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Automotive brand manufacturing subsidiary of Volkswagen Group

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Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Everything in web dev is Amazing!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:28


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk about all the things that have improved the lives of web developers over the years. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the "How did you hear about us?" section. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 00:16:18 Topic introduction 01:03:00 Leaf blowing and house updates 02:57:01 We complain a lot 04:13:22 Typescript improvements 06:20:00 Optional chaining 07:01:06 Async, Await and Promises 07:57:05 Array methods and tools for immutability 09:13:16 DOM interactions with getElementBy 10:34:10 Arrow functions 11:13:06 Classes! + All of ES6 was a huge breath of fresh air 12:18:07 Looping 13:22:00 Prettier Code is a huge game changer Prettier ESLint 15:51:00 Sponsor: Freshbooks 17:04:15 CSS updates 17:41:11 CSS Variables 18:41:15 Flexbox and Grid 20:16:10 VH, VW units 20:47:24 Overflow scroll on mobile 21:54:10 Color formats 23:08:06 Sticky headers 23:45:06 HTML 5 Introducing HTML5 By Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp A Book Apart 27:54:00 Web components 28:29:09 Sponsor: Sentry 30:01:17 Tooling Syntax 12 Why Is Everyone Switching to VS Code? 31:28:13 Speed of latest crop → ESBuild, Vite, Snowpack, parcel Vite Snowpack 33:33:03 Image compression 37:08:21 Hot module reloading 39:11:09 Image resizing, video hosting, accepting credit cards Gatsby Cloudinary Spritecow SmushIt Stripe Braintree Entrepreneur friendly licensing 39:48:18 Entrepreneur friendly licensing 40:43:18 Sponsor: Linode 42:11:10 Developer Tools in the browser Tweet from @Bentlegen Chris Coyier - Let's Suck at Github Together Chrome.io 43:52:17 Insights into errors and troubleshooting 44:49:13 Cross browser and cross device testing 47:12:19 Hosting and SSL Certificates 48:14:08 Scaling up 49:53:13 Scaling with containers 50:14:09 When did we start using Github? 53:52:12 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott 59:42:22 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Wes ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Tonal Wes: Reboot your Portfolio / Canadian Couch Potato Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3212 - VW Poaches Apple's Head of Batteries; Nissan's Electrification Plans; Chinese-Made EVs Could Impact Europe

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:58


- VW Poaches Apple's Head of Battery Development - Nissan Reveals Its Electrification Plans - Euro NCAP Tests Highway Assist Systems - Porsche Offers Any Color Under the Sun - BMW Expands eDrive Zones - Stellantis Secures Lithium Supply for Batteries - Buick Velite 6 EV Gets Same Updates as Menlo EV - Chinese-Made EVs Could Have Political Impact in Europe - Chip Shortage Not Letting Up

eMobility update
eMobility update vom 29.11.2021 – Mercedes EQS – Renault – Tesla – VW

eMobility update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:26


Herzlich Willkommen zum ersten „eMobility Update“ der neuen Woche – präsentiert von Compleo. Heute ist Montag, der 29. November. Und mit diesen Themen legen wir los: 0:25 - Mercedes EQS 350 ist neues Basismodell 2:13 - Renault Master Z.E. mit größerer Batterie 4:20 - Tesla: Verzicht auf deutsche Batterie-Förderung 5:52 - Tesla erhöht Kapazität in Giga Shanghai 7:23 - VW wirbt Experten bei Apple und BMW ab Das war unser „eMobility update“ am Montag – präsentiert von Compleo. Wir wünschen Ihnen einen guten Start in die neue Woche und hören oder sehen uns morgen wieder!

Loop Matinal
Segunda-feira, 29/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:15


Patrocínio: Linode Acesse linode.com/loopmatinal, crie sua conta e ganhe US$ 100,00 de crédito para contratar os serviços de computação na nuvem e servidores Linux da Linode. --------------------------------   Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Roblox processa usuário idiota: 
https://www.polygon.com/22799362/roblox-sues-banned-cybermob-leader-for-terrorizing-the-platform-its-developers Paramount+ não atrasará estreia de Star Trek no Brasil: 
https://intl.startrek.com/news/star-trek-discovery-season-four-lands-on-paramount-pluto-tv-internationally MP processa site usado para pirataria: https://tecnoblog.net/535190/exclusivo-ministerio-publico-quer-r-19-milhao-de-site-que-baixa-videos-do-youtube/ China quer que Didi saia da bolsa americana: 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-11-26/china-is-said-to-ask-didi-to-delist-from-u-s-on-security-fears Google pagará impostos retroativos na Irlanda: 
https://www.irishtimes.com/business/technology/google-ireland-agrees-218m-tax-settlement-with-revenue-1.4738798 WhatsApp segue desenvolvendo reações: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/25/whatsapp-tera-novo-campo-para-exibir-informacoes-de-reacoes/ Galaxy Note não será atualizado em 2022: 
https://tecnoblog.net/535678/sabe-o-samsung-galaxy-note-tambem-nao-vai-ter-geracao-nova-em-2022/ VW contrata engenheiro de baterias da Apple: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/25/apple-loses-global-head-of-battery-developments-to-volkswagen-over-ev-ambitions/ Apple volta a vender na Turquia: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/26/apple-sales-in-turkey-resume/ Headset imersivo da Apple deve chegar em 2022: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/25/kuo-apples-ar-headset-to-launch-in-2022-with-mac-level-computing-power-will-operate-without-the-iphone/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Finding & Funding Real Estate Deals with Anson Young | EP80

