Podcasts about Kennedy Space Center

United States space launch site

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Latest podcast episodes about Kennedy Space Center

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk
Managing Global Cyber Risks And Insurance

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:28


Hacking is no longer a far-off, fictional plot from science fiction. We all participate in the digital world. The threats to individuals and their identities are real and inevitable; no person or corporation is exempt from identity theft or data breach. Last year, Microsoft was infiltrated by at least 10 different hacker groups as a result of software flaws and unsuspecting users. Cyber-tech leaders Shawn Wiora and Mike Echols will show Global Forum members how to manage cyber risks and be empowered to safely navigate the tech world.   About the Speakers: Mike Echoles headshotMike Echols is the CEO of IACI, a Kennedy Space Center nonprofit, and CEO of Max Cybersecurity LLC. Echols spent 10 years at the Department of Homeland Security in critical infrastructure protection and cybersecurity leadership and served as the point person for President Obama's Executive Order Promoting Private Sector Cybersecurity Information Sharing, Chair of the Communications Sector and Network Security Information Exchange, and designated federal official for the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee. Echols is a graduate of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative – Harvard Kennedy School of Public Health, and the Federal Executive Institute.     Shawn Wiora headshotShawn Wiora is the co-founder and CEO of Maxxsure, a leading cyber risk quantification and blockchain company in DFW. Known as a cyber industry expert, Wiora has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, CIO.com, and CNNMoney and is a frequent keynote and conference speaker for SOX, PCI, NIST, and HIPAA. Additionally, he took the first healthcare company in the U.S. to the cloud, a company which received the designation of the most cyber-resilient healthcare company in the U.S. . . Do you believe in the importance of international education and connections? The nonprofit World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth is supported by gifts from people like you, who share our passion for engaging in dialogue on global affairs and building bridges of understanding. While the Council is not currently charging admission for virtual events, we ask you to please consider making a one-time or recurring gift to help us keep the conversation going through informative public programs and targeted events for students and teachers. Donate: https://www.dfwworld.org/donate

Learn Irish & other languages with daily podcasts
20220929_IRISH_speirling_ian_tagtha_i_dtir_i_florida

Learn Irish & other languages with daily podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 8:08


jQuery(document).ready(function(){ cab.clickify(); }); Original Podcast with clickable words https://tinyurl.com/2p4adjta Contact: irishlingos@gmail.com Ian's sparrow has landed in Florida. Spéirling Ian tagtha i dtír i Florida. The people of Florida on the east coast of America were preparing today for major floods and Ian's skyrocket has landed there. Bhí muintir Florida ar chósta thoir Mheiriceá ag ullmhú inniu do thuilte móra agus spéirling Ian tagtha i dtír ann. The thunderstorm strengthened as it made landfall in Florida today with wind gusts of up to 115mph. Neartaigh an spéirling agus é ag teacht i dtír i Florida inniu agus gustaí gaoithe suas le 115mph san uair léi. This area has not been struck by a skyscraper for over 100 years and residents have been ordered to leave coastal areas as well as other low-lying areas. Níor bhuail spéirling an ceantar seo le breis agus 100 bliain agus tá ordú tugtha d'áitritheoirí áiteanna cois cósta a fhágáil chomh maith le ceantair eile atá ar thalamh íseal. The worst damage in Florida is estimated to be between the cities of Fort Myers and Tampa. Meastar go mbeidh an díobháil is measa i Florida idir chathracha Fort Myers agus Tampa. Amusement parks such as Disney World, Sea World and Busch Gardens are all closed and Nasa's planned rocket launch from the Kennedy Space Center has been postponed. Tá páirceanna siamsaíochta ar nós Disney World, Sea World agus Gairdíní Busch ar fad dúnta agus seoladh roicéid a bhí beartaithe ag Nasa ó Ionad Spáis Kennedy curtha ar athló. The Storm will bring heavy rain and hurricane force winds. Beidh báisteach throm agus gaoth fórsa hairicín leis an Stoirm. It is predicted that up to half a meter of rain will fall in the heart of Florida within 24 hours of Storm Ian reaching the State. Tá sé tuartha go dtitfidh suas le leath mhéadar báistí i gcroílár Florida taobh istigh do 24 uair an chloig i ndiaidh do Spéirling Ian an Stát a bhaint amach. All the people of Cuba have been left with no food after the skylark and a lot of damage caused by Spairling Ian on the island. Tá muintir Chúba ar fad fágtha gan aon aibhléis i ndiaidh na spéirlinge agus scata damáiste déanta ag Spéirling Ian ar an oileán. Ian's Sphere is now reported to have strengthened to storm force 4. Tuairiscítear go bhfuil Spéirling Ian neartaithe anois go dtí fórsa stoirme 4. Ian's sprat landed in Florida Ian's sprat landed in Florida Spéirling Ian tagtha i dtír i Florida Spéirling Ian tagtha i dtír i Florida

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Richard Arnold: US correspondent as Hurricane Ian smashes into Cuba, Florida evacuating

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 3:31


Hurricane Ian tore into western Cuba as a major hurricane, with nothing to stop it from intensifying into a catastrophic Category 4 storm before it crashes ashore in Florida, where officials ordered 2.5 million people to evacuate. Ian made landfall at 4.30am EDT Tuesday in Cuba's Pinar del Rio province, where officials set up 55 shelters, evacuated 50,000 people, rushed in emergency personnel and took steps to protect crops in the nation's main tobacco-growing region. The US National Hurricane Center said "significant wind and storm surge impacts" occurred Tuesday morning in western Cuba. Ian struck with sustained top winds of 205km/h. As much as 4.3m of storm surge was predicted along Cuba's coast.   Traffic builds along Interstate 4 in Tampa, Florida as Hurricane Ian approaches. Photo / Willie J. Allen Jr, Orlando Sentinel via AP Ian was forecast to strengthen even more over warm Gulf of Mexico waters, reaching top winds of 225km/h as it approaches Florida's southwest coast. Tropical storm-force winds were expected across the southern peninsula late Tuesday, reaching hurricane force Wednesday morning. "Right now we're focusing on west central Florida area as the main area for impact," hurricane specialist Andy Latto told The Associated Press on Tuesday. Shoppers at the Costco store in Altamonte Springs, Florida grab bottles of water from the last pallet in stock. Photo / Joe Burbank, Orlando Sentinel via AP With tropical storm-force winds extending 185km from Ian's centre, damage was expected across a wide area of Florida, regardless of where Ian makes landfall. The hurricane centre expanded its storm surge warning to the peninsula's Atlantic coast, and expanded its tropical storm warning from Boca Raton to Brunswick, Georgia — a distance of about 603km. Waves crash against a seawall as Hurricane Ian passes through George Town, Grand Cayman island. Photo / Kevin Morales, AP Gil Gonzalez boarded his windows with plywood Tuesday and had sandbags ready to protect his Tampa home from flooding. He and his wife had stocked up on bottled water and packed torches, battery packs for their cellphones and a camp stove with a large propane burner as they got ready to evacuate. "All the prized possessions, we've put them upstairs in a friend's house and nearby, and we've got the car loaded," Gonzalez said. He added: "I think we're ready." Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said an estimated 2.5 million people were under evacuation orders. He urged people to prepare for power outages and to get out of its way. "When you have five to 10 feet of storm surge, that is not something you want to be a part of," DeSantis said Tuesday. "And Mother Nature is a very fearsome adversary." Hurricane Ian grew stronger as it barreled toward Cuba. Photo / Nasa Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System via AP The hurricane centre expanded its hurricane warning to include Bonita Beach north through Tampa Bay to the Anclote River. Fort Myers is in the hurricane zone, and Tampa and St Petersburg could get their first direct hit by a major hurricane since 1921. "People on the barrier islands who decide not to go, they do so at their own peril," Roger Desjarlais, county manager of Lee County, where Fort Myers is, said early Tuesday. "The best thing they can do is leave." The county issued mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas including Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel and Bonita Beach, where about 250,000 people live. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, left, speaks as he stands with Kevin Guthrie, director of the Florida Division of Emergency Management. Photo / Chris O'Meara, AP As the storm's centre moved into the Gulf, scenes of destruction emerged in Cuba's world-famous tobacco belt. The owner of the premier Finca Robaina cigar producer posted photos on social media showing wood-and-thatch roofs smashed to the ground, greenhouses in rubble and wagons overturned. "It was apocalyptic, a real disaster," wrote Hirochi Robaina, grandson of the operation's founder. State media published photos showing broad floodwaters flowing through the town of San Juan y Martinez and more than 1 million Cubans were without power Tuesday morning, including all of the western provinces of Pinar del Rio and Artemisa. There were no reports of deaths. A resident uses plastic as protection from the rain in Batabano, Cuba. Photo / Ramon Espinosa, AP Ian's forward movement was expected to slow over the Gulf, enabling the hurricane to grow wider and stronger before it brings punishing wind and water to Florida's west coast. Forecasters said the surge of ocean water could reach 3m if it peaks at high tide. Rainfall could total 410mm with as much as 610mm in isolated areas. Coastal communities could be inundated. In Key West, the airport closed Tuesday as gusty rains from the storm added to a king tide to swamp the streets, prompting animal rescuers to delay venturing out until after Ian passes. In Orlando, Disney World closed four hotels as a precaution while holding off on any decision to shut down its theme parks. Busch Gardens in Tampa closed at least through Thursday. In Florida's northeastern corner, the US Navy said it planned to move ships and aircraft from its base outside Jacksonville. As Hurricane Ian approaches Florida, shopping carts are left abandoned next to empty shelves that stock bottled water at a supermarket. Photo / John Raoux, AP Playing it safe, Nasa was rolling its moon rocket from the launch pad to its Kennedy Space Center hangar, adding weeks of delay to the test flight. The airports in Tampa and St. Petersburg announced they'll close Tuesday afternoon. President Joe Biden also declared an emergency, authorising the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to coordinate disaster relief and provide assistance to protect lives and property. FEMA has strategically positioned generators, millions of meals and millions of litres of water, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said. News crews, tourists and residents take images as high waves from Hurricane Ian crash into the seawall at the Southernmost Point buoy. Photo / Rob O'Neal, The Key West Citizen via AP Damaging winds and flooding are expected across the entire peninsula as Ian moves north, reaching into Georgia, South Carolina and other parts of the southeastern US between Friday and Sunday, the hurricane centre said.  — Cristina Mesquita & Curt Anderson, APSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dave Berry Breakfast Show
Breakfast - Old Swiss Has Been To The Kennedy Space Center

The Dave Berry Breakfast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 38:27


Dave Berry is back from his holidays! And with him he's brought the return of 5 Words 5 Grand and the search for Band Of Mum And Dad is in the guitar stage!

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 61 – Unstoppable Polymath with Pat Daily

