Podcasts about Nelson Mandela

First President of South Africa and anti-apartheid activist

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Latest podcast episodes about Nelson Mandela

Deep Focus
2022.09.19 Gary Lucas on Abdullah Ibrahim - 3 of 3

Deep Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 42:05


Every once in a while, an artist comes along who gets so caught up in the sweep of history that the world seems to create itself for the artist's work, rather than the other way around.  Dollar Brand came of age as a pianist in South Africa in the late Fifties, just in time for the multiethnic explosion of Johannesburg's Sophiatown.  In the wake of the repression that followed the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960, he became a European exile.  Within months, his music came to the attention of Duke Ellington who was so moved that he brought about the LP session Duke Ellington presents The Dollar Brand Trio on Frank Sinatra's Reprise label.     Brand came to New York, subbed for Duke leading the Ellington Orchestra and attended Juilliard.  But experiences with John Coltrane, Don Cherry and the progressive cadre of the Jazz world gave him a new appreciation of his African roots and he incorporated them into his music.  He returned to South Africa, converted to Islam and became Abdullah Ibrahim.  With these changes came a new style of music that embraced the multi-kulti, freedom-loving culture of his native Cape Town.  His song "Mannenberg" became a theme for the anti-apartheid movement.   After South African police fired on children during the Soweto Uprising of 1976, Ibrahim publicly came out in support of the African National Congress and subsequently returned to New York.  Here he found a community of open-minded musicians and an audience that was supportive of his distinctively contemplative and deeply grooving music.     After the Apartheid regime fell and Nelson Mandela became president, Ibrahim returned to Cape Town; In 2022, he is still recording and performing throughout the world.     What's that you say?  "Gary Lucas?  That guy's a rocker!  Who is he to talk about Abdullah Ibrahim?"   A rocker?  Guess what: so is Abdullah Ibrahim!  Have you heard Gary's version of Ibrahim's "Bra Joe From Kilimanjaro"?  You will have a whole different understanding of who both of these guys are.  Besides, Gary Lucas is a true musical gourmand of the New York old school and I love to talk about music with him.  I can't wait to hear what he has to say about his fellow iconoclast.  As always, the WKCR archives have delivered some rare beauties for us to cherish.     This Monday (Sept. 19) on WKCR 89.9FM, WKCR HD-1 and wkcr.org.  Next week it goes up on the Deep Focus podcast on your favorite podcasting app or at https://mitchgoldman.podbean.com/   #WKCR #JazzAlternatives #DeepFocus #AbdullahIbrahim #GaryLucas #MitchGoldman #JazzInterview #JazzPodcast   Photo credit: Tore Sætre, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Zero Squared
Episode 442: Understanding the History of Socialism

Zero Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 50:41


Mike Taber has edited and prepared a number of books related to the history of revolutionary and working-class movements—from collections of documents of the Communist International under Lenin to works by James P. Cannon, Leon Trotsky, Malcolm X, Che Guevara, Fidel Castro, Maurice Bishop, and Nelson Mandela. His book Under the Socialist Banner is a collection of the resolutions of the Second International from 1889 to 1912. 

The OK Comic Talk Podcast
Iyanu Child of Wonder

The OK Comic Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 71:46


"It happened again" - Iyanu   This week we conclude the swap with Kyle presenting Ozzy's pick Iyanu Child of Wonder, which is already be adapted into a TV series by HBO Max and Cartoon Network! The story follows Iyanu as she tries to learn the secrets behind her power and the corrupted. Other topics for your consideration include Ozzy schooling Kyle on how to not feel bloated after a beer, Kyle worrying, as a child, that Manu Ginobili was more important than Nelson Mandela, and the Las Vegas Aces winning the only title that Las Vegas will ever win, that's right Raider's fans your team is trash. 

Desperately Seeking Paul : Paul Weller Fan Podcast
EP115 - Nigel ”Spanner” Sweeney - Legendary Plugger... ”Into the stars and always up...”

Desperately Seeking Paul : Paul Weller Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 65:39 Very Popular


On this episode of The Paul Weller Fan Podcast, I'm joined by another absolute legend of the music industry - this fella has undoubtedly been one of the best TV and Radio pluggers in the business - Nigel “Spanner” Sweeney. We're talking U2, Rolling Stones, Simply Red, The Cure, Depeche Mode, UB40, Erasure, Robert Palmer, Bros, East 17, Jamiroquai, Elvis Costello, Janet Jackson, George Michael, Massive Attack, Kylie Minogue, Aerosmith, M People, Neneh Cherry, Kenny Thomas, Liza Minelli, Fun Boy 3, Nine Inch Nails, Shane McGowan / Johnny Depp, Robert Miles, Terry Hall, Dave Stewart, Tom Jones, Louise Redknapp, Malcolm McClaren, Spandau Ballet, S'Express, Bomb The Bass, Innocence, Garth Brookes, Will Young, Gareth Gates, Five and Betty Boo. Whilst with Arista there was also Prince, Santana, Puff Daddy, TLC, Toni Braxton, Whitney Houston, Usher and Annie Lennox... A pretty incredible list right?! We should also call out PR for The Brits, all the Comic Relief singles and the Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute Concert in 1988. We dig in to some great stories of his career including times starting out with the likes of Clive Banks and Gary Crowley, to plugging for The Jam and The Style Council along with a lovely connection for the comeback single Into Tomorrow with Paul Weller Solo… We also chat about Live Aid and Do They Know It's Christmas with involvement from Paul. And so much more... If you enjoy this episode of the podcast - please share on your social media channels - and leave a review and if you want to support the podcast financially, you can buy me a virtual coffee at paulwellerfanpodcast.com/store

New Books in European Studies
Sarah Colvin, "Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners" (Reaktion Books, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 44:39


Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners (Reaktion Books, 2022) is a history of modern Germany told not through the lives of its leaders, but its lawbreakers. As Nelson Mandela said, “a nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.” Shadowland tells the sometimes inspiring, often painful stories of Germany's prisoners, and thereby shines new light on Germany itself. The story begins at the end of the Second World War, in a defeated country on the edge of collapse, in which orphaned and lost children are forced into homelessness, scavenging and stealing to stay alive, often laying the foundations of a so-called criminal career. While East Germany developed detention facilities for its secret police, West Germany passed prison reform laws, which erected, in the words of a prisoner, “little asbestos walls in Hell.” Shadowland is Germany as seen through the lives, experiences, triumphs, and tragedies of its lowest citizens. Sarah Colvin is the Schröder Professor of German at the University of Cambridge. She has participated in prison-based arts and education projects and is an advisory group member for the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance. She is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Routledge Handbook of German Politics and Culture. Nicholas Misukanis is a doctoral candidate in the history department at the University of Maryland - College Park. He studies modern European and Middle Eastern history with a special emphasis on Germany and the role energy autonomy played in foreign and domestic German politics during the twentieth century. He is currently working on his dissertation which analyzes why the West German government failed to convince the public to embrace nuclear energy and the ramifications this had on German politics between 1973 and 1986. His work has been published in Commonweal, America: The Jesuit Review, The United States' Naval Academy's Tell Me Another and Studies on Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

Yallah Habibi
Irgendwas mit Gabi

Yallah Habibi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 38:09


Wo wohnen wir eigentlich? Bei Haus Lala? Nein! Jetzt wohnen wir am A**** von AlTireh bei Nelson Mandela. Unsere Wohnung ist toll, mit Strandblick. Außerdem haben wir gelernt, dass man bei Karies zum Gynäkologen muss und dass man nicht um Nutella herum kommt, wenn man eigentlich zu Goethe will.

New Books in History
Sarah Colvin, "Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners" (Reaktion Books, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 44:39


Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners (Reaktion Books, 2022) is a history of modern Germany told not through the lives of its leaders, but its lawbreakers. As Nelson Mandela said, “a nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.” Shadowland tells the sometimes inspiring, often painful stories of Germany's prisoners, and thereby shines new light on Germany itself. The story begins at the end of the Second World War, in a defeated country on the edge of collapse, in which orphaned and lost children are forced into homelessness, scavenging and stealing to stay alive, often laying the foundations of a so-called criminal career. While East Germany developed detention facilities for its secret police, West Germany passed prison reform laws, which erected, in the words of a prisoner, “little asbestos walls in Hell.” Shadowland is Germany as seen through the lives, experiences, triumphs, and tragedies of its lowest citizens. Sarah Colvin is the Schröder Professor of German at the University of Cambridge. She has participated in prison-based arts and education projects and is an advisory group member for the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance. She is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Routledge Handbook of German Politics and Culture. Nicholas Misukanis is a doctoral candidate in the history department at the University of Maryland - College Park. He studies modern European and Middle Eastern history with a special emphasis on Germany and the role energy autonomy played in foreign and domestic German politics during the twentieth century. He is currently working on his dissertation which analyzes why the West German government failed to convince the public to embrace nuclear energy and the ramifications this had on German politics between 1973 and 1986. His work has been published in Commonweal, America: The Jesuit Review, The United States' Naval Academy's Tell Me Another and Studies on Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in German Studies
Sarah Colvin, "Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners" (Reaktion Books, 2022)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 44:39


Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners (Reaktion Books, 2022) is a history of modern Germany told not through the lives of its leaders, but its lawbreakers. As Nelson Mandela said, “a nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.” Shadowland tells the sometimes inspiring, often painful stories of Germany's prisoners, and thereby shines new light on Germany itself. The story begins at the end of the Second World War, in a defeated country on the edge of collapse, in which orphaned and lost children are forced into homelessness, scavenging and stealing to stay alive, often laying the foundations of a so-called criminal career. While East Germany developed detention facilities for its secret police, West Germany passed prison reform laws, which erected, in the words of a prisoner, “little asbestos walls in Hell.” Shadowland is Germany as seen through the lives, experiences, triumphs, and tragedies of its lowest citizens. Sarah Colvin is the Schröder Professor of German at the University of Cambridge. She has participated in prison-based arts and education projects and is an advisory group member for the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance. She is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Routledge Handbook of German Politics and Culture. Nicholas Misukanis is a doctoral candidate in the history department at the University of Maryland - College Park. He studies modern European and Middle Eastern history with a special emphasis on Germany and the role energy autonomy played in foreign and domestic German politics during the twentieth century. He is currently working on his dissertation which analyzes why the West German government failed to convince the public to embrace nuclear energy and the ramifications this had on German politics between 1973 and 1986. His work has been published in Commonweal, America: The Jesuit Review, The United States' Naval Academy's Tell Me Another and Studies on Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books Network
Sarah Colvin, "Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners" (Reaktion Books, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 44:39


Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners (Reaktion Books, 2022) is a history of modern Germany told not through the lives of its leaders, but its lawbreakers. As Nelson Mandela said, “a nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.” Shadowland tells the sometimes inspiring, often painful stories of Germany's prisoners, and thereby shines new light on Germany itself. The story begins at the end of the Second World War, in a defeated country on the edge of collapse, in which orphaned and lost children are forced into homelessness, scavenging and stealing to stay alive, often laying the foundations of a so-called criminal career. While East Germany developed detention facilities for its secret police, West Germany passed prison reform laws, which erected, in the words of a prisoner, “little asbestos walls in Hell.” Shadowland is Germany as seen through the lives, experiences, triumphs, and tragedies of its lowest citizens. Sarah Colvin is the Schröder Professor of German at the University of Cambridge. She has participated in prison-based arts and education projects and is an advisory group member for the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance. She is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Routledge Handbook of German Politics and Culture. Nicholas Misukanis is a doctoral candidate in the history department at the University of Maryland - College Park. He studies modern European and Middle Eastern history with a special emphasis on Germany and the role energy autonomy played in foreign and domestic German politics during the twentieth century. He is currently working on his dissertation which analyzes why the West German government failed to convince the public to embrace nuclear energy and the ramifications this had on German politics between 1973 and 1986. His work has been published in Commonweal, America: The Jesuit Review, The United States' Naval Academy's Tell Me Another and Studies on Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Leadership Is Changing
353 Patricia Bradley - Leadership is Being Powerfully Quiet

Leadership Is Changing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 36:23


As leaders, how do we adapt to change in the workplace? In this episode, Patricia Bradley shares importance of adapting to change and how leaders need to be open to learning   Patricia Bradley is the Global Chief Commercial Officer at MindMaze, a global pioneer in the  development of neurotechnology and digital therapeutics (DTx) for neurological recovery and care. With more than 25 years of increasingly impactful roles at MindMaze, Huma, Novo Nordisk, and Neuromedical Systems, Patricia maintains a strong focus on patient-centric, outcomes-focused healthcare solutions. She was recently named Global Chief Commercial Officer for MindMaze.    Previously as VP of Sales and VP of Marketing at Novo Nordisk, Patricia built a clinical education startup that was recognized as best in class.    Patricia holds an MBA from Wagner College (NY) and a Bachelor's degree with a dual major in Business Economics and Political Science from The State University of New York at Oneonta.      In this episode: Patricia shares her background and how she got her start in the digital healthcare  Starting a leadership role in sales and learning how to lead while on the role  Patricia talks about Nelson Mandela and his leadership style and how it is important to not just be loud but learn how to be powerfully quiet Embracing the work from home setup for employees      Key Takeaways: Leaders can be successful when they look in the positive of things  Importance of personal connections and how they can be beneficial for both employees and employers Technology will influence how leaders impact the global community         Tweetable Quote:   “ I do think you have to embrace change and not be afraid of it. Too many people wanna do things the way they did in the past, or they're afraid of new technologies. I think you've got to challenge yourself to always be learning.” - Patricia Bradley   Connect with Patricia onhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/havenner/ ( )http://linkedin.com/in/patricia-bradley (LinkedIn), and check out her website https://www.mindmaze.com (https://www.mindmaze.com).     Email: denis@leadingchangepartners.com Website:http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/ ( http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/)  Leadership Is Changing Facebook Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/ ( https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/) Leadership is Changing LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/)

New Books in Policing, Incarceration, and Reform
Sarah Colvin, "Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners" (Reaktion Books, 2022)

New Books in Policing, Incarceration, and Reform

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 44:39


Shadowland: The Story of Germany Told by Its Prisoners (Reaktion Books, 2022) is a history of modern Germany told not through the lives of its leaders, but its lawbreakers. As Nelson Mandela said, “a nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.” Shadowland tells the sometimes inspiring, often painful stories of Germany's prisoners, and thereby shines new light on Germany itself. The story begins at the end of the Second World War, in a defeated country on the edge of collapse, in which orphaned and lost children are forced into homelessness, scavenging and stealing to stay alive, often laying the foundations of a so-called criminal career. While East Germany developed detention facilities for its secret police, West Germany passed prison reform laws, which erected, in the words of a prisoner, “little asbestos walls in Hell.” Shadowland is Germany as seen through the lives, experiences, triumphs, and tragedies of its lowest citizens. Sarah Colvin is the Schröder Professor of German at the University of Cambridge. She has participated in prison-based arts and education projects and is an advisory group member for the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance. She is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Routledge Handbook of German Politics and Culture. Nicholas Misukanis is a doctoral candidate in the history department at the University of Maryland - College Park. He studies modern European and Middle Eastern history with a special emphasis on Germany and the role energy autonomy played in foreign and domestic German politics during the twentieth century. He is currently working on his dissertation which analyzes why the West German government failed to convince the public to embrace nuclear energy and the ramifications this had on German politics between 1973 and 1986. His work has been published in Commonweal, America: The Jesuit Review, The United States' Naval Academy's Tell Me Another and Studies on Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Focus
2022.09.19 Gary Lucas on Abdullah Ibrahim - 2 of 3

