hartnell College is located in Salinas, California and serves approximately 14,000 students in the Salinas Valley.

SA Voices From the Field
Public Policy 101 - Beth Devonshire and Diana Ali

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 50:56


This is season seven, public policy in action, where we will explore public policy issues impacting higher education today and how this will impact the work that you do on a daily basis. This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Beth Devonshire, J.D., and Diana Ali and talked about some of the basics as it comes to Public Policy and how this intersects with the work that we do every day.  Beth Devonshire, J.D. is an experienced student affairs professional with expertise in student conduct, Title IX, threat assessment teams, policy development, trainings for various constituencies, and the impact legislative and legal decisions have on higher education.  From 2006-2018, Ms. Devonshire worked as the Associate Dean of Students at UMass Boston, the Director of Community Standards at Bridgewater State University, and the Director of Community Standards at Stonehill College.  In these roles, Ms. Devonshire was charged with oversight of the student conduct systems, membership in CARE/BIT teams, serving as the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and drafting policies and procedures related to students. Prior to her work in higher education, Beth served as a law clerk for the Justices of the Superior Court in Massachusetts and in multiple roles at the Massachusetts State House.   Ms. Devonshire has been an Associate with D. Stafford & Associates (DSA) since 2012 and she joined as a full-time consultant in August of 2018.  In this role, Beth works with institutions on issues involving Title IX, Clery Act, threat assessment, and other compliance related issues; and advises on policy and procedures, conducts trainings, participates in investigations, reviews enforcement practices of campus law enforcement, and serves in interim roles.  Ms. Devonshire also speaks on a variety of other topics including legislative and legal issues impacting higher education including FERPA, Clery, and Alcohol and other Drug Prevention.   Ms. Devonshire is a faculty member in New England College's Doctorate of Education Program and the Higher Education Administration program at Bridgewater State University. Additionally, Ms. Devonshire serves on the Public Policy Division for NASPA, and is also the former Massachusetts Public Policy Liaison for MA NASPA.  Beth also served as the Director of the Legislative Committee for the Association for Student Conduct Administrators (ASCA) for two years.    Ms. Devonshire is a member of the Massachusetts Bar.  She is a graduate of Stonehill College with a degree in English and Secondary Education and holds a J.D. from Suffolk University School of Law.  She is also a trained mediator. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

The Admissions Club
19. Once In A Lifetime: Having A College Experience With Intention with Jude Kiah, PhD

The Admissions Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 37:31


Many people have the intention to go to college, but haven't thought much more beyond that acceptance letter. Speaking of intention, colleges are also intentional in the experience they design for students. Some colleges go overboard in their desire to attract and retain students. Did you know that LSU students have a lazy river as part of their campus? In this episode, Elizabeth talks with Jude Kiah about how to experience college intentionally as a student and how colleges intentionally design the student experience. Jude Kiah is the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. In this episode you'll learn….The importance of getting out of your dorm room. Nothing will happen if you don't leave your room and see what opportunities exist.Why it is essential to say YES in college! Take risks, try things. These will become your favorite lasting college memories. How college departments work together to create a positive student experience. The Admissions Club Podcast is your one-stop shop for all things college admissions, complete with a nostalgic 80s playlist and Gen X vibes. It's hard to believe that we've traded in scrunchies and Bruce Springsteen posters for walking our kids through the college admissions process!  But, I'm here to share my 25 years of higher education experience, with 10 years of direct college admissions experience, with you and your student so you don't have to walk it alone. Connect with Elizabeth!WebsiteFacebookYouTubeLinkedIn

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 59 – Unstoppable Centered Leader with Donovan Nichols