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:53


Anson Young is a Real Estate Agent and Investor with Hundreds of Transactions Completed in Each Category of Real Estate. Anson and his team Specialize in Marketing directly to Sellers for Off-market Deals, Using Many of the Methods that can be Found in his Book Finding & Funding Great Deals. When not Working, Anson can be Found Exploring the Wilds of Colorado's Rocky Mountains with his family, Reading Favourite Books to his Son, and Attending Loud Rock Concerts. In this episode we talked about:  • Anson's Bio & Background  • Anson's First Steps in Real Estate Business  • Becoming a Real Estate Agent   • Anson's Main Focus in Real Estate  • Raising capital   • Private Landing  • Sourcing Deals   • Building an Off-Market List  • Prospecting and finding  Opportunities  • Anson's Thoughts on Inflation and Interest Rates  • Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: https://www.instagram.com/younganson/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ansonyoung Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in real estate or business that you wish you knew when you started out.   Anson (31m 43s): So I kind of, I definitely always traded just short-term money for, you know, not worrying about long-term things and, you know, it's like, oh, you're in your twenties. You know, you don't really care too much about it, but once you get up into your forties and you're kind of still doing the same thing, it's probably not the best idea. And so I would, I would go back and tell myself for sure, just like, Hey, keep like even a third of the amount of houses that you're doing, and then you won't have to work when you're 40.   So   Jesse (32m 17s): There you go. That's a, that's a good point. Okay. In, in terms of, for that person, that's getting into our industry, what do you tell them in terms of your view on mentorship?   Anson (32m 32s): Yeah, that's a really, really good question. I'm a big fan of mentors, whether it's kind of formal mentors and informal mentors, you know, people who were willing to help you up. And I would say, just find somebody who aligns with your values and then see how you can provide value to them so that they can help you get to where you want to go. And then once you're at a place where, you know, a few years along the line, I think that mentorship works both ways where you should have a hand up and a hand down.   So you're, you know, you'll graduate through mentors that you're working with and every step along the way, you should be helping bring people up as well. And that teaches you a lot of things too, as you're teaching and working through things with other investors as well. So you've kind of learned by teaching and then obviously you learn by learning from somebody who's where you want to be.   Jesse (33m 31s): Yeah. That's great. Great answer as well. Okay. In terms of, let's put a pin in rich dad, poor dad. So put that one aside, but what is a book that you find yourself just recommending over and over again?   Anson (33m 45s): Yeah. So my, that is, it was a book that I also give about the most as well. And it's obstacle is the way by Ryan holiday and it's a book on stoicism and it's, it's really helped me in my personal life and also through business as well. And so it's just an, and an outlook on life and on business and situations that I wasn't exposed to until I kind of started getting into it. And that book definitely hammered it home for me.   So   Jesse (34m 19s): That's cool. I don't think we've ever had that book recommended on the show, but I've, I've definitely had people say it's a, it's a killer book. Yep. Okay. Last question. First car, make and model.   Anson (34m 32s): I had a 1979 tan VW rabbit. That is   Jesse (34m 38s): Unreal.   Anson (34m 39s): Two door.   Jesse (34m 40s): Yeah. That's pretty good, man. Like 79. I just looking at you. I would've, I would've assumed it'd be the eighties or nineties, but that's, that's quite the car.   Anson (34m 50s): That's the same year I was born. It just happened to be, my dad's always worked on VWs my whole life. And so my step-mom drove like a Cabriolet and my dad's had like dozens and dozens of bugs and, and yeah, when it came time to me, for me to start driving, you know, he bought this 79 tan rabbit that he's like, this is yours. If you get your grades up. And it took me a little while, but finally got my grades up enough to, to drive it. So   Jesse (35m 20s): I love how they're bringing back the seventies and eighties, the retro stitching for a, for a lot of their, their new models. So it got kind of that vintage look.   Anson (35m 29s): I'd love to see it. I'd love to see a new rabbit. Yeah.   Jesse (35m 32s): Oh yeah. Bring it back. Awesome. All right. Answered for those of you that want to connect or reach out or have any questions. I know you're doing work with bigger pockets. Maybe you could tell, tell listeners where they can go on the Google machine.   Anson (35m 47s): Yeah. If you go to the Google machine and if you want to connect with me bigger pockets, this is probably the easiest way to do it. It's just, if you just search my name on the site, you'll find my, my, my profile. Think I'm the only answer on the young, on there still. So that's good. Yeah. And then yeah, if you want to find me on Instagram at young Anson, and if you want to find me on YouTube, I do do videos for bigger pockets and starting to do more videos for myself as well. And so you can find me there.   Jesse (36m 16s): My guest today has been aunts and young aunts and thanks for being part of working capital.   Anson (36m 21s): Thanks, Jesse. Thanks so much.   Jesse (36m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in