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 65:24


So what is a “polymath”? Come on in and listen to this week's episode to find out from our guest, Pat Daily. After hearing my conversation with Pat, not only will you know the definition of the word, but you will see why Pat fits the Polymath mold.   In his life, Pat has served as a pilot in the military, a pilot for a commercial airline, a successful employee at Honeywell, participated in starting a company and he is now even a successful science fiction author.   I very much enjoyed reminiscing with Pat about some of my and his early days around aircraft as we both have similar experiences in a lot of ways.   By any standard you can invoke, Pat is not only inspirational, but he also is easy to talk with and he is easy on the ears as well. I hope you like this episode and that you will please reach out and tell me what you think. As always, please feel free to email me at michaelhi@accessibe.com. Also, I hope you will give this episode a 5 rating after hearing it. Thanks for listening.   About the Guest:   Pat Daily is a polymath, serial entrepreneur, gamer, and the author of SPARK, a near future science fiction novel. Pat began his professional career as an engineer and Air Force test pilot. After leaving the military, Pat worked at NASA's Johnson Space Center on both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs before launching his first company. He has worked globally as a human performance and safety consultant.     When not writing or trying to bring new airplane designs to life, Pat can be found gaming. He is a fan of role-playing games – particularly open worlds with engaging storylines where actions have consequences. Pat and his wife live in Houston.   Social media links:   Website: https://thepatdaily.com Blog: https://feraldaughters.wordpress.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/patdailyauthor Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/patdailypics/ Twitter: @patdailyauthor Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/21521042.Pat_Daily   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes* Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, wherever you happen to be, and welcome to another edition of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to chat with Pat Daily, who describes himself as a polymath. He is also an author, and entrepreneur. And specifically, he's the author of a book called spark. And we're gonna get into that, but I'm gonna start with tell me what is a polymath? Because some people won't quite probably know that.   Pat Daily  01:47 That's a good question, Mike. And I appreciate the opportunity to be here and talk about that. The I fell in love with this word when I discovered it just a couple of years ago. And really all it is is somebody that's polymath is someone who's had professional success in different lines. So not all sales, not all leadership, not all engineering. Cool.   Michael Hingson  02:15 So where have you had success? Well, I've   Pat Daily  02:18 been an Air Force Test Pilot. I've been an engineer at NASA. I've started my own business. I've been a safety consultant. I've been   Michael Hingson  02:30 now an author. There you go. Well, tell us a little bit about you maybe growing up just to learn about you and your background and stuff. And we'll go from there.   Pat Daily  02:38 Sure, sure. I grew up in Seattle, Washington up in the rainy northwest corner of the country. From there, I graduate from high school, went into the Air Force Academy, graduated from there and started pilot training in the Air Force flew was a pilot in the Air Force for about 13 years and then decided that my, my life lay in commercial aviation. And so I went to went to work for American Airlines. And they agreed with me up until about the one year point, and then they decided that they had too many pilots and furloughed, me. And at that point, I thought, maybe I need to rethink this, this whole pilot as a career thing. So I went off and did some other things.   Michael Hingson  03:29 So you when you went to the Air Force Academy, did you miss Pike's fish market?   Pat Daily  03:38 Yeah, yeah, I actually worked there a little bit when I was in high school at a restaurant whose name I can't even remember right now. But But yeah, that's a place that's got a lot of interesting energy.   Michael Hingson  03:51 It does. I've been there just once. And I know someone who worked there in in one of the places in the market, but it does have a lot of interesting and somewhat unusual energy.   Pat Daily  04:04 That's certainly true. So   Michael Hingson  04:07 you, you worked for American, why did you go off and do after American?   Pat Daily  04:11 Well, after American, I went to work for Honeywell and ended up working for Honeywell, Defense and Space electronic systems. And we did guidance, navigation control stuff for the space station and the space shuttle down at Johnson Space.   Michael Hingson  04:30 So what what did you do there? Can   Pat Daily  04:31 you talk a bunch about it? Oh, yeah. And then there's, we didn't do anything classified there. I mean, the whole human space thing, at least as far as NASA is concerned, is pretty much an open book. The probably my favorite project that I worked on was a thing that was supposed to be a lifeboat for the space station and it was the x 38 project. And it was kind of a lifting body. So it had some have swept back and swept up wings that that became well we ended up calling a rudder Vader because it was a combination of an elevator and rudder, although it was way more rudder than it was elevator. And, and it was a lot of fun. Got to actually watch it do a few drop tests from NASA aircraft. And then of course, somewhere along the way, it was decided that we were going to use Sputnik capsules and Soyuz capsules to to get us back from orbit so we no longer pursue that project. So it was a sad day when they shut that down but still a lot of fun to work on.   Michael Hingson  05:43 I grew up and near Edwards Air Force Base. So my father worked out there as the supervisor, the head of the precision measurements equipment lab, so he was in charge of calibrating all test equipment and things like that. So worked with Joe Walker, of course, who was famous with the x 15. Going back a long way from the x 38. And, and was there actually at the time of the m two lifting body which was kind of probably the precursor of all of that   Pat Daily  06:10 down. Were bounced because I spent a bunch of years at Edwards. Whereabouts Did you live?   Michael Hingson  06:15 We lived in Palmdale. Okay, and one of my favorite memories, boy I don't know about today, but was when my dad would come home from work and tell us that he left our street, which was Stan rich Avenue in Palmdale, California, and drove all the way to Edwards without stopping once, which was, which was definitely amazing back in those days, just in terms of no traffic, no cars to interfere. And he oftentimes did it both ways. And in the evening, when he was coming home, I would talk with him, we both got our ham radio licenses. When I was 14, he waited for me because he could have gotten at any time. And we would chat as he was coming home from work and had a lot of fun just talking up on the two meter band a lot. And he would just keep going and going and never stop until we got to our street and there was stop signs. So we had to stop.   Pat Daily  07:09 That is really neat. That was a great memory to have your dad.   Michael Hingson  07:13 It was and you know, there were a lot of things that happen that he couldn't talk about a couple times we went out and visited him. And we would go to his lab and he said, Well, I can't let you in quite yet. We have to hide things that you can't see. Well, that really didn't matter to me a whole lot. But I guess my mom and my brother were there. So they had to do that. But it was it was fascinating going there. And he introduced me to Joe Walker. He knew Neil Armstrong, but I never got to meet Neil. But did spend some time with Joe Walker, which was a lot of fun. Of course. Yeah. He was one of the first real astronauts taking the x 15, up above 50 miles. What an airplane that was oh, and we actually would occasionally sit on our roof at home. And watch as the B 52. Took it up and dropped it. And they they didn't have anything on the radio that we could listen to. But he would he told us where to look. And so we actually looked and and watched it drop and then fly and do the things that it did. It was pretty fascinating.   Pat Daily  08:17 Could you hear the sonic booms? down upon do?   Michael Hingson  08:19 That is a really good question that I'm glad you asked when we first moved to Palmdale in 1955. We heard sonic booms all the time. Never thought about it didn't bother us that they were there. And I remember once we knew that we're going to be playing war games between us and a couple of the other bases in Southern California. And the way you scored, especially when they did it at night was to see how close you could get to the other bases General's house without being detected. And break a sonic boom. So I gather we at Edwards were pretty successful at getting getting close to the generals house. But yeah, we heard a lot of sonic booms. And then one day, they just weren't there anymore.   Pat Daily  09:06 Yeah, I wasn't there during that. That era. But but when I was we had a we had a corridor, we actually had a low altitude and a high altitude supersonic corridor. And that's where if we were going to intentionally go supersonic, that's where they wanted us to be. And that ran mostly east west. Yeah. So so that Sonic Boom would have had to propagate quite a ways for folks down in Palmdale to hear it. But yeah, don't ever do. We heard them all the time.   Michael Hingson  09:39 Well, yeah. And I would I would expect that. And the reason that they disappeared from us was because I guess too many people started complaining but you know, GE, it never bothered me. I guess, however, that they decided that they could be somewhat destructive, especially if they were close enough or loud enough to buildings and so on. So they had to do it. And then I didn't hear any until actually, we were down near Cape Kennedy once when the shuttle was coming back in for a landing, and we got to hear the sonic booms, which was fun to hear.   Pat Daily  10:15 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I've   Michael Hingson  10:16 heard them loud enough to be startling. But the ones like the shuttle threw off. It was always like, Ah, good. They're home. Boom, boom, the double sonic boom, yeah, which was great. We were at a number of Armed Forces Day, events doubted it out at Edwards. And it was really fun when the Thunderbirds were there. Other people were flying the jets, and they would come almost right down on the deck, past us. And we were we were all together. So my dad said, well, here they are. And I said, I don't hear anything all of a sudden boom, and you hear the whole sound, because they had already gotten faster than the speed of sound. So the plane was there about two seconds before the sound of the engine, which was kind of fascinating. Yep. But we, we enjoyed it. And it was part of growing up. Never thought about it. And then all of a sudden, one day, I haven't heard sonic booms in quite a while. And it was I know, because people were complaining about the noise. Oh, what a world war two world. You know, the sonic booms were there before they were but nevertheless, as I said, probably there were some complaints about the noise. And I've read in recent articles that they they did decide that some of the the sonic booms could be destructive to structure. So   Pat Daily  11:35 I know they've they've broken windows before. And I know that sometimes livestock react poorly. And now NASA and industry are working on a thing called Quiet spike, which was programmed to reduce the the intensity of the sonic boom, so that an airliner for example, that would be traveling supersonic. To hear them Passover would be no more loud than the sound of a car door closing.   Michael Hingson  12:05 Right? There was I think something on 60 minutes about that either earlier this year, or late last year, which is where I first heard about it. So far. I guess it's still somewhat theory, because they haven't built the airliner yet that they believe will be able to have that low level of noise. But it'll be pretty fascinating if they can make that happen.   Pat Daily  12:26 It will be because it it seems like we've been stuck, essentially traveling around the world at about point eight Mach. Yeah, for for 50 years, and forever, longer now forever.   Michael Hingson  12:38 And it will be I think it will be great if we can really do that. And also have it on an aircraft that's small enough that we could even do supersonic inside the United States that will speed up a lot of air travel.   Pat Daily  12:52 It will. It will no it'd be wonderful.   Michael Hingson  12:54 But if I recall, right, they said they were going to have the first generation of that aircraft sometime later this year. Do you know anything about that? I know they've got the   Pat Daily  13:03 flying testbeds already. In fact, one of them is flying out of Palmdale.   Michael Hingson  13:08 Oh, okay. Well, we are now living in Victorville, so maybe we'll hear it on Victorville.   Pat Daily  13:15 I used to live in Victorville when I was able to George Air Force Base.   Michael Hingson  13:19 There you go well, and when I was growing up, compared to Palmdale Victorville was hardly a blip on the radar scope. And now, we have over 120,000 people in Victorville. And in the whole Victor Valley area here we have over 600,000 People go the heck and figure it out.   Pat Daily  13:37 I had no idea that it had grown that much.   Michael Hingson  13:39 And continues to we just learned that there is a new housing development, about two miles from here that will have 15,000 new homes, low cost housing, but still 15,000 new homes. Oh, my gosh, I know, go figure. Now. It'll be interesting to see how more how many more come along, but they're building a lot of stuff up here. And at the same time we see open stores that is vacant stores that don't understand why they're doing the building that they're doing when they got all this vacancy. And where are those people going to work? Are they are they commuting down into the LA basin? I work? Yes, that's I guess that's what's happening. And there is of course, a lot of that but I hope that they come up with something other than just going down I 15 Because already the traffic on Interstate 15 going from Victorville down through Cajon Pass and down the other side is horrible. Almost 24 hours a day. I've gone to Ontario airport early in the morning like at four and still take an hour and 20 or minutes or an hour and a half or longer to get to Ontario.   Pat Daily  14:52 And Ontario has got to be getting busier and busier too because I remember that that was when I first moved out to that area. It was the like the secret gym that the airport nobody knew about and had very little traffic and and you didn't have any jet bridges you just walked walked out to the aircraft and up the stairs. But still it was so much easier to navigate than lax,   Michael Hingson  15:18 sort of like Burbank airport. I don't think that they've gotten totally into jet bridges. At least the last time I flew into Burbank they hadn't. And the value of that is that they have people exit the aircraft from both the front and the back. So it hardly takes any time at all to evacuate an airport. Not evacuate, but get people off a plane when they land. Yeah. Which is kind of cool. Much faster. So as a test pilot, what kinds of of aircraft Did you test? What was kind of maybe the most unusual one? No flying saucers, I assume are   Pat Daily  15:52 flying saucers. Got to fly a bunch of different things. Most of my test time was in variants of the F 16. But probably the most unusual aircraft that I got to fly was the Goodyear blimp. There you go. Yeah. And I mean, did going through a test pilot school. And it felt an awful lot like climbing into someone's minivan because the gondola was that spacious that that roomy had plenty elbow room, plenty of people could sit around. It certainly wasn't, was a passenger compartment back in the days of the Hindenburg or anything, but it was, it was still pretty roomy for a modern aircraft cockpit. And we we went in and got to fly out over Long Beach and that whole area and I was the only airplane I've ever flown that only had one wheel. And I know because they tie the nose of the blimp to a big mast. And it just has one large wheel that casters around and as the wind blows it, it can weathervane into the wind and just pivot around on that little wheel.   Michael Hingson  17:09 Did you ever have any involvement with the flying wing? No, no at the time was probably before, well,   Pat Daily  17:17 well before but then the b two is a streamline wind design. And other than watching it, you know seeing it fly around. I never had any any interplay with it or never got to fly it. I do remember having to go out to their facility for something, a meeting or a test mission. And if you weren't cleared into the program, they had to turn on a beeper and a flashing light to let everybody know that that uncleared scum were entering the area and hide all the secret stuff,   Michael Hingson  17:54 tell people what the flying wing is a   Pat Daily  17:56 flying wing is if you can imagine, and airliner with its left and a right wing. And now take away the fuselage where all the people sit and where most of the gas is and the luggage, and then just join those two halves of the wing together. Now you're gonna have to beef it up a little bit, scale everything up. But it turns out that the flying wing design can be incredibly efficient. But it also comes with some pretty scary instabilities that you have to have to be ready to deal with. And so the earlier version, I think the XB 49 was the original flying wing. And it had small rudders to to help it maintain its directional stability. But the b two comes out at completely differently by using kind of differential speed brakes and spoilers. And, you know, that gave us differential thrust, I guess, but it's, it's a much more efficient and much more UFO like looking aircraft than we're used to seeing.   Michael Hingson  19:11 Yeah, well, it will. It will be interesting to see, well, I don't know whether they'll ever use that and probably not for an airliner or anything like that, because there's just not room for much in the way of passengers is there?   