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 64:19


What do a Rubik's Cube and leadership have in common? Hint, think about the title of this episode.   Meet Donovan Nichols who describes himself as a values-based, recovering workaholic. Donovan always felt his mind seemed to work differently than those around him, but it was not until his late thirties that he discovered he not only was an ADHD individual but that he also had a reading disability.   Disabilities notwithstanding, Donovan went through school all be it a bit slower than others, graduated from college and obtained a master's degree, and had a successful 15-year career in the college student affairs arena.   Eventually, he discovered that his life path was taking him in a different direction. Today, he is seeking his Ph.D. in Higher Education. He also is a speaker and teacher on Leadership. One of his main programs is based on solving the Rubik's Cube. He will tell us why the cube is so important and how teaching students to solve it helps them advance and learn to live a better life.   Donovan's story and this whole episode are quite fascinating and inspirational. I had a lot of fun getting the opportunity to interview Donovan and I hope you will have as much fun and joy listening to this program.   About the Guest: is a passionate educator, optimistic innovator, servant leader, caring speaker, husband, father, and fun seeker! As a professional speaker since 2008, Donovan has inspired thousands of people across the country to see the world from a different perspective, discover solutions to their challenges, and unlock their potential. This winner of the prestigious “20 Under 40” award for distinguished leaders has a proven track record for transforming groups into high-functioning, award-winning organizations. Through overcoming his learning disability and mental health challenges, Donovan has gained effective life tools and a unique perspective that he loves to share with others. During the pandemic, Donovan left his career in student affairs after 15 years and is now a full-time speaker and Ph.D. student. This self-proclaimed values-based, recovering workaholic says his greatest accomplishments in life are (1) marrying an incredible woman who makes him a better man, and (2) tag-teaming with his wife Alycia to raise two loving and joyful sons, Sawyer and Knox. Donovan's primary goal in life is to help people live happier, healthier, and more balanced!         About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Thanks for being here, wherever you happen to be. I hope that you will enjoy our episode today and that you're enjoying this whole series. I'd love to hear from you. So don't hesitate to reach out and let me know what you think we have Donovan Nichols on unstoppable mindset today, and I'm gonna let Donovan tell his story. So Donovan, welcome to our podcast.   Donovan Nichols  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm excited to be here. Thanks for having me.   Michael Hingson  01:47 Why don't you tell us a little bit about kind of where you came from your early years and all that sort of stuff just so people get to know you a bit.   Donovan Nichols  01:55 Sure, I am from a blue collar family to amazing and loving parents who are both kind of educators by trade, and instilled that in myself and my family from from a young age very values based but, you know, went through some hardships. And at one point were on food stamps, and government cheese and all of that stuff when I was a little bit smaller, and they just had put everything into our family and said they're going to do everything that they can to make sure that we have a good life that we're all educated and giving people so that's kind of where we started from. I was born and raised in Sylvania, Ohio, which is a suburb of Toledo and on the Ohio Michigan border. And I went to the University of Toledo did my undergrad, my masters there, and I am now a doctoral student as well. And getting my doctorate at the University of Toledo. I've lived a couple different places. I've lived in Las Vegas. I was there for six years. I've lived in Georgia and Athens, Georgia. I was there for about three years, and also lived in Prague in the Czech Republic for six weeks, and was a nomad around Europe for another four weeks. So I've had a lot of great experiences over life. So you're back in Slovenia. I am back in Sylvania. Yep. So I made my whirlwind tour of the United States, when you know, Ohio, to Nevada to Georgia, back to Ohio.   Michael Hingson  03:36 Now, when were you in Las Vegas?   Donovan Nichols  03:38 I was there from 2006 until 2012.   Michael Hingson  03:42 It is certainly changed over the years.   Donovan Nichols  03:45 Oh my gosh, yeah, I went back just, you know, couple years later, and there's just new buildings and other buildings were torn down. And it's just it's an ever evolving city.   Michael Hingson  03:57 We were there almost three weeks ago, for the first time in a long time. I've been to a couple of computer electronics shows, but not really got a chance to see much of the city. But we went to a concert actually to a Michael Buble a concert is just amazing how much it has changed. And the prices have gone up a great deal.   Donovan Nichols  04:18 Yeah, that's I mean, my parents went back I think for their 25th anniversary, and they were talking about how the prices were so low and you know, got to do all this great stuff. And now the prices are just astronomical.   Michael Hingson  04:30 Yeah, even food is not something anymore that you go to Las Vegas and expect to get an inexpensive price.   Donovan Nichols  04:37 It's pretty right. Yeah. And they're charging for parking now. And different blades   Michael Hingson  04:41 are charging for parking. And hotels are very expensive. And yet people still go and gamble. We're not gamblers. So we didn't do that.   Donovan Nichols  04:49 Yeah, but I love my experience there had a wonderful time as a young new professional in that city.   Michael Hingson  04:56 So you went off to college and got a master's degree and all that and then you went into the workforce. What did you do?   Donovan Nichols  05:03 Yeah, so actually, after I got my undergrad in communication started off in engineering, actually, my brother's a mechanical engineer, actually, as a nuclear engineer now, followed a little bit in his footsteps. And then, after my freshman year realized that I needed to carve my own path and find what worked best for me. I still remember sitting in one of my engineering classes, huge lecture hall, just looking in the screen and asking myself are, what am I doing here? And it was kind of this not only what am I doing here in this in this program, but what is the purpose of me going to college? What is the purpose of me being on this earth and had this you know, philosophical awakening, realize that I loved leadership and being on campus and helping other students getting engaged and really enjoying their college experience. And so from that, I decided to go get my Master's in higher education. So I did that right after my undergrad. And then right after that, I joined AmeriCorps, which is like the domestic Peace Corps, that is to fight poverty in America, I spent a year in America before. And then I moved out west to Las Vegas spent 15 years working in student activities. And that's kind of where my career led me is to help other students get involved on campus, teach them about leadership, and the you know, just enjoy their college experience and take the most from it as possible so that they can grow and develop and be amazing citizens of the world.   Michael Hingson  06:42 Now, you have said that you have a disability, is that something that you always knew or you discovered later, or what   Donovan Nichols  06:52 I can still remember back to being in second grade, and the teacher told me that I was in the lowest reading group. And I just wondered, you know, why I thought I was a good student, I thought I was very intelligent. And I just, you know, kind of question it. But then throughout life, I just always knew something was different with my brain. And I think a lot of people, you know, think differently, we have all these different types of neuro diversities, but they're just something that I couldn't wrap my mind around, but just knew I was different. As I would take tests, I would have to plug my ears, tap my foot on the ground, I would always be the last student that would take a test, it took me forever to read through everything. Funny story with my AC T's, I took the AC T the first time, my math score was good. My reading score was low, and knew that it took me a long time to read and actually what would happen is I get to the questions, and the test would be over. And I wouldn't be able to actually answer the questions. So I just fill in bubbles. So I my my mom said, Well, why don't you take a speed reading course, I took the course went back took the AC T again, did better in the math section that I didn't study for whatsoever and worse in the reading section. So so I you know, I there's all of these hints, but I had never gotten tested. It wasn't until I got to, to the University of Toledo working as the assistant dean of students and I taught a course and leadership, I had a student that came up after class, and said that he needed an accommodation for the class. And it really gave me pause, because he is an extremely intelligent student was highly engaged, I would have had no clue that he had a diversity. And it turned out that he had a learning disability. And so I from that point, I started to try to figure out a little bit more because his story really jives with you know, what I had felt my entire life. And at the age of 37, I ended up going through testing, which is not easy to try to find a place to get tested as an adult and the amount of money that you have to pay to get testing and I had to go seven or eight times for the testing. It's, you know, it's not an easy process to go through. And the ultimate outcome was I found out I have ADHD inattentive type. And I also have a reading impediment that makes it somewhat difficult are actually very difficult for me to to read. And so the the ADHD really as I'm reading, I'll get to the bottom of the page and realize that my mind had completely wandered, I have no idea what I read. So the second time I'll say okay, I'm gonna focus this time and I'm gonna get it. I'll get to the end of the page again and realize that my mind wandered once again, even though I told myself I was gonna focus. So it's You know all that to say that it wasn't until I was 37 years old, that I was finally diagnosed with a learning disability, but it was always something that I had known. I just didn't know how, what exactly it was.   Michael Hingson  10:14 So when you say a learning disability, what, what is that? Or can you describe it in more detail? Or? Yes?   Donovan Nichols  10:21 So with the learning disability really, you know, it's, it's something within your brain so they call it a neuro diversity and it with the neuro diversity, it's essentially that, you know, your brain works differently. And so it's there's so many different types of neuro diversities that are out there specifically with ADHD there's, and then you know, a lot of people think with ADHD, it's, you know, somebody that's bouncing off the walls, and it's just very hyperactive, which that is a type of ADHD. But another is the inattentive type. So for me, it is I can be looking at somebody and having a conversations. And as we're having a conversation, I could actually be saying, Yep, aha, and it seems like I'm paying attention, and my mind is completely somewhere else. And so I just get, you know, attracted to different stimulus that happened, I won't mind wanders frequently, when, you know, I was just before we started talking, I was closing tabs, because I had 112, web browsers open. And that's just, I get interested in something, I'm like, Oh, that's really cool when I start to research that, and then that leads me to something else. So that's one part of it. Another piece that people don't really know, is that I have hyper focus. And that hyper focus is I can just get so completely engrossed in something that the rest of the world just kind of goes away. And I just get deep into whatever that is. And so if it's something that my mind is very interested in, that's, that's a piece of ADHD that people don't really know, they think it's kind of you're looking at all these different things in your mind's wandering all the time. But your, your mind can also hyper focus as well. So I'd like to talk about that, because that's something that people don't necessarily think of, or know about.   