Motoring Podcast - News Show
Hear the Sparrows Farting - 23 November 2021

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:42


FOLLOW UP: VW SHOULD'VE PUBLISHED ENGINE PLANIn a test case brought by investors in Germany, Volkswagen is accused of failing to disclose the problem from back in 2008. The judge has stated that it is on the investors to prove VW or any of their staff withheld information, but it is up to VW to prove the board not telling investors from 2012 was not grossly negligent nor deliberate. To read more, click here for the Reuters article. FOLLOW UP: CONTINENTAL EX-CEO AND EX-CFO INVESTIGATED The ex-CEO, Dagenhart, and just sacked CFO, Wolfgang Schaefer, who held their roles for Continental, are being investigated by German prosecutors over their involvement in dieselgate, specifically regarding the 1.6 litre diesel engines. To read more on this story, click the Yahoo News article here. HAND HELD DEVICES TO BE ILLEGAL BEHIND THE WHEELThe Highway Code will be updated with changes to interacting with your mobile phone, whilst driving. The loopholes that allow playing games, filming or scrolling through playlists whilst holding the phone, will be illegal. However, if the device is in a cradle it can still be prodded as though it was a touchscreen infotainment system fitted to the car. To find out more, click here for the BBC News article. NATIONAL PARKS NOT CONSIDERING BANNING CARSStories started circulating that some National Parks were considering banning cars from some roads at certain times of the year, this is not the case. However, they are all looking at what they can do to reduce congestion and the effect so many visitors have travelling to these beauty spots. To read more, click the Autocar article here. PORTSMOUTH CAZ OPENS 29 NOVEMBERPortsmouth will be starting their Clean Air Zone (CAZ) initiative on 29 November. This will only affect HGVs, buses, vans, taxis and private hire vehicles as it is designated as a Class B CAZ, therefore private car drivers are not going to be saddled with extra costs to enter the city. To find out more, click here for the YesAuto article. VOLTA TRUCKS STARTS PRODUCTION IN COVENTRY Volta Trucks has started building their prototype all-electric Zero lorry, in Coventry. The vehicles comes with a range of 95-125 miles. 25 prototypes will be built in Coventry and once Volta are ready for full production they will be built in their Austrian factory. To find out more, click the Autocar Professional article here. MORGAN APPOINTS NEW HEAD OF EVSMorgan has made it clear that electrification is very much in their future, with the appointment of Matthew Hole as Chief Technical Officer, with Graham Chapman who moves up to Chief Operations Officer. To read more, click here for the Autocar article. MOTORWAY SERVICES EV CHARGING MONOPOLY LOOSENS Gridserve, who now own Ecotricity, has informed the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) that they will not enforce the exclusivity clauses in their contracts with MOTO, Extra or Roadchef, after 2026, over EV charging stations. This will allow other operators to install their equipment and give consumers a choice on charging providers. To find out more, click the Electrifying article here. SMMT PUBLISHES MARKETING GUIDELINES FOR AUTOMATED TECHNOLOGYThe Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), has worked with industry organisations, the Advertising Standards Agency, Thatcham Research and Government departments to come up with principles for advertising automated vehicle technology. To find out more, click here for the SMMT article. PRIVATE E-SCOOTERS NEED MORE RESEARCH BEFORE LEGALISATIONThe Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety has advised that more information is required before private e-scooters can be legalised as there appears to be a difference in behaviour between rental and privately ridden scooters. They wish to gather more data so that recommendation that allow for safe approval of the idea or rejection can be fully considered. To read more, click the Autocar article here. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-WRC: RALLY MONZASebastien Ogier rounded off his last full time season with a win, which meant he captured his eighth championship. He was pushed all the way by teammate Elfyn Evans and Dani Sordo, for Hyundai, rounded off the podium. Ogier will take part in only a small number of events next season. To find out more about what happened at Monza, click here for the DirtFish article. To read the What We Learned article, click the link here. To watch the DirtFish video showing Ogier's final full-time season, click the link here. To watch the chat the Team Principles have with each other, click the DirtFish video here. NEW NEW CAR NEWSHyundai Heritage Series GandeurIn recognition of the importance of the Grandeur, Hyundai have created a retro-modern reinterpretation of their flagship model which they originally released 35 years ago. Similar to the recent Pony concept car, there are some lovely modern touches but a retention of the original, recognisable, shape. To read more, click the YesAuto article here. Genesis G70 Shooting BrakeWhilst marketing calls this a shooting brake, it is an attractive estate with five doors. They will be fitting this European only car with the same V6 from the Stinger, plus letting the Germany development centre make sure the ride, handling and everything else is how we expect them to be in this market. PRices start at £35, 250. To find out more and look at the rather attractive shape, click the EVO article here. LUNCHTIME READ: THE CORBY ORBITAL NORTHERN ROAD This article explains why the Corby Orbital Northern Road took £10 million public funding but has never been completed and possibly who is now the owner of it. Intrigue, multiple owners at the same Channel Island address and more can be found in this excellent example of why local reporting is so very important. To read the article, click the Northamptonshire Telegraph link here. LIST OF THE WEEK: GORDON MURRAY'S TOP 10 CARSYou can watch a fascinating video from Goodwood Road&Racing where they propose the Top 10 cars designed by Gordon Murray. Don't forget to let Alan know if you agree with his choice and if not which you would pick as the number one car. To view the video, click the YouTube link here. AND FINALLY: TINY ENGINE THAT IS A WORK OF ARTA creator called Maker B has spent 1,000 hours creating a miniscule 4-stroke engine and condensed the process into a 15 minute video show ing the skill and artistry involved in making the engine and getting it running. To see this click the Hagerty link here.