Pat Daily  19:23 No, although I've seen the whole design Yeah, and the whole design every once in a while when you see something in Popular Mechanics or something like that, where it's a hugely scaled up flying wing design. And of course, the downside of that maybe it's an upside is that everybody is now stuffed in the middle and and very few people get window seats, but the the times I've found recently hardly anybody is looking out the window anyway. And they tend to close the window shades and just get on their electronic entertainment devices   Michael Hingson  20:00 he up and it has its pluses and minuses to do that. But you know, I put on my earphones but I do try to listen to what's going on around me and try to stay aware. But you have people do that. And, of course, lights are brighter or when you're 30,000 feet or more. You're you're dealing with a lot of things. And as you said, people just want to get on their entertainment devices and escape. And so so that happens and then there you go. I'm still waiting for flying saucers and jetpacks, I'm ready for my jetpack. Yeah, that would be fun. I'm not sure how well I do with a jet pack. We need to get more information that comes in an auditory way rather than visually, but we can get there. Down. Yeah. Or tactically? Well ordered and tactically tactically. Yeah. Which would be both. There's an experiment that the National Federation of the Blind did actually now it's it started. Well, it started in 2001. Soon after September 11, I was at an event in Baltimore when a new building for the National Federation of blind was started called the Jernigan Institute. But one of the things that the President of the National Federation of the Blind back then did was to challenge private industry and the school systems, the college technical college systems to build a car that a blind person could drive. And in 2011, what they created was between Virginia Tech and some companies that worked with Virginia Tech came up with this device, they actually modified a Ford Escape. And what they did is they put a number of different kinds of radar and sonar devices on it. Other technologies that they felt would ultimately not even cost very much. But then the driver sat in the car and had some very long gloves on that would go up their arms, that had haptic or tactile devices that would vibrate, there was also a pad that he sat back against. And there were also something similar to the gloves that would would go around their legs so that there are a number of different kinds of vibrating things that were available to them. And a person was able to drive a car successfully. In fact, there's a demonstration of it's still on the National Federation of the Blind website or a subdomain. It's called www dot blind driver challenge.org. And what you see if you go to that website is a video where the now president of the National Federation of the Blind Mark Riccobono, gets in this device and drives around the Daytona Speedway right before the January 2011 Rolex 24 race, going through obstacle courses, driving past grandstands, and people cheering and all that driving behind a van that is throwing up boxes that he has to avoid, and then passing the van and eventually getting back to homebase. But no one's giving him directions. It's all from the information that the car is transmitting to him. And the reality is that, that it is doable. And he was driving at something like 30 miles an hour, so he wasn't going slow, and had no problem doing any of that. So the reality is, I think it's possible to develop the technology that would make it possible for a blind person to have a safe and good driving experience. And especially as we get into the era of autonomous vehicles, where things are not necessarily totally as failsafe oriented as we would like. And as perfect as we would like, I see legislatures already saying, well, even if you're going to have an autonomous vehicle, someone has to be in the driver's seat who can drive the car, and there should be no reason why that can't be a blind person as well.   Pat Daily  23:51 No, absolutely not. I mean, it's, it's all just a matter of data and input channel, right? I mean, right, whether it comes tactically or haptically, or auditorily, or we could have olfactory cues, maybe, but that that starts sounding a little messier,   Michael Hingson  24:09 probably a lot less efficient to do that. But but the fact is that Mark did this. And I think that car has been driven a number of times, I think he drove it around the streets of Baltimore as well. But the fact is that, that it is possible, which is another way of saying that eyesight isn't the only way to do stuff. But unfortunately, it is the main way that most people use and I understand that but the fact is not using some of your other senses, I think limits drivers a lot. I'm still surprised that for example, with Apple who has constructed all of its technologies to be accessible. So VoiceOver is built into every device that it releases. I'm surprised I haven't done more to make voiceover involved with interactions in automobiles. And there's an android version of, of all of that called TalkBack. But I'm surprised that with cell phones in cars, that they don't use more auditory output. And then like, you've got the Tesla where everything is driven by a touchscreen, which means no matter what you do you still have to look at the touchscreen. Why aren't they doing more with audio?   Pat Daily  25:20 Yeah, that's, that's a great question. And it, I think it gets to something I've heard you say on some of your interviews about sighted people have a disability in that we are light dependent, and you take away the light from us and and the world by and large becomes a navigable right to most of us. And that's just because we haven't tuned our other senses in the way that   Michael Hingson  25:49 you have. And there's no reason that we can't make it possible for people to use more of their senses. But the the automotive industry doesn't tend to do that. I think there's probably although it's still more emergency oriented. In aircraft, there's a lot of information that comes out auditorily, but probably a lot more could as well.   Pat Daily  26:12 Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. And so much in aviation now is, is really autonomous, that the biggest problem that aircraft like the the Boeing purple seven have is, how do we make sure that on a 16 hour flight, the crews are still awake? Yeah. And so they they build checklists to require them every so often to actually physically do something that the aircraft is perfectly capable of doing on its own. But we we want, it seems to still have that that pilot in the loop that pilot and control, do we get alarms or something that makes the pilot pay attention then to do whatever it is they need to do? Yeah, yep, get chart chimes, you get verbal cues, where the aircraft is actually talking to you.   Michael Hingson  27:05 Yeah, it makes perfect sense to to do that. And I've seen times where aircraft have flown, although pilots are still there, completely autonomously landed themselves gone right up to the, to the hangar or to the place where they let off passengers and so on. And all of that technology is accurate enough to do that today. Absolutely. There are several of us that are talking about the concept of trying to use some of the same technology I described with the the car that a blind person could drive to create, or build it into an airplane and have a blind person, fly the plane. And there's one person actually who wants to see this happen, and then be the first person to fly the same route Lindbergh did across the Atlantic, but be a totally blind person doing the flight.   Pat Daily  27:56 Well, that would be one heck of the demonstration of concept. But I'm with you. I don't think there's any reason they couldn't do that. There shouldn't be   Michael Hingson  28:07 any reason why we do have the technology today. It's the usual thing of a matter of finding a matter of will on the part of enough people to to make that happen. But I see no reason why with the technology we have today. We can't do that. Yeah, I think it all comes down to what you said. It's   Pat Daily  28:26 desire and funding. Sounds like a lot of fun down.   Michael Hingson  28:29 We'll see it be a fun project. Well, maybe you can help us. But oh, I have to ask this. In all your flying. Of course, you I'm sure you have flown in like the plane that everybody calls the vomit comment and had your experiences of weightlessness. Absolutely. And but you haven't gone yet fully into space?   Pat Daily  28:52 I have not. That's that's been one of my major disappointments. I always wanted to be an astronaut. And got a shot, got interviewed got to go down to NASA and then try to plead my case. And, and unfortunately, I was not selected, had a lot of friends that were selected, but I was not among them. You know,   Michael Hingson  29:16 Scott Parazynski? I do, we interviewed Scott, not too long ago. So he was talking to us about a number of the space station events and thought things that he has done. He wrote his book with the help of the same person who assisted me with underdogs. Susie Florrie. So that's how we got very good, which is which is kind of fun. So you went off and did Honeywell and and all that and got to work. I've never been to the Johnson Space Center. I'd love to do that sometime. I think it'd be a lot of fun. I have spent some time at NASA Goddard. And of course a little bit at the Kennedy Space Center but nothing really too involved in some didn't really get a chance to look at much of it but it'd be fun to go to the Johnson Space Center sometimes. So we'll have to come down and visit you and go there.   Pat Daily  30:05 Yeah, come on down, we'll take you.   Michael Hingson  30:07 But what did you do after Honeywell and all of that? After Honeywell, I,   Pat Daily  30:12 I launched a consulting company where we did safety consulting, and training and professionalism, professional development. And I really loved them, I really enjoyed the work. But after about 15 years doing that I was kind of done. So I left that behind, sold my share of the company to my partners, and wish them all well and, and move back into the flight test world. And so what did you go off and do? I went up to Moses, Lake Washington to work for Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation. And at the time, we were trying to build and certify a thing called the originally was called the MRJ, for Mitsubishi regional jet. And then they rebranded it, and called it the space jet, which, which, I don't know, I probably would have picked a different name, but hey, I'm not in marketing. And the thought behind the name was that they had reconceived reconceptualized, the way an airliner is built, traditionally, all the all the luggage, and everything goes in the belly. And that moves the floor of the aircraft up into the aluminum tube. And so you start losing head room and overhead, luggage space. And Mitsubishi had the idea, well, what if we just put all the luggage in the back, and then we have more room in the tube, and even fairly tall guys could stand upright in the in the aisle without having to duck. And that gave us the opportunity to build to build bigger luggage, overhead luggage compartments, and things like that. Unfortunately, that, you know, we, we got to flight test we built maybe seven of them that actually flew me see for here too, there are six that actually flew and then some that were just being used for structure testing. And then and then COVID happened and Mitsubishi decided that the program was far enough behind schedule and far enough over budget, that they needed to really rethink it. And so they they put it on what they call an extended pause. So extended that personally, I don't think it's ever coming back coming   Michael Hingson  32:39 back. It's yeah, permanently pause. So that kind of didn't help your job any?   Pat Daily  32:44 No, no, I got I got laid off from there. And thought that well, you know, I'm not I'm not working when I want to try writing. And so I'd already been playing around with the whole writing thing when COVID hit, and then just took it to the next level and got really serious about it finished the novel. And then, you know, long Behold, found somebody that actually wanted to publish it. You know, Michael, I don't know if you have this problem. But But I have a bit of an ego problem. I think that what I do is pretty doggone good. And so I wrote this book and draft one I thought, okay, it's no, it's no Of Mice and Men. It's it's not great literature, but it's a good book. And so I started sending it out. And and then I joined some writing groups, and the writing groups. It turns out, it's a little harder to get honest feedback than one would hope. Because everybody's worried that they're going to hurt your feelings and offend you. Yeah. And when they tell you you've got an ugly baby. But I had, I had a hideous baby. And it wasn't until well, she's become a friend of mine, another author, Alex Perry, who wrote a wonderful children's book, not children mid grade book, called pig hearted that she finally told me she said, Pat, it's boring. She said, your writing all makes sense. You can put a sentence together but it's like watching somebody else. watch somebody else play. A video came. And, and it hurt. But but it was exactly what I needed to hear. Yeah. And so I joined another writing group. And then I guess after about four or five revisions and 22 queries later, that Inklings publishing, said, Hey, you know, we think you got something here. So, you know, why don't we pair you up with a developmental editor and we'll see you We can do and they paired me up with a wonderful woman named Steph Mathias son. And she shepherded me through three more revisions of the book. And every time it got better, and largely because of the people that were willing to give me that honest feedback people like stuff, so that it you know, it got published and and now I've submitted book to to Inklings, and that should be coming out in December. And I've started on Book Three. So it's been, it's been a lot   Michael Hingson  35:34 of fun. And sequel is booked to a sequel, Book Two as a sequel. Yeah, great. Well, you know, there's nothing like a good editor, they're, they're worth their weight in gold and more. They're editing, right. And I learned that, not the hard way. But I learned it in a great way when we were doing fender dawg, because Thomas Nelson paired us with an editor who said, My job isn't to rewrite this in my own style. And to tell you how to write my job is to help you make this something that people will want to read, and to fine tune what you do. And and he did. We had, for example, I don't know whether you read thunder dog, but one of the parts about thunder dog is that it starts every chapter with something that was occurring on that day in the World Trade Center for me are around it. Then we went back to things I learned in my life. And then we came back and ended each chapter kind of continuing on in the World Trade Center. And what what our editor said was that your transitions lose me there, you're not doing great transitions from one scene to the other. And you got to fix that. And that was all he said. So I volunteered to do the transition examinations and try to deal with that, because it just clicked when he said that. I know exactly what he's saying. And I never thought about it. And and Susie says the same thing, you know, we hadn't really thought that they were as much of a problem as they are. But now that you mentioned it. So literally over a weekend, I've just went through and created transitions for every chapter. And I think that's one of the strong points of the book. And others have have said the same thing that the transitions absolutely take you where you want the reader to go. And it all came about because of the editor. Yeah, and I'm with you there. I   Pat Daily  37:31 think transitions are key. And I largely ignored them as well, in my in my early writing, that that of reading or consuming a book is actually requires work on both ends. And it's easier for the reader, if you pull them along as the writer if you seamlessly pull them into the next scene or seamlessly transition them. So yeah, transitions are huge.   Michael Hingson  38:00 They are and as soon as I heard that it made perfect sense. And the thing about it is I know now that I knew it, then I just never thought about it. So it's it's great to have a wonderful editor who can guide you. Well, your first book is called spark tell us about it, if you would. Spark is a near future science fiction novel, it.   Pat Daily  38:26 It takes place, mostly in Southern California, because when I was flying out there, I remember there being a solar power facility called solar one. And you could see it from probably 100 miles away during the daytime because it was one of these solar facilities where it relied on mirrors to reflect the solar energy up to a central collecting vessel that that normally has some sort of molten salt in it because it turns out that's really good for retaining heat. And then then they use that to transfer the heat to water turn that into steam to power a turbine and voila, electricity, by all always was fascinated by the whole solar power idea. And so spark itself is an acronym. It stands for Solar prime augmented reality Park. And, and as one of my readers pointed out, will pat that should be spark than not Spark as well. Yeah, but but spark doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. So I took a little license there. And the spark is a theme park for gamers. And it is an augmented reality theme park that makes use of both haptic technology as well as auditory cue News and visual cues in a thing I call augmented reality glasses that present the the player with a blended version of the real and the virtual. It's close enough in time to us that most people recognize a lot of the technology. But it posits some pretty impressive changes in artificial intelligence and solar power. And of course, it's it's got action adventure, there are good guys bad guys. The hero of the story a young man named wil Kwan shows up at the park, as you know, after his parents passed away, is his father dies in the second Korean War, which when I wrote it, wrote the book seemed much farther away than it does today. And, and that his his mom suffered mightily from the loss for her husband. And she ends up dying just few years later, and will is left as an orphan and things don't go well for him in foster care. And he ends up running away his goal is to run out to spark where his parents took him when he was younger. And he figures he's gonna get a job and just live there forever. Except that spark won't hire miners. And so he's got to figure out another way around it. And as he does, he realizes that there are far more layers to the game, and to spark itself than are normally perceived by others. And so he starts, he starts hunting a little bit, trying to learn more, he, he meets a young woman that or he has a disastrous first encounter with like, by the end of the novel, even though they still butt heads, they're now holding hands. And so you get a little little action, a little adventure, little romance, little mystery, and it ends up I think, just being kind of a fun novel.   