Michael Hingson  12:17 So what do you do to address that in terms of everyday life? Or reading and so on? Now, are there things that you can do or, yeah, that you started to perform, or what, there   Donovan Nichols  12:29 are some medications that help the you know, the other thing with learning disability is there's no cure. Right to it there, you know, there are medications that can help with somebody's condition, so they can concentrate better, be less impulsive, feel calmer, and, and then there's all their accommodations that you can make. And these are, you know, practices that you can use a skill, and something that I didn't realize throughout my life as I had created my own accommodations. And that's when I was diagnosed, I had, you know, talk to the doctor about a psychologist and just said, you know, what can I do? And they said, Well, you know, you've already figured out some things without even knowing it. So some of the things that I do is I will listen to meditation music, while I work for classical music, my entire master's thesis was written while I listen to classical music, and there is just something about it, that allows my mind to focus a little bit more. And so that works for me, I usually need, you know, quiet or you no door shut. And there's also you know, these accommodations that you make there, there are some times that it can come off negatively to other people. I've heard throughout my life, and this is before I knew that I had a learning disability, that people would say that I'm closed off and not approachable, because my door would be shut at work. Well, what I was doing is I was really trying to accommodate my learning disability, so I could focus in on what I was doing, but it felt to other people, like I was closing them off or just trying to not be approachable. And so that that until I was you know, later on in life, then I started to try to find ways, okay, how can I keep my door open at time so that I'm approachable, but at the same time, be able to find what works for me so that I can focus in you know, so that that's one of the things that I do, you know, one of the things that I had talked about earlier is like, I will tap my foot to a beat. And sometimes when I'm doing that, or shaking my leg, I have to be careful because in a meeting when I'm shaking my leg, it'd be snowing to somebody if I make the table shake, but you know, for me that rhythm that there just something about music, I've always been, you know, captivated by music and a musician play guitar sing. And that is something that helps my mind find a rhythm and be able to stay concentrated on whatever I'm working on.   Michael Hingson  14:59 So So you discovered that you had a learning disability, it's always good to find the answers, isn't it?   Donovan Nichols  15:05 Oh, absolutely. You know, it's one of those things where I didn't know what I wanted the outcome to be. When I went and got tested, you know, it was like, Okay, if I, if I don't have a learning disability, then, you know, then what, then okay, well, why is all of this stuff happening? Or why do I think differently? Or, you know, why can I not pay attention? And then, you know, the other aspect of it is okay, well, if I find out a learning disability, then what, you know, I have a learning disability. So what, what comes next, and I think the best is, is knowing, because once you know, then you can address it. And I really wish that I would have been tested as a young child, it wasn't as prevalent getting tested back then. But I really wish that if I would have had accommodations during my AC T, I probably would have done much better, I might have gotten more scholarships, to be able to go to college. And so there's a lot of other things that could be beneficial. I was, you know, I was a straight A student going through to through school, which is one of the reasons why I'm like, well, there's no way that I have a learning disability, I'm able to get A's in class. But what the rest of the world didn't know is I'm putting in triple the amount of work and not getting any sleep at night, because I'm reading and it's taking me a long time to get everything done. And so that it's funny, because one of my my pieces is that I say that I'm a recovering workaholic. And a part of that is that workaholism, I think, came from my learning disability of having to put in the extra hours. And so the more hours that I put in, the better I could do, and my accommodation was, well, I'm gonna feel better about myself if I go above and beyond what people's expectations are, because I am not able to do it as fast as other people are.   Michael Hingson  16:59 Right? Well, so you were in, in the college environment, student activities and so on for 15 years. And I remember going a long time now, but a lot of the Student Affairs people that I knew at UC Irvine when I was there, and not only enjoyed talking with them, but they they helped a lot in terms of assisting with sometimes accommodations and financial aid and just being integrated into the campus. So it's clearly a very rewarding career to be involved in all that. But then you switched, what prompted that,   Donovan Nichols  17:35 it is a very rewarding area to work in. I mean, just to see the development of students over the course of the time that you get to work with them, but then watching what they do after. I mean, I've I've had students that went on to be an assistant for David Copperfield, or another student who was on a Hulu program, Hulu series behind the mask and, and it's just awesome. I've had students that become PhD students before me. And that's just exciting to be able to see that development and know that I was allowed to be a part of their journey and, and help them along the way in any way that I could. So leaving that type of environment can be very difficult because of how rewarding it is. But essentially, what it came down to is work life balance. And I realized that as a young professional staying at work until two o'clock in the morning, you know, for comedians and movie nights and all that the fun entertainment or sticking around after a program just to talk to a student because they were going through something and to help them with their their mental health. You know, that was something as a new professional when I don't have kids, I didn't have a dog to take care of. I didn't have a spouse that wanted to see me out. And you know, all the time that that was fine. But as I later in life, I got married to an amazing woman, Alicia, we have two kids. So you're inox. We have four dogs. Chloe Tate, Doosan Vegas and with that and having people rely on you at home, but also just wanting to spend time with you and you wanting to spend time with them. It that type of lifestyle just wasn't as accommodating to what I wanted in my life anymore. And so I say, you know, I didn't go through a midlife crisis, I went through a midlife innovation, and I had to rediscover who I am and who I wanted to be. And ultimately, I know that I'm a caring human that wants to inspire people to reach their full potential and live balanced. So I wanted to look for a career that would allow me to do that. So I'm getting my PhD with the hopes of being faculty professor at a university, but I'm also speaking and doing consulting and through that I still get to be connected with college campuses, but I have a flexible schedule that allows me to do things like later today, and picking my son up early from school to take them to the doctor, you know, and that I have a wife that is incredibly amazing businesswoman, I definitely married up. And so she has a lot she, you know, can be flexible when she needs it. But she also needs to be at work, and she has great responsibility in her job. And so I I love being able to be a little bit more flexible, and being able to take care of the family in that way. What does she do, she's an executive vice president for credit union, Adrian Michigan, she just got promoted. And she has aspirations to be the first woman CEO of the credit union as well. And so, like I said, I married up, not only is she intelligent and caring and a great leader, but she always makes me want to be a better man, just by watching her and seeing what she does makes me want to be a better person. And she's so loving, supportive and encouraging of what I want to do. She was actually the one that suggested Hey, maybe you need to switch out of Student Affairs, and was encouraging in that way. When I was like, I don't know if I can do it. You know, all I see myself as Student Affairs after 15 years, you you kind of lock yourself into who you think you are. And so she really unlocked a different piece of me and said, you know, let's, let's do this for us, so that we can have more time together. And, and we can build this family together.   Michael Hingson  21:42 I was just going to ask how did you actually go to the point of switching careers? And clearly she opened the door?   Donovan Nichols  21:51 For sure. Yeah, it was it was a process. You know, it was kind of a several year process. She there's one night when I came home, and she goes, I know that you're not going to want to listen to this. But I think that you should think about switching careers. And it was one of those things where my mind was immediate, like, No, I can't do that. But she's like, just think about it. And it wasn't easy. You know, we had to take money out of retirement. Luckily, it was during the time of the pandemic. So there was some stimulus that was coming in that was very helpful to our families so they can make that transition. I have a doctoral graduate assistantship, or teaching assistantship that brings in a little bit of money. While I'm trying to gear up my, my speaking, as well as finishing my, my doctorate.   Michael Hingson  22:41 So going from assistant dean of students to graduate teaching assistant, well, it's, you know, it's, it's all about reward in your own mind. And, ultimately, there's nothing wrong with doing that. I think a number of us have had to switch careers over the years. I know, for me, I have, in one way or another, either by choice or not had to change what I do on more than one occasion. And, you know, it's it's all about being an adventurer, isn't it?   Donovan Nichols  23:12 Oh, yeah, absolutely. is quite the adventure. And, you know, going through from assistant dean to graduate assistant is, I say, I got a promotion. Yeah. So with that, I mean, it's, it's a totally different lifestyle. You know, obviously, the financial compensation is not as good in any way, shape, or form. But the flexibility and the quality of life is so much better for me now, working in the academic side of the house, and being able to focus only a few, you know, 20 hours a week, instead of the 40 on paper, but really 50 to 60 In reality, in my other career, it allows me to really have that quality of life where I can leave work at five and be okay with it and spend time with my son and put projects you know, off until tomorrow. Whereas before it's like I'm working, working, working, just trying to get it done. And now it's you know, that can wait till tomorrow. And   Michael Hingson  24:21 how old are your sons by Sawyer is   Donovan Nichols  24:23 going to be three in August. And then Knox just turned four months old.   