Deep Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 65:18


Every once in a while, an artist comes along who gets so caught up in the sweep of history that the world seems to create itself for the artist's work, rather than the other way around.  Dollar Brand came of age as a pianist in South Africa in the late Fifties, just in time for the multiethnic explosion of Johannesburg's Sophiatown.  In the wake of the repression that followed the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960, he became a European exile.  Within months, his music came to the attention of Duke Ellington who was so moved that he brought about the LP session Duke Ellington presents The Dollar Brand Trio on Frank Sinatra's Reprise label.     Brand came to New York, subbed for Duke leading the Ellington Orchestra and attended Juilliard.  But experiences with John Coltrane, Don Cherry and the progressive cadre of the Jazz world gave him a new appreciation of his African roots and he incorporated them into his music.  He returned to South Africa, converted to Islam and became Abdullah Ibrahim.  With these changes came a new style of music that embraced the multi-kulti, freedom-loving culture of his native Cape Town.  His song "Mannenberg" became a theme for the anti-apartheid movement.   After South African police fired on children during the Soweto Uprising of 1976, Ibrahim publicly came out in support of the African National Congress and subsequently returned to New York.  Here he found a community of open-minded musicians and an audience that was supportive of his distinctively contemplative and deeply grooving music.     After the Apartheid regime fell and Nelson Mandela became president, Ibrahim returned to Cape Town; In 2022, he is still recording and performing throughout the world.     What's that you say?  "Gary Lucas?  That guy's a rocker!  Who is he to talk about Abdullah Ibrahim?"   A rocker?  Guess what: so is Abdullah Ibrahim!  Have you heard Gary's version of Ibrahim's "Bra Joe From Kilimanjaro"?  You will have a whole different understanding of who both of these guys are.  Besides, Gary Lucas is a true musical gourmand of the New York old school and I love to talk about music with him.  I can't wait to hear what he has to say about his fellow iconoclast.  As always, the WKCR archives have delivered some rare beauties for us to cherish.     This Monday (Sept. 19) on WKCR 89.9FM, WKCR HD-1 and wkcr.org.  Next week it goes up on the Deep Focus podcast on your favorite podcasting app or at https://mitchgoldman.podbean.com/   #WKCR #JazzAlternatives #DeepFocus #AbdullahIbrahim #GaryLucas #MitchGoldman #JazzInterview #JazzPodcast   Photo credit: Tore Sætre, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