Michael Hingson  42:12 So I would gather from augmented reality and everything else that, that there must be a lot of adventures and quests, and so on in the book. So if somebody were to buy the rights for the book, what quest would you like to see them convert into real life?   Pat Daily  42:29 That's a good question. That's a good question. I think my favorite and I D, detail a couple of the quests pretty deeply in the book, and one is called war on Mars. And I think it would be the most fun because it is the most expansive it, it takes place in mostly in Mariner Valley on Mars, which is so much larger than the Grand Canyon, in the United States. It is seven kilometers deep, that's four and a half miles deep. And it's it's nearly as wide as the United States is or long as the United States is east to west. And so I thought there were some cool things you could do with that out elevation change and, and of course, then there's got to be aliens involved in there, too.   Michael Hingson  43:28 I was just going to ask.   Pat Daily  43:32 Yeah, so So there are some aliens who don't take kindly to us being on Mars, and there's combat but but will is the kind of guy that he would rather think his way through things and fight his way through things. So he's, he's hung up on trying to find a more peaceful solution to our conflict with the aliens and I think that ends up being a lot of fun and wouldn't be a lot of fun to play out in real life.   Michael Hingson  44:03 Hopefully he figures out a way to get some peace and make some new friends.   Pat Daily  44:08 He does. Oh, good.   Michael Hingson  44:09 What character given that you're you're doing this a little bit future mystic kind of where what character was the hardest to develop   Pat Daily  44:18 the the young woman whose name is Shay Cree Patel, but her avatar name is feral daughter, and, and that name came out of something. My own daughter said that I misunderstood. We were on a on a vacation and they were in in shopping and I'd had enough of shopping in that particular store. So I just wanted to go stand outside for a little bit. Enjoy the fresh air. And she came out and she said something that I misunderstood as feral daughter. And I jumped all over that I said, that would be a great name for kind of a counter culture. clothing line, or, or you know, a boutique for women's clothes at a university or something like that. And she goes, Dad, what are you talking about? I said, Well, feral daughter isn't that we such no I and I don't even to this day, I don't remember what she actually said that it was not Farrell daughter. And it turns out that while I think I am a good husband, and good father, I am not very good at writing female characters. And again, my writing groups came in and were tremendously helpful. You know, some painful feedback, but also very good feedback to help me develop the female characters make them more authentic, so that, that neither of my daughters or my wife were embarrassed by the by them at the end   Michael Hingson  45:51 of the day, you mean, your daughter didn't help you? Right? She gave me   Pat Daily  45:55 one daughter, God bless her read all the way through one of the early drafts and gave me a lot of good feedback. The second one, the second daughter was far more interested after the book came out. And she was better at answering specific questions about well, you know, would this would this girl do this? Or? Or what do you think about this? Or how should he or she approached this? So they both been helpful in very different ways? Like, yeah, I, I was embarrassed enough by my writing that I put them through too many revisions of the of the novel   Michael Hingson  46:36 well, but if they, if they looked at it, and really helped unless you just were way too graphic with the sex scenes?   Pat Daily  46:44 No, no. And, and honestly, them that factored into it, I wanted to write a book that I wouldn't be embarrassed for my goats to read any of eventually, their children to read a call. They're calling you now. They're calling me now Dad, what are you saying? So, you know, interestingly, when I got the idea for the book, I was pitching it to my wife when we were out to dinner one night, and she's a fourth grade school teacher. And she started asking me all these questions, what about this, and this and this and this, and it would not be an understatement to say that I reacted poorly to the feedback. And at the end of the night, we ended up still married and still loving each other. But she told me that she was not going to read it until it was published. And so I lost my opportunity to have my first best writer critiquer   Michael Hingson  47:45 How about now with future books and the book you're working on now?   Pat Daily  47:49 Now, I think she is much more open to it.   Michael Hingson  47:52 And are you more open to Yes,   Pat Daily  47:55 yes. And I I'm better at taking feedback. And that helps tremendously. Because now I can I can discuss it a little more dispassionately and talk about what works what doesn't work in a scene and, and how characters might actually react. How old are your daughter's daughter number one is 36. Donner number two will be 33. The end of this year?   Michael Hingson  48:27 Do you have any sons? Nope.   Pat Daily  48:29 Just daughters.   Michael Hingson  48:30 So you've got two daughters, and they still and your wife still has some time to read and comment on your writings. Indeed,   Pat Daily  48:40 although my I'm probably not her favorite genre. Now she she loves historical fiction. So she'll, she'll jump on one of those books more eagerly than a science fiction book.   Michael Hingson  48:56 Well, okay, science fiction book. I guess we have to get to some other questions about that. So if we're dealing with science fiction today, Star Wars or Star Trek?   Pat Daily  49:07 Oh, gotta say I love them both. But I was born and raised on trek. And so I'll always be a Trekkie, even though I am a little disgruntled with some of the decisions they've made and some of the recent movies.   Michael Hingson  49:21 Yeah, yeah, my I hear you. But I like them both. I, especially the earlier Star Wars movies. I think, again, they've they've lost something in some of the translated translations later on. But they're fun. There are a lot of really nice Star Wars and Star Trek books, however, that are fun to read.   Pat Daily  49:44 Yeah. Yeah. And I actually, I actually tried to write a Star Trek book years ago, and I thought it was it was going to be good but it never I never finished it and The series move beyond one of my central characters I made Lieutenant Saavik a central character and, and things just move beyond her.   Michael Hingson  50:11 Mm hmm. Things happen. Yep. Well, and I was, you know, I like all of the Star Wars movies and I guess they they dealt with it but like the the last well of the original Nine with Luke Skywalker I guess in a little in a sense I was a little disappointed of course, I was disappointed that that Han Solo son killed him and what was that number? That would have been what number seven? But nevertheless, they're they're, they're fun. They're great adventure scores. So was Indiana Jones.   Pat Daily  50:46 Yes, yes. Indiana Jones that Raiders of the Lost Ark was actually the first movie I took my wife to go see   Michael Hingson  50:56 her you go down and how she liked it. She loved it.   Pat Daily  51:01 She loved it. I knew nothing about it other night heard other people say great things about it. And so I was delighted that it turned out to be such a good movie. I think it made a positive impact.   Michael Hingson  51:13 And were you afraid of snakes? I had to ask.   Pat Daily  51:16 I hate snakes.   Michael Hingson  51:21 Then as far as more I guess you could say science fiction, probably more fantasy, but something that I think has had a major impact on the lives of a lot of people, especially kids and helping them read is Harry Potter.   Pat Daily  51:33 Yes. That completely hooked. My daughter's my my first daughter got hooked on the red wall series. Brian jocks but then as soon as the Harry Potter's came out, she started devouring those and that is what really turned my second daughter into a reader was all the Harry Potter books. So II and that's the point, right? Yep. Yep,   Michael Hingson  52:01 I think we discovered Harry Potter with the third one in the series, prisoner basket band, we heard about it, and saw some new things about it. And at that time, there was still this company books on tape and we went in and we got copies, we got a copy and started reading the first one. And we got hooked. It was a little while getting into it. But it was a little boring at first, but we got hooked on it. And so we read the Sorcerer's Stone. And then we were hooked and couldn't wait for each of them the rest of the books to come out. So we read the first three pretty quickly because we were already on the Prisoner of Azkaban when we learned about it, but then we grabbed books as soon as we can. We got the audio books because my wife liked to listen to them as well, although we also got a print copy of all of the books, but we enjoyed listening to them. Jim Dale was such a great reader. And one of my favorite stories about all of that is that he was scheduled to read part of the fourth book in the series. I think that was the one published in 2001. When September 11 happened and he was supposed to be in Manhattan and was in Manhattan. He was supposed to do a reading outside of scholastic publishing, publishing. And so when the Goblet of Fire was published, he was going to be there doing a reading at Scholastic because they're the publisher of it. And of course, it was on September 11 And September 11 happened so he didn't get to read it. And we didn't get to go up and listen. But I remember that that was supposed to all happen on September 11.   Pat Daily  53:41 Oh my goodness, I never knew that. So she was going to be an evening thing. We're going to have to take off work, go play a little hooky to listen to the reading Oh,   Michael Hingson  53:50 we we could have gone up there without any difficulty during the day because we were working with scholastic publishing and sold them tape backup products. So it's not even a hard problem to go off and deal with going up there. Ah, okay. And when only going from the World Trade Center up to Scholastic, which is Midtown Manhattan, so was likely we'd be up in that area. Anyway. My favorite though thing about scholastic was we went in once I and a couple of wire other people. And one of the elevators was out of order, and they had a sign on the one that worked that said, this is for muggle use. And then the one that was out of order for wizard use only, which was really cute. I like that. Yeah, it was kind of fun. But you know, I really admire authors and books that promote reading and encourage people to read and I'm glad that that Harry Potter has done that and, you know, I'm looking forward to reading spar have gotta figure out a way to get access to it. I assume it may not be in audio format yet or is it?   Pat Daily  54:53 It is not. But I just started conversations with someone who could be the the narrator and I I've just learned that there's a huge difference between narrators and voice actors. And so I may need someone with voice acting skills, rather than just narration. Because I've got a lot of characters and some drama, and I want somebody that that can do more than simply read the words off the page. But I don't know how long it takes from day one to final release of an audio book. But I will let you know when it happens.   Michael Hingson  55:30 It you do have to get somebody who can read it. Well, I enjoy books where the reader is a as an actor and puts different voices into it. I've been reading talking books from the library of congress, of course, my whole life and early on, especially, they sought actors to do the reading. One of my favorite series has always been the wreck stop series near wolf, the private detective. Yeah, in the in the reader who did the best job was a radio actor named Carl Webber, who I never heard much of in radio, although I clicked radio shows, he did do a show called Dr. Six Gun. And I've discovered that and listened to him. And it does sound like our a Weber. But he read the neuro wolf books, and they were absolutely incredibly well done. So it does make a difference to have someone who's a good actor reading it, as opposed to just somebody who reads the lines, because they will help draw you in. Yeah, yeah. And I actually   Pat Daily  56:35 just downloaded thunder dog. I still do a fair amount of driving and I like to listen to books while I'm driving. So I'm I'm looking forward to hearing that. Well, Christopher   Michael Hingson  56:48 prince did a did a good job with it. I, I don't know how he would be at well, actually, I take that back. I have heard another book of that he read where he did. It was a fiction book. And I'm trying to remember the name of it, I'd have to go back and find it. But he did a pretty good job. He did this for Oasis audio. But there are some good actors out there. And so I hope that you have some success. Let me know. And if you need somebody ever to listen, I'd be glad to help.   Pat Daily  57:17 Oh, excellent. Thank you. I'll take care on that.   Michael Hingson  57:20 I have one last question I've been thinking about not book related. But talking about aircraft. Again, the 747 I keep hearing is probably the most stable passenger airliner that has ever been really produced. What do you think about that? Why is it so stable? Oh, I've   Pat Daily  57:38 got to agree with that a real champion of design. And it's got a couple things in his favor. One is one is the wings are Anhedral, which means that they can't up a little bit and especially when, when they get a little lift on him, they they get pulled up as all their aircraft wings do. And then the enormous vertical stabilizer lends a lot of a lot of stability to the aircraft. And then finally, I think Boeing just did an absolutely spectacular job of, of harmonizing the flight controls and putting everything together to make it a very docile airplane, certainly for something of its size. I mean, it carries so much fuel that he uses fuel for structural integrity when it's more full. And so we have that 747 is a spectacular airplane. And, and unfortunately, it's it's kind of aging   Michael Hingson  58:38 out. But how come they haven't done other things with that same level of design and stability? At least? I haven't heard that they have. But yeah, I   Pat Daily  58:48 think I think the triple seven is close to it. There have been very very few mishaps with the with the triple seven. And it's it's another marvelous airplane. I don't think they got exactly what they're hoping for with the 787. They did have some design issues, some manufacturability issues, but it's it's certainly a highly efficient and remarkably quiet appointment. So   Michael Hingson  59:20 what prompted the question was when you were talking about the Mitsubishi aircraft and so on, and putting the luggage at the backs of taller people could stand up. It reminded me of the 747 with the upper level for first class, the lounge where the pilots and so on were so it almost was to a degree at least a double decker aircraft.   Pat Daily  59:38 Yeah. Yeah. And of course Airbus has made the a 380 which is a true double decker full length. But that's that's another aircraft that hasn't exactly lived up to its hype. Well,   Michael Hingson  59:51 still holding on for flying saucers. There you go. Well, Pat, I want to thank you for being on unstoppable mindset. How do people reach out and maybe learn more about you? Where can they get the book? You know, love all your contact information and so on.   Pat Daily  1:00:08 Okay, probably the easiest way is the website, which is thepatdaily.com. And it's t h e. P a t d a i l y.com. And that has links to to my blog to the bio to all my other socials. I'm on, of course on on Facebook at Pat Daily, author and on Instagram at Pat daily pics and then Twitter at at Pat Daily, or I think it's at Pat Daily author, but easiest way, just the website, everything is there. Down. Cool.   Michael Hingson  1:00:48 Well, I know I'm looking forward to finding a way to read spark and your other books as they come out. That will be fun being a science fiction fan, of course. And I think we talked about it before we were doing this particular episode. But we've talked about science fiction and some of my favorite authors, I would still like to see somebody take Robert Heinlein to the Moon is a Harsh Mistress, and make it into a radio series. Talking about actors. I just think that do. I think you're right. I loved that book.   Pat Daily  1:01:19 I loved so much of what Heinlein wrote, you know, one of the one a great masters of the genre.   Michael Hingson  1:01:25 Yeah, yeah. And I think that's his best book. A lot of people say Stranger in a Strange Land was and it was very unique, and so on. But the Moon is a Harsh Mistress is so clever. And there's so much to it. And of course, then there are books that follow on from it, where some of the world's the same characters are involved. Heinlein created a whole universe, which was fun, did it just sort of like as I did with the foundation series? Well, thanks, again, for being here. We need to do this again. Especially when you get more books out, when you get your next book out, we got to come back and talk about it. I'd love to.   Pat Daily  1:02:02 And and thank you so much for having me on your show, Mike, I really appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  1:02:05 Well, I really appreciate you taking the time to be here. This has been fun. So people go find the Pat daily.com and contact Pat reach out and enjoy the book. And let me know what you think of it. I'm going to get to it as well, I'm just going to find a way to be able to read it. So we'll get there. But for all of you who listened in today, thanks very much for being here. If you'd like to reach out to me, please do so. My email address is Michaelhi@accessibility.com. That's M I C H A E L H I  at A C C E S S I B E.com. Where you can go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast where you can reach out to us as well. I hope you'll give us a five star rating. And Pat, we didn't talk about it. Well, we should probably at some point, talk about how accessible your website is and get you in touch with people in accessibe.   Pat Daily  1:03:01  Absolutely. I did check out accessibe and it looks like something that once I get the website fully developed, we'll be in contact.   Michael Hingson  1:03:09 Well, we'd love to help you with that. But again, everyone thanks for being here. Please give us a five star rating and we hope that you'll be back again next week for unstoppable mindset. And again, Pat, thank you for being here as well.   Pat Daily  1:03:20 Thank you, Mike.Take care,   Michael Hingson  1:03:22 you too.   Michael Hingson  1:03:26 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K441: 登月五十年後 美國試飛新火箭重返月球