The People's Car
63. Turkey, Types, and Talks

The People's Car

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 59:28


In this episode we talk about Audis, Trivia, and V8s. Hit us up and take a listen! THANK YOU!!!!!

Road to Redline : The Porsche and Car Podcast
Inside the world of Porsche parts!

Road to Redline : The Porsche and Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 67:01


Whether it's for a mod or maintenance, we've all bought parts for our Porsche, but what do we really know about the industry behind them? Andy Gregory from Heritage Parts Centre joins us to explain what it takes to source, supply and even make parts for us, the enthusiast. Heritage Parts Centre is a company with family roots that has been built from supplying Karmann Ghia parts in the 1980s to now supplying all classic VW and Porsche parts, including their own design and manufactured components. Andy also tells us about his personal projects including his 944, Stuttgart South gatherings, and Stuttgart Side Shots instagram page.Get your 10% discount on all Heritage Parts Centre orders by entering the code 9WERKS10 at the checkout on www.heritagepartscentre.comYou can find Andy at @stuttgart_sideshots & @stuttgart_south ‘9WERKS Radio' @9werks.radio is your dedicated Porsche and car podcast, taking you closer than ever to the world's finest sports cars and the culture and history behind them. Brought to you by 9werks.co.uk, the innovative online platform for Porsche enthusiasts,  9WERKS Radio is presented by Porsche Journalist Lee Sibley @lee_sibs and 993 owner and engineer Andy Brookes @993andy, with special input from friends and experts around the industry, as well as our valued listeners.If you enjoy the podcast and would like to support us you can do so at www.patreon.com/9werksradio your support would be greatly appreciated.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/9WERKSRadio)

YAP - Young and Profiting
Episode #142: Make a Powerful First Impression with Mark Bowden

YAP - Young and Profiting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 82:45


Want to learn how to influence people and learn their values just by their language? In this episode, we talk with Mark Bowden! Mark is a best-selling author, Founder, and Human Behavior/Body Language expert! He is credited with pioneering nonverbal analysis of human behavior where it pertains to influence and/or persuasion. His techniques have been used by G7 leaders, including Canadian Prime Minister and Stephen Harper. He is the Founder and President of TRUTHPLANE, a communication training company that offers a unique methodology for anyone who has to communicate with impact to an audience. His bestselling books on body language and human behavior are: Winning Body Language; Winning Body Language for Sales Professionals; Tame the Primitive Brain; and Truth & Lies, What People are Really Thinking. Mark is a regular instructor for Canada's #1-ranked EMBA program at Kellogg-Schulich School of Business, and he is President of the National Communication Coach Association of Canada.  Mark uses his unique system of cutting-edge and effective nonverbal communication techniques to instantly help audiences become more confident, collaborative, and credible in their communication. His highly acclaimed TEDx talk, “The Importance of Being In-Authentic”, and YouTube Channel have reached millions of people, and he has presented to many of the most prestigious organizations in the world, including Microsoft, Toyota, VW, Samsung, Johnson & Johnson, KPMG, GSK, Walmart and Nestle.  In today's episode, we cover Mark's childhood, how he learned to live with his dyslexia, and how it brought him to his passion for human behavior. We'll also learn the difference between influence and persuasion, how to learn other people's values from small talk, and making a powerful first impression. If you want to learn how to read behaviors from others fast, keep listening! Sponsored by - Kraken - Visit kraken.com/yap now to learn more or search for "Kraken" in the app store Eight Sleep - Go to eightsleep.com/yap to check out the Pod Pro Cover and save $150 at checkout Jordan Harbinger - Check out jordanharbinger.com/start for some episode recommendations Social Media: Follow YAP on IG: www.instagram.com/youngandprofiting Reach out to Hala directly at Hala@YoungandProfiting.com Follow Hala on Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/htaha/ Follow Hala on Instagram: www.instagram.com/yapwithhala Follow Hala on Clubhouse: @halataha Check out our website to meet the team, view show notes and transcripts: www.youngandprofiting.com Timestamps: 00:52- Mark's Childhood and Living with Dyslexia  9:22- The Animal and Reptile Brain 12:37- How Influence and Persuasion Are Different 16:27- Understanding Other People's Values  28:30- How to Influence People Using Their Values 30:21- Difference Between Traits, States, and Moods 39:39- Making a Powerful First Impression 46:52- How to Take Up Space 50:45- Mark's Best Advice for Dating Phases 1:01:57- The Need to Be Inauthentic 1:08:36- What Makes a Great Story 1:12:45- Mark's Secret to Profiting in Life Mentioned in the episode: Mark's Website: https://truthplane.com/