Michael Hingson  24:31 So now it says so Knox is about to finish his first year in college. Right?   Donovan Nichols  24:35 Right. Exactly. He's grown at that rate.   Michael Hingson  24:41 That is That is really cool and that you've referred to yourself as a values based recovering workaholic. And now I think I can understand what that means.   Donovan Nichols  24:50 Yes, a big part of me deciding to switch careers really had to do with re looking at my values and recognizing At I had always said that family was first. And I had never truly lived that way. You know, when I would come to I need to work versus, you know, go home and spend time with family work kind of always was the primary decision. And I had to be very honest with myself when I think, you know, I always say to people, show me your calendar and your financial statements, and I'll tell you what your values are, because where you put your time and money is telling me what is most important to you. And so I needed to make sure that I was really aligning myself and really spent time thinking about what my values are looking at, you know, how do I spend my time? And then how do I want to spend my time and let's look at that. So my, my values are happiness, integrity, love, innovation, fun, and education. And with that, you know, family you won't see in there because love to me, half is family. And that's a big piece of it. Happiness, to me, is family fun to me, is family. So a lot of these other values encapsulates that piece of my life. And then yeah, go ahead. Oh, I was just gonna say that. Yeah, the recovering workaholic piece of it is, like I said, you know, I did notice that I was a workaholic. And I needed to take a step back and recovery for any, you know, work kind of became an addiction to me, and it's how I valued myself was based off of how good I was at work, was how good I felt about myself. And, and I recognize, especially after having children, you know, that changes, I have all the things that I've accomplished in the world, my, the two major things that are my proudest moments are marrying Alicia, who, like I said, just makes me want to be a better man, and just as pure joy and happiness and love. And then our two sons and watching them be successful. And those forever will be my two most proud accomplishments. And everything kind of pales in comparison of that. And, and with the recovering piece, it's, it's not easy. It's not just one day, you can say, Okay, I'm going to stop working super hard, or endless hours, there's still times where you you do work, you know, some late nights, but it's about balance. And it's about being able to if okay, if I'm working really hard this day, then I need to take a day where I'm focused on family. And that's all I do. So I try to be very conscious about when I'm spending time with the boys of putting my phone to the side, and really just focusing and paying attention there and not splitting my time and attention. So you   Michael Hingson  27:54 have switched, you're now in a PhD program. And what what's the PhD going to be in   Donovan Nichols  28:02 the PhD is in higher education? Okay, so that would be, you know, could originally it was the university administration, I thought I was going to be a Vice President for Student Affairs. And, you know, as time went on, just realize that that wasn't the career path that I wanted to chase anymore. And now, you know, with a PhD, I could be a faculty member. And then I also it's, you know, first speaking and consulting, I'm learning a lot about higher education in general. So being able to go in and consult with different institutions, I would love to consult about work life balance, that's become my new passion. My dissertation is on work life balance, it's something that I never really had. And it wasn't something that I realized was super important to me until I left Student Affairs. And what I'm trying to do now is do a lot of research to help other people understand how they can be in these career fields, but still have great work life balance, and find opportunities that are meaningful and enjoying for them.   Michael Hingson  29:10 So you mentioned no more than once about speaking. You have a speaking career. Yeah. Have you started speaking tell me more about the whole speaking thing?   Donovan Nichols  29:20 Yeah. So I have a couple of things that I speak about. I really got into it in 2008. I got into it because   Donovan Nichols  29:29 I started to speak on pay it forward. The concept of paid for doing good for other people without expecting anything in return. And that came from when I was a leadership student at the University of Toledo was in a program called Leadership ut which is now less leadership. And in that program, they would bring in a bunch of leaders and people that talked about leadership to speak. And as I sat there in class, I would just, you know, have such admiration for these people want to really appreciate the their words of wisdom and I'd say to myself, You know what, I I want to do that, that'll be really cool. But I also knew I needed something to talk about, I needed more life experience to be able to share with other people that I was going to be able to connect with them and help them in whatever way that they needed. So I put it on the back burner. Fast forward, I was in America or in America, where I was working with students and teaching them about servant leadership. And I realized that the lessons weren't quite connecting. And so I said, You know what, let's try a different path. And we watched the movie, pay it forward, and I did a session afterwards a reflection session. And as we were doing that, there was a lot of light bulbs, I could see going off in the room where students were finally making the connection of, Oh, I saw this in the movie. And that's how it relates to my life in this way. And this is something I want to do different, or this is something I want to do better to help other people. And then I had somebody come up and say, Hey, I really liked that. Can you come do it for the 100 resident advisors on campus? And then from that session, it was, hey, can you come do that for my residence hall floor can come through that for my leadership program. And through that, I realized, okay, maybe this is my thing. You know, this is something that I could talk about, and it's something that the world needs. And it's something that everybody should be doing all the time. But sometimes we just forget. And we get so busy and caught up in our everyday lives that we forget about being intentional, and going out of our way to help somebody else. You know, sometimes when we help people, it's in a moment of convenience, as opposed to really being intentional of how can I put in some sacrifice in order to truly change somebody else's life. And then with pay for, you know, I wanted to do the ethical thing and found out that I wanted to see you okay, this is probably trademarks, I don't know if I can speak on this found out that the movie was based off of a book, I reached out to the author, Katherine Ron Hyde, and said, Hey, this is what I do. Can I speak on this, and she said, it wasn't trademarked. She had me send her a video. And then after seeing what I did, she gave me her blessing. And I was able to make a great connection with her ended up being on the Payette, Ford Foundation Board of Directors for two years, connected and in a lot of different ways with pay it forward. So that in 2008, did my first speaking engagement at Dominican University in Chicago. And from that, I just did it part time. So as I'm doing my work with Student Affairs, I'm also speaking on the side, until I get to this moment of needing to change careers. I had a buddy from college that saw that I was leaving the university and said, Hey, have you ever thought about speaking full time, and he's running an agency called for college for life, talk with him and said, Yeah, I'm interested in this. So I signed on with him. And now I'm a speaker and consultant. Not only do I talk about the pay afford stuff, but I also have a session about teaching the technique. The technique for solving a Rubik's Cube, I believe, is a technique that you can use to solve any large complex problem, you can use it to accomplish any goal that you have. And so I utilize that session really to teach people about confidence, grit, and resiliency, and to just continue moving through the hardships in order to accomplish your goals. And then, throughout, you know, with me learning about my learning disability, I try to incorporate that into the sessions that I go out and present on. Because I think it's important to not only just have a session about that, but to put it into different pieces of what I do. So individuals can see the importance of understanding learning disabilities, and maybe even connecting, you know, there might be somebody in the audience's it's like, hey, you know that that story really resonates with me, maybe I need to go and get tested and figure this out. And then I also work life balance, that's a big thing, not only speaking but consulting, one of the sessions I do is just work life balance in general, how people can have better work life balance, and then the other ones about with supervisors, and teaching them how to create a better environment for work life balance, because when we think about work life balance, usually it's, it's a self care model, right? People think, okay, in order to have better work, life balance, you know, meditate, yoga, do something to find happiness, but then come and work but for me, self care is only a piece of the puzzle. The other equally important part is community care. So how are we helping each other to have better work life balance? How are how is the environment at work, allowing people what's the culture like? How are we promoting each other to be better at what we do and and that sending them emails at night and expecting them to respond. And not only just that, but sometimes when we send an email, we'll say, Hey, don't respond to this to the morning. Well, that's like, you know, and people getting emails on their phone, now they'll see it. And all they'll do is think about it, or they'll respond, because they, they feel like that's what they need to do. And telling somebody, Hey, don't think about this until tomorrow is like saying, Hey, don't think about, you know, a big, huge pink elephant. Yeah. Because then what are people going to do? That's all they're gonna think about. All   Donovan Nichols  35:34 right. So you know, with that, it's, what am I doing, I need to be doing things differently. So that I'm not causing other people more stress for my convenience, you know, so it's the, you know, if you're sending out an email, making sure that maybe you don't have it, so it delivers tomorrow at 8am, instead of delivering tonight, and there's a lot of great technology out there that allows you to do that. So that you can send things when is most convenient for you as you're finding your own work life balance. But you are also being aware of how it affects other people, and that you play a big role and ensuring that other people can have work life balance in their life.   Michael Hingson  36:12 And as you are doing that, and putting these things into practice isn't that of course, in part, also, paying it forward, because you're practicing what you preach, and you're trying to help other people get into this idea of work life balance, and isn't that as good as it gets for paying it forward.   Donovan Nichols  36:29 So it's all about, you know, doing something outside of yourself that's altruistic, and really thinking about what is more beneficial for this person, even if I have to sacrifice a little bit?   