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 4:15


每日英語跟讀 Ep.K441: NASA tests new moon rocket, 50 years after Apollo Years late and billions over budget, NASA's new moon rocket makes its debut this week in a high-stakes test flight before astronauts get on top. 遲來數年、預算超出數十億美元的美國太空總署(NASA)新型登月火箭,本週將首次啟航,進行一次高風險的試飛,以便為搭載太空人做準備。 The 98m (322ft) rocket will attempt to send an empty crew capsule into a far-flung lunar orbit, 50 years after NASA's famed Apollo moonshots. If all goes well, astronauts could strap in as soon as 2024 for a lap around the moon, with NASA aiming to land two people on the lunar surface by the end of 2025. Liftoff is set for Monday morning at 8:33am to 10:33am EDT from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. 在NASA著名的阿波羅登月計畫五十年後,這九十八公尺(三百二十二英尺)長的火箭,將嘗試把一個空的載人太空艙送入環月軌道遠端。如果一切順利,太空人最早可在二〇二四年啟程,環繞月球一圈;NASA的目標是在二〇二五年底前,將兩個人送上月球表面登陸。火箭預定在美東時間週一上午八點三十三分至十點三十三分之間自NASA甘迺迪太空中心發射。 ROCKET POWER The new rocket is shorter and slimmer than the Saturn V rockets that hurled 24 Apollo astronauts to the moon a half-century ago. But it's mightier, packing 4 million kilograms (8.8 million pounds) of thrust. 火箭動力 新型火箭比半世紀前將二十四名阿波羅計畫太空人送上月球的火箭農神五號更短、更細,但更強大,具有四百萬公斤(八百八十萬磅)的推力。 Unlike the streamlined Saturn V, the new rocket has a pair of strap-on boosters refashioned from NASA's space shuttles. The boosters will peel away after two minutes, just like the shuttle boosters did, but won't be fished from the Atlantic for reuse. The core stage will keep firing before separating and crashing into the Pacific in pieces. Two hours after liftoff, an upper stage will send the capsule, Orion, racing toward the moon. 與流線型的農神五號不同,新型火箭有一對安裝在外的推進器,是由NASA太空梭改造而來的設計。推進器將在升空後兩分鐘脫落,如同太空梭的推進器,但不會再把它從大西洋打撈上來重複使用。核心節則將繼續前進,然後分離、墜入太平洋碎裂。升空兩小時後,火箭的上節將全速把獵戶座太空船送往月球。 MOONSHIP NASA's high-tech, automated Orion capsule is named after the constellation, among the night sky's brightest. At 3m (11ft) tall, it's roomier than Apollo's capsule, seating four astronauts instead of three. For this test flight, a full-size dummy in an orange flight suit will occupy the commander's seat, rigged with vibration and acceleration sensors. Two other mannequins made of material simulating human tissue — heads and female torsos, but no limbs — will measure cosmic radiation, one of the biggest risks of spaceflight. One torso is testing a protective vest from Israel. 登月船 NASA的高科技自動化太空船獵戶座,是以夜空最亮的星座為名。它高三公尺(十一英尺),比阿波羅計畫的太空艙更寬敞,可乘坐四名太空人,而非三名。這次的試飛中,一個身著橙色飛行服的真人尺寸假人將置於指揮官座位,配備振動與加速度感測器。另外還有兩個以仿人體組織材料所製成的假人──有頭部和女性軀幹,但沒有四肢──將用來測量宇宙輻射;宇宙輻射是太空飛行最大的風險之一。另一軀幹則是測試一件以色列製的防護背心。 FLIGHT PLAN Orion's flight is supposed to last six weeks from its Florida liftoff to Pacific splashdown — twice as long as astronaut trips in order to tax the systems. It will take nearly a week to reach the moon, 386,000km away. 航行計畫 獵戶座太空船預計航行六週,始自佛羅里達升空,終至濺落太平洋,是太空人旅行時間的兩倍,以便檢驗及評估系統。到達三十八萬六千公里外的月球,需要將近一週的時間。 The big test comes at mission's end, as Orion hits the atmosphere at 40,000 kph on its way to a splashdown in the Pacific. The heat shield uses the same material as the Apollo capsules to withstand reentry temperatures of 2,750 degrees Celsius. But the advanced design anticipates the faster, hotter returns by future Mars crews. 大考驗是在任務結束時,獵戶座太空船會以每小時四萬公里的速度撞擊大氣層,掉落在太平洋。隔熱罩所使用的材料與阿波羅計畫的太空船相同,可承受再進入大氣層的高溫攝氏兩千七百五十度。但此先進的設計已預想了未來火星任務人員返回時更快的速度,以及更熱的溫度。Source article: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/lang/archives/2022/08/30/2003784369 歡迎留言告訴我們你對這一集的想法: https://open.firstory.me/user/cl81kivnk00dn01wffhwxdg2s/comments Powered by Firstory Hosting

Super Startup Club
Carl Fisher - Cama Plan and how to make tax free money

Super Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 41:24


Carl is 3rd generation real estate developer and has managed millions of dollars in real estate investment transactions over the years. Carl, began his investing career in the 1970s when he was employed as a rocket scientist at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. He is presently one of the founders and principals of CAMA Self Directed IRA, LLC

DECIDING TO WIN
Space for a better world with Christina Korp

DECIDING TO WIN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 32:32


On this episode, i am joined by the amazing Christina Korp, the president of purpose entertainment, astronaut manager and producer. For ten years she managed Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin and launched his education foundations – ShareSpace and the Aldrin Family Foundation. She produced the last five galas at Kennedy Space Center celebrating Apollo 11 and the Webby winning and Emmy nominated, “Cycling Pathways to Mars” VR experience. She is passionate about promoting ways space benefits the planet and people every day and promoting women's issues. She spearheaded projects in 2020 to celebrate the Women's Vote Centennial in the USA. She leads SPACE For a Better World producing events and experiences that raise money for partner charities. She currently works with Apollo 16 moon walker Charlie Duke and NASA astronaut and aquanaut Nicole Stott. Christina has traveled the world as a singer, producer, tour manager and as an Astronaut Wrangler. She produces ground breaking, mass participation experiential artworks and event that focus on inspiring people and giving back to the planet. This episode was produced by the amazing Justin Fiallo. Photocredit : David Christopher Lee

Hot Off The Wire
Texas sheriff investigating migrant flights; UN chief issues warning; 'Serial' conviction tossed; UK mourns queen | Top headlines for Sept. 19 & 20, 2022