Marietta Stories | Crazy cool stories from the community builders of Marietta, Georgia
S6EP14, Jennifer Maxwell of Tiny Apple Farm and Kissie of Shop Hippie Kids

Marietta Stories | Crazy cool stories from the community builders of Marietta, Georgia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 10:25


Two interviews for the price of one! Bill first interviewed Jennifer Maxwell two years ago. Jennifer and her husband had just bought their dream farm and started their local business. Now Jennifer has expanded her blueberry bushes, has add art and has a baby due!  Shop Hippie Kids is the brain child of two sisters and Bill speaks to one, Kissie (from McKenzie) and explains her passion for clothes and the business they have built together. You will absolutely notice the VW van and the hip clothes when you come to the Marietta Artisan Market!

The Informed Life
Hans Krueger on the Cycle of Emotions

The Informed Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 34:33


Hans Krueger is co-founder of the international design consultancy MetaDesign. He also co-founded another design consultancy, FutureDraft, where we worked together for several years. In this conversation, we discuss Hans's trajectory and how ancient teachings have helped him better understand his emotions. Show notes Hans Krueger (LinkedIn) Now Partners Erik Spiekermann Uli Mayer-Johanssen MetaDesign Arnaud Maitland Nyingma school of Buddhism FutureDraft Walter Link The Cycle of Emotions - A guide to influencing reality by Jessica Fan Longchenpa Kindly Bent to Ease Us – Part One: Mind by Longchenpa Kindly Bent to Ease Us - Part Two: Meditation by Longchenpa Kindly Bent to Ease Us - Part Three: Wonderment by Longchenpa Some show notes may include Amazon affiliate links. I get a small commission for purchases made through these links. Read the transcript Jorge: Hans, welcome to the show. Hans: Thank you, Jorge! Jorge: I'll just say it, it's always a joy to see you. Hans: Pleasure is entirely mutual. Jorge: Well, folks, you might detect in the warm welcome that Hans and I have known each other for a while, and we've worked together. And I'm honored to say that I think of you as a good friend. But folks listening might not know who you are. So, for their benefit, would you please introduce yourself? About Hans Hans: Okay. I'll try to keep it brief. The problem at my age is the story is awfully long. So, obviously I'm from Germany, as you can hear with my accent. So, I think it's probably best to start... to take us to Berlin when the wall was falling, in the fall of 1989 and to a meeting where I met this guy, this funny typographer called Eric Spiekermann, and my friend Uli Mayer took me to meet him. And basically, out of that meeting came the creation of a company called MetaDesign. And for those who know the design scene in Europe, that's a fairly significant company and continues to be. I was the... basically I was running the company for the first 12 years of its existence. From, you know, building it from scratch to a few hundred people and multiple offices. And it was one hell of a ride! It coincided the emergence of a technical phenomenon called the internet. That happened simultaneously. We were in the middle of that, even though MetaDesign had its core competency... it came from typography and micro design, and therefore the term MetaDesign — design for design. But it quickly became like a multifaceted design firm, with a huge emphasis on the internet. So, it was fascinating and a long story, so I will not go too far into that, but basically just to add one more thing: we did things such as, just to give you an example, for VW built their first car configurator. It was one of the first online car configurators. In those days those were huge endeavors. All the code had to be created. And not only that, we managed to link that car configurator to the production database of VW so that the car configurator would automatically only show the options that were actually possible within a car, and the combinations that were possible. Because that's the huge complexity with these things. And these things change all the time. So, that was huge. Jorge: And this was in the 1990s? Hans: Yeah, absolutely — 1990s. So, it was awesome. And, those were like huge projects, you know? Like a year and a half and massive manpower and equivalent budgets. Very interesting. So, after 12 years, I was literally finished, because I had learned how to build a company in a way. Got fairly good at that. But I had not learned how to regenerate myself. When I left, I had... I don't know how many but like way more than a hundred unused vacation days. And I was absolutely depleted, you know? And so, I had not learned how to regenerate myself. I had always discounted that as a topic. That was a costly lesson and it led to a multi-year process of rebuilding that foundation, with the most important element of meeting the teacher that actually introduced me to the knowledge that I needed to do the rebuilding process. It was a dark time at times, I have to say. And his name is Arnaud Maitland, and he's now retired pretty much. But he is a Nyingma Buddhist. So, the interesting thing for me was less... you know, I was never a religious guy, so I did not... there was no interest on that level. But the knowledge of the human condition that these guys have, in these lineages, in these knowledge lineages, is just extraordinary. It's immeasurably deep. You know, in our life and the way we live, we can barely scratch the surface of that, even if we commit to a significant amount of study. So, that was important. After that, you and I started basically working together for a number of years in FutureDraft. It was a lot of fun, and from my perspective, really interesting in terms of the design process that we developed there, which was very much a collaborative design process. And from my perspective, and you might differ on that, but the extraordinary thing was that we started to design complex systems sort of from the inside out. So, that was a great chapter and then... it ran its