CFR On the Record
Social Justice Webinar: Infectious Diseases

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022


Demetre Daskalakis, deputy coordinator of the White House national monkeypox response, and Jeremy Youde, dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at the University of Minnesota Duluth, discuss the emergence of monkeypox and other diseases, international responses, and messaging around health issues that especially affect the LGBTQ+ community. Jennifer Nuzzo, senior fellow for global health at CFR, moderates. Learn more about CFR's Religion and Foreign Policy Program. FASKIANOS: Thank you, and welcome to the Council on Foreign Relations Social Justice Webinar series. The purpose of this series is to explore social justice issues and how they shape policy at home and abroad through discourse with members of the faith community. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. As a reminder, this webinar is on the record, and it will be made available on CFR's website, CFR.org, and on the iTunes podcast channel, “Religion and Foreign Policy.” As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Jennifer Nuzzo, senior fellow for global health at CFR, to moderate today's discussion on infectious diseases. Dr. Nuzzo is a senior fellow for global health here at CFR. She's also a professor of epidemiology and the inaugural director of the Pandemic Center at Brown University's School of Public Health. Her work focuses on global health security, public health preparedness and response, and health systems resilience. In addition to her research, she directs the Outbreak Observatory, which conducts operational research to improve outbreak preparedness and response. And she advises national governments, and for-profit and non-profit organizations on pandemic preparedness and response, and worked tirelessly during the COVID pandemic to advise and tell people what was going on, to the extent that we knew, as we made our way through this two-and-a-half-year pandemic. So, Jennifer, I'm going to turn it over to you to introduce our speakers. NUZZO: Great. Thank you, Irina. Thanks for that introduction and thanks for organizing this webinar today. I'm very glad that we're having this conversation. As someone who's worked in infectious diseases for my entire career, I have found the last few years to be particularly staggering. I was looking, and as of today there are more than 616 million cases of COVID-19 that have been reported globally, upwards of 6.5 million diagnosed deaths that have been reported worldwide. At the same time, we are also seeing a global surge in cases of monkeypox, a disease that many hadn't heard of prior to this past year. And now we are over 66,000 cases that have been reported globally, more than 25,000 of those reported here in the United States alone. At the same time, successive outbreaks of Ebola have been occurring, and we have measles once again on the rise. And now vaccine-derived polio circulating in countries where the virus had been previously thought to be eliminated. So it's really a staggering list of infectious diseases that have been occurring and continue to occur. So clearly, we're at an important crossroads in terms of how we respond to these recurring hazards and infectious disease emergencies. But today we get to zoom out a little bit, and to examine factors that they may have all in common, and to try to understand what may be driving these—the recurrence of these events over and over again. So over the past few years we have seen the consequences of social, economic, and racial inequities play out center stage. These factors have underpinned not only our underlying vulnerabilities to infectious diseases, but also how effectively we respond to them. So that's what we're going to talk about today. And to help discuss these issues we are joined by two globally renowned experts who have a long history in working to address infectious disease threats and the disparities that accelerate them. Our first panelist is Dr. Demetre Daskalakis. Dr. Daskalakis is the deputy coordinator of the White House national monkeypox response. Prior to this role, he served as director of CDC's division of HIV prevention. And prior to that, oversaw infectious diseases for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which is one of the largest health departments in the nation and rivals the WHO in terms of staff and budgets. So Dr. Daskalakis is a leading national expert on many things, but also in particular health issues affecting the LGBTQIA+ communities. And he has worked clinically for much of his career to focus on providing care for these communities. We are also joined by Dr. Jeremy Youde, who is the dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Previously, Dr. Youde was an associate professor in the department of international relations at Australia National University in Canberra. Dr. Youde is an internationally recognized expert on global health politics. And he is a very prolific writer. He has written five books, and many chapters, and countless articles. I recently read a very compelling blog post by him on our own CFR's Think Global Health. So really excited to get both Dr. Youde and Dr. Daskalakis's perspectives on the issues in front of us. So I will get the conversation started. We have a lot of great attendees, and we'll have time for questions. But just to get the conversation going, let's see here. Maybe first, if I could turn to you, Dr. Demetre. For those who haven't been living in the monkeypox data as much as you have, perhaps you could just give us a quick summary of where we are and where you see us being headed. DASKALAKIS: Thank you. And thank you for having me. I'm really excited to join Jeremy and to be a part of this discussion. So living in the data is, in fact, what I do. So I'll tell you, so monkeypox—I'll give a little key bit of background just for everyone to be level-set—is an orthopoxvirus, that is a virus that causes disease, transmitted usually from animals to humans. Usually, traditionally, not a lot of human-to-human transmission. This current outbreak in 2020, global in scale, with 66,500 cases reported internationally, actually demonstrates pretty good human-to-human transmission, often in the setting of close contact, often associated with sexual activity, and the majority of cases being among men who have sex with men—the vast majority, over 96 percent. In the U.S., at this moment, we have 25,300 cases. I can tell you right up to the moment. And so we continue to see increases in cases in the United States, but we're seeing a deceleration in the rate of increase. So cases are stilling being logged. We used to see kind of around four hundred cases per day. We're now more on the order of two hundred or below and continue to see that trend going in a good direction with more data imminently coming to the website of CDC later on today. Again, just briefly, the demographic, majority male, mainly men who have sex with men—the gay, bisexual, other men who have sex with men. Looking at the demographics, at the beginning of the outbreak in May, the majority of cases were among white men. And now we're seeing about 68 percent of those cases are happening in Latino or Black men. From the perspective of that measure as well we've seen a significant increase in vaccinations. So we can talk—we're going to talk more about that, I'm sure. But really with lots of strategies to increase vaccine supply. We are now well over eight hundred thousand vaccines administered. There is an inequity there as well. The majority of vaccines are going to white men. And we're seeing Latino men and Black men in second and third place, respectively, in terms of vaccines administered. Jennifer, I hope that that's a good situation summary to start off with. NUZZO: Yeah, great summary. Thank you so much. That helped kind of bring everybody to the same—somewhat same level. Just a quick follow-up question for you. There have been a lot of headlines about the important progress we've made, and the fact that the global monkey—or, sorry—the monkeypox cases seem to be coming down in terms of numbers. Question: Are you seeing similar trends for all demographics? Or are you concerned that perhaps the large numbers are hiding increased transmission in other groups? DASKALAKIS: I had to fix the mute. There we go. So I think what we've seen is that the declines are looking to be even across population. So that's good news. Again, the vaccine equity is our main issue right now in terms of where we're—where that's stubborn right now, and really thinking about strategies to improve that. We had a lot of news today, which I'm sure we'll be able to talk about some of the strategies that we have to address that. But so I think there's no clear sign that the deceleration is different in different populations. Geographically, however, it is different. And so that's, I think, one place where—the jurisdictions that have had the greatest and longest experience with this outbreak, so the most cases, are also the jurisdictions that have access to the most vaccines. So whether it's because of behavior change that we're seeing, which is definitely something that we, I imagine, could talk about here as well, or natural infections plus vaccine-induced immunity, I think the places that have had more experience are showing deceleration faster. So New York, California, Texas, and Georgia are looking down, while some of the places where the outbreak is newer and they've also had less access and time for vaccines, those places are showing an increase. We're going to get an update of this, this week. So this is based on data that's about a month old. So soon we're going to have a new view into how this deceleration or acceleration looks like, jurisdiction by jurisdiction. NUZZO: Great. Thank you. Maybe turn to you, Dr. Youde. You've been an important voice about the global dimensions of the monkeypox crisis. And I'm just curious where you think we are globally. And I referenced in introducing you that piece that you wrote on Think Global Health that I thought was—made a quite compelling argument about the role of WHO and where you see the response needing to go. Do you want to maybe elaborate on those points for people who haven't had a chance to read your article? YOUDE: Sure. Thank you for the question, and thanks for organizing this. I'm honored to be part of this event. And, picking up on some of what you were talking about and what Demetre was just talking about as well, we do see these inequities that exist, especially when we're looking worldwide. The World Health Organization did declare monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern. And while it doesn't necessarily come with automatic funding or programmatic resources, it does raise the profile. It does put this on the global health agenda and say: This is something we need to be paying attention to. In the piece I described it as the WHO's bat signal. We're sending out the message: This is something that we need to pay attention to. But one of the things I think is frustrating about the WHO response, and just sort of the global community's response to monkeypox in general, is that monkeypox isn't a new disease. This is a disease that we've known about in human cases since 1970. Laurie Garrett in her book, The Coming Plague, which came out in '94—which is one of the books I think a lot of us who are probably about a similar age read in our early, formative days as we were coming into global health and global health politics—she talks about it in that book. And if you look at the data that we have, we've been seeing increases in monkeypox cases in humans in countries where monkeypox was endemic for about the last decade or so. And so—but what really caught the international community's attention was then when it came to the Global North, when it came to the industrialized countries. And that helps to reinforce some of these questions about what is the nature of our real concern about global health? Is it about health in this very broad mandate, like the World Health Organization has as part of its constitutional mandate, to be this international coordinating body? Or is the sense that we, in the Global North, want to keep the diseases from the Global South coming to affect us? And there are similar sorts of issues when we're looking at vaccine equity and vaccine access, when we're looking globally. And, there have certainly been some problems here in the United States, getting access to the vaccine. But, I was able to get vaccinated against monkeypox. Yeah, I had to drive two and a half hours to Minneapolis to do it, but I was able to do it. And I was able to arrange it. People in countries where monkeypox is endemic have little to no access to these vaccines. And it raises some of the questions then, again, about how the international system and the global health governance systems that we have in place—how they can address some of these equity challenges? Because in many ways, outbreaks like monkeypox, they glom onto the societal and social cleavages that exist, and help to reinforce and exacerbate them, but also provide this opportunity for us to really put some of our ideals and our promises around social justice, around a cosmopolitan view of understanding that we are all healthier if we are all healthier. And really put those into practice, if we have the political and economic will to do so. And that's where—that's one of the areas where I get a bit concerned right now. I know we're all exhausted talking about COVID-19 and about monkeypox, and all of these sorts of outbreaks. Jennifer, I know you've been doing a lot of this. Demetre, obviously, you've been on the frontlines. I've been doing some of this work as well. But when we lose that attention, sometimes we lose then that motive—that momentum in the political system to try to address some of these challenges and these shortfalls that we have identified. So, I can be a critic of the World Health Organization, but I also recognize that the World Health Organization is a creature of its member states. And so, it's really incumbent upon the member states to really put some action behind their words. And to say: If we want to have a more effective response, we need to build systems that are going to be able to respond better than this. NUZZO: Thank you for that. It's a good segue to what I wanted to talk about next, which is the title of this webinar being about social justice. And those who've worked in public health, the notion that social justice has a role to play in reducing our vulnerability to infectious disease is quite clear. But I'm aware, particularly over watching—(laughs)—the national political debate over the last several years that those outside of public health may not recognize the connection between our vulnerability to infectious diseases and social justice. And they may be dismissive of the idea that public health authorities should be engaged in the work of social justice. So this is actually a question for you both. And maybe reflect on monkeypox or your long experience of other infectious disease threats that you've worked to address. And what would you say to folks that just don't understand why public health should be concerned with social justice, and what role do you think it has to play going forward? And maybe we'll turn back to you after Demetre. DASKALAKIS: Do you want Jeremy to go or do you want me to go first? NUZZO: Go ahead. YOUDE: Go for it. Go for it. I'll let you start. DASKALAKIS: All right. So I'll put my very strong HIV hat on, because that's sort of where I come from. And I'll start that this is a forty-one—a forty-two, almost, year-old lesson that I think we've seen play out over and over again, which is that really the social determinants of health are actually what drive infection. So there are countermeasures that can work. There's vaccines. There's drugs. There's pre-exposure prophylactics, post-exposure prophylactics. It doesn't matter. The social determinants are really what ultimately ends up blocking us from being able to implement the full vision of what we know we can from the perspective of medical technology and public health. And so I think that at the end of the day that implementation piece is so critical. So much technology can exist, so many interventions can be designed, but they sit on the shelf unless there's both the political and social will to move them forward. And so I think I should put that HIV hat there for a second, because in environments where there is less political and social will we tend to see HIV flourish. And in places where there is social and political will, we tend to see HIV not do so well from the perspective—or, in other words, we will do well because of less incidents and prevalence. So I think that sort of looking at that will is so critical. I'll give you a story from monkeypox which I think is really important, that is about the sort of CDC response. I got pulled in really early on, before the first case actually hit the United States. One of the very early conversations that we had with the response is that we need to expect that we're going to have inequities that are going to be a part of this. And I think that's based on lessons from COVID, and lessons from HIV, and lessons from so many other infections. I think we really worked to make equity the cornerstone of the response. But even when you do that, it is an all-of-society thing that needs to happen, and not just something that is mediated simply by a public health department or a public health agency. Over. YOUDE: And if I can take that public health hat and HIV hat that you had on, and I'll wear it myself. I got into this line of work through working on HIV/AIDS issues in Zimbabwe and South Africa, and seeing how those sorts of societal cleavages played a role, but then also how infectious disease outbreaks, and the spread of HIV was glomming into these other issues around democratization, around building societies that were going to be equitable, that were going to be able to fulfill the promises that governments had made to their populations. And seeing how a disease like this was thwarting that progress. So it's something that is not just unique to the United States. It's something that we see globally. From a very instrumental perspective we can say, look, public health is ultimately a weakest link public good. Everyone is still at risk, so long as risks still exist. So we need to reach out to those places which might have fewer resources, which might not have the same sorts of ability to implement these sorts of programs, because ultimately that's going to make us all healthier. And I think there's elements and an important role for those sorts of instrumental views of public health. But I also think about the recently passed Paul Farmer, and his notion of public health, especially his idea around the preferential option for the poor, which was kind of a double-edge sword. Because on the one hand he was saying, look, the people who are disenfranchised within societies, those are the people who are the most vulnerable to these infectious disease outbreaks. Those are the people who are at the greatest risk. But also, we need to think about our programs, we need to think about our interventions putting those people first, thinking about equity. Putting that not as an afterthought or something that we think about five, six, seven steps down the road, but it needs to be central, and it needs to be core. Because, again, if we're not taking equity seriously and we're not really putting this into everything that we're doing, then we're just reinforcing these sorts of divisions and, again, providing these opportunities and these outlets where diseases can thrive. And so, to just cosign what Demetre was saying we can have all the technologies we want. And I have all my criticisms about the way that the access to pharmaceuticals and drug interventions exist on a global level, and questions about compulsory licensing and all these sorts of things. Those are all important, but those are secondary in a lot of respects if we don't have the underlying core infrastructure in place. And that core infrastructure, even if it's not touching us in a direct way, does have an effect on our ability to stay healthy. DASKALAKIS: Could I—this is a fun one. Could I keep going a little bit longer on this? NUZZO: Please do, yeah. DASKALAKIS: This is a great, stimulative conversation on this. And along with what ends up being both the foundation of the issue as well as the deeper foundation, the way that all of these social issues interact with stigma, like I think we've seen in fast-forward with monkeypox. Like all the things that we saw with HIV and other infections and COVID—today, for instance—this is a really good example. So, we're giving the vaccines and right now they're going on people's forearms. Which means that literally some people will have a mark on their forearm. So talking about stigma—literally stigma. And so, we changed it so that individuals can elect to get the vaccine on their shoulder or on their back. So we have people who want vaccines but are saying, I don't want to be marked by this. I don't want to have the sort of—someone know that I am someone who's potentially identifying myself as part of a group at risk. And so it interacts exactly with the social determinants. Whether it's poverty, transportation, racism, all of it interacts in a way where these sort of more brass-tacks economic issues interact with these very profound stigma issues and create barriers where even if you do have great access—I'll give an example again. [The] Ryan White [program] is really great access for people for HIV medication, but we still don't have everybody in the country—(inaudible)—right? So why is that? It's partially access, but it's also that the systems are built to sort of maintain structures of stigma and structures of inequity that are really hard to overcome, even with things that provide access. NUZZO: So I was actually going to ask you about stigma. So thank you for segueing to it. And I seems to me that—and I don't have the HIV hat to wear, like you both do. But studying events that we typically think about in the field of health security—which is a field that sort of struggles to incorporate the forty-plus year lessons that HIV has learned—is that it is clear that stigma is an issue in nearly every single event. Any time we have particularly a new infectious disease, or something that's unusual, society seems to look for some group to blame. But what it seems, though, is that while there's an increasing recognition of the importance of stigma, it doesn't seem like we have great strategies for addressing it. And I guess I'm wondering, do you agree? And also, what practically can and should we be doing to address stigma? I really saw us struggle with this. I mean, we had a recognition of it as being important in monkeypox, but I feel that the absence of clear ways to deal with it really led us to struggle to talk about monkeypox, and who was at risk, and how people could protect themselves. So what should we be doing going forward not just for monkeypox but future threats, so that we don't get hobbled by—first of all, that we can minimize or tackle stigma, but also don't get hobbled by it? Whoever wants to chime in. (Laughs.) DASKALAKIS: So this is back to the HIV hat. This is the tightrope that we walk every day in HIV. And I think that the lesson actually—well, one of the first lessons that's important, sort of sitting on the government side of the world, is that government needs to lead, and governmental public health needs to lead, so that its messaging does not propagate stigma. That's very important. Because whether people like governmental public health or not, or have complaints about it, ultimately people do look to governmental public health—like CDC, local health departments—to really fine-tune their own messaging, and then translate that messaging not just to another language but translate it so the populations that people work with actually understand. And so I think monkeypox was actually a kind of exciting example, where from the very beginning of the response it was a how can we take an anti-stigma stance in how we messaged it? And so the balance really then depended on the data. And so that's what was really important. So it was starting with imperfect data, and as the data became more and more clear, making sure that the messaging evolved in a way that addressed what you were actually seeing epidemiologically without necessarily—without creating a scenario where you're pinning infection, a virus, on a population. Let me give you an example since, Jennifer, you say your HIV hat isn't as strong as ours. So in the '80s, when HIV started, before it was HIV it was gay-related immunodeficiency. So that lesson was the lesson that was so important in the work that we did with monkeypox, to start off by saying: This is a virus that can affect anyone. But we're seeing this virus more in this population. As opposed to saying: This is this population's virus. And so it's leading by that example. And it's one of those things that we can raise up and say: We have learned the lesson from this forty-two years ago, and we're not doing it this way again. And so with that said, I think that there's a lot of strategies that can address stigma. And a lot of that has to do with communications, using trusted messengers. So, that has been a really important part of this as well because, again, working in public health I would love if everybody listened to public health data. So providing good communications to individuals who are trusted messengers is really important. And also, part of the propagating stigma is also being clear about what data is, things that we fully know and things that we're still learning. Because that really allows that risk communication so that you don't over-select or too rapidly move a response into what population, as opposed to being broad. So as you learn more data—so, for us, our guidance started off in one place about safer sex and safer gathering. As we were seeing that this was not moving throughout the different populations, it got stronger and stronger. And we really started the conversation by saying that this is guidance that's going to change as we learn more. I think that we do have stigma mitigation strategies. But stigma's a stubborn thing. I'll give it over to Jeremy. YOUDE: Yeah, I would agree with everything that you said. And especially being—having that level of humility. We are still learning about this. Things are going to change. Things are going to evolve but building those sorts of trusting relationships. The other things that I would emphasize, and I think these complement what you were saying quite well, is empowering communities to speak to each other. I think one of the things that we've seen here in the U.S. around access to the monkeypox vaccine, and the relatively high rates of vaccination that we've seen, has been people talking to other people. Men who have sex with men talking to other men who have sex with men, and this becoming part of the conversation. Even if it is something at the level of, where were you able to get access to it? When supplies are limited. Just building that sort of awareness within a community can be incredibly important. I think it's also important to make sure that we do have targeted messages. Not blaming messages, but understand that the message that just says, everyone is at risk for HIV or everyone is at risk for monkeypox, ends up falling flat and doesn't really strike anyone. And so having that sort of targeted outreach plays an important role. But going back to this point about empowering the affected communities, one of the most powerful things that I think that I've seen in the work that I've done is looking at the Treatment Action Campaign in South Africa, and the work that they did, especially in the late '90s and early 2000s, with the T-shirts that just in huge, bold letters across the chest said: HIV positive. And just having people going out there, wearing those T-shirts. The image of Nelson Mandela wearing one of those Treatment Action Campaign T-shirts is just incredibly important because, again, it's helping to remove some of that stigma. It's getting people who are trusted, who are respected, coming into the conversation. OK, if he's involved in this, if he's saying this is an important issue, maybe this is something that I need to be paying attention to. But also just trying to make that sort of availability, so that people are willing to share their experiences, or talk about what's going on, or what worked, or what didn't work for them. Again, these all play really important roles. It's never going to be perfect. It's something that we do need to keep at the forefront when these sorts of outbreaks happen. And you see some of this in some of the broader conversation around even what we call diseases, the names that we use. The fact that there is a very strong move away from geographically located names for diseases, because we don't want to stigmatize those particular communities or people who happen to be coming from those areas. Even something like that can play a really important role in helping people to think, this is something that I need to take seriously if I'm in the United States, I need to take this seriously. Even though we're talking about something like monkeypox, which isn't a geographic designator but there aren't a lot of monkeys roaming around in Minnesota. But it's something that they should be taking seriously, because of these effects and these sorts of community-based responses that help to try to destigmatize things, encourage people to get access to vaccines, or treatments, or other sorts of options that are available to them, and start to have those conversations to empower communities. NUZZO: That's great. I'm going to turn over to questions. And maybe participants can start putting their hands up. But while that's happening and before I turn it over for that section of the conversation, one last question to you both. Which is, I am deeply worried that we respond to these events as these one-offs. We have an emergency, we get emergency funding, then perceptions of the emergency being over, the funding disappears, and it's gone. And we saw that happen with COVID, where the money went away and then states had to let go their pandemic hires. And guess what? They weren't there when monkeypox happened. So I guess the question is, how do we move away from sort of seeing these as just one-off emergencies, and moving towards a role where we create a durable sort of permanent system that's in place to snap into action anytime there's an event, which is happening—which we're seeing—these events are happening with an increasing frequency? YOUDE: I'll jump in first, Jennifer. It's like you're reading the paper that I've been working on throughout the event today. And that's part of my concern about WHO designating this to be a public health emergency of international concern, when we're talking about monkeypox or COVID-19 for that matter, is the emergency framework. Public health, when it's doing its job, we don't know about it. It's something that—where we're essentially trying to stop things before they reach that level of public consciousness, or stopping it really, really early in the process. And so the emergencies, they get the attention for global health but they don't necessarily get the long-lasting system. It becomes, like, OK, whew, we got through that. We can move onto the next thing, or we can just not pay attention to global health again until the next system comes up. But at a very fundamental level we have this organization. We have the World Health Organization, which has this constitutional mandate to act as this international coordinating body for health—cross-border health issues. And it has a smaller biennial budget than many large hospital systems here in the United States. So how is it going to be able to do that sort of work when it has so few resources? Plus, given the way that the WHO is funded, it only has control over about 20 percent of its budget. The rest of it is coming through these voluntary contributions, which are generally specified for specific purposes, which may or may not align with the purposes that the WHO itself would put in place. So I think that one of the things that happens there is it behooves us, it behooves the member states to actually—to put some diplomatic and political capital behind this, to actually move on this. I have no doubt that in a few years' time we will have some sort of after—some sort of response that will look at the response that WHO made to COVID-19. And it will bemoan the failures. And it will talk about all the things that need to change. And then it will gather dust on the bookshelf. And we will get similar sorts of things for monkeypox. And what we haven't had is a country or a group of countries, or some sort of person with high stature, really glom onto this and be like, yes. We need to do this. This is our potential roadmap for trying to address this in the future. I—nerding out in the global health politics world—I had this idea that someone like a Helen Clark, or an Angela Merkel, someone who knows international politics, who knows the systems, who has that sort of diplomatic experience, but also is concerned about issues around health, that could be the person who could help to inspire some of these actions, and could get the attention of world leaders in a way that civil society organizations often aren't able to do. Which is not to say anything bad about those organizations, just that there are structural problems getting the attention of world leaders, and having that sort of concentrated attention. So I think we—ultimately, we need a champion. We need a person, or a country, or a group of countries who are willing to really champion this, and go to the mat for trying to make these sorts of changes, so it isn't just emergency, after emergency, after emergency, but something that is going to be more long lasting, that is going to provide that sort of infrastructural support, and make sure that we aren't just lurching from here, there and everywhere, but actually can have some sort of coordinated response and something that is a bit more forward-thinking. But it's a challenge. NUZZO: Demetre, the bullets of your bio—(laughs)—are a list of the emergency, after emergency, after emergency. So I know you have first-hand perspectives of this. So any hope we can fix it? DASKALAKIS: Sure do. (Laughter.) So, my perspective may be very domestic, but I actually think it's not. I think when I start talking, I think it's going to seem as if there's also infrastructure that needs to be leveraged internationally that's similar. Which is, I always think about what actually worked. And so one of the things that I think we're seeing over and over again, whether it's COVID, or monkeypox, or other outbreaks, is leveraging systems that already exist, and really figuring out how to support those systems during peacetime as well as wartime, so that it stays warm for a response. And that's a very public health—it's a very sort of operational, public health example. So I'm talking HIV. I'm talking chronic infections. I'm thinking domestically, we have this excellent—I think the HIV Epidemic Initiative, it's not nationwide yet. It hasn't been resourced to do that. But, if it were, that is a really sort of important way to be able to create and maintain an infrastructure. So thinking about sort of chronic diseases like viral hepatitis, having an infrastructure that could potentially lead to curing more people with viral hepatitis creates a system that then could be used for care and other public health delivery of countermeasures. So thinking about things that—what can we do to sort of do our peacetime work, which is around chronic infections like virus hepatitis and HIV, and what can we—and STIs, which are out of control in the United States, mainly because they're under-resourced—but what can we do sort of to maintain sort of those systems, so that when we flip the switch from peacetime to wartime that we can pivot those resources to do the work? I'll give an example from the research universe—monkeypox, as an example. Right now, there are studies that are going on for monkeypox vaccines and for monkeypox therapeutics. And they're built on the networks of HIV investigators. So, HIV Vaccine Trials Network and AIDS Clinical Trials Group are currently the people that are doing those studies. And sort of research funding potentially being a bit more flexible, that pivot is possible. But what if we had similar models sort of in the operational world of public health, where you have sexual health clinics or STD clinics that are doing HIV/STD work during peacetime, but can flip into monkeypox vaccines and testing in wartime? And so it's investing in a chronic infrastructure to be able to make it translatable into an emergency response, in a nimble way, I think is really important. And of course, I back up Jeremy. That idea of political will and leadership is really important in making sure that this sort of moves forward in a way that works. But, I mean, I say this domestically, but then one can conjure PEPFAR in terms of an infrastructure that works. So that—they have been leveraged. And so what if we worked harder to make sure that they were resourced adequately during the peacetime, so that during wartime they flip and are flipped more effective? And by the way, that HIV positive T-shirt has influenced my career, Jeremy, in terms of seeing people who were willing to put on a shirt that really works against stigma. My favorite being Annie Lennox, who I met with that T-shirt on, and I was very excited, as a fan. But definitely an important thing to reclaim that stigma. Jennifer, thank you. YOUDE: And if I can build on what Demetre was saying, think about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014, and the cases that popped up in Nigeria. That led to all sorts of concern. Now you've got someone who has Ebola in Lagos, a city of twenty million people, and just not a city that necessarily has the sort of infrastructure in place that you're going to think, oh, we're going to be able to contain this. But they were able to repurpose existing programs. They were able to use measles control programs and other sorts of programs. And, using the word that we have all become way too familiar with over these past two and a half years, they pivoted, turned that into doing the surveillance and doing the contact tracing for Ebola, and were able to stop the spread, and being able to prevent that from spreading rampantly throughout one of the largest cities in the world. And I think that's the sort of thing, you know? If we have these sorts of structures in place, we can adapt them. Even if they are for one purpose, they can be adapted for other purposes. And so it's not that we need to recreat the wheel each time, it's that we need to figure—we need to make sure that we've got enough wheels out there, essentially. DASKALAKIS: And that goes for surveillance. Maintaining good surveillance systems for chronic things means that when an acute thing comes up, that good surveillance already exists there. So not only for an operation, but also for being able to understand what's happening with the threat. I like to call it keeping the system warm, if you think of sort of the stuff that's happening. So when you have to heat it up, you're not starting from—it's not a TV dinner you're taking out from frozen. It's thawed already. You can move quickly. NUZZO: It's really hard to build capacities in the midst of an emergency. So thank you for those thoughts. I am going to give others a turn to ask questions and turn it over to the question-and-answer session now. OPERATOR: Thank you. (Gives queuing instructions.) Our first question comes from Mark P. Lagon from Friends of the Global Fight against AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. LAGON: Hi, there. Thank you for this really thought-provoking forum. I come from a perspective working in the health field, but also background in human rights. I was an adjunct senior fellow at CFR, and president of Freedom House. I wonder, to take some of the points that Jennifer Nuzzo has been making and posing to you, to move to pandemic preparedness. If you have—we've seen that AIDS confronts one with very clear human rights and equity issues, particularly for stigmatized populations. You have a kind of a reprise with monkeypox. There was a lot of discussion about in terms of the impact of COVID and equity on vaccines. As the international community has moved to form a fund housed at the World Bank, how do you embed preparation for pandemics to have a human rights or social justice perspective? Activists really had to push hard to get two voting seats for civil society on the governing body of that fund. Thank you. NUZZO: Anyone want to take that on? (Laughs.) YOUDE: Sure. I'll offer a few thoughts. I think this is something—again, this is something to be thinking about at this early stage. As these sorts of systems are being designed, as they're being set up, keeping these sorts of elements important and at play. But I also think it's important to make sure that there are multiple channels for this communication to happen. That there's one thing to talk about formal board seats, and those are obviously important to have people at the table for these pandemic financing facilities through the World Bank and other sorts of organizations. But also make sure there are other opportunities, because new organizations may pop up. They may change. Depending on the particular circumstance or the particular outbreak that we're talking about, there may be other groups that are being mobilized and being affected by this. And so, there needs to be a certain level of nimbleness that needs to go into this. I think it's also something that puts a lot of—we need to put pressure on our leaders to really put their promises into action, to make sure that this isn't just something that we have as a tick box exercise. Oh, yes, equity is important, we need to address this. But actually, that there is this ongoing pressure and this sort of check of what are we actually doing here? Are we reaching out to these communities that are being affected? How can we better do this? And so I—again, there's an interesting moment right now that we can hopefully seize to make sure that this is something that really does get instantiated within these systems. And I hope we don't let that moment pass. I hope we don't decide to just we'll go back to existing systems. Because that's the other thing that goes along with this. It does challenge the status quo. It does challenge the sorts of standard operating procedures that we have in these organizations. And that can be challenging. That can be a difficult sort of conversation to have. And we have to be willing within our international organizations and other sorts of responses, we have to be willing to have those conversations. We have to be willing to challenge ourselves and to criticize ourselves, and to then make changes that are going to be effective. LAGON: Thank you. DASKALAKIS: I don't have almost anything to add to what Jeremy said. I think there really—again, the political will is important. And just we've all experienced that U-shaped curve of concern, right, where when things are very exciting everyone is very worried and engaged, and then when it fades away, resources fade away. And what that means is the infectious disease comes back. And so it's really—whether it's the same or a different infectious disease, sort of keeping that momentum and having it really come both from the political piece, from organization, but also from the side of advocates and activists is really critical to keep the—to keep the energy moving and the momentum moving. We have to make sure that we come to a better place. Every event, you learn more. And so I think that even if we take a quantum leap in what preparedness looks like, whatever the next event will challenge that level of preparedness and will require us to then—to really develop systems that are—that are updated based on the experience. So I think moving the needle anywhere, but moving it in a coordinated way because of that will and that strategy is the most we could hope for and the most we should expect. Or the least that we should expect, the minimum, of being able to move to a place where we have something that is better than how we found it, and potentially more resilient in terms of a—monkeypox is minor compared to COVID, after COVID. NUZZO: Yeah. I mean, I think the more we have these events the more we learn, though it does feel to me a little bit like the more we have these events, the more we learn the same things over and over again. (Laughs.) And particularly when we're talking about these inequities. And Jeremy pointed out about the stark inequities in terms of who's able to access vaccines in the globe. And that was clearly something that we saw throughout much of COVID-19, still see it today. We saw it during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, in terms of who had vaccines and who didn't. So I guess the question—and I recognize that we have just about ten minutes left, and the CFR rule is we always end on time. So I'm going to—(laughs)—I'm going to be aggressive about that. But just on that point what do we need, I think, to put into place? We talked about how there's a pandemic fund now, which is important. But aside from money, and maybe it's just money, what else do we need to kind of create structures to address these inequities globally? Given, Jeremy, you also made the important point about—I've been struck by how hard it's been to contain monkeypox here in the U.S. But let's say we're successful, we're still going to have challenges as the virus continues to circulate. So we need to make progress globally. And we need to have systems in place such that every time these emergencies happen, we don't keep learning these same lessons over. So maybe just two or three minute each, your takeaways on what you would do to fix these problems if you were deemed in charge of the world. YOUDE: A little new world, just like that. Money is obviously important. The amount of money that we spend on development assistance for health has gone up dramatically since the early 1990s, but it still pales in comparison to the level of need. So there is just a basic resource need. The second is that we need to make sure that systems that we are building are not for specific diseases, but are things that can be flexible, things that can be adapted. We don't want to just say: Now we're going to set up all these monkeypox surveillance systems, when that may or may not be what is going to be the next big outbreak. So we need to have things that are going to be able to be flexible like that. Third, we need to have—we need to have a better sense of just our—I guess our international community's willingness to engage with global health. We have the international health regulations. So we do have an international treaty that's supposed to govern how states respond to infectious diseases and their outbreaks. But the willingness of states to abide by that varies quite dramatically. And so we need to have a big of a come-to-Jesus moment about what are we actually willing to do, when push comes to shove? And then last thing I'll say is that I do think we need to have a conversation around access to pharmaceuticals and vaccines and other sorts of medical interventions like that. Because we know that there are inequities, and we know that oftentimes the communities that have the least access are the communities that have the highest rates of incidence or are in the most need of these sorts of things. And our structures are not really well designed for getting people access. Even though there are things like COVAX, even though there are things like PEPFAR, and all these other sorts of programs, which have done tremendous work, they are still falling short. And so we need to—we need to have a better sense of what—how do we actually put these sorts of things into practice? How do we actually make sure that these scientific breakthroughs that are so invaluable are reaching all the people that need to be reached? DASKALAKIS: Ditto, I'll start off. So that makes my job a little bit easier, because I think what Jeremy said is really important. I'll say again, I think in my hierarchy the first and most important thing is consistent political will, because I think that that then drives a lot of what happens beyond that. So I think that that really jives really well with what Jeremy said, in terms of that sort of commitment. Money is very important, I think, but it is not the only thing that drives us into preparedness. So I think that having that commitment. I also would like to think about that investing the money in things that keep the system warm. So I'll go back to that sort of statement, or like thinking about investing in the diseases that we still haven't finished. We still are working—we've got HIV, we have hepatitis, malaria internationally that we're worried about. There are a lot of areas that we could invest to create systems that are infrastructures that keep it warm for operation for pandemic. I cannot say it loud enough that what Jeremy said about flexibility is right. You can't really build the infrastructure on chronic disease if it's not flexible to move to another acute event. So it needs to be something that is both creates and maintains the infrastructure, but also has the ability—everyone's favorite word today—to pivot into the emergency response zone. So very important. I think also workforce and data. I think that it is important to remember that we talk about giving patients trauma-informed care, but we need to give our workforce trauma-informed care. COVID has been hard. Monkeypox has been hard. Our next challenge will be hard. And sort of how can we support the workforce and then also continue to mentor it to be able to do the work? Data also is so important. A commitment to share data, and to have data that is accessible for decisions, even if it is imperfect. And then finally, the realization—and it goes back full circle, Jennifer, to your first question—about our—or, maybe second question—about the social determinants. There's only so much that public health can do. There is an all-of-society need to address the core drivers of so many of the inequities. We can't solve everything through public health. We can get closer to health equity, but ultimately the goal is that as you access is really to go into social justice, which is not just public health but really an all-of-society endeavor to try to improve the environment so that we don't have fertile ground for these pandemics to blossom and grow. NUZZO: Thank you. There's a question that just popped up in the Q&A box. And we just have a few minutes. It's about the privilege of good information and how we address misinformation and disinformation, which likely leads to fragmentation. I will just chime in, having done a lot of communication over the past two years, I think that this is not a problem that public health can solve. I actually think the drivers of this are much, much larger. And I think we need an all-of-government approach to this that includes the potential regulation of the platforms. But I'm curious if you all have any quick comments to add to that. DASKALAKIS: I mean, I just agree with you. (Laughs.) It's definitely much bigger. There are things we can do, like monitor social media and make sure that our messaging is one way. But ultimately this is an issue that's bigger, that requires not just the public health lens to address. YOUDE: And, at the same time, we also can recognize that those trusted outlets, those can be really important tools. So, churches in sub-Saharan Africa played a really crucial role in many parts of helping to decrease HIV stigma, helping to get access and information out there about testing, about protection, about these sorts of things. I mean, that can also be the flipside, though. If you got these trusted sources that are peddling this misinformation, then it becomes this much bigger issue that goes beyond what public health can do. So I guess it's—part of it is just figuring out where those allies exist, be they in government or outside of the government, and what sorts of connections they might have with populations. DASKALAKIS: And to your earlier point about building those connections prior to events, so those relationships exist and you're not trying to forge them in the midst of a crisis. NUZZO: Well, really, thank you both. I wish I could appoint you both in charge of the world, because if I was asked who should be in charge of the world you would both be on the top of my list. But I am very glad that you continue to do the work that you do and contribute in important ways. And have both been really guiding voices as we continue to experience these events. So thank you very much for that, and really thank you to our participants for attending and the thoughtful questions. FASKIANOS: I second that. Thank you all. And we appreciate your taking the time to do this. I hope you will all follow their work. For Dr. Daskalakis, you can follow him at @dr_demetre. Dr. Youde is at @jeremyyoude. And Dr. Nuzzo is at @jennifernuzzo. Pretty easy. So we also encourage you to follow CFR's Religion and Foreign Policy Program on Twitter at @CFR_religion and write to us at outreach@CFR.org with any suggestions or questions. We want to help support the work that you all are doing. And we hope you will join us for our next Religion and Foreign Policy Webinar on the Politics of Religion and Gender in West Africa, on Tuesday October 11 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time. So thank you all again for being with us, and thank you for your public service. We appreciate it.