Hot Off The Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 12:57


A Texas sheriff has opened a criminal investigation into two flights of migrants sent to Martha's Vineyard by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. But Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar on Monday did not say what laws may have been broken in putting 48 Venezuelans on private planes last week from San Antonio. Hurricane Fiona dumped more rain on Puerto Rico. The deluge came after the storm knocked out power and water to most of the island. The storm is now barreling toward the Turks and Caicos Islands as a Category 3 hurricane. Student loan borrowers who paid down their debt during a pandemic freeze that started in March 2020 can get a refund — and then apply for forgiveness. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is warning that the world is in “great peril." And he says world leaders meeting in-person for the first time in three years at the U.N. General Assembly must tackle conflicts and climate catastrophes, increasing poverty and inequality, and divisions among major powers that have gotten worse since Russia invaded Ukraine. A Baltimore judge has ordered the release of Adnan Syed after overturning Syed's conviction for a 1999 murder that was chronicled in the hit podcast “Serial.” Circuit Court Judge Melissa Phinn on Monday ordered that Syed's conviction be vacated and she approved the release of the now-41-year-old who has spent more than two decades behind bars. On Sept. 20, 1973, Billie Jean King beat Bobby Riggs in straight sets to win the Battle of the Sexes and the $100,000 winner-take-all purse at Houston's Astrodome. In sports, the Eagles and the Bills dominated Monday night football and the Mets clinched a playoff berth. Britain and the world said farewell to Queen Elizabeth II with pomp and pageantry. Crowds massed in the streets of London and at Windsor Castle to honor a monarch whose 70-year reign defined an era. The first state funeral since Winston Churchill's drew world leaders and other royalty. Before the service, a bell tolled 96 times for each year of Elizabeth's life. Royal Navy sailors pulled a gun carriage carrying her flag-draped coffin to Westminster Abbey before pallbearers bore it inside. Atop the coffin sat a handwritten note from King Charles III. After a committal service at a chapel in Windsor Castle, the coffin was lowered into the royal vault. In movie theatres and pubs, on giant screens and smartphones, people watched and pundits droned on as the funeral in London flooded the airwaves live across time zones and continents. An American contractor held hostage in Afghanistan for more than two years by the Taliban has been released. The White House and family members of Mark Frerichs said Monday his release came in an exchange for a convicted Taliban drug lord jailed in the United States. A Northern California woman has been sentenced to 18 months in prison for faking her own kidnapping so she could go back to a former boyfriend, which led to an three-week, multi-state search. Forty-year-old Sherri Papini pleaded guilty last spring under a plea bargain. The number of people killed on U.S. roadways fell slightly from April through June. But the government says traffic fatalities are still at a crisis level. Estimates from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration show that 20,175 people died in crashes from January through June, an increase of 0.5% over the same period last year. The United Arab Emirates will launch its first lunar rover in November. The rover would be launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard a Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket and deposited on the moon by a Japanese ispace lander sometime in March. A Russian missile has blasted a crater close to a nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine, damaging nearby industrial equipment but not hitting its three reactors. Ukrainian authorities denounced Monday's attack as an act of “nuclear terrorism." In this week's religion roundup, pastors offer a mixed response to Republican transports of migrants to Democratic-run jurisdictions, while a faith-led group seeks missing migrants in the US-Mexico desert. And Pope Francis calls for peace in Ukraine. —The Associated PressSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rivet360 News
First-ever lunar mission planned by United Arab Emirates

Rivet360 News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 0:41


The mission manager has told state-linked newspaper The National that the rover will be launched from Florida's Kennedy Space Center onboard a Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket.

Earthy Girls
Major Tom to Ground Control. Space, The Final Frontier. Is it our future? Artemis 1 is set to launch soon after several setbacks. SE 2 EP 17

Earthy Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 18:21


Artemis 1 an unmanned spacecraft was scheduled to launch on Monday 8/29, but plans were scrubbed due to some storms & lightning and was then rescheduled to hopefully launch in early September and now set for September 27. Meteorologists are hoping that conditions will be favorable for the launch. Artemis is the first integrated test of NASA's Orion spacecraft their SLS (Space Launch System) rocket and the ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Why do we care? Lets talk space and beyond. As Earthy Girls, we love our planet. Earth's and its atmosphere is important to our survival. But the great beyond is here and why it could be important to us, the Earthy Girls. The Earthy Girls want to encourage, inform & inspire you to take that small step, make that 2 degree pivot towards loving your planet not just living on it. It's a Mindset! Flip that Script. Reduce, Reuse and then Recycle. Consider it this way, It's Not just an inconvenience, it's an investment in the future generations. Find us on Instagram @earthygirl.co or on Facebook as Earthy Girls. @absentmindedwolf https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/ https://auroraforecast.com/ If you want to support our show, donate to the cause, please click on the Venmo Link. https://account.venmo.com/u/Rebecca-Behnke https://kite.link/earthy-girls https://link.chtbl.com/Grg4n6-Xhttps: https://podvine.com/podcast/earthy-girls-3sM6ta9A9 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rebecca-behnke/message

Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
It's Not Just NASA: Space Agency Leaders at the Artemis 1 Launch Attempt

Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 77:59 Very Popular


More than 100,000 came to the Kennedy Space Center hoping to see Artemis 1 head for the Moon on August 29. Among them were leaders of the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Center (DLR), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI). They sat down with Mat Kaplan for conversations about the international collaboration behind the Artemis program, along with some of the other brilliant successes they have achieved. We also celebrate the 60th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's speech that set the United States on course for the Moon. There's a JWST T-shirt waiting for the winner of the new What's Up space trivia contest. And there's more to discover at https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2022-esa-dlr-asi-leadersSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Houston We Have a Podcast
Leading the Space Coast

Houston We Have a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 Very Popular


Janet Petro reflects on her first year as the director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center. HWHAP Episode 256.

NASACast Audio
Leading the Space Coast

NASACast Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Janet Petro reflects on her first year as the director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center. HWHAP Episode 256.

Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
Countdown to Artemis, The Return to the Moon

Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 70:53 Very Popular


Come with us to NASA's Kennedy Space Center for our special coverage of the first attempt to launch the giant Space Launch System rocket toward the Moon. You'll hear astronaut Thomas Pesquet, “Everyday Astronaut” Tim Dodd, NASA Associate Administrator Thomas Zurbuchen, and much more. Then take your best shot at winning the Artemis 1 prize package in this week's space trivia contest. There's more to discover at https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2022-artemis-1-launch-special-coverageSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Smart Talk
NASA Artemis rocket rescheduled to launch Saturday

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 8:49


On Saturday, NASA's Artemis rocket attempts to take off for the second time from NASA's modernized Kennedy Space Center in Florida. According to BBC news, the lift-off scheduled for Monday had to be scrubbed when one of four engines on the vehicle would not cool down to its required operating temperature. According to NASA, the Artemis mission is to land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon, using innovative technologies to explore more of the lunar surface than ever before. Brixx Minguez, General Manager of Shippensburg University's Television Station, who interviewed astronauts and the Head of Space Exploration at the press site during the first attempt to launch the rocket said, the name Artemus comes from an ancient lunar goddess turned feminist icon, which is significant because they're bringing the first woman to the moon. "There is this moment when you're getting to the end of your interviews with each person and you ask them, 'Any final words about the launch?' and people start to cry and say that this is their dream coming true. This is their childhood. This is what they've waited their whole lives for," Brixx said. They also said it took everyone that played a part in creating the Artemis rocket 10 or more years to do so. “We are going to the moon to stay,” NASA said. Brixx said what NASA meant by this statement is they're training astronauts to build a permanent moon base with Artemis mission. Brixx said she hopes the issues that caused Monday's launch date to be scrubbed will be addressed for a successful launch Saturday.Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast
Steffan Tubbs Show 9-2-22 Hr2

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 43:28


We begin with Erin Kane, Superintendent, Douglas County Schools in studio. Bond and mill levy issues on the November ballot. Then - we go live to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and a preview of the Artemis1 mission to orbit the moon. Rob Chambers, Director of Strategy with Lockheed Martin in Littleton, discusses the window of opportunity to launch tomorrow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
Space Policy Edition: Mike Gold on Crafting the Artemis Accords

Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:41 Very Popular


As we wait for the launch of Artemis 1, we explore the Artemis Accords: a shared set of principles for exploring space, signed now by more than twenty nations. The accords outline a set of peaceful behaviors and shared values, including the open sharing of scientific data, safe disposal of orbital debris, commitments to mutual aid, and practices for using space resources and preservation. Mike Gold, former Associate Administrator of Space Policy and Partnerships at NASA, helped draft these accords and joins the show to share why they're important, how they came together, and the immense practical benefit of having global norms in space. Casey and Mat also discuss the context and meaning of the Artemis 1 mission following their visit to Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Discover more here: https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/artemis-accords-mike-goldSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily News Brief by TRT World
September 2, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 2:18


*) UN experts to stay at Ukraine nuclear plant to 'continue with assessment' UN inspectors will be "staying" at a Russian-held nuclear plant in southern Ukraine — at least till the weekend. The Chief of the International Atomic Energy Agency described their first visit to the facility as productive. Today we were able, in these few hours, to gather a lot of information," IAEA director general Rafael Grossi told reporters outside the plant after the inspection. *) Hundreds of flights cancelled in Germany as Lufthansa pilots go on strike Pilots at Lufthansa have gone on strike, forcing the German airline to cancel hundreds of flights and leave holidaymakers stranded. Friday's walk out has led to the cancellation of nearly 800 flights, affecting around 130,000 passengers. The strike began at midnight local time and is set to continue for 24 hours, according to a statement by the pilots' union. *) Iran sends 'constructive' response to US offers on nuclear deal Iran has sent a "constructive" response to US proposals aimed at reviving Tehran's 2015 nuclear deal. Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Nasser Kanaani said "The text that was sent (by Iran) has a constructive approach aimed at finalising the negotiations." The report said Iran's response was sent to EU Foreign Policy Chief Josep Borrell, who has been coordinating the negotiations. *) Sri Lanka's deposed president Rajapaksa 'to return home' from Thailand Sri Lanka's deposed former president Gotabaya Rajapaksa is expected to end his self-imposed exile in Thailand and return home, a top defence official has said. "He has been living in a Thai hotel as a virtual prisoner and was keen to return," the defence official, adding that the ex-leader is expected to return early on Saturday. The 73-year-old fled the island under military guard in July after a huge crowd stormed his official residence, following months of public protests over an unprecedented economic crisis. *) NASA readies for Moon rocket launch attempt The stars appear to have aligned for NASA's Moon rocket to finally blast off, with weather forecasts favourable and technical issues resolved. Lift off is scheduled for 1817 GMT from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the potential for up to a two-hour delay if necessary. The chance for favourable weather conditions within that window sat at 60 percent Thursday evening.

880 Extras
NASA's Artemis rocket due to blast off Saturday

880 Extras

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 2:18


CBS News Correspondent Peter King has more from the Kennedy Space Center.

Space Cafe Radio
Space Cafè Radio - on tour in London - with Dr. Philip Metzger

Space Cafe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 15:53


In this Space Café Radio – SpaceWatch.Global Senior Editor and Space Café Italy Host Dr. Emma Gatti spoke with Dr. Philip Metzger, planetary scientist at the University of Central Florida. In 2021 he was selected as the Kennedy Space Center's NASA Scientist/Engineer of the Year for research into the blast effects of lunar landings. In 2021, the International Astronautical Union named Asteroid 36329 Philmetzger after him for his efforts to preserve the Apollo sites on the Moon.In this episode Philip discusses how humanity can use and preserve the moon. He covers how both a human and robotic presence is essential for moon resource extraction and economic activity on the moon. He even suggests that humanity is 10 years away from bringing moon resources to Earth's orbit to use as propellant.Space Café Radio brings you talks, interviews and reports from the team of SpaceWatchers while out on the road. Each episode has a specific topic, unique content and a personal touch. Enjoy the show and let us know your thoughts at radio@spacewatch.global!You can find other episodes of our Space Café Mini-series - on tour in London - here (more to come):Space Café Radio – on tour in London - with Farzana BaduelSpace Café Radio - on tour in London - with Temi Shogelola

Headline News
NASA targets Saturday for Artemis I launch

Headline News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:45


NASA is targeting this Saturday for the launch of the Artemis I lunar mission from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It comes as the first attempt was called off Monday due to an engine issue.

All Sides with Ann Fisher
Tech Tuesday: NASA's Moon mission postponed

All Sides with Ann Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 50:00


Thousands traveled to the Kennedy Space Center on Florida's Atlantic coast yesterday to watch the launch of Artemis 1. They were disappointed when an engine problem forced NASA to scrub the launch to Friday at the earliest.

All Sides with Ann Fisher Podcast
Tech Tuesday: NASA's Moon mission postponed

All Sides with Ann Fisher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 50:00


Thousands traveled to the Kennedy Space Center on Florida's Atlantic coast yesterday to watch the launch of Artemis 1. They were disappointed when an engine problem forced NASA to scrub the launch to Friday at the earliest.

Florida Travel Fanatics
4: Making a visit to the Florida Space Coast and watching a Rocket Launch

Florida Travel Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 31:41


The Florida Space Coast is one of our favorite places to visit, especially when we get to watch a rocket launch from Kennedy Space Center.   In this episode, we offer a bunch of advice about the best way to watch a launch, visit the Kennedy vistor's center, and enjoy the Space Coast.Useful links from this episode:www.VisitSpaceCoast.com contains a lot of really useful travel information for your next trip to the SpaceCoast. www.LaunchPhotography.com  This site is owned by Ben Cooper, a terrific photographer, and has a very comprehensive list of different spots around the Space Coast to watch a rocket launch :   http://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.htmlwww.KennedySpaceCenter.com is all about the Space Center, visiting, tickets, launches, etc. For information on kids summer camp programs at KSC:  https://www.kennedyspacecenter.com/camps-and-educationBest local SpaceCoast brewery : https://www.PlayalindaBrewingCompany.comTheir Brix location has a full food menu.   Their downtown Titusville location has a limited food menu, but it's a cool spot and located in an old hardware store.   Check 'em out !https://www.cocoabeach.com/     Cocoa Beach is one of our favorites on the East Coast.  Be sure to visit their Pier, which is a great spot to grab a cold beverage and watch the surfers!