course. The sort of work we were doing was increasingly hard to find, so we decided to go do something else and I had another big revelation. The second really big revelation in my life was when a mutual friend of ours introduced the notion and the clear distinction of extraction versus regeneration. And I started to think about that. That really hit home. So, it suddenly dawned on me the nature of our economic activity and what is going on there, and then sort of close the loop to to finding the mission for the second half of my life. And that's basically... it took me a little bit away from the design industry, but I'm now completely focused on bringing the logic of regeneration into companies and building an organization around that. So that's what I'm doing right now. And on a personal note, I've been married for a long time. I have one son. My son is already almost 30. And, I've also always been a musician, you know that about me. So I play drums in too many bands to mention. And, still love to do that. And, I also know fairly... I could still hit a fairly decent golf ball! That's another thing I know how to do fairly... fairly well. But, yeah! That's about it. Jorge: Oftentimes when I invite folks to be guests on the show, there's a topic that we agree on beforehand. And in your case, we're kind of going into this with many possible topics to explore, which is a challenge, right? And the thing that draws my attention, just in hearing you introduce yourself, is that there's this trajectory in your career where you helped build this organization, and helped grow it to a fairly large size, especially for the design world. Hans: Yeah. Coming out of the dark Jorge: And, as you said, you... I don't know if this is exactly what you said, but I got the sense that you kind of burned yourself out in the process of doing that? And the time when I met you, and when we worked together, it felt to me like you had overcome that and you had overcome it... I got the sense that you had overcome it in part through these teachings that you were talking about. And just in my knowing you and knowing your trajectory since then, it feels like those have been central to both the work that we were doing at FutureDraft and also the work that you're doing now in regeneration. And I was hoping that we could explore that a little bit here because it might be of value to folks listening in to hear more about how you came out of this kind of dark period of your life and how these ideas have influenced the trajectory since then. Hans: Oh, that's a loaded question, my goodness! How do you come out of a deep dark period? So... but, I can give you sort of a glimpse and it's very much an individual thing, you know? In the end, everybody has to find the path individually and it starts by becoming aware of what calls you. In my case, I had always felt, like, an affinity to the Tibetan Buddhists for some reason. I mean, that's also... and it started way earlier before it became fashionable, and the mountains and all of that. But what I experienced... so, the way I met my teacher, I was at a retreat in Brazil, invited by a very good friend of mine, Walter Link — who played a big role in my life and continues to — and he invited me. And part of that program in that retreat was a Buddhist teacher, teaching two days on the subject of time. And I thought, when I looked at the program, what is he going to talk about for two days on time? Time is a fairly straightforward topic. I went into this and after an hour, it dawned on me that I could study the subject of time for the rest of my life and would not even be able to scratch the surface. So, that was like a relief because at that moment, the realization was — and it's not... it wasn't as explicit as it is now when I look back on it — but this has happened in some shape or form was, the revelation was that there is knowledge that is so far greater than anything I have the idea off — that it exists. That I can actually take refuge in it. That I can rely on some basic things that others have really thought through carefully. And I have not found that before in my life. Certainly not in the church I grew up with in Germany. None of it. And I would describe it as knowledge of the human condition. And you could also say knowledge of our own operating system. And when you shine a light on what actually drives your patterns — your thought patterns — and they become visible, that's when the relief sets in. So what basically has power over you without you realizing it becomes visible. And that's in the end, the process. So, I know we've talked about the whole subject of emotions. Huge topic. What surprisingly few people realize is that there is like a real system behind this thing, this whole emotional complex. How they work, how they interact with each other, what leads to what, what you can do to actually cultivate your own emotional state. A state that allows you to perceive as clearly as possible what is real, versus what you imagine is real. Jorge: What do you mean by emotions? Like, what emotions are we talking about? Emotions Hans: Well, you can start anywhere but of course, classic emotion is fear, or anger, right? So these are very strong expressions. And if you talk about the system... if I shed like a little light on it, maybe? So each one of these, for example, fear or anger, they're connected to a whole complex of emotions. So, there's like a sequence. Fear is actually... and this might not be so intuitive, but I can tell you it's, for example, connected to apathy and aversion, right? And anger on the other hand, which surprisingly many people sort of think has a lot to do with fear, anger actually is connected to emotions such as attachment and desire, stuff like that. The interesting thing is that... so one of the core realizations is that each one of these emotions, for example, anger. Good example, anger. If your mind gets used to being angry, you will be angry all the time. So anger is actually something that... it's a pattern in the mind. And for example, if you are used to experiencing