Michael Hingson  36:41 Well, I really love the concept and have loved it for a long time, the concept of paying it forward. So it's nice to hear you doing that. And and you're right, people get emails, they want to respond immediately, or they send out emails. And all too often, we expect an immediate response. And we don't have a respect for the balance or life balance that other people might want to have as well. And we can all help make that process go better if we would, rather than just needing to have instant gratification for ourselves.   Donovan Nichols  37:18 And it's not just you know, top down to it's also bottom up. So no, I'm a big proponent of work life balance. And so I will be talking to my super, I'll want to send my supervisor a text at night, because that's when I'm thinking about it. And I just take the step back and say nope, I'm gonna wait until I know that they're in the office because I also don't want to put them in a place where they feel like they have to take time away from their family or whatever they choose to do with their time outside of work.   Michael Hingson  37:50 Or sometimes you substitute a different text just like Hope all is going well have a good night and, and do other things that maybe people don't expect, but let you know they're thinking about them. And that kind of helps the connection a little bit. Texting is hard enough to create a real connection because you're you're texting, you're not conversing in any way that we can kind of use that to help make up a closer connection is always a helpful thing to   Donovan Nichols  38:17 Yeah, or even knowing what's going on in that person's life. Maybe they took the day off to because it was their daughter's birthday. And so texting on that day saying, Hey, I know you're off for your daughter's birthday. I just wanted to say happy birthday to her. And I hope you have a wonderful day. Nothing to do with work. It's all about I know that you have a life outside of work. And I appreciate that. And I hope you are enjoying your time off.   Michael Hingson  38:42 Exactly. Well, you have talked about the you mentioned Rubik's cube. And I want to hear all about that solving the Rubik's cube and the other lessons that you get from that,   Donovan Nichols  38:52 for sure. It's, it's kind of interesting. So I was married before and was going through a divorce. And during that time, it you know, it can be very difficult. And just, you know, I was not necessarily in a good place mentally. And in order to pull myself out of it. I told myself, I want to do something that is unique and different that I've never done before that's positive, that's going to give me something to focus on and propel me forward. I was watching in pursuit of happiness. And as I'm watching that program, I the main character solves a Rubik's cube. And as I was watching, I said that that's what I want to do. I've never done that. I've wanted to do it. I don't know how to do it. I don't know how I'm going to figure it out, but I'm going to figure it out. And so then I just got on YouTube watched a bunch of different things and spent a lot of time figuring it out. And then kept doing it you know the first time it might take a couple days to figure it out. And then then next time is 18 hours and then the next time it's 10 hours, and then it's two hours, and then it's, you know, you're getting down into the minutes. And it would just over and over practicing in it. And as I was doing it too, I don't know why. But I started to think about just leadership. And I was like, this, this cube is, you know, kinda like leadership in the sense of, this is a really difficult thing to do. But anybody can do it, if they just put in the dedication and the patience and the commitment to make it happen. And some are like, Oh, that's a lot like leadership. And there's other things about a Rubik's cube. So there's six faces on a Rubik's Cube, and there's a center piece, and each of those faces, well, the centerpiece is never move. They're all in the exact same port or position to each other. And that's how you orient yourself in order to know what piece on a Rubik's Cube needs to go into what place. And so then I started to think, well, that's like your values. You know, if you know what your values are, then you can orient yourself in while it seems like there's all this chaos happening around you, you know how to put each each piece into place in order to move forward. With a Rubik's Cube, there's only three layers to a Rubik's cube. So while it seems like there's a whole lot, it's really just three layers, you know, there's 26 pieces, there's only essentially 12 ways that you can move a cube. And in order to put pieces into place, you're just doing an algorithm or a pattern of these 12 moves. So when you start to really break it down, you realize, okay, it's, it's not as hard as I thought, I just need to focus on the smaller steps to get there. And that's a lot like life and your goals. It's, you know, it can get extremely overwhelming if you think about everything that you have to do to make something happen. But if you think okay, what I'm going to focus on today is putting one piece into place. And once I do that, then I'll focus on the next piece. And really, my goal is to accomplish the first layer. And once the first layer is done, instead of thinking about, Oh, there's two layers that I still don't know how to do, and beating yourself up about it, it's about taking a step back and say, No, I was able to solve the first layer. Let's celebrate that. And recognize that I never was able to do that before. And so if I wasn't able to do that, and now I am, I can go to the next level. So as I was thinking about all of these pieces, then when I went to the University of Toledo, I was teaching a class it was for roughly 40 Freshmen a year. And I was teaching them a leadership class. And I always wanted to be a different teacher, not just somebody that taught from the book and lectured but how can I connect with people in a much different way that they will never forget. And so I said, You know what, I'm gonna, I'm gonna do something different. And I gave all the students a Rubik's cube at the beginning of the year, and told them that at the end of the semester, their final exam was to solve the Rubik's Cube and write a paper on how it was like leadership. And it was interesting, because you know, you have the one student that's like, oh, sweet, I already know how to solve the Rubik's Cube. You have the other students that are like, Okay, this is a challenge. I think I can do it, I'll try to do it. I'll put in my best effort. And then the other individuals that are just, you know, looking at me you like a deer in headlights? Again, what? What are you thinking? There's no way I'll be able to do that. And there's actually one story of one of my students, Megan, she, the first day after class, she went home, and she was crying with her mom and saying, you know, I have to drop this class, there's no way that I'm going to be able to solve this. And she had defeated herself before she even tried. And luckily, her mom said, you know, Megan, let's stick with it. You know, just have patience with the process and just never give up. You can do this. And that was great advice about grit that Megan really took to heart. And little did she know that later that semester, her mom would find out that she had cancer. And so now Megan, was the one telling her mom to never give up and giving her mom back. You know, that same advice. And by the end of the semester, not only was Megan able to master solving the cube, but she was one of the students in class that was helping other students learn how to solve it all while helping her mom along her cancer fighting journey. And it's great to know that MEGAN'S MOM is now in remission, and she's doing well. And at the end of the semester, Megan said that she found out that she's capable of more than And she ever realized. And when it comes down to it, that's, that's why I do it is to have students realize that this impossible thing that they didn't think that they can do that somebody else could do it because they're smarter or you know, they can figure it out, but they can't do it is to get rid of that notion and allow them to believe in themselves, and teach them the technique in order to accomplish goals that they think are impossible, because once they're able to accomplish something they thought was impossible. It opens up the floodgates to them being able to say, Well, what else in life that I did, I think was impossible that now if I if I put in the right pieces into place, I take it a little bit at a time, I orient myself by my values, that they are able to then accomplish those large complex problems and achieve their wildest dreams.   Michael Hingson  45:56 Well, and of course, that's what unstoppable mindset is all about. And that's my I call it a mindset. Because if we really take to heart that we can do more than we think we can, or that we at least ought to explore doing more than we think we can. And then we find out, we really can do more than we thought we could. We're discovering that we are more unstoppable than we ever believed, and isn't a negative thing at all. But it is all about adopting a different mindset. And it's it's so often that people, as you said, defeat themselves before they even get started.   Donovan Nichols  46:36 Yeah, one of the other things that I say is, you know, limited thinking produces limited results. So if we limit our what we believe is possible, then we've already lowered our own expectations, and not allowed ourselves to truly achieve what we are capable of doing. And that's why I want to help people to understand the importance of believing in yourself, and having confidence and being able to, to really show that grit to be resilient as things this challenges are thrown at you. And it seems like there's no way that you can do it. You just push through with that grit and you bounce back from any mistakes that are made, or any challenges that happen. And just keep persevering until you're able to accomplish what you want to accomplish. And it you know, something my dad would always say is it will all work out in the end. And if it hasn't worked out, it isn't the end.   Michael Hingson  47:42 Yep. Well, the other thing that I think about when I'm listening to you is, what do you do at the end of the day, or at some point during the day to analyze what's going on in your life? Do you tend to be introspective? Do you look at the end of the day about what happened today? And what went well? And what could I do better? Or what did I do great that maybe I can even do better next time? Yeah, I would. I would   Donovan Nichols  48:07 love to say that. I do that every night. But I'm not always good at that. But I do try to be intentional about thinking through what was I able to accomplish? And how can I build on that tomorrow? I think that's a great practice. Because it really is focusing on. Like I said, with that, you know, solving the qubits, you focus on the piece that you were able to put into place and then realize, okay, what's the next piece that I need to work on. And you know, that sometimes happens at night where I think about it, but sometimes it happens in the morning to my my best thinking, best reflection happens in the shower. And I you know, take showers in the morning, and there's just something serene about that, where I want my mind will just wander and think about all the things that I need to accomplish that day. And I'll have these kind of movie images in my mind of how to accomplish that. I believe in thinking about or having the end in mind. So to visualize what what that end looks like, so that you can work your way back and figure out okay, how do I get there? You know, it's like with a Rubik's Cube, it's seeing the Rubik's Cube solved in your mind, and then saying, Okay, now how do I get there? And and so every day, I actually have a couple things that are by my computer. And this is one of the techniques that I use, not only just to to to achieve goals, but also to help myself with my ADHD is that I have on my wall, my values, and so it shows all my values and then I have questions to myself. I have my overarching goals of what I want to accomplish big picture. And then I write out every day to With three goals that I want to accomplish that day, and so those are my my pieces that I want to put into place. Okay, if I can accomplish this today that I'm working towards my overarching goals. And as I noticed myself start to deviate, you know, it's really easy for me, like I said, going down that rabbit hole of websites and YouTube videos and getting to things that just interest me. But I asked myself three questions. One is in harmony with my values. Two, will it help me achieve my goals? And three, Is it urgent and absolutely necessary to do right now. So if I can take whatever decisions come my way or choices, and I filter them through those three questions, and then I also filter them through my values, I am able to weed out the things that aren't as important and be left with the the pieces of life are the choices that I want to make that will best help me to work towards my goals and accomplish work life balance.   