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
How to grow your business with a profits & principles mindset, Carmel McConnell

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 7:16


Guest post by Carmel McConnell MBE is a change maker and author of Change Activist: Make Big Things Happen Fast You're an entrepreneur. You're in tech. So far so good. You want to succeed, make everyone proud, perhaps create the neatest tech solution ever. Make a ton of profit and start living the life. And you also want to feel like you're giving something back, making a difference. If any of that sounds true, I have a strategy for you. It's really simple, a bit like walking. One foot on the ground, after profit, one foot, putting principles into action. Put your weight on one, then another and keep going in every pitch, every product, every meeting. Grow your business with “profits & principles” Carmel McConnell Have we got weight on profit as well as demonstrating our principles? Are we pushing hard for growth and offering our most profitable products to the hungriest parts of the market? Are we going for justice, for climate change, for feeding children in the hungriest parts of the country around us? Yes, I hear you say, we already do all that. We work hard, give as much as we can away. Great – but is it articulated in a strategy to build more trust than the competition? Your USP in a fast, transparent global marketplace directly correlates with trust. Do you build trust or destroy it? Can your customers rely on you when it comes to timescales, service, care? Do your team believe that when you say you'll do something, you actually will? I believe that trust is really the only USP with currency today. Someone else, somewhere else is going to be all over your IP at some point, all over your functionality, your app genius. But no one can take away the relationships you build and sustain through trust. Profit and principle as a mindset will define your USP. Social activists are great role models for making change happen. In my view, the bringers of social change, the activists, have always been smarter and faster than suits, haven't they? Think about what Nelson Mandela was able to do and the poor guy didn't even have TikTok. The person who can negotiate a national living wage with a government wanting to know how to tax avoiders is going to be one hell of a girl – same in the marketplace. Prove you can deliver the system to solve our logistics problems and also give us a carbon reduction advisory – great. You're in. Deliver a fast SD-Wan and guess what – for every single one installed in your office, we'll put one into the nursery down the road and the charity up the street at 50% off. Actually, this strategy is paying dividends already for a one young tech firm that I am having big fun working with. Their MD, Alex Halsall is seeing his business grow as clients welcome his more compassionate pitch, saying “we offer a readymade charity strategy, recognising that many of our customers are small businesses, and don't have much capacity. People trust us more knowing we actively help others on lower budgets access the same IT products” My own random career might help shed some light on what it is and why it works! My background is in tech, broadband specifically, and I ran a consultancy helping firms deliver tech value, with values. While out doing some research, I found out about children going to school too hungry to learn & I set up Magic Breakfast in the UK (www.magicbreakfast.com) which now feeds over 200,000 vulnerable children every day in 1,000 schools. Right now, apart from mentoring charity leaders scale up, avoid my (many) mistakes, I work with tech leaders, increasing revenue by finding the sweet spot – customer centric growth that allows for a rich outpouring of social value along the way. It's a workout for the soul of the business, to focus on the best market opportunities, while tackling our most urgent social / racial /climate-based problems. As a proud Irishwoman, my hope is that the Irish tech sector will not only grow intellectual might on the global stage, but also lead from the heart, be role models for t...