relief when you blow off steam, that's a pattern that when that happens, it's way more likely that it will happen again in the very near future. What that means is you can actually dry these things up. And why do you want to do that? You want to do that because when you're angry, for example, and you get to a real rage state... this is like when it becomes most obvious, you're completely disconnected from reality. You don't know anymore what's really happening in the world. And it goes as far as hurting yourself, you know? You might run with your head into the wall. Jorge: I'm hearing you describe this Hans, and thinking that that sounds like the business model for a lot of the social networks, right? Hans: Right! right. Well, I mean, they absolutely... they trigger these emotions and they play with it and it's actually like a drug. And what it does is it could completely disconnect you from reality. And the whole goal, as far as the Buddhists are and what they teach in terms of the human condition teachings, they say that your aspiration in life... a good, healthy aspiration in life is to be as clear in your perception of reality as possible, as often as possible. So, meaning that these emotions that basically take away that clarity or that connection to reality, are really detrimental and they lead to all sorts of actions that we might regret afterward, you know? And they also lead to actions where we destroy our own habitat. Greed, by the way, is one of these emotions, you know? So, if you're in the grasp of greed, you do damage and you don't realize because you're completely disconnected from reality. Jorge: Well, and I'm thinking another example might be when one gets angry at someone and you just let your mouth fly and say all sorts of hurtful things, right? Which you then regret. Hans: Of course. And you can go into physical altercations, you know? So absolutely. The structure of emotions Jorge: So, these ideas sound fairly intuitive. What is different or at least was different for me when I first heard it, was the way that they're structured. They're grouped in particular ways, right? And they relate to each other in particular ways, which I first heard of from you, and I was hoping that you would tell us a bit more about that because I think it's very intriguing. Hans: Happy to do that. So, I just basically try to describe how these emotions are grouped in clusters, right? That actually there's like a common core to them. There's like a common core. So the thing is, of course, there are also positive emotions. Emotions that actually help you to see the world as clearly as possible. Where you really like... you're breathing pure oxygen. Okay, that's not so healthy either. But you're like completely clear and connected to everything and you'll hear all the voices and you know exactly what's going on and what's needed at a particular moment, right? I'll give you an example of how this works together. So, when you love something, you care about it deeply, when you love something. This could be another human being, or it could be a beautiful flower, or the planet itself. Or it could be anything. There's like, there's… Jorge: The Beatles? Hans: The... who's that? He's pulling my leg, you know? So, anyway, that's another huge topic, don't get me started on that! But basically what happens is that when that love is pure, for example, you love another human being, it does not infringe on that other human beings "being," if that makes sense. So, it's actually... love is an emotion of freedom. And when that turns, and there's a shadow side to it, and that shadow side is attachment. Because now suddenly something that you love, you want it to be in a certain way. You take away its freedom to develop as it needs to develop because you want it to be in a certain way. So, now you're attached, right? And now there is a progression from attachment to anger, to rage... it's just one progression, you know? It's just a question of time. So how this systemically works is... this means there's a shadow side actually to those emotions that are actually beneficial for you. And the little trick is you cannot, when you have become angry, you cannot go back. First of all, if you consider what happens to most people is they become angry that they're angry, right? So now you have anger times two. Anger, layered on top of anger. And then actually, that continues to the third and fourth and fifth dimension. And so the anger gets thicker and thicker. Jorge: It's a positive feedback cycle, right? Hans: Yes. I don't know if it's positive. Jorge: Positive in the sense that it grows, right? Hans: I know. So, the trick here is you can only get rid of it with an antidote. And the antidote is actually... in the case of attachment and anger, which is very much about yourself, you want something to be in a certain way, right? That's like the common root of this, and you get angry because it's not like that, is compassion -is the cultivation of compassion. So, compassion means you take somebody else's wellbeing, or the wellbeing of the planet, or whatever, you take it on the same level of importance as your own. So, when you do that, anger can't exist anymore because it's not about you anymore. So I hope the logic gets clear, is sort of visible in that description of one of the quadrants. And the thing is there's like a whole circle of these. It goes around in a 360-degree circle. One thing leads to another, it's the antidote of another, and you cultivate that and that can go wrong again, and so this goes all the way around, which is too much in our format here, but that's the little secret. And what was the breakthrough for me was that I actually have the freedom to cultivate what I want to cultivate. To realize that I'm not the victim of whatever I'm in the grip of. That I can cultivate it myself. Jorge: That sounds incredibly liberating. I just want to point out because you hinted at the fact that there's a cyclical structure to this, and we don't have enough time to get into it here, but Jessica Fan has written up the model based on a