Michael Hingson  51:05 So tell me, it's, I think what you're talking about is really great. And we all should do a lot more of, of working intentionally to not only have a life balance, but to think about what we do in life. That's why I asked you the question about intentionally What do you do in terms of how you end your day? Because I think all too often we never take the time to analyze what we're doing and and think about how did that work? Or how did that work, and we we just keep rushing forward without really thinking about it, which is unfortunate. And it would be so important if we would do a lot more to analyze what we do and use that to help us improve. But here's another question for you. Do you ever worked with? Or have you worked with other students with disabilities?   Donovan Nichols  51:52 Yes, and one of the things I think is a great example is with the Rubik's cube. So like I said, I give a Rubik's cube out to all of the students. And over the course of six years, I gave it out to 232 students. And there was one day where they I found out that a student said that he was not able to solve the cube because he is colorblind, and he couldn't distinguish the different colors. So there was no way that he was going to be able to solve it. And that was something that actually took me aback because I had never even thought about that. I didn't think of colorblind. Now if I had a student that was visually impaired or blind, I would say, Okay, I am going to find an accommodation. But when people have these invisible disabilities, you don't recognize it all the time. So it was it was great that I was somebody was able to help me understand that. But then step two is okay, what do we do? What's the accommodation, because I'm not going to allow you to think that there is a disability that you have that doesn't allow you to achieve this impossible task, or seemingly impossible. So I ended up writing a with a permanent marker, the first letter of each color on all of the pieces. And then when he was he saw that, then he was able to see those letters, and then he was able to solve the cube. And so that was something that was an enlightening moment for me to be more inclusive in the practices and to think outside of you know, what I currently know. But it was great to work with with his name's Tyler was great to work with him and see him accomplish a goal that not only did he have the task of trying to solve something that seemed impossible, even if he wasn't colorblind, but because of being colorblind, it added a different challenge. And there's a couple things that happen through that process is the biggest thing was recognizing that we all have different challenges in life. And it's about understanding what those different challenges are. And but not allowing them to keep you from from doing what you want to do. And that's goes imperfect with you know, your unstoppable mindset. So understand what it is that you need to overcome. And then what are the resources? What are the accommodations that need to be put into place, but let's not allow ourselves to let an additional roadblock keep us from going down a path that we know is most beneficial for ourselves. One of the problems   Michael Hingson  54:37 that exists with diversity is that we don't really recognize all the differences and for example, I've maintained for a long time that diversity has really weeded out disabilities. We don't include disabilities in the diversity conversation. But then when we start to talk about inclusion, you can't get away from that as much as still people want to try their Reality is either you're inclusive or you're not. And if you're not including persons with disabilities, for example, then you're not inclusive. The Rubik's Cube is a is a great illustration, the fact is that there are Rubik's Cubes available, that instead of having or maybe in addition to having different colors, not seeing the colors on each side, there are different shapes, so that there's a different shape for each color, essentially. So it is possible for a blind person to do a Rubik's Cube, they're available for sale, I don't remember where but I had one for a while, we've moved a couple of times, so kind of have lost it along the way. And I'm going to have to go back and find it now and start to play with it again. But the fact is that all of us have differences I've maintained. And I usually say it sort of facetiously, but in reality, I'm very serious. Every person with eyesight has a disability, your light dependent, you don't do well, unless the lights are on. And Thomas Edison and the inventors of the electric light bulb really created a reasonable accommodation for light dependent people by creating the light bulb so that you guys can turn the lights on and all is fine. Doesn't bother me a bit whether the lights are on does my wife however, so I've gotten into the habit of turning the lights on. And now we have a number of lights that we control with Alexa. So that also helps. So the echo gives us the ability to to make sure lights are on or off. And it's actually been very convenient. So technology improves. But the fact is that all of us have challenges and the sooner that everyone recognizes that just because someone is different than they are doesn't mean that they're less than they will be a lot better off as a society, I would think.   Donovan Nichols  56:44 Yeah, that's, I mean, a wonderful point to be made. And I'm actually holding a real Rubik's cube right now. You got one I do. Because after you know that I had found out about that challenge. I was like, Okay, well, I need to look a little bit deeper into this. And, and then I found out there are these Braille cubes. And I was like, wow, that's really cool. And so I actually bought one and then taught myself how to do a cube just by using braille by touch so at night, when I'm this light dependent person has its his lights out, and I'm not able to see the cube, I'm I'm still able to solve it at night. And so it was a new interesting technique that I got to do that. It I feel like it's it's helping me to better understand my senses. And so you know, it's like the feeling of touch and just noticing the subtle differences between the different pieces and being able to do that. That really helps you hone in and get better   Michael Hingson  57:50 that says, Well, I'm glad you have a Braille Rubik's Cube. Good for you. Yeah, that's, that's,   Donovan Nichols  57:55 it's definitely fun to do. It keeps my mind at work. I really enjoyed that said, I love being able to find out how to be more inclusive. In the work that I do.   Michael Hingson  58:09 Well, I want to thank you very much for sharing all of that with us. And in sharing your time on unstoppable mindset, my gosh, once again, an hour has gone by really quickly, hasn't it. And so we'll have to do more of this. I want to hear more about your adventures as you're getting the PhD and indefinitely as you're moving forward in your speaking career. I started doing that after escaping from the World Trade Center on September 11. And I have always felt that as long as I learn more, in a sense, then the people where I go speak, then I think I'm doing a good job. And I've found speaking to be a wonderful adventure, and extremely rewarding because it's not that I just get to share with people, experiences and my thoughts, but I get to learn from them. And as I said, that's really the, for me the important part about it.   Donovan Nichols  59:01 I'd love to like I said, I've listened to your podcast and gotten to know more about your story. And I'm just so appreciative that you have had me on and and then we're able to grow this connection and friendship because through learning about your story, it it continues to help me to think differently about how to continue to be more inclusive, and how to continue to work with people all across the board, and how to how do we utilize this unstoppable mindset as a propellant to get us to all be able to accomplish our goals, but understand the obstacles that we need to remove from the equation in order to accomplish them as we work for move forward. Well stated so much. Thank you so much for what you do. And the incredible story that you have to be able to help us elfin others was September 11. I mean, it's for anybody that doesn't know that story they need to, they need to learn it because it you know what, what you went through and how you were able to do it with grace and confidence in what you do is just absolutely amazing.   Michael Hingson  1:00:18 Well, thank you. And I really appreciate you telling your story and be here today. So if people want to reach out and maybe contact you or learn more about you, and so on, how can they do that? So a lot   Donovan Nichols  1:00:29 of different social media, but the best thing I would say is go to my website, www dot Donovan nichols.com And that is spelled D o n o v a n N I c h o l s.com. Now I say Donovan is spelled like do know van, because it can be spelled a lot of different ways. But I drive a minivan. So do you know van nichols.com?   Michael Hingson  1:00:57 So it is in Dino minivan? Hmm? Great. Well, go visit Donovan's site, reach out to him learn about him, because he's got a lot that he is offering that we all can use. And, again, thank you for being here. I hope all of you listening will reach out and talk to Donovan in some way. And I hope that you will let us know what you think about the podcast and that you'll contact me with your thoughts. And as always, if you know someone else who should be a guest on our podcast, please let me know you can reach me at Michaelhii m i c h a e l h i at accessibe, A C C E S S I B E.com. Or go to our podcast page www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. And when you're there or wherever you're listening to this podcast, I hope that you'll give us a five star rating. We really appreciate that. But again, I do want to hear from you and hear your thoughts. So Donovan again. Thanks very much. And let's do this again.   Donovan Nichols  1:01:59 Thank you, I would love to and I want to help everybody that I possibly can. And so anybody that would like to connect let's let's do it and let's solve our impossible goals and   Michael Hingson  1:02:12 remain unstoppable. That's right. Thanks again, Donald. Thank you. You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast
LTG(R) Ronald Blanck, DO – From Vietnam Battalion Surgeon to Surgeon General of The US Army