Steve Cochran on The Big 89
NASA set to launch most powerful rocket

Steve Cochran on The Big 89

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 7:04


NASA is set to launch its first crew-rated rocket in the Artemis program. Aerospace Journalist Jim Banke calls into the Steve Cochran Show live from the Kennedy Space Center to talk about troubleshooting technical problems, launch delays, and why this 322ft rocket differs from all others. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TODAY
August 29: Breaking news – NASA rocket launch scrubbed. Consumer Confidential – passenger complaints at all-time high. Remembering Princess Diana 25 years later.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 32:08


NASA delays this morning's Artemis 1 launch after several issues and storms in the area overnight.  Plus, a Consumer Confidential – tips on making your Labor Day travel plans smooth as a report from the Department of Transportation shows customer complaints have skyrocketed. And, Prince William and Prince Harry are preparing to mark 25 years since the death of their mother Princess Diana.

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing
August 29: The almighty vs. the alternative

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 4:33


Today is launch day for the Space Launch System Rocket, which will push the Orion spacecraft on a trajectory to orbit the moon. It lifts off at 8:33 a.m. Eastern time from the ​​Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA TV's stream of the enormous 30-story tall rocket is already live with a countdown clock. This is a big day for VP Kamala Harris. There have occasionally been snickers about the fact that the vice president chairs the administration's National Space Council. Today the potential upside of that assignment will take center stage. If all goes well, in six days, the unmanned Orion capsule — which can accommodate four astronauts in future missions — will begin orbiting the moon from a distance of some 43,000 miles from the lunar surface. Kara Tabor is an audio producer for POLITICO Audio. Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

EZ News
EZ News 08/29/22

EZ News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 6:00


Good afternoon, I'm _____ with today's episode of EZ News. **Three Taiwanese from Myanmar Human Trafficking Ring Arrested ** The Criminal Investigation Bureau says three people have been detained on connection with a human trafficking ring in Myanmar. The three were allegedly involved in organ harvesting and sex trafficking. They were arrested after it was confirmed they were fugitives and are likely members of a telecom extortion ring in Myanmar. The three Taiwanese nationals were detained after they returned home from Myanmar this past weekend. One of them was on Taiwan's most wanted list for forgery (偽造罪) and currency counterfeiting, but police have not indicated that that individual was involved in human trafficking operations. **KMT Vice Chair Touts China Trip as 'Helping Taiwanese People' ** K-M-T Vice Chairman Andrew Hsia says his recently concluded 17-day trip to China was aimed at looking after the needs of Taiwanese people based in the country. Speaking after returning to Taiwan, Hsia said used his meetings with Chinese officials to convey (表達) concerns over Beijing's recent military drills in areas surrounding Taiwan. According to Hsia, he told Chinese officials that the military exercises were of no help to peaceful development, and that the vast majority of people in Taiwan were uneasy, worried, and dissatisfied with the drills. Hsia says he also exchanged views with them on job scams in Cambodia, cross-strait flights, the reopening of the "mini-three links" and rumors of the termination of the ECFA accords "early harvest" list. **Army Fires Warning Flares at Chinese Drone in Kinmen ** The army says it has fired warning flares after a Chinese drone after it was spotted over a small island in Kinmen County. According to the Kinmen Defense Command, a civilian-operated drone from China appeared over Lieyu Township and troops responded by firing warning flares based on standard operating procedures. Defense officials say troops refrained from takiing more aggressive (挑釁的) measures, such as shooting the drone down, in order to avoid further escalating cross-strait tensions. A clip of the drone's flight was posted on Chinese social media platform Weibo and shows it flying close to and filming a military lookout post, including its facilities and soldiers and ship and aircraft identification charts. The Ministry of National Defense says it is work on a defensive system against drones for installation by 2023 in Kinmen and Matsu. **Serbia opposition, rights groups condemn EuroPride decision ** In Serbia, opposition parties and international rights groups have denounced (斥責) a decision by the President to cancel next month's LGBTQ EuroPride events. President Aleksandar Vucic explained that the Balkan nation could not handle EuroPride because of a political crisis with Serbia's former breakaway province of Kosovo, and economic problems amid Russia's war in Ukraine. Most of the groups say they would ignore the ban announced Saturday by Vucic and go ahead with the September 12-18 events scheduled in Belgrade. **NASA moon rocket on track for launch despite lightning hits ** NASA's new moon rocket is expected to launch later today, despite a series of lightning strikes at the launch pad. Officials say neither the rocket Artemis 1 nor ground equipment suffered (受到) any damage. Five lightning strikes hit the 600-foot towers surrounding the rocket at Florida's Kennedy Space Center this past weekend. The 322-foot rocket is the most powerful ever built by NASA. It plans to send an empty crew capsule into lunar orbit, 50 years after NASA's Apollo program. Astronauts could return to the moon in a few years, if this six-week test flight goes well. That was the I.C.R.T. news, Check in again tomorrow for our simplified version of the news, uploaded every day in the afternoon. Enjoy the rest of your day, I'm _____.

The Ryan Gorman Show
Artemis I Launch Scrubbed Over Technical Issues

The Ryan Gorman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 6:37


News Channel 8 Meteorologist Amanda Holly joins the show live from the Kennedy Space Center following the cancellation of the Artemis I launch. She explains why the launch was scrubbed and potential rescheduling options.

The Ryan Gorman Show
Hour 3 - Redacted Affidavit Recap, Today's Top Stories, Artemis I Launch Scrubbed

The Ryan Gorman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 27:58


In the 9a hour, Fox News Radio Reporter Tonya J. Powers joins the show to recap the release of the Mar-a-Lago search warrant affidavit. Plus, Chris Trenkman with today's top stories, a Florida woman story, Aaron's sports update, and News Channel 8 Meteorologist Amanda Holly live from the Kennedy Space Center.

The Automotive Troublemaker w/ Paul J Daly and Kyle Mountsier
Does Carvana Actually Sell For Less, Unhelpful Content Purge, Going To the Moon

The Automotive Troublemaker w/ Paul J Daly and Kyle Mountsier

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 19:24


We're set to take off this Monday with some investigative journalism around Carvana's claims, Google gets very helpful in their recent search update, and the US is going back to the moon (ish) today. Does Carvana really sell for lower prices as stated? Forbes contributor, Jeremy Alicandri has a very hard time finding any proofBy visiting the WayBackMachine website, I was able to recover deleted content (shown below) from Carvana's website that promised shoppers an average savings of $2,199 for each vehicle purchased from its site. The content also stated that Carvana saved its customers over $130 million versus traditional car dealers, a number that represented the accumulated savings for all sold vehicles since 2016.Carvana cites KBB as a source in the fine print, so Jeremy reached out and received a statement saying that KBB could not endorse the accuracy as there was a major internal calculation as a basis for the claim. Carvana did not respond to requestHe scoured public financials from Carvana's reports finding higher profits per vehicle then dealersTurned to VINCUE to study pricing and their algorithm found Carvanas prices higher than dealers 72% of the timeRegarding financing, Carvana claims to give customers lower rates, however, on average from 2018-2021 Carvanas rate was 13.41% vs Dealers 8.76%Google's latest update targets ‘unhelpful content' by steering users away from it. It's called “the helpful content update” and will reward content creators who take a “people first approach”Good qualities for ‘people first' include: Will someone reading your content leave feeling like they've had a satisfying experience? Does your content clearly demonstrate first-hand expertise and a depth of knowledge (for example, expertise that comes from having actually used a product or service, or visiting a place)?Bad qualities for ‘people first' include:Creating content primarily to attract people from search engines, rather than made for humans?Are you producing lots of content on different topics in hopes that some of it might perform well in search results?Does your content leave readers feeling like they need to search again to get better information from other sources?Are you writing to a particular word count because you've heard or read that Google has a preferred word count? (No, we don't)NASA's Artemis 1 SLS Megarocket is heading to the moon and back starting today as the preparations to send humans back to the moon takes another step forwardLaunch window between 8:33a and 10:33a EST today from Kennedy Space Center in Coco Beach FL. Special appearances at the launch include  Jack Black, Chris Evans, and Keke Palmer as well as a performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by Josh Groban and Herbie HancockNEXT LAUNCH DATE IS SEPTEMBER 2Get the Daily Push Back email at https://www.asotu.com/Rock with us LIVE at ASOTU CON! Tickets: https://www.asotucon.comJOIN the conversation on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/asotu/Read our most recent email at: https://www.asotu.com/media/push-back-emailASOTU Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/automotivestateoftheunion

The Steve Gruber Show
Scot Bertram, An Orion spacecraft atop NASA's biggest rocket ever is preparing to blast off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center this morning.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 11:00


Live—from the campus of Hillsdale College in beautiful Hillsdale Michigan— this is Scot Bertram in for Steve on the Steve Gruber Show for –Monday, August 29th 2022—   —Here are 3 big things you need to know—   One — A Memphis man is dead after being killed in the war in Ukraine.  Joshua Jones' loved ones have revealed he died in Eastern Europe to become the third known US citizen killed in combat during the conflict.  Official details about the 24-year-old are still unknown with the state department declining to give any information at present.     Two—    Gas prices in Michigan are down eight-cents a gallon according to Triple-A Michigan to three-dollars-83-cents. It is the tenth straight week that prices have fallen and they are now down 49-cents in the past month. The most expensive gas is in Traverse City at four-dollars-one-cent, while Grand Rapids has the lowest prices as three-67.     And number three— An Orion spacecraft atop NASA's biggest rocket ever is preparing to blast off from Florida's Kennedy Space Center this morning.  Director Vanessa Wyche of Houston's Johnson Space Center says the mission is the first step in getting American astronauts back to the moon. The uncrewed spacecraft will fly around the moon and back on a six-week test flight.    

Your Florida Daily
Monday, August 29th 2022

Your Florida Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 3:29


NASA is trying to get its historic Artemis I mission off the ground at Kennedy Space Center, a Florida sex offender is arrested for allegedly asking a couple to purchase their young daughter in a grocery store and the governor wants to charge Florida medical marijuana operators more to do business in the Sunshine State.

DS Vandaag
Wat hebben we nu nog op de maan te zoeken?

DS Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 24:41


We gaan weer naar de maan. Vanop het Kennedy Space Center vertrekt de Artemis-missie: de eerste van een hele reeks vluchten die de maan uiteindelijk tot écht vertrouwd terrein moeten maken. Maar wat hebben we daar nog te zoeken, een halve eeuw na de laatste maanlanding? Was onze blik niet vooral op Mars gericht?  Omschrijving + Credits op standaard.be/podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Steve Gruber Show
Scot Bertram, Three people are dead, including the suspected shooter, after a grocery store attack in central Oregon

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 11:00


Live—from the campus of Hillsdale College in beautiful Hillsdale Michigan— this is Scot Bertram in for Steve on the Steve Gruber Show for –Monday, August 29th 2022—   —Here are 3 big things you need to know—   One — Florida's Space Coast is gearing up for a big day as final preparations are underway for NASA's Artemis One launch.  The first attempt at getting the giant rocket off the ground will come this morning at the Kennedy Space Center.  Tens of thousands of spectators are expected to travel to see the historic mission.  The Artemis program aims to put humans back on the moon within the decade.   Two—    Gas prices in Michigan are down eight-cents a gallon according to Triple-A Michigan to three-dollars-83-cents. It is the tenth straight week that prices have fallen and they are now down 49-cents in the past month. The most expensive gas is in Traverse City at four-dollars-one-cent, while Grand Rapids has the lowest prices as three-67.      And number three— Three people are dead, including the suspected shooter, after a grocery store attack in central Oregon.  Police say they responded to reports of an active shooter at a shopping center in the town of Bend on Sunday night.  The shooter reportedly entered a Safeway and shot one person at the entrance, then moved further into the store and shot and killed a second victim.    

Hometown Stories
Hometown Stories Episode 43 - Artemis I: NASA explains next step to Mars

Hometown Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 12:45


NASA has sights set on human exploration of Mars. But before they run, they've got to walk and NASA leaders see the Moon as the perfect place for those baby steps. In this episode of Hometown Stories, a member of Artemis' team at Kennedy Space Center details the plan to take us from Apollo to Artemis.