Rotated Views
Episode 308: Film Fest Filmmaking: PART 3 (Guest - Morgan Hart)

Rotated Views

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 62:31


In this episode we have special guest Morgan Hart. We cover topics that range from filmmaking, cinematography, creative processes, film festivals and much more. We wrap the episode up with quotes from Marianne Williamson & Nelson Mandela. Big thanks to the Producer: Gabe Rivera, beat by TeiMoney & Executive Producer Jimmylee Velez. Check out "No Good Deeds" @DEMBAFILMS YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC329eGhbWcTs__L74dr3fDw/videos Check out the Bl3ssed lifestyle brand: Website: http://www.bl3ssed.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bl3ssedlife/

ThinkEnergy
The 2030 EV Action Plan with Electric Mobility Canada

ThinkEnergy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 62:25


The 2022 federal budget doubled down on Canada's commitment to make all light-duty vehicles and passenger truck sales fully electric by 2035, with a considerable amount of money allocated to getting Canadians behind the wheel of an EV. Daniel Breton, President and CEO of Electric Mobility Canada joins us to discuss whether the real concerns about a shift to EVs are being addressed. From pricing models to helping rural, northern First Nations and Inuit communities, there's still a lot to be done.    Related links LinkedIn, Daniel Breton: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-breton-b8a3b1a4/ LinkedIn, Electric Mobility Canada: https://www.linkedin.com/company/electric-mobility-canada/ Electric Mobility Canada: https://emc-mec.ca/   --- To subscribe using Apple Podcasts:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/thinkenergy/id1465129405   To subscribe using Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7wFz7rdR8Gq3f2WOafjxpl   To subscribe on Libsyn: http://thinkenergy.libsyn.com/ --- Subscribe so you don't miss a video: https://www.youtube.com/user/hydroottawalimited   Check out our cool pics on https://www.instagram.com/hydroottawa   More to Learn on https://www.facebook.com/HydroOttawa   Keep up with the Tweets at https://twitter.com/thinkenergypod   Dan Seguin  00:06 This is thinkenergy, the podcast that helps you better understand the fast changing world of energy through conversations with game changers, industry leaders and influencers. So join me, Dan Seguin and my co host Rebecca Schwartz, as we explore both traditional and unconventional facets of the energy industry.  Hey, everyone, welcome back. Are zero emission vehicles the answer to a stronger economy, cleaner air, a healthier environment and good jobs? The Government of Canada certainly thinks so. And they're not the only ones.   Rebecca Schwartz  00:50 EV enthusiast owners, experts and advocates have been mobilizing like never before. They're being driven on a renewed commitment and mandate by the Canadian government to make all light duty vehicle and passenger truck sales fully electric by 2035.   Dan Seguin  01:05 A look at the 2022 Federal Budget shows that considerable money has been earmarked to get more Canadians into the driver's seats of an electric vehicle. According to the government's projections, at least 20% of all new passenger vehicles sold in Canada will be zero emissions by 2026. To give some perspective, last year in 2021, the percentage of zero emission vehicles sold in Canada was 5.2%. That gives five years for the government to reach its targets-doable?   Rebecca Schwartz  01:48 Well, since there's a rising trend in the demand of electric vehicles, many companies have actually gone out of stock. Automobile makers are experiencing a shortage in their EVs, and thus putting customers on waiting lists because of this high demand. Some manufacturers aren't even taking new orders for the foreseeable future because they just can't keep up.   Dan Seguin  02:08 So here's today's big question. Despite the momentum, are the real needs, issues and concerns by EV enthusiasts, owners, experts and advocates being addressed and setting the stage for success?   Rebecca Schwartz  02:25 Our guest today is Daniel Breton, the President and CEO of Electric Mobility Canada, one of the oldest associations dedicated to the electrification of transportation in the world.   Dan Seguin  02:37 Electric Mobility Canada members include vehicle manufacturers, electricity suppliers, universities, tech companies, environmental NGOs, and many more.   Rebecca Schwartz  02:50 Daniel's background includes serving as the ex-Minister of the Environment, Sustainable Development, Wildlife and Parks. He was also the first elected official to oversee a government strategy for the electrification of transportation in Canada in 2012.   Dan Seguin  03:06 Daniel, thank you for joining us on the program today for what's a very busy week for you. To kick things off, can you tell us a bit about Electric Mobility Canada, its mandate, and what drove you to the organization?   Daniel Breton  03:25 Well, EMC's mandate, EMC being one of the oldest organizations in the world dedicated to electric mobility. Its mandate is basically to accelerate electric mobility of all sorts. So we're not just talking cars, but we're talking buses, we're talking trucks, we're talking off road, marine. So we have a growing diversified membership. So now we do have bolt makers and bus makers and truck makers and mining companies and research centers and tech companies. So So that's it. So our mission is really to accelerate electric mobility in all forms and shapes. I would say that electric mobility is growing really fast these days around the world. And we also want to make sure that while we want to accelerate electric mobility, to lower greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, we also want to make sure that we create jobs in the process. So to me, we want to make sure that we have an EV supply chain that's made in Canada, and that we don't just end up extracting critical minerals in Canada to send elsewhere in the world like we have done so many times in the past. We want to develop our own industry. And this is happening right now. And, obviously, we do a lot of networking but amongst members, and we have our conference, you know, happening from September 27 to 29th. And we talk a lot to federal government, provincial governments, cities, some of which are members. And you're a member being City of Toronto [Ottawa]. So yeah, so that's what I do on a full time basis. That's what I've been doing for decades, actually. And we have a growing team; growing membership. So we're, it's really exciting, actually.   Dan Seguin  05:33 What's been the most significant event, innovation or policy that you think has changed the future trajectory for mass EV adoption? For the better?   Daniel Breton  05:46 Well, I think there's not one thing in particular, you know, that may have made it possible, I would say that's a growing, or it's a number of things. So obviously, battery technology has evolved quickly, over the past 10, 15, 20 years. Just to give you an example, between 2008 and 2020- volume density of battery has grown eight fold. So when you look at batteries, today, you have, you can have a lot more capacity, and a battery now than you had five years ago, 10 years ago, and it's going to keep growing as time goes by a lot of people seem to think that if you have let's say, a 60 kilowatt hour battery, it's going to be four times the size than a 15 kilowatt hour battery from let's say, 2010. Actually, it's not the case at all. It's just that is has more capacity, and the smaller volume per kilowatt hour, meaning that actually weight has not increased as fast as capacity. So to me, that's very important. The other thing is that infrastructure, infrastructure deployment and infrastructure, evolution has made a big difference. Just to give you an example. 10 years ago, the average electric car had 120 kilometers of range. Now it's 450. So in 10 years, it's quadrupled. At the same time, 10 years ago, if you wanted to charge your electric car, there was hardly any fast chargers on the road. So for example, when I was working in Montreal that I had to go to the National Assembly, I could not buy an electric car, I had to buy a plug in hybrid electric car, because there was no fast charger petrol between Montreal and Quebec. That's 10 years ago. Now, if you go five years ago, a fast charger had a 50 kilowatt charger. So that meant that we went from charging 120 kilometers of range in about four or five hours to charge charging 120 120 kilometers of range in about half an hour. And now with new fast chargers, you know, weighing you know going from 50 kilowatt to 150 kilowatt, 250 kilowatt and even 350 kilowatt, you can charge 120 kilometers of range in 10 minutes. So so things have accelerated regarding the technology of infrastructures as well. Education is making a big difference because more and more people are interested in EVs. There's still a lot of work that needs to be done. I'm often surprised to hear the same questions I was being asked 5, 10, 15, 20 years ago regarding battery life, for instance. But I still do get those questions on social media and even sometimes on regular media.   Rebecca Schwartz  08:55 On the other hand, what do you consider to be the most significant setback or barrier to the mass adoption of electric vehicles? Feel free to speak to Canada in general, and more specifically, right here in Ontario?   Daniel Breton  09:08 I would say it's education and training and supply. So that's the three the three things the three issues the roadblocks, first of all, supply. I mean, most EVs nowadays you have to wait between six months and three years to get your hands on one. So that's a real issue. We are supporting the federal government, and its will to adopt a federal ZEV (Zero-Emission Vehicle) mandate to make sure that we have more and more supply of electric cars across the country, but in Ontario in particular- I don't know if you remember this, but 11 years ago, the federal government and the Ontario government announced joint support for the assembly of the Toyota Rav4 EV. So both of them gave $70 million to assemble the Rav4 electric in Woodstock, Ontario, because there was no regulation no mandate in Ontario or in Canada for that matter, but because there was a mandat in California. And you have to keep in mind that back then there was a rebate of up to $8,500 in Ontario, even with the rebate 100% of these Toyota Rav4 EVs were sent to the US. So you could live two kilometers away from the plant, you could not buy one. So considering that now, the federal government and the Ontario government have invested billions of dollars into the assembly of either vehicles, or batteries, or cathodes or anodes across the country. We think that ZEV mandate is really, really super important for Ontario citizens. Because it would be a shame that we yet again, we would assemble electric vehicles and in Ontario, but because there are ZEV mandates, and 15 US states plus two Canadian provinces, while most if not all, of these electric vehicles assembled in Ontario would be sent elsewhere. So that's the first thing. The other thing is education, there's so much work that needs to be done. I mean, there's so there's so much disinformation or bad information, you know, going around in regular media, I mean, I read regular media on a daily basis about electric vehicles in English Canada, and I'm stunned to see how many bad articles written on electric vehicles. It's really bad. I mean, it used to be like that in Quebec, not so much anymore. There's a lot of work that needs to be done, and training, training for people to work in the auto industry. I did some training last year, for a car manufacturer, whose name I won't mention, but I was surprised to see how little they knew not only about the ecosystem, I mean, the chargers, the apps, the networks, but about their own product. I mean, I was teaching engineers at this manufacturer about their car. So to me, it shows how much work that there is still to do. Regarding the EV ecosystem- I often say when we're talking about electric vehicles, that when someone drives a gas car and wants to go to electric car, it's like saying, I've never owned a boat, I'm going to buy a boat. But there are a lot of different regulations when you are on the water because it's a different world. Well, it's a bit the same when you're talking about electric cars, because there are new things you need to learn about, in particular range, the way you use them on a daily basis. Winter driving, charging, obviously. So yeah, so education and training, I think is super important. And it's a roadblock right now.   Dan Seguin  13:12 Now, Daniel, what is your opinion of the adoption rates so far in Canada, which provinces or territories, or even companies are doing the best job at building an EV movement?   Daniel Breton  13:30 Well, I would say that provinces, obviously BC and Quebec are ahead of the curve. When you look at the Q1 EV sales number for Canada. While in Canada, we were at 7.7%. EV sales, according to Statscan. And BC, they were at 15.5%. So that's twice the national rate. And in Quebec, they were at 12.7%. At the meantime, Ontario was at 5.3%. So that shows that you need to have rebates. I think rebates are important, which you don't have anymore in Ontario, but you have to have mandates as well. Let me give you a perfect example of that. In BC, the rebate is up to $4,000 and Pei and New Brunswick it's $5,000. But because they have no mandate there, they have no supply so their their EV sales are below 5%. So I think it's very important to have both rebates and mandates regarding companies obviously Tesla is driving the charge. I mean, it's obvious. If you look at if if things keep rolling out like we are seeing today, the Tesla Model Y will be the best selling gas or electric vehicle in the world next year. I mean, this is no small feat. But so yeah, so Tesla is making a huge difference Tesla's a member of EMC, by the way, but we are seeing that some Korean manufacturers like Kia and Hyundai, are coming up with very interesting products. And I'm stunned to say this, but I think that the Japanese are being left in the dust, by even the Americans. And this is something I would have never predicted five or 10 years ago, we are seeing that there seems to be a lot of resistance on the part of Japanese manufacturers. And to me being old enough to remember, it looks to me a bit like what I saw in the 80s and the 90s, when the Japanese came really strong to the market, and they left the American manufacturers behind. So I think the Japanese manufacturers, not all of them, but most of them are going to have to wake up because right now they're really lagging behind.   Rebecca Schwartz  15:56 So we recently had Loren McDonald on the show, and he talked about how consumers need to shift the way that they think about EVs. He said that EVs are more like a smartphone that you charge every night and less like a traditional gas car that you head to the pumps for. Do you agree with that? And if you have a story or anecdote that you'd like to share, we'd love to hear it.   Daniel Breton  16:19 So well. I mean, obviously, EVs are becoming more and more like regular vehicles, because if you go back five or 10 years ago, as I mentioned, you know, a regular EV that was not $100,000, EVs had between 120 and 150 kilometers of range. So it was a very different story, then, my girlfriend still drives one of those EVs, I mean, she drives us a Smart Fourtwo electric, it has 100 kilometers of range, it doesn't even have fast charging. So so when she goes on the road, she she's aware of the way that this vehicle behaves, and the range that she can have winter or summer. But keep in mind that most Canadians, most families have more than one car nowadays. So I would say that the first EV, which would be like the family EV, which can be either a car or an SUV, or even a pickup truck is the one that you're going to use when you go traveling when you go on a trip when you go to see the family. And that one is the one that you drive every day because you use it every day. The second one, if you have a second car, it can be a smaller EV, or a plug in hybrid electric vehicle. And, and I always suggest to people not to buy two big cars with two big batteries. I think it's a waste from an economic point of view, and environmental point of view. So, so if you want to talk about anecdotes, I remember when my girlfriend first got her car. I mean, I remember the second or the third night we went to drive in movie. And the range were the range that she had left was about 25 kilometers. And you have to, to plug the vehicle you have to connect to the radio to hear the movie. And she was honestly she was freaking out because she said, I'm not gonna have enough range to go back. We can't watch all of the movie. So we did not we ended up going back home before the end of the movie. It took her was, say, a couple of weeks before she got used to the range of her vehicle. Keep in mind that it doesn't have a lot of range. Now that she knows how the car behaves, she's not stressed anymore. One thing that happens to all of us is at one point we forget to charge a car or to plug the car at night. You know, it happens to us once or twice, but most of the time, then you remember it's like your phone, you know one night you'll come back home, you're tired. You don't plug the phone the next morning say oh my god, I have no, I have no capacity. There's there's no range. So that's the type of thing that you learn from. It happens to you a couple of times and then you know, I would say. What do you think are the biggest social drivers for the recent uptick in EVs? Is it really the high price of gas? Or is it connected to something bigger? I think it's a few things I think first gas prices have made a huge difference. Because people are seeing that there's a really it's really interesting to buy an electric car with those gas prices. But more than that, the fact that there are more and more child choices of different models and shapes of EVs You know with the new F150 lightning coming to market, you know the Kia EV6, the Hyundai Ioniq 5. These are really appealing vehicles. So I think that choice and and price is making a big difference. I mean, I'm sure you saw that but a couple of weeks ago, GM announced that they were coming up with their new Equinox EV starting at $35,000. And I don't know if you know this, but I just saw the price for the base Honda CRV. It's $36,000. So now, if you look at small SUV, electric, small SUV gas. Without the rebate, the small SUV the CRV is even more expensive than the base version of the Equinox EV? So even though people say prices of EV keep going up and up and up. It's not necessarily true. It depends on the model. Yes, some people do want more expensive electric car. But let's be honest here. You know, many people who buy the base model of any vehicle, gas or electric, it doesn't happen. It just doesn't. So I would say that prices of vehicles have gone up way up actually gas or electric. But we are seeing at the same time. So I'm very competitive models in on the EV side, especially from GM and I have to salute them for that.   Dan Seguin  21:29 I've got a follow up question here for you. What are some of the overall benefits as a nation when we reach 100%, EV passenger sales by 2030 and all other vehicles by 2040?   Daniel Breton  21:44 Well, I would say that the first benefit is lower emissions is going to make a hell of a difference. Because you know, a lot of people say that GHG emissions from transportation represent 24% of Canada's total GHG emissions. But that's only downstream emissions. When you add upstream emissions, it's 30%, meaning that transportation is the number one source of GHG emissions in Canada. But that's GHG emissions, so lowering them by I would say 50 to 80%. Because you have to keep in mind that you have GHG emissions from electricity production, although it's getting much better. I mean, the last coal plant is going to close next year in Alberta. And and Nova Scotia intends to go I think it's 80% renewable by 2030. So as time goes by electric vehicles become cleaner and cleaner because the grid is becoming clearer and cleaner. So that's one thing. But the other thing, which is super important, and people seem to forget, is that according to Health Canada, they released a report on the impact of air pollution last year, the economic cost of air pollution is estimated at $120 billion, not millions, billions 120 billion from air pollution. And that's 15,300 premature deaths, which is eight times the death toll of car accidents. So if we bring more electric vehicles on the road, it's going to lower significantly air pollution, whether it's from light duty vehicles, or medium or heavy duty vehicles. So it's going to save billions of dollars to Canadians, help our healthcare system and save 1000s of lives. I mean, this is not insignificant. This is very important. And this is something I think that needs to be said. And last but not least- jobs. I've been talking about this, believe it or not, I've been coming to the House of Commons because from where I am, I can see the House of Commons right here because I'm in Gatineau this morning. I've been I started to talk about the EV industry about 15 or 16 years ago to the federal government saying that we need to transition our automotive sector from gas to electric because that's where the industry is going. So there was really not much of any interest for years. But now the federal government has really caught on I have to salute Minister Champagne for his leadership on this particular issue to make sure to attract EV assembly battery assembly battery manufacturing, critical minerals strategy. So we are seeing a real shift I mean you have to keep in mind that between 2000 and 2020 light duty vehicle production in Canada has been going down and down and down time and time again. We went from fourth biggest manufacturer in the world, to not even be the top 10 in 2020. Now, because the federal government, the Ontario government, the Quebec government and other Canadian governments are investing more and more on the EV supply chain in the EV industry, we are seeing a revival of the automotive sector in Ontario. And to me, this is significant. And if we hadn't done this, there will not be an automotive sector by 2030, or 2035. So this is huge.   Rebecca Schwartz  25:33 Electric Mobility Canada recently launched a 2030 EV action plan with the goal of highlighting how we get to an EV future by 2030. So what is this and what was involved in its creation?   Daniel Breton  25:48 Well, most members of EMC were involved with the creation of the 2030 EV action plan. So it meant, you know, manufacturers, it meant infrastructure providers, utilities, research centers. So I mean, we have a large pool of very qualified experienced people, or either staff or on our board, or our GR Committee on our MHD working group, or battery working group, our utilities working group, so all of these minds come together to say, this is what we recommend for the future of Canada regarding e-mobility. So so yeah, so it was a broad consultation amongst ourselves to see what kind of policies we could put in place to accelerate EV adoption. And I would say that the result has been significant, because we have seen a lot of interest from the federal government, amongst others. Regarding our recommendation, whether it was for- I'll give you an example, at the end of July, I was invited by a Minister Alghabra's Cabinet to be at his announcement for their new medium and heavy duty vehicle incentive program. Because we basically wrote the program, we sent it to them, we had some exchanges, and they said, this does make sense. And we learn from other programs elsewhere in the world or elsewhere in Canada. So I mean, it is significant. We're talking about more than half a billion dollars to accelerate EV adoption regarding any medium and heavy duty vehicles. Obviously, the infrastructure deployment program, almost a billion dollars is something that's going to make a big difference to accelerate EV adoption. This was also part of our recommendation and 2030 action plan. And but we're not stopping there to us that 2030 Action Plan was was an important, I would say, moment and EMCs history. But we are coming up with newer updated revised recommendations, new documents being published. So this is a, you know, this is a work in progress.   Dan Seguin  28:15 Okay, great. We're going to discuss the six pillars of the plan today, which I think covers a lot of the issues and concerns raised by many Canadians. Let's dig into pillar number one, light duty EV; consumer adoption. Some of the highlights under this pillar include price parity, with gas cars, some clever incentive proposal and removing caps for taxis, and ride sharing companies to move fully electric. Can you talk to some of these and what your ultimate goal with this pillar is?   