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 47:01


   LTG(R) Ronald Blanck, DO served in multiple leadership positions across the globe in his 32 years in the Army. These assignments include Commander of Berlin Army Hospital, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at the Uniformed Services University, commander of Walter Reed Medical Center, and Surgeon General of the US Army. After his career in the Army, he served as the President of the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. He currently serves as an advisor on bioterrorism issues and an expert in preparing the medical community to respond to mass casualty incidences.    In this episode, he describes how his career in the Army started out in a memorable fashion by being deployed as a Battalion Surgeon to Vietnam weeks after finishing his intern year, and discusses the many lessons learned from this experience. He then had the opportunity to serve at Walter Reed and was an integral faculty member in the early years of the Uniformed Services University rising to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. He discusses the importance of USUHS and how it develops doctors prepared to serve in the military. After serving as the Chief of Medicine at Brooke Army Medical center he was then sent to Berlin to be the commander of Berlin Army Hospital and discusses what it was like interacting with the Soviets and his trips to East Berlin. Shortly after serving in Europe he became the commander of Walter Reed and ended his career as the Surgeon General of the US Army and Chief of the U.S. Army Medical Corps. We discuss many of the opportunities and tribulations he experienced while at Walter Reed and later serving at the Pentagon including how he helped shape the DoD's response to Anthrax threats. He shares many insights, historical references, and leadership lessons over a distinguished career. You don't want to miss this episode!                                             Find out more and join Team WarDocs at www.wardocspodcast.com   The WarDocs Mission is to improve military and civilian healthcare and foster patriotism by honoring the legacy, preserving the oral history, and showcasing career opportunities, experiences, and achievements of military medicine. Listen to the “What We Are For” Episode 47. https://bit.ly/3r87Afm WarDocs- The Military Medicine Podcast is a Non-Profit, Tax-exempt-501(c)(3) Veteran Run Organization run by volunteers. All donations are tax-deductible, and 100% of donations go to honoring and preserving the history, experiences, successes, and lessons learned in military medicine. A tax receipt will be sent to you.  WARDOCS documents the experiences, contributions, and innovations of all military medicine Services, ranks, and Corps who are affectionately called "Docs" as a sign of respect, trust, and confidence on and off the battlefield, demonstrating dedication to the medical care of fellow comrades in arms.         Follow Us on social media. Twitter: @wardocspodcast Facebook: WarDocs Podcast Instagram: @wardocspodcast LinkedIn: WarDocs-The Military Medicine Podcast

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Treatment Advancements in Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Assessing HIF-PH Inhibitors | PTCE Pharmacy Connect

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 40:11


Introduction of moderator, faculty, and disclosures by Todd: ­We have an incredible discussion coming up with our moderator, Dr. Jessica Kerr, Professor and Clinical Pharmacy Specialist – Cardiometabolic at the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy in Illinois and Dr. Joanna Hudson, who is a tenured Professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Translational Science and the Department of Medicine (Division of Nephrology) at the University of Tennessee (UT) Health Science Center and a Clinical Pharmacist specializing in nephrology at Methodist Hospital in Memphis, TN. They will provide a brief overview of anemia in chronic kidney disease and highlight updates and advancements in the development of some of the emerging agents used.  If you haven't listened to the three other webinars in this learning series on anemia in chronic kidney disease, be sure to check them out at pharmacytimes.org. Outline updates and advancements in the development of HIF-PH inhibitors for anemia in chronic kidney disease.   Express the role of the pharmacist in managing anemia in CKD through early detection and coordination of care.    Guests:    Dr. Jessica Kerr PharmD Interim Associate Dean - Office of Professional and Student Affairs at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville   Dr. Joanna Hudson PharmD Professor at University of Tennessee Health Science Center Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SA Voices From the Field
Intro to NASPA's Public Policy Division with Brent Marsh, and Jeanna Mastrodicasa