880 Extras
Unmanned spaceship to take off from Kennedy Space Center Monday

880 Extras

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 2:47


NASA's Jeremy Parsons spoke with WCBS Reporter Mack Rosenberg.

SWR Aktuell Kontext
The Next Generation – Die Rückkehr zum Mond

SWR Aktuell Kontext

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 18:03


Mit dem Artemis Programm will die NASA zurück auf den Mond. Für das Programm wurde eine neue Trägerrakete entwickelt – die stärkste und größte in der Geschichte der NASA – und eine neue Raumkapsel, deren Lebenserhaltungssysteme von der europäischen Raumfahrtbehörde ESA beigesteuert wurden. Am 29. August soll der erste Testflug vom Kennedy Space Center in Florida ins All starten. Florian Mayer über die nächste Generation der US-amerikanischen Raumfahrt.

Money Tales
$avvy, with Robin Hauser

Money Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 31:49


In this episode of Money Tales, our guest is Robin Hauser. Robin is an award-winning director of documentary films at Finish Line Features. In 2021 she released the documentary, $avvy, which contemplates the historical, cultural and societal norms around women and money and explores why it's critical for women to take an active role in managing personal finance. This film was inspired by Robin's personal experience of going through divorce after twenty-four years of marriage. As Robin tells us, she felt shame at that time for having taken her eyes off of their personal finances. Simultaneously, she realized she was solely responsible for her own financial wellbeing.Robin is the director and producer of award-winning documentaries (CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, Bias, $avvy, Running for Jim) made to illuminate causes about which she is passionate. Those include the gender gap in tech, unconscious bias, equality and financial literacy. Robin's work has carried her around the world, from the TED and TEDx stage to the White House, NASA's Kennedy Space Center, and conferences worldwide, speaking about mitigating bias in artificial intelligence, diversity, inclusion, financial wellness and gender equality. A self-described “disruptor,” Robin is committed to provoking thought to address the most important socio-economic issues we face today.Learn more about Money Tale$ > Subscribe to the podcast Recent episodes See all episodes > Form CRS Form ADV Terms of Use Privacy Rights and Policies

About Space Today
LIVE SUNDAY PRE-LAUNCH PROGRAM

About Space Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 0:53


This Sunday, join Dawn Meyer and David Denault for a special Pre-Launch show LIVE from the Kennedy Space Center at 10am ET.  

Your Online Coffee Break
NASA Artemis I - Return to the Moon with SLS Booster expert Dave Reynolds

Your Online Coffee Break

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 19:19 Transcription Available


Interview with Dave Reynolds, NASA's Deputy Program Manager for SLS Booster SubsystemsIn this episode we'll discuss NASA's upcoming Artemis 1 mission, scheduled to launch no earlier than the end of this month. The Space Launch System rocket, or “SLS” will propel the Orion spacecraft on its mission around the Moon and back to Earth. Artemis 1 will be an uncrewed flight test that will travel farther than any other human-rated spacecraft has traveled before. This mission, the first of an increasing series of complex missions, will demonstrate NASA's capability to extend human existence to the Moon, and on to Mars.Joining me in this episode from NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center is Dave Reynolds, Deputy Program Manager for SLS Booster Subsystems. Artemis I Mission OverviewArtemis I is the first integrated test of NASA's deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration and demonstrate our commitment and capability to return humans to the Moon and extend beyond.During this flight, Orion will launch atop the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown. Over the course of the mission, it will travel 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) from Earth and 40,000 miles (64,000 kilometers) beyond the far side of the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any human spacecraft has without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.This first Artemis mission will demonstrate the performance of both Orion and the SLS rocket and test our capabilities to orbit the Moon and return to Earth. The flight will pave the way for future missions to the lunar vicinity, including landing the first woman and first person of color on the surface of the Moon.With Artemis I, NASA sets the stage for human exploration into deep space, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems near the Moon needed for lunar surface missions and exploration to other destinations farther from Earth, including Mars. With Artemis, NASA will collaborate with industry and international partners to establish long-term exploration for the first time.For more information visit Nasa.gov/artemis-1Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

About Space Today
SUNDAY LIVE

About Space Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 0:59


Join Dawn Meyer and David Denault for a Special Pre-Launch Report LIVE from the Kennedy Space Center.

Thinking Like a Bank
Episode 69: Avoid Taxes Using these Vehicles with Carl Fischer

Thinking Like a Bank

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 34:24


Carl Fischer graduated from Cornell University and is a third-generation real estate developer. Carl began his investing career in the 1970s when he was employed as a rocket scientist at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Carl is one of the founders and principals in CAMA Self Directed IRA, LLC (dba CamaPlan) founded in 2004. CamaPlan is a national company located in Ambler, PA. Carl has implemented plans and managed millions of dollars in real estate transactions. His real estate investments include commercial and residential properties, including real property, notes, and mortgages. He's been able to increase his net worth using self-directed tools, such as self directed IRAs. This has led to tax free income as well as tax free profits from real estate deals and private placements. In addition to his hands-on experience, he has spoken to many groups including real estate investors and brokers, CPAs, financial advisors, attorneys, and mortgage professionals about the power and possibilities of IRA, 401k, and qualified plan self-directed plans. He provides continuing education credits for both nationally and state-specific attorneys, accountants, realtors, and appraisers. This episode talks about: ​Carl's journey to creating a Self-Directed IRA company Types of Alternative Investments that can be used inside of Self-Directed IRAs Can you use a self-directed IRA to invest passively in real estate? IRA loans? What is a Nonrecourse loan? What is Unrelated business income taxes (UBIT)? What triggers UBIT? Interest rates on IRA loans? Can you leverage your self-directed IRA to loan money to others (also known as Private Money Lending)? How to avoid/mitigate some risks of using a SDIRA Can you reinvest your IRA in something else other than real estate? Can you convert your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA (without penalty)? How does CamaPlan work to help you create your own self-directed IRA? To connect with Carl Fischer, please visit:

Science Friday
Back-To-School Health Concerns, Artemis Moon Mission, Designing A Better Lanternfly Trap. August 19, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 47:03 Very Popular


Teen Innovator's New AI Tool Helps Create Affordable Drugs The U.S. has some of the highest prescription drug prices in the world, which can push patients into bankruptcy over medications they cannot afford. More than three in four American adults think the prices of prescription drugs are unaffordable, prompting the Senate to recently pass a bill intended to help lower prescription drug costs for seniors. One young innovator set out to find his own solution. 17 year-old Rishab Jain developed ICOR, a tool to improve the rapid production of drugs like COVID-19 vaccines. Ira talks with  Jain from Portland, Oregon, about his innovation and vision for the future.   When Trapping Invasive Bugs Is Science Homework The spotted lanternfly, an invasive species, was first introduced to the U.S. in Pennsylvania, around 2014. Since then, it has spread aggressively, and has now been spotted in 11 states. The bug is pretty—adult spotted lanternflies are about an inch long, and feature striking spotted forewings and a flashy red patch on the hindwings. But they are also very hungry, and pose a significant threat to agricultural crops, including grapevines. Many control efforts have focused on either stomping the insects on sight, or on spotting and destroying the egg masses that the lanternflies lay in the fall. However, researchers have been developing trapping techniques for the bugs as well. One, involving a sticky band looped around a tree, is effective—but can also snare other insects and even birds. Experts at the Penn State Extension have come up with a new style of circle trap for lanternflies, based upon an existing trap for pecan weevils. Now, STEM educators at Rutgers University are using that design as the starting point for an engineering design challenge, asking K-12 teachers and students to come up with improvements to the design. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com. Should Kids Get Vaccinated If They've Already Had COVID-19? It's nearing the end of August, which means it's back-to-school season. There's a big difference between this school year and last: All children are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. This means the risk of disease will likely be way down, compared to the past two autumns, according to vaccine researcher and pediatrician Paul Offit. But for kids who have already been infected by COVID-19, will the vaccine add meaningful immunity? “My answer to that question is yes,” Dr. Offit tells Ira. “Then you can be sure that they will then develop the kind of immunity that will likely lead to fairly long-lived protection against serious illness.” Ira and Dr. Offit also discuss the risk of monkeypox and polio spreading in schools, and how to best keep our kids safe against infectious disease this fall.   The Countdown Begins For Humanity's Return To The Moon NASA's largest and most powerful rocket ever began inching its way to Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Tuesday night. Over twelve years in the making, the long-delayed, over-budget Space Launch System rocket is finally nearing its first chance for liftoff at the end of this month. The August 29th targeted launch will mark the beginning of the Artemis program—NASA's series of missions designed to send humans to the Moon and, eventually, Mars. The multi-billion dollar orange rocket now stands taller than the Statue of Liberty, resembling a colossal upside-down carrot. Its maiden uncrewed flight will carry a trio of mannequins equipped with radiation sensor vests in preparation for crewed flights slated for 2024. These future missions will be the first to return people to the Moon since Apollo 17 in 1972. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

Ray Appleton
Hour 3 - The Resurrection Of The Tasmanian Tiger. NASA Moon Rocket Moved To Launch Pad.

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 37:19


Tasmanian tigers have been gone for almost a century but one genetic engineering and de-extinction company is on a mission to change that. Known more commonly as the Tasmanian tiger, the keystone species is not a tiger at all, but a carnivorous marsupial native to Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea also known as a thylacine. NASA's new moon rocket arrived at the launch pad Wednesday ahead of its debut flight in less than two weeks. The 322-foot (98-meter) rocket emerged from its mammoth hangar late Tuesday night, drawing crowds of Kennedy Space Center workers. It took nearly 10 hours for the rocket to make the four-mile trip to the pad, pulling up at sunrise.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Discount Property Investor Podcast
Episode 317: Carl Fischer from CamaPlan on Self Directed IRA's

Discount Property Investor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 33:58


Carl Fischer is a third-generation property developer and a graduate of Cornell University. While working as a rocket scientist at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, Carl started his investment career in the 1970s. At the moment, he serves as one of the company's principals and co-founders (dba CamaPlan). Ambler, Pennsylvania is home to the national headquarters of CamaPlan.

Casual Space
171: NASA's SLS= Space Launch System

Casual Space

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 40:49


This week, NASA has announced that they are moving towards the first launch attempt for the Artemis I mission with the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft currently in the Vehicle Assembly Building at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA is currently targeting launch for no earlier than Monday, Aug. 29, at 8:33 a.m. EDT during a 2 hour window!!!!! So, Dean and Beth dig right in to the who, what, where, when, why and how of NASA's Space Launch System on this week's episode of the Casual Space Podcast!  NASA's SLS (Space Launch System) is the world's most powerful rocket and the backbone of NASA's human lunar exploration program (check out this reference guide ASAP: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/sls_reference_guide_2022_v2_508_0.pdf). No other rocket can send astronauts and the Orion spacecraft directly to the Moon for the Artemis missions. SLS provides an unmatched capability to deliver greater mass and volume than any current launch vehicle for both human and robotic exploration of the Moon, Mars, and the outer planets. SLS was established by the NASA Authorization Act of 2010. The program was created at Marshall in 2011 and received funding in FY2012. SLS is the world's first exploration-class launch vehicle since the Apollo Program's Saturn V. Along with SLS, NASA's Exploration Systems Development Mission Directorate in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate is developing the EGS and the Orion spacecraft for crew. Orion, managed at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, is a spacecraft designed to carry astronauts on exploration missions into deep space. EGS has converted facilities at Kennedy into a next-generation spaceport capable of supporting launches by multiple types of vehicles.  More about NASA's SLS: https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/index.html 

The John Batchelor Show
#SpaceX: NASA hesitates on Kennedy Space Center as Starbase.Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 13:55


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #SpaceX: NASA hesitates on Kennedy Space Center as Starbase.Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com https://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/nasa-is-apparently-withdrawing-its-permit-for-starship-launches-in-florida/

ResortLoop.com - A Walt Disney World Podcast!
Kennedy Space Center and the Florida Aquarium [Ep. 841]

ResortLoop.com - A Walt Disney World Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 31:32


Tim and Dawn Talk about some non-Disney attractions they experienced on their recent trip to Florida!  They will share their thoughts on The Florida Aquarium in Tampa and Kennedy Space Center on the east coast! Consider supporting ResortLoop.com!  You can find our Patreon here! Thank you for downloading and listening to ResortLoop.com - The Gateway to the Magic!  Relaxing at 43.21 degrees?!  Please stand clear of the doors! To receive your free vacation quote visit us at Resort Loop Travel! Help support our friends at The NASCAR Foundation! To help support the show, visit ResortLoop.com/support! Check out our LooperGear at TeePublic! Thank you for downloading Episode 841 of ResortLoop.com!