Daniel Breton  28:58 Well, this pillar is to not only encourage EV adoption, but discourage gas guzzler adoption, because we have what we call, you know, the fee based system that we recommend. I've been talking about this for more than 10 years. Because, while people are buying more and more EVs at the same time they're buying more and more light trucks, gas light trucks. And this is an issue because we see that, you know, what most manufacturers offer now is more and more SUVs, pickup trucks and crossovers. So cars are less and less bought by Canadians because there are less and less manufacturers by OEMs. You know, if you go to a Toyota dealer, there's no honda fit anymore. There's no Yaris anymore, but there's more and more of those SUVs. So so for us a fee based system, I think is a recommendation that's important, but it's not an easy one to adopt. We have not seen anyone in North America I'd love the feedback system yet. We it has shown to be very effective in Europe. But it's it's an issue. And you know, in North America and Canada and Canada in particular when one thing that I'm really focusing on is the fact that for us, it doesn't make sense that, you know, car sharing companies, car hauling companies would have a cap of 10 vehicles that can get the federal rebate. Because not only do we want to encourage the transition to EVs, but especially in downtown areas, we want to make sure that if people don't know don't need to buy a car, and they can use a car sharing service, well, they should be encouraged to do so. And the car sharing services should be encouraged to electrify their fleet. So for us, this cap has to go. This is something I've been discussing with people in the federal government. And we are coming up with more data and information, you know, explaining why we need this. Other than that, no, you're we're talking about evey rebate for for used vehicles. This is actually in one of the mandate letters. And it has been in the mandate letters for a number of years now at the federal level, the program has still not been put together. So we are anxiously waiting to see what's going to happen with this. And last but not least, I don't know if you know about this. But in California, there is a particular rebate on top of the regular rebate for low income individuals and families who want to buy an electric car. So we think that this is something important for people who have, you know, we're not as affluent to be able to buy an electric car.   Rebecca Schwartz  31:52 So Daniel in pillar two you discuss medium heavy duty and off road fleet electrification and a number of rebates, tax credits, and offsetting costs for electrical infrastructure. What are some of the key takeaways? And what about the tools and restrictions for large polluters? Can you speak to that a little bit?   Daniel Breton  32:13 Well, I would say that what we are seeing because of this very important announcement from Minister Alghabra, this summer, what we are seeing now is that the main issue or the main challenge is infrastructure. Let's say you are a transit agency, and you want to buy a whole fleet of electric buses, you have to charge them. And the garages that we have in Canada have not been planned this way. So we have to really either adapt them or build new garages. But this is something that can be done. I mean, right now, there's less than 1000 electric buses in Canada, closer to 600. and China, they have more than 600,000 electric buses. And I was I was told a few years ago by someone from a trade transit agency whose name I won't mention that, because in this particular city that this person worked in population density made it harder for them to electrify buses. So I couldn't help but reply that, yes, because China, as we all know, does have a lot of people. So so to me, that was it was not an argument. I mean, if you want to plan this, you'll find a way. I mean, this, you know, there's the saying, you know, if if you want to do it, you find a way if you don't want to do it, you find an excuse. So to me, this is really a challenge regarding, you know, transit fleets, we're talking about trucks. Well, depo charging is going to be very important. But right now, this is not something that's been planned or budgeted in the federal government's programs. So we are looking to try and recommend to the government that we put together a particular program for medium and heavy duty vehicle infrastructure, this is something that we that needs to be done. And regarding off road vehicles, so off road vehicles is a different issue because a lot of people seem to think that if you buy a snowmobile, or Sea-Doo or a side by side, that it's just for fun, but a lot of people work with these snowmobiles and see those and side by side because they work in a park that they work at a ski station, work on a construction site. So keep in mind that our regulars, modern snowmobiles, it pollutes as much talking about air pollution here as 40 modern cars, gas cars. So from an air pollution point of view, it's a big win for people to adopt electric off road vehicles. So that's why we are pushing for that as well. Not to mention the fact that some of the companies making those side by sides and snowmobiles are Canadian companies. So it's not only good for the air pollution, but it's also good for job creation as well. And expertise. I mean, after all, I mean, where else then in Canada, should we have electric snowmobiles to start with I mean, it should be starting here. And it is starting here.   Dan Seguin  35:47 Okay, at least 1/3 of Canadians live in multi unit residential buildings today. Under pillar number three, you go into some details about the national EV infrastructure deployment plan. What are the targets and recommendations you believe are needed when it comes to public charging and making condos and apartments EV ready?   Daniel Breton  36:15 Well, there needs to be some regulation put together either by provinces or cities to accelerate EV adoption and merge, you know, multi unit residential buildings. Actually, I learned just a few days ago that the city of Laval, Quebec has put together an EV ready regulation that says something we are seeing in BC. And this is something we should see across the board across the country. Because it's not just about, you know, incentives for people to install EV chargers in condominiums, because some, some condo owners and all their their syndicate. They simply don't want that they don't allow for that to but to be able to, you know, for people to install them. So we think that there needs to be regulation so that, you know, there should be a right to charge. And this is something very important. We are asking the federal government but other governments as well, to make sure that at least we have at least a million chargers by 2030 across the country. We think it's very important because yes, public charging is key. But let's face it 80 to 90% of charging happens where? At home or at work. So if we have both public chargers and verb chargers and home chargers, this is the only way we're going to be able to reach our targets regarding EV options.   Dan Seguin  37:50 Okay, here's a follow up question for you, Daniel. Where do you see utilities playing a role in the 2030 EV action plan?   Daniel Breton  38:01 They will play a big role. I mean, they have so much to win from EV transition, that it's really surprising that some utilities don't see the interest. I wouldn't say that Canadian utilities don't see the interest, I would say that most of them do. Most utilities in Canada are members of EMC, we have a utilities working group, they are looking at ways to help this transition it both from a technological point of view from a planning point of view, and from a regulatory point of view. So they do play a big role. But I was part of a discussion last year with people in the Ontario government. Because a lot of people in government were saying how much is this infrastructure deployment going to cost? You know, people in Ontario and utilities. And I said, I asked this question to a person from the Federal from the Ontario government. I said them, you know how much it costs you to import oil to make diesel and gas in Ontario on a monthly basis? And that person said no. So I looked at how much Ontario cars and trucks consume on a monthly basis. And I made a calculation that's $60 a barrel, which was lower a year ago, you know, and back then it added up to $1.2 billion a month. So if you take that $1.2 billion a month that just flies out of Ontario because Ontario is not a province that produces oil, and you bring it back in and you put that money into infrastructure and jobs and electricity production from Ontario utilities. It's a lot more money that stays in Ontario $1.2 billion a month is a lot of money. So that means that we, Ontario does have the means to electrify its fleet and to update and yeah, to update its grid.   Rebecca Schwartz  40:10 Next, what are the benefits to the government launching a national 2030, EV strategy and regulation? And why is this so important?   Daniel Breton  40:19 Well, that's something that we are seeing already, you know, with the very important announcement that have been made by Prime Minister Trudeau, Minister Champagne, Minister Wilkinson, because keep in mind that when we're talking about create job creation, and and the EV sector, it's not just about car assembly or truck assembly or bus assembly, it's also about infrastructure, manufacturing, you know, whether we're talking about level two chargers, you know, the main sponsor of our e 2022. Conference is Grizzly, which is a company based in Ontario, and they make residential chargers, but they're going to start making public chargers, and they're doing it in a way that's very efficient. So that's show creation as well, where we're talking about construction jobs for those infrastructures, where we're talking about mining jobs, and processing jobs. So there was a report released by the International Energy Agency a few days ago, that said, that stated that right now, in Canada, we are right now about at 50/50 when we're talking about the percentages of job, and fossil fuel versus renewables, and electric mobility, and that's 2022. But we all know that between now and 2030, the number of jobs created, and renewables and green mobility is going to be much higher than in fossil fuels. So this is very important. We're talking job creation, you know, from the whole spectrum. We're going from mining to mobility.   Rebecca Schwartz  42:06 Okay, so a quick follow up for you, though, a couple of items under the fourth pillar that we found to be interesting was the Green SCRAP-IT program and your recommendation to help rural northern First Nations and Inuit communities? Can you briefly talk about those and the rationale?   Daniel Breton  42:26 Well, the Green SCRAP-IT program is inspired by stuff that we are seeing that we have seen in Quebec and BC, because of what we're seeing is that for people who drive older vehicles, whether it's for individual cars, or old buses, for instance, because some of those buses have been on a roll for a long time, and their pollution levels are through the roof. So we want to help either it's companies, individuals, or transit authorities, school boards, to transition to electric vehicles, whether it's, you know, cars, trucks, buses, school buses. But it's a way for us to make sure that we do accelerate the transition, but it regarding individual vehicles, what we are saying is that we should accelerate scrappage program. But what some people are saying in the industry is that should people should, you know, just get rid of the old car and be able to buy a new car, and it could be a gas car. So we don't agree with that. But not only that, when people let's say somebody gets rid of his or her Honda Civic, and decides to buy a brand new Honda CRV, well, air pollution is going to be lower, but GHG emissions is going to be higher because it's a bigger car. And GHG emissions are directly linked to fuel consumption. So it's not because you buy a new car that necessarily it's that good for the environment. So that's why we're saying our SCRAP-IT program should be linked either to the purchase of electric vehicle, but it can also be a transit pass. It can be an electric bike, it can be car sharing service, carpooling service, because, yes, electric mobility is a key ingredient in the solution to lower GHG emissions, or we're talking about transportation, but it's not the only one. So that's why because I've been working at this for decades. I know that we have to also encourage, you know, collective transportation, active transportation, car sharing, carpooling, commute work. All of this is part of solution when we're trying to find not only ways to lower GHG emissions but to lower traffic congestion as well. Regarding First Nations and remote communities, I live in the country. I don't live downtown Montreal for though because we hear that very often, you know, oh yeah, electric cars are only good for those who live in the city and try, you know, a commute around the city. While actually when you look at the Cape, the Quebec data 75% of EV owners in Quebec live outside of Quebec and Montreal, why? For a very simple reason, because they have either a garage or a driveway, it's a lot easier to plug your car, when you have garage or driveway, than when you live in a suburb. I'm sure you know this as well as I do. But for those who live further down, you know, let's say you live in northern Saskatchewan, or in northern Ontario. And you say, well, it's going to be really hard for me to be able to have access to electric car, or to drive the long distances that we need to drive we live in, we live far away? Well, first of all, there seems to be some misconception about the fact that Canada is a big country, and therefore we drive a lot. We do a lot of mileage. That's just not true. Okay? The average driving from Canadians on a daily basis to go to work and back 80% of Canadians drive 60 kilometers or less to go to work and back. So what that means is that, no, it's actually 80 kilometers and back 80 kilometers to go to work and back. So. But this is very important, because most Canadians don't drive that much. I mean, the average driving habits of Canadians from the latest data, which is not new by any means, because the latest data that we found from the federal government was 2009. Believe it or not, this is so outdated, I can't believe it. But anyway, we were at 17,000 kilometers approximately. So 17,000 kilometers, is not that much driving. I mean, I because I travel a lot for my work, I drive more than 50,000 kilometers a year. So having an electric car and driving a lot is no issue. What we need is to make sure that remote communities have access to chargers, fast chargers, in particular, when you get out of the 401, the 417, the 15 the trans Canadian when you go more up north, it is an issue for many regions in Canada, especially when you live in the prairies. I've heard some people, you know, look for chargers didn't know where they were because no one explained to them, where to plug the vehicle, there were only level two chargers. So infrastructure is a real issue. For those who really live, you know, outside are most of the grid, you know, when you live in Nunavut, or Nunavik are, you know, you count the Northwest Territories. There are more and more chargers being deployed, then very often people who live there buy SUVs or pickup trucks. So now that we're seeing more and more SUVs and pickup trucks coming to market, it's becoming less of a challenge, but they do need to get them delivered over there. That's the first thing. The second thing for those who would be, I would say, more anxious about the fact that when it's minus 30 minus 40. You know, you lose up to 50%. And rage, worse comes to worse, you can always buy a plug in hybrid electric vehicle. Mean, meaning that you know, you're going to have some range, especially in the summer. In the winter, not so much. So, but but the truth of the matter is that, you know, I've been driving EVs for I've been driving partial and full EVs for 23 years now. So I know that even at minus 20, I've been going to Saguenay they actually were organized an EV day, and Saguenay in January at minus 25 minus, minus 30. We're 20 of us from Avec. I was with Avec back then we drove all the way up there. And no one had an issue. You just need to have the infrastructure and that's an issue. Right now. In Northern Ontario. It is an issue. And we are seeing that in northern provinces. We're in BC and Quebec I would say.   Dan Seguin  49:07 When it comes to federal leadership with respect to EVs in your sixth and last pillar, what is the government doing right? And what are your recommendations for improvement?   Daniel Breton  49:21 Well, I would say that what the government is doing right for EV adoption at the federal level, is that they are helping more and more departments by EVs. So to me, this is this is key, but we need to install a lot more chargers in federal buildings and federal parking that we have right now. As I mentioned, you know, I'm right across the river from the House of Commons. And I think that I see like less than 10 chargers at the House of Commons. To me this is far from being enough. When I was in Norway in June, we went to a city called Arendal, about 300 kilometers away from Oslo. And it's a small city 40,000 people. And there was an underground parking over there that could accommodate about 150 cars. There were 70 chargers. So, so we have a lot of catching up to do. Let's put it that way. And on that topic, I have to mention this. When I was in government, in in my government plan for the government of Quebec, 10 years ago, we had a plan to electrify ferries. So when we lost our election, you know, the the electrification of ferry fell, you know, in the cracks. When I was in Norway in June, I learned that there's 825 ferries in Norway, eight wto five 825 ferries in Norway. 400 of those 400 of those ferries are already electric. And the largest electric ferry in Norway can accommodate 600 people and 200 cars. So I think that if the Canadian government wanted to electrify its ferry lines, it would be a great opportunity for the marine industry in Canada to develop a new skill and create all you industry actually.   Rebecca Schwartz  51:33 So something that I thought was fascinating in this pillar was the zero emission zone in downtown Ottawa. Can you tell us what that is and why you recommended it or called out Ottawa specifically?   Daniel Breton  51:45 Well, I think it's because it's the symbol. I mean, Ottawa is the capital of Canada. So if we have a zero emission zone in Ottawa, I think it will send a strong signal that people could not drive gas or diesel vehicles in that particular area.   Dan Seguin  52:01 Okay, Daniel, we always end our interviews with some rapid fire questions. And we have a few for you. Are you ready?   Daniel Breton  52:11 Go ahead.   Dan Seguin  52:12 Okay. Here's number one. What are you reading right now?   Daniel Breton  52:17 Oh, my God. That's funny, because, you know, I used to read a lot of novels when I was younger. Now all I read is sports. I need that I read battery reports and I need books and I read everything related to electric mobility. The oil industry energy transition. So basically, most of the reading that I do is scientific or economic. That's That's my bedtime reading. Yeah.   Dan Seguin  52:48 Okay. What would you name your boat? If you had one?   Daniel Breton  52:54 I don't have one because I'm an old time windsurfer. So I live, I mean, my house is by the St. Lawrence River. So I windsurf in my backyard. So and I don't intend to have a boat. But I I keep windsurfing. Even though I turned 60 this year. I want to die windsurfing. Want to wind surf until I die. So yeah.   Dan Seguin  53:18 Moving on to the next one who is someone that you admire?   Daniel Breton  53:23 I admire a lot of people. It's hard to tell. Because I mean, so many people that I admire, I mean, believe it or not my I said my girlfriend but my wife because I got to wait three weeks ago. Thanks. She met with the Dalai Lama a few years ago, because she used to be a member of parliament and she was the only Buddhist Member of Parliament. So she met with the Dalai Lama. So that's a person that I really admire. Nelson Mandela, I really admire obviously, being from Quebec and native and you have to keep in mind that there and Ivanka has done a lot. For those who are in Ontario. You know, a lot of people think about independence, but when I think about going to the bank, I think about metal she knew when he was natural resources minister, and, and they held the referendum election of the nationalization of electricity 1962 And that helped propel Hydro Quebec from a small company to one of the biggest forces in the world regarding electricity production, and cleaning, electricity production for that matters. There's not a size and a need Ivanka are really important in my mind, I would say and even though he is controversial, I would say Elon Musk, you know, I mean, he's done so much. And he is such a leader and and you ways of doing things, but I don't always agree with him. But I have to say that when you work in electric mobility, it was what if it was not for him? We will not be there today.   Dan Seguin  55:10 What is the closest thing to real magic that you've witnessed?   Daniel Breton  55:15 That's a good question. Real closest thing to real magic, I would say is that it was the night that I saw an aurora borealis. It's very spectacular.   Dan Seguin  55:28 Okay, let's move on here. What has been the biggest challenge to you personally, since the pandemic began?   Daniel Breton  55:36 To me personally, I mean, a lot of people close to me, I've got COVID, my mother's got COVID, she's been very sick. So many people close to me, either, were really sick. A friend of mine, you know, fell in a coma for almost 20 days. So I thought he was going to die. Another friend of mine, 52 years old, died from COVID. So so this is at, you know, this hit home really hard. For me as see point of view, keep in mind that I started at EMC on March 9 2020. And, and the first thing that I did as CEO of EMC, was to cancel a conference. So my first decision was to cancel a very important event for EMC for its members. And I remember, I cancelled it like March 15, like a week after I had come in. So people were really not sure about what I was doing, because it was this new guy canceling the conference. Is he nuts, but I was just, you know, in front of the curve. So it was complicated for us. Because since I would say that I was pretty much the only one to cancel an event of any big event or conference in 2020. I had a lot of issues with hotels and people that we paid for, because they said, not gonna happen. What you're saying doesn't make sense, these events will happen. We don't want to reimburse you. So we had to fight for months and months to get our money back. Because at one point, everybody came to the conclusion that there was no other way around this. But it was a couple of months that were really very hard. I can tell you that.   Dan Seguin  57:27 We've all been watching a lot of Netflix or TV lately. What's your favorite movie, or show?   Daniel Breton  57:37 Right now? I watched a series called the Casa de Pepe. It's a Spanish TV series. It's super weird, but it's very interesting. And, and the other one that I've been watching recently, because keep in mind that my wife is Vietnamese. So it's a short call, I think career plan or something like that about an Asian woman who was a lawyer. And it's it's served career and it's her path in life. And my girlfriend is a career woman, she has been very successful. So this is something that we watch together.   Rebecca Schwartz  58:17 Okay, lastly, what's exciting you about your industry right now?   Daniel Breton  58:21 Oh, my God. I would say that it's just this- listen, I've been talking about EV and EV adoption and EV industry for decades now. So for for many years, I felt like I was, you know, this nut case, you know, that walks around, you know, the cities, you know, repent. The end is near, you know, I felt like because I was talking about I was talking about, you know, climate change, because I studied and climate change. That's what I studied in when I was in university. So to me at one point around 2005 or so, I said, we have to talk, we have to stop talking only about depressing stuff and start talking about solutions. And that's when in 2005 I said I have to make it a goal of mine to find ways to accelerate EV adoption. That was 17 years ago, I created MCN 21 back then; wrote books on the subject. I've written many books on the subject. But still until five years ago, I mean, there were only a few of us. Now that we are seeing car manufacturers, truck manufacturers, plane manufacturers. You know, jumping and jumping on the bandwagon of electric mobility. It's very exciting. And I mean, I didn't even take a vacation this summer because there was so much job so many consultations, so many reports. So much stuff to do. So at one point I said that to federal employee I said you know oh, well, I mean, I would be nuts to complain, because I have too much work because I've been asking for this for many years. But I would say the most exciting thing is just the vibe. You know, it's just, it's just that. I mean, it's a hot topic nowadays. I mean, just two years ago, because I've been, I've been, I'm well known in Quebec, a lot of people know me, people. I know, people, people know me. I'm all over the media. But in the rest of Canada, it was not such a hot topic to talk about electric mobility until maybe a year ago, two years ago, the most. But now every week, you know, I'm not the only one. But a lot of people now do interviews about electric mobility, electric cars, and the chargers. And some of those articles, as I mentioned, are really bad. But I mean, we are talking more and more about this. So the old excitement, you know about this transition, I think is is is very encouraging. And I know that all of us will have worked for decades to come, because this is only the beginning.   Rebecca Schwartz  1:01:07 All right, Daniel. Well, that's it. We've reached the end of another episode of the thinkenergy podcast. But before we go, if our listeners want to learn more about you and your organization, how can they connect?   Daniel Breton  1:01:19 Well, they can go to our website you know and find a contact. We have a growing growing team now. So we have more and more people working at EMC so they can connect with us. They can send me an email info@emc-mec.ca. I'm always reachable.   Dan Seguin  1:01:39 Again, Daniel, thank you so much for joining us today. I hope you had a lot of fun. Cheers.   Daniel Breton  1:01:45 Oh, I did. I thanks a lot. Very, very interesting conversation. I really appreciated that.   Dan Seguin  1:01:53 Thanks for tuning in to another episode of the thinkenergy podcast. And don't forget to subscribe and leave us a review wherever you're listening. And to find out more about today's guests or previous episodes, visit thinkenergypodcast.com I hope you will join us again next time as we spark even more conversations about the energy of tomorrow.