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 49:18


Welcome back to SA Voices from the Field for Season 7. This is season seven, public policy in action, where we will explore public policy issues impacting higher education today and how this will impact the work that you do on a daily basis. This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Dr. Brent Marsh and Dr. Jeanna Mastrodicasa, the current and past chair of NASPA's Public Policy Division. We explore public policy and important topics that are currently impacting all of our work! Brent arrived at the University of Mississippi in August 2019, being honored to join the UM community as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Dean of Students. Prior to his arrival at UM, Dr. Marsh served for five years as Vice President for Student Affairs at Rogers State University, overseeing numerous programs and services that promoted student engagement and success. Before his time at RSU, Marsh served for 10 years at Howard Payne University in central Texas in three successive student affairs leadership roles, culminating his time there as Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students. Marsh earned bachelors and masters degrees at Kansas State University and a doctorate in higher education administration from Bowling Green State University. His earliest professional experiences were in student housing at two universities in Abilene, Texas, serving there between academic stints at K-State and BGSU. Dr. Marsh is actively involved in NASPA where he recently served as Director of the Public Policy Division from 2019-2021, and currently serves as member-at-large. Prior to this role, Brent served as Coordinator of Region Finances for the IV-West region from 2017-2019, while simultaneously sitting on the Small Colleges & Universities Division advisory board as Public Policy Liaison, which also placed him on the Public Policy Division's leadership team. From 2015 to 2017, Marsh served a two-year term as the Student-Athlete Knowledge Community chair. Dr. Jeanna Mastrodicasa is the Associate Vice President for Operations at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), where she manages budget, facilities, business operations, conferences and institutes, and compliance for the land-grant mission of the university. UF/IFAS has more than 4,000 employees across Florida, $450 million in annual expenditures, and more than 4 million built gross square feet of facilities. Dr. Mastrodicasa is currently the national chair for NASPA's Public Policy Division, serving a term on the national NASPA board from March 2021-2023 supporting higher education administration. In summer 2022, she will be participating in the HERS Summer Institute, which is an intensive leadership program for women in higher education. She is also on several local boards in the community, including the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, Family Promise of Gainesville, the Gainesville Police Advisory Council, Friends of Susan B. Anthony, and the Alachua County ½ Cent Sales Tax Oversight Board. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

Enrollment Edge by enrollmentFUEL
Episode 43—Predicting Student Retention in the Admission Stage

Enrollment Edge by enrollmentFUEL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 40:27


On this Episode of the Enrollment Edge Jay talks to Dr. John Borum, Head of Engagement at Degree Sight. John has spent much of his career in Student Services and has built a specialty in building predictive models to predict student retention at his university. While Predictive Modeling looks at who among prospective student's is most and least likely to apply and enroll, John's model goes beyond that and into the student's college career – predicting year to year retention. And he believes schools can also do this kind of retention modeling at the prospective student's application stage. As Enrollment Managers search for effective enrollment strategies to support their colleges and universities, this is one strategy that is worth the time to investigate! About Our GuestDr. John Borum serves as Head of Engagement for DegreeSight, an Educational Technology company that offers online solutions for transcript evaluations and degree planning. Dr. Borum has 20 years of Higher Education experience in Enrollment and Student Affairs. He has served in leadership positions in admissions, student life, and retention/student success. John Borum's Infojohn.borum@degreesight.comhttps://www.degreesight.com Have any questions or comments? Let's chat here!

Therapy Chat
347: Healing Sexual Trauma With Yoga - With Zabie Yamaski

Therapy Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 48:39


Welcome back to Therapy Chat!  In today's episode, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Zahabiya "Zabie" Yamasaki, who is a survivor, an advocate and a teacher who is deeply passionate about helping survivors find healing after experiencing sexual violence. She offers courses, trainings and her newest offerings, her book with companion card deck. Zabie's kind and compassionate nature comes through in this interview, which we hope you will find valuable.   Zabie Yamasaki, M.Ed., RYT is the Founder of Transcending Sexual Trauma through Yoga. Zabie has trained thousands of yoga instructors and mental health professionals and her trauma-informed yoga program and curriculum for survivors is now being implemented at over 25 colleges campuses and agencies including the University of California (UC) system, Stanford, USC, University of Notre Dame, and Johns Hopkins University. Zabie received her undergraduate degree in Psychology and Social Behavior and Education at the UC Irvine and completed her graduate degree in Higher Education Administration and Student Affairs at The George Washington University. Her work has been highlighted on CNN, NBC, KTLA 5, and The Huffington Post. Her book: Trauma-Informed Yoga for Survivors of Sexual Assault published by W. W. Norton & Company was released on 1/11/2022.   And more fabulous interviews are coming throughout the next few months...stay tuned for a wonderful surprise that we can reveal soon! If you're not already a subscriber, please subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts so you won't miss a thing!   Resources   Find Zabie's book, Trauma Sensitive Yoga for Survivors of Sexual Assault, Practices for Healing & Teaching with Compassion on Amazon here.   For more information on what Zabie offers, including her trauma-informed yoga courses, and speaking offerings, visit her website: http://www.zabieyamasaki.com/ Follow Zabie on Instagram here.    Go here to find the episodes of Therapy Chat with Nityda Gessel, RYT, LCSW, that were mentioned today. Bringing Yoga Therapy Into A Talk Therapy Practice and  Trauma-Informed Practice and Scope. Thank you to TherapyNotes for sponsoring this week's episode! TherapyNotes makes billing, scheduling, notetaking, and telehealth incredibly easy. And now, for all you prescribers out there, TherapyNotes is proudly introducing E-prescribe! Find out what more than 100,000 mental health professionals already know, and try TherapyNotes for 2 months, absolutely free. Try it today with no strings attached, and see why everyone is switching to TherapyNotes. Now featuring E-prescribe. Use promo code "chat" at www.therapynotes.com to receive 2 FREE months of TherapyNotes! Thank you also to The Receptionist for iPad for sponsoring this week's episode. It's the highest-rated digital check-in software for therapy offices and behavioral health clinics, used by thousands of practitioners across the country. Sign up for a 14-day free trial of The Receptionist for iPad by going to www.thereceptionist.com/therapychat  and when you do, you'll also receive a twenty five dollar Amazon gift card. This episode is also sponsored by Trauma Therapist Network. Learn about trauma, connect with resources and find a trauma therapist near you at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com. We believe that trauma is real, healing is possible and help is available. Therapists - get on the waiting list for TTN membership here!   LAURA REAGAN & ERIKA SHERSHUN'S HEALING SEXUAL TRAUMA COURSE COMING 9/13/22:   Listen to episode 305 with Erika Shershun, LMFT here.    Get on the interest list for the Healing Sexual Trauma Course that opens for registration 9/13 here, and receive a free e-book, "The Many Ways to Ground," as a gift from Erika.    When you join the list, or if you are already on Laura's mailing list, you will be notified when registration opens - SOON!! - for our 6 month online Healing Sexual Trauma course.   Podcast produced by Pete Bailey - https://petebailey.net/audio 

Coaching DNA Podcast
Sam Ferguson (Pt. 2), Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics and Student Affairs, McMurry University

Coaching DNA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 26:31