Deep Focus
2022.09.19 Gary Lucas on Abdullah Ibrahim - 1 of 3

Deep Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 59:45


Every once in a while, an artist comes along who gets so caught up in the sweep of history that the world seems to create itself for the artist's work, rather than the other way around.  Dollar Brand came of age as a pianist in South Africa in the late Fifties, just in time for the multiethnic explosion of Johannesburg's Sophiatown.  In the wake of the repression that followed the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960, he became a European exile.  Within months, his music came to the attention of Duke Ellington who was so moved that he brought about the LP session Duke Ellington presents The Dollar Brand Trio on Frank Sinatra's Reprise label.     Brand came to New York, subbed for Duke leading the Ellington Orchestra and attended Juilliard.  But experiences with John Coltrane, Don Cherry and the progressive cadre of the Jazz world gave him a new appreciation of his African roots and he incorporated them into his music.  He returned to South Africa, converted to Islam and became Abdullah Ibrahim.  With these changes came a new style of music that embraced the multi-kulti, freedom-loving culture of his native Cape Town.  His song "Mannenberg" became a theme for the anti-apartheid movement.   After South African police fired on children during the Soweto Uprising of 1976, Ibrahim publicly came out in support of the African National Congress and subsequently returned to New York.  Here he found a community of open-minded musicians and an audience that was supportive of his distinctively contemplative and deeply grooving music.     After the Apartheid regime fell and Nelson Mandela became president, Ibrahim returned to Cape Town; In 2022, he is still recording and performing throughout the world.     What's that you say?  "Gary Lucas?  That guy's a rocker!  Who is he to talk about Abdullah Ibrahim?"   A rocker?  Guess what: so is Abdullah Ibrahim!  Have you heard Gary's version of Ibrahim's "Bra Joe From Kilimanjaro"?  You will have a whole different understanding of who both of these guys are.  Besides, Gary Lucas is a true musical gourmand of the New York old school and I love to talk about music with him.  I can't wait to hear what he has to say about his fellow iconoclast.  As always, the WKCR archives have delivered some rare beauties for us to cherish.     This Monday (Sept. 19) on WKCR 89.9FM, WKCR HD-1 and wkcr.org.  Next week it goes up on the Deep Focus podcast on your favorite podcasting app or at https://mitchgoldman.podbean.com/   #WKCR #JazzAlternatives #DeepFocus #AbdullahIbrahim #GaryLucas #MitchGoldman #JazzInterview #JazzPodcast   Photo credit: Tore Sætre, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 317 - Jennifer Griffin

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 52:54


Jennifer Griffin is an American journalist who works as the chief national security correspondent at the Pentagon for Fox News. Griffin graduated from Harvard University in 1992, receiving a B.A. in Government. Prior to working at the Pentagon, Griffin started her career reporting for The Sowetan newspaper in Johannesburg, South Africa, covering Nelson Mandela's prison release and South Africa's transition from apartheid. She then lived in Islamabad, reporting on the rise of the Taliban in Pakistan and Afghanistan before moving to Moscow in 1996 where she reported for three years on the end of the Boris Yeltsin era and the rise of Vladimir Putin. In 1999, Griffin became a Jerusalem-based correspondent for 7 years, providing coverage of the Second Palestinian Intifada, suicide bombings, military incursions and failed peace deals. In 2000, she provided on-site coverage of Israel's withdrawal from Lebanon, its withdrawal from the Gaza strip and Yasser Arafat's funeral. In 2005, Griffin conducted a rare interview with former Prime Minister of Israel Ariel Sharon before he lapsed into a coma. Griffin later coauthored with her husband NPR correspondent Greg Myre This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Transformed Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Since 2007, Griffin has reported daily from the Pentagon where she questions senior military leaders, travels to war zones with the Joint Chiefs and Secretaries of Defense, and reports on all aspects of the military. Since 2010, Griffin has hosted the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine's Heroes of Military Medicine Awards. For the past decade, Griffin has also hosted the Wounded Warrior Experience, which features stories from wounded veterans and service members. She is a member of the Board of Directors for the Prevent Cancer Foundation and an Advisory Board Member for Report for America, an effort by the Ground Truth Project to save local journalism. She was recently awarded the Transatlantic Leadership Network 2022 Freedom of the Media Gold Medal Award for Public Service and received the Medal of Honor Foundation's “Tex” McCrary Award for Excellence in Journalism in 2015. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Resiliency Within
International Healing: The Community and Trauma Resiliency Models

Resiliency Within

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 60:00


“I think this is what Nelson Mandela meant by the ‘rainbow nation'. Learning about how to stabilize the nervous system is equality and is beyond nations, culture, religion, and ethnicity.” Community Resiliency Model Teacher, South Africa The Trauma Resource Institute (TRI) has brought their ideas about healing the wake of traumatic experiences to Asia, Europe, the Mid-East, the Caribbean, Africa, Central America, North America, and the United States. They have created projects to help underserved individuals to learn innovative biologically based interventions (The Community and Trauma Resiliency Models) that can heal individuals and communities during and after human-made and natural disasters. So far, their work has been translated into 17 languages and has been brought to more than 75 countries. In February of 2022, TRI launched the Ukrainian Humanitarian Resiliency Project in collaboration with EdCamp Ukraine and have had over 80,000 views on Facebook. The CDC Foundation (2022) describes public health as the science of protecting and improving the health of people and their communities. The field of public health fundamentally tries to prevent people from becoming ill by promoting wellness and healthy behaviors. Identifying mental health as a public health issue is imperative to building healthier and more productive communities internationally. The Trauma Resource Institute's Dr. Michael Sapp, CEO, and Reena Patel, Director of Education will discuss with host, Elaine Miller-Karas, the Co-Founder of the Trauma Resource Institute their international work and the importance of biological based models that are a bridge to all nations because of our shared humanity.

The Rooted Leadership Podcast
Why Study Leadership?

The Rooted Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 64:06


Aaron Ng'ambi has spent the past several years learning from various leaders in his country of Zambia. He has met with political leaders, sometimes in their homes, and asked questions and listened. He has wanted to understand what makes great leaders, and what they have in common. Aaron hopes to return to his country in due time and serve in a political capacity as a leader so he can influence others for good. He is inspired to learn as much as he can about leadership in the interim. We agree with Aaron that studying leadership is essential to leading. We owe it to our personal philosophies and those we lead to study how to lead. We reflect on great leaders like Nelson Mandela who are examples of taking great leadership principles literally. Enjoy this episode and discover more about why we take the time to study leadership within our institute.

il posto delle parole
Claudia Scoto "Teatro Colosseo"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 9:56


Claudia Scoto"Teatro Colosseo"https://www.teatrocolosseo.it/ Il cartellone si apre con un progetto speciale vincitore del Bando della Città di Torino in accordo con il Ministero della Cultura: si intitola THE MAKING OF e a partire dall'8 ottobre fino al dicembre 2022 offrirà ai torinesi un'occasione per essere protagonisti della nascita di un nuovo spettacolo. Attraverso una call to action – aperta dal 15 settembre al 1° ottobre - rivolta ai ragazzi delle scuole superiori, ma anche all'intera città, un gruppo di nuovi “lavoratori dello spettacolo” si potrà approcciare al meccanismo ‘teatro' partendo dalla messa in scena di un'opera teatrale che potrà essere seguita fin dalle sue fasi di allestimento, passando attraverso laboratori con la compagnia, le maestranze, gli addetti ai lavori. Il Teatro Colosseo, per un mese, si trasforma in laboratorio di saperi e di mestieri, rompendo la quarta parete e permettendo ai partecipanti di non essere solo spettatori passivi ma totalmente attivi nella fruizione e nell'elaborazione del teatro stesso.Tantissima, diversa e trasversale la proposta musicale: al Teatro Colosseo trovano il palcoscenico ideale gli spettacoli dei protagonisti della scena italiana e internazionale in collaborazione con le più grandi agenzie del Paese. Il cartellone si apre con la grande musica per film di JOHN WILLIAMS nell'interpretazione della K&K Philarmonic Orchestra diretta dal Maestro Kendlinger (17 ottobre). Il 1° novembre si viaggia ancora, questa volta sulle note dei Pink Floyd interpretate dai BRIT FLOYD, acclamati in tutto il mondo come The World's Greatest Pink Floyd show. Dopo gli spostamenti per l'emergenza sanitaria arriva in Teatro l'atteso concerto della star internazionale JAMES TAYLOR (3 novembre) accompagnato dalla sua All-Star Band. Primo fra gli italiani, il 4 novembre, FRANCESCO RENGA protagonista di un tour che finalmente torna a cantare dal vivo il suo amatissimo repertorio. Il giorno successivo il palco è tutto di GIGI D'ALESSIO che si propone di festeggiare il ritorno al live offrendo al pubblico la possibilità di costruire la scaletta del concerto scegliendo fra ben cento titoli della carriera del cantautore napoletano. Anche la grande musica dei Genesis sarà protagonista grazie al ritorno in Teatro, il 15 novembre, dello straordinario STEVE HACKETT, il leggendario chitarrista che propone “Genesis Revisited – Foxtrot at Fifty + Hackett Highlights”, che segna il cinquantesimo anniversario di Foxtrot del 1972, album che mise i Genesis al centro della scena rock britannica. Anche la PFM PREMIATA FORNERIA MARCONI festeggia (16 novembre) con il tour “1972-2022” il cinquantennio trascorso da “Storia di un minuto” fino all'ultimo “Ho sognato pecore elettriche” abbracciando naturalmente la poesia di Fabrizio De André DANIELE SILVESTRI, cantautore amatissimo, con una cifra stilistica che coniuga la ricerca di una nuova canzone d'autore con il riscontro del grande pubblico, mescolando talento e tradizione, leggerezza espressiva e impegno civile sarà in scena il 18 novembre. Dicembre, il mese delle feste, si apre il 2 con l'apparizione torinese del SOWETO GOSPEL CHOIR con l'incredibile carica di uno dei cori più famosi del mondo, vincitore di Grammy Awards, in un concerto specialmente dedicato a Nelson Mandela. In una sequenza straordinaria il 3 dicembre MARCO MASINI porta al Colosseo il concerto per i primi trent'anni della sua carriera; ALEX BRITTI (4 dicembre) incontra il pubblico in un inedito “tour sul divano” dove saranno protagoniste le canzoni e le sue immancabili chitarre; UMBERTO TOZZI – dopo l'enorme successo del tour con Raf della scorsa stagione – festeggia i suoi settant'anni con il tour “Gloria Forever”. NOEMI sarà in concerto il 7 dicembre e l'anno musicale si concluderà con il grande ritorno di MASSIMO RANIERI che, archiviata l'infinita sequela di standing ovation con i suoi show da “Sogno”, torna a stregare un altro straordinario viaggio tra canto, recitazione e danza, brani cult, sketch divertenti e racconti inediti.Il 2023 si apre con uno spettacolo che è già entrato nella storia della musica: sul palco, ancora una volta insieme, ANTONELLO VENDITTI E FRANCESCO DE GREGORI (17 e 18 gennaio). DARDUST, al secolo Dario Faini, arriva in Teatro insieme il 7 marzo con il suo show fra pianoforte ed elettronica e dopo aver raccolto enormi successi in eventi di richiamo internazionale come il Superbowl, l'NBA All Star Game e i Giochi Olimpici. FABIO CONCATO (9 marzo) riprende il suo inossidabile repertorio, ma in chiave totalmente acustica, tanto da diventare una piacevole (ri)scoperta. Nel 2023 I NOMADI compiono 60 anni di musica, emozioni, impegno sociale. Una band transgenerazionale che festeggia al Teatro Colosseo (18 marzo) la capacità di rimanere il passo con i tempi mantenendo la sua identità. Due gli incontri con ERMAL META: voce inconfondibile e penna sensibile arriva finalmente (19 e 20 marzo) sul palco del Teatro Colosseo con la sua profonda ispirazione e con le sue canzoni più belle in nuovi emozionanti arrangiamenti e nell'anno dell'esordio letterario con il libro «Domani e per sempre”. Il 23 marzo FRANCESCA MICHIELIN arriva per festeggiare insieme i dieci anni di carriera dalla vittoria sul palco di X Factor dove è stata celebrata anche come conduttrice. Ultimo in elenco – in un programma che certamente si arricchirà ancora – il concerto de I MUSICI DI FRANCESCO GUCCINI il 24 marzo. Il 25 maggio BREAK FREE - LONG LIVE THE QUEEN il rock del gruppo inglese incontra le splendide sonorità di un quartetto d'archi in uno spettacolo ricco di scenografie e costumi per stupirsi e vivere insieme grandi emozioni. IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEAscoltare fa Pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

The Toby Gribben Show
Richard Stone

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 22:13


Richard Stone has painted portraits of the Royal Family for more than four decades. At the age of 22, he became Britain's youngest royal portrait artist since Sir Thomas Lawrence painted Queen Charlotte in 1790 at the age of 21. Although he has had little formal art training, Richard Stone's success is a direct result of a natural talent and a strong determination to succeed in the career he has pursued since childhood.Born in 1951 the son of a Colchester postman, Richard began cultivating his talent following an accident at the age of four that left him with a fractured skull and permanent deafness in his right ear. The young artist began sketching in a notebook and later painted to communicate with his family and teachers, demonstrating a keen sense of perspective and mixing colours.From the age of eight, he was actively encouraged by his next-door neighbour, Frederick Heron. An amateur Essex painter, Heron taught Richard the basics of art. Then when he was fourteen, Richard went to the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, where he saw a portrait by Sir Gerald Kelly. With the directness that has subsequently characterised his career, he wrote to Sir Gerald, saying how much he had admired the portrait and asking if he could possibly help and advise him. The result was prompt. Sir Gerald could offer him all the reasons against being a portrait painter, but if he would like to call and see him, and bring his work, he was welcome. Richard took along what work he had done, listened to Sir Gerald's reasons, and would not be dissuaded. It was the start of a friendship that was to last until Sir Gerald's death in 1972.Sir Gerald had been an ideal tutor. With his help and advice, Richard set about becoming a portrait painter. The achievements are formidable. Following Sir Gerald's advice, he started knocking on doors in an attempt to find work, and he was successful. One of his earliest subjects was Sir Arthur Bliss, the Master of the Queen's Musick. As well as Sir Adrian Boult, another contact Richard made was at Clarence House, Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother's London residence. When he was put through to the Comptroller of the Household, Lord Adam Gordon, Richard made his mark with a memorable phrase, “Don't ring off, I could be the latter-day Rembrandt”. This singular lack of modesty paid off and Lord Adam listened to his reasons for wanting to paint the Queen Mother. After accepting a commission to produce a likeness of Lady Adam Gordon, Richard was invited to paint the Queen Mother's portrait. The finished work was greeted with tremendous critical acclaim, but many were sceptical that the young artist could sustain a successful career.Defying the critics, Richard saw this as the first step that would lead to the achievement of his childhood ambition. Unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery in 1992, his portrait of HM Queen Elizabeth II is his most famous work. Commissioned by the burghers of Colchester, the eight-foot by five-foot canvas hangs today in the town's Moot Hall, and represents three years of work and some seven sittings. The portrait has been hailed as one of the finest painted during Her Majesty's reign and was subsequently chosen by Her Majesty as the Royal Mail airmail stamp. To commemorate HM becoming Britain's Longest Reigning Monarch, Richard was commissioned by The Realms to paint Her Majesty's portrait again in 2015. Upon completion, it was acquired by The Royal Collection and now hangs in St James's Palace, London.Richard continues to paint senior members of the Royal Family, alongside other prestigious commissions. His sitters have included Nelson Mandela, Luciano Pavarotti, Baroness Thatcher, Dame Joan Sutherland and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.Richard is married and has a son and two daughters. He lives in Colchester where he maintains a studio. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Oui Are New York
Olivier Attia (Gershon): Les clés pour entreprendre aux USA

Oui Are New York

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 85:24


Pour ce 1er épisode de rentrée, Olivier Attia, CEO @Gershon Consulting délivre en 1h25 un véritable MBA pour comprendre les codes et entreprendre sur le marché américain. Et en 26 ans aux USA, tel Nelson Mandela, qui ne perd jamais, qui gagne ou qui apprend, Olivier a beaaaaaaaaaaacoup appris. "Failure is not an option: Keep trying." Prenez des notes, ca défile. Ingénieur de formation et visionnaire, il a fondé successivement et revendu 4 startups. Il a été élu "Breakout Company of the year" par Forbes, a levé des millions, en a perdu 9,4 et fort de cette expérience est aujourd'hui à la tête d'une plateforme de service centrée sur le branding, le marketing et la vente, qui aide petits et grands entrepreneurs à se developper outre-atlantique! L'aventure de Contentsquare pilotée par l'emblématique Jonathan Cherki fait partie de ses faits d'armes... Son parcours, semé d'embûches sert de trame à ce cours magistral, plein d'humour dans lequel vous découvrirez les clés de l'American Dream version moderne. Bonne écoute! Elsa ASK

GEDANKENtanken - Inspiration & Motivation von Top-Rednern - Jede Woche neue Auftritte unserer Rednernächte.
#937 Du brauchst Träume! Vertraue in dein Leben & es lässt dich gelingen // Oliver Brünner

GEDANKENtanken - Inspiration & Motivation von Top-Rednern - Jede Woche neue Auftritte unserer Rednernächte.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 17:07


Warum wollen manche Menschen auf die Bühne? Ist es das Geld? Der Ruhm? Der tosende Applaus, wenn der Vorhang fällt? Oftmals ist der Auslöser ein anderer: Die Motivation, eine bedeutende Botschaft zu deinem persönlichen Herzensthema in die Welt zu tragen. Denn auch Dr. Martin Luther King, John F. Kennedy, Nelson Mandela oder Steve Jobs waren Idealisten, die die Welt zu einem besseren Ort machen wollten. Hast DU eine wichtige Message, die du mit uns allen teilen möchtest? Willst du auch auf Missstände hinweisen, Ungerechtigkeit bekämpfen und die Welt ein kleines Stück besser machen? Dann haben wir ein Geschenk für dich:

Something Extra
Where Entrepreneurship Meets Education w/ Chris Crane

Something Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 43:52


Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the pathway out of poverty.” As an award-winning business leader, Chris Crane merged his passions for education and entrepreneurship to launch self-sustaining, Christ-centered schools for children living in poverty in Africa and Latin America. Since becoming the CEO and Co-Founder of Edify, Chris has partnered globally with entrepreneurs in education to serve 3.2 million children throughout 12,000 schools. You won't want to miss this story!Guest Links:Chris' LinkedInEdify.orgCredits: Lisa Nichols, Host; Scott Crosby, Executive Producer; Jenny Heal, Guest Coordinator; Morgan Cochran, Marketing Support

We Need To Be Doing That
EP 64: Vada Manager

We Need To Be Doing That

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:54


Founder/CEO of Manager Global Holdings He's been in the room in negotiations with Nike, has worked with 2 Arizona Governors and helped Nelson Mandela transition… he has a fascinating career that we dug into in this episode We met Vada at the Sports PR Summit earlier this year where he received a Lifetime Achievement Award — thanks Brian Berger + team - Growing up in East St. Louis, Illinois - College in Arizona State and served 2 AZ Governors - Went to Washington DC, helped Nelson Mandela transition - Recruited from Levi's to Nike, where he worked with Michael Jordan, Mario Lemieux, LeBron James + how he was part of the growth - The strategic idea to send Michael Jordan to China - Working with Nelson Mandela in 3 different occasions - Operating with his mantra “Attitude of Gratitude” and how Vada's childhood made him who he is today - Advice to the younger generation getting their career started __________ We Need To Be Doing That is a HEARTLENT Group Production https://www.weneedtobedoingthat.com

New Books in Music
Stevie Van Zandt, "Unrequited Infatuations: A Memoir" (Hachette Books, 2022)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 67:37


What story begins in a bedroom in suburban New Jersey in the early '60s, unfolds on some of the country's largest stages, and then ranges across the globe, demonstrating over and over again how Rock and Roll has the power to change the world for the better? This story. The first true heartbeat of Unrequited Infatuations: A Memoir (Hachette Books, 2022) is the moment when Stevie Van Zandt trades in his devotion to the Baptist religion for an obsession with Rock and Roll. Groups like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones created new ideas of community, creative risk, and principled rebellion. They changed him forever. While still a teenager, he met Bruce Springsteen, a like-minded outcast/true believer who became one of his most important friends and bandmates. As Miami Steve, Van Zandt anchored the E Street Band as they conquered the Rock and Roll world. And then, in the early '80s, Van Zandt stepped away from E Street to embark on his own odyssey. He refashioned himself as Little Steven, a political songwriter and performer, fell in love with Maureen Santoro who greatly expanded his artistic palette, and visited the world's hot spots as an artist/journalist to not just better understand them, but to help change them. Most famously, he masterminded the recording of "Sun City," an anti-apartheid anthem that sped the demise of South Africa's institutionalized racism and helped get Nelson Mandela out of prison. By the '90s, Van Zandt had lived at least two lives--one as a mainstream rocker, one as a hardcore activist. It was time for a third. David Chase invited Van Zandt to be a part of his new television show, the Sopranos--as Silvio Dante, he was the unconditionally loyal consiglieri who sat at the right hand of Tony Soprano (a relationship that oddly mirrored his real-life relationship with Bruce Springsteen). Underlying all of Van Zandt's various incarnations was a devotion to preserving the centrality of the arts, especially the endangered species of Rock. In the twenty-first century, Van Zandt founded a groundbreaking radio show (Little Steven's Underground Garage), created the first two 24/7 branded music channels on SiriusXM (Underground Garage and Outlaw Country), started a fiercely independent record label (Wicked Cool), and developed a curriculum to teach students of all ages through the medium of music history. He also rejoined the E Street Band for what has now been a twenty-year victory lap. Unrequited Infatuations chronicles the twists and turns of Stevie Van Zandt's always surprising life. It is more than just the testimony of a globe-trotting nomad, more than the story of a groundbreaking activist, more than the odyssey of a spiritual seeker, and more than a master class in rock and roll (not to mention a dozen other crafts). It's the best book of its kind because it's the only book of its kind. Stevie Van Zandt on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music