presentation that you did, and I'm going to include a link to that article in the show notes for folks to check out. It is worth checking out. Hans: She's lovely. Yes, she did a great job on it. Jorge: This idea that through greater awareness of your emotional state, you can liberate yourself from being kind of driven by these things is incredibly powerful. And yet from experience, I know that it's hard, right? Like when you're in a rage, you're not thinking straight. Hans: No, that's right. Escaping emotional cycles Jorge: So, how do you overcome that? Like, how do you gain the ability to escape from these feedback cycles? Hans: Yeah. So a very good question, Jorge. So what I would say is... so the path — my path, and I always have to preface everything, that this is my path. So this is not... you cannot generalize it. But for me, the path was to... for a long period of time, and I do this still every day, I contemplate the system. Whenever I'm somewhere — and it runs like a background program — the first step is to really memorize the system, which takes surprisingly long, actually. That you have it completely in your mind; that it's ingrained in your mind. That it becomes part of your normal, interior structure. So, memorizing the system is the first step. The second thing is to actually start contemplating yourself, how these things interact. Because it's literally like you discover... I can tell you I've done this now for more than 15 years, I think? Every day, I discover new dimensions in this. How like little mechanisms, how they work. And then, the process is, in the end, is classic. So, usually what happens is you have like an episode during the day and you lie in your bed at night and you contemplate, "Geez! You know? There it was again.:" So, you become aware. So, the practice is, as it gets ingrained into your body, into your system, these intervals become shorter and shorter. So, you're... initially, you probably think about it at night in bed. Then you get closer and closer to the point where it actually occurs. And if you're a master, — I'm nowhere near — you actually catch it at the onset, when it's like the first tiny irritant in your body, you already got it. And you apply what I call the antidote. You immediately catch it. If there's like the tiniest amount of attachment, you already got it. That way, it never progresses. So, that's the path. It definitely starts by really memorizing the whole thing. You have to know it. That this leads to that, that leads to that, that leads to that. These are the different groups .... and you have to have it in your system. That took astonishingly long. I had like one that I was constantly missing. I could not remember it, you know? That, of course, points to other psychological phenomena; that you have a blind spot. Design and the cycle of emotions Jorge: Like you were saying, this stuff is so deep and vast. Like, there's a lot to explore here. Many of the folks listening to this show are probably interested in design. They have either a design background or are practicing designers. And I'm wondering if you can talk about the relationship between the framework — this cycle of emotions — and the design process… if there's any relationship there? Hans: Oh, there's a huge relationship! So, let's start by saying what happens to you on an individual level, happens to organizations on an organizational level. So, you can have angry organizations. You have arrogant organizations; organizations who think they know at all. You have all that, and if you know how this works, you can actually design according to what's needed. You can design for the antidote. And you can also completely miss it because you are not aware of it. So, if you apply the wrong antidote, there's not going to be any impact. So, that's like one huge thing. You can actually observe it. Do you know who really knows this stuff well? People who write movie scripts. Since I've been aware of this, I watch movies and I go like, "Ah, there it is." This is like a blueprint, how they operate with the system, you know? And I'm sure it's not, in many cases... I would be surprised if they actually explore it through Buddhist teachings, but these are all universal truths. This is not something that the Buddhist own or something. They just describe something that exists. So, it's inevitable that others come to the same conclusion because it's the truth. That's just how it works. And I see it in movie scripts all the time. But it definitely applies to organizations. It applies to teams, to design teams, you know? When you work in a team and you have a person who is in a particular state, if you have this knowledge, you can address it. The challenge is to actually apply this in an organizational context. And we even had that at FutureDraft because there's so much resistance. There's a lot of resistance to actually... which is really interesting, to making this stuff visible. Many people don't want this to become visible. They sense that there's sort of a complication for their life. They love their emotions, you know? Why would I start manipulating my emotions? Right? My anger is healthy. I hear those, but... yes, there is sometimes a place for anger, but from my perspective, the trap is to become caught up in it. Sometimes you just have to blow up. But how do you calibrate your own system afterward so that it does not linger in your system and block your ability to see clearly? Jorge: What I'm thinking in hearing you describe this is that in gaining greater awareness of the degree to which emotions are influencing your behavior, and gaining the ability to regulate that process, imparts upon you a certain degree of responsibility, right? Like, you can no longer point to your emotional state as the cause for these things. So, you were talking earlier about this victim mindset. It's like, well, you know, "I was angry, so that's the excuse!" Hans: Yep, exactly. Exactly. Very true. Yeah. The notion, in a way, is to take responsibility on that level. Take responsibility for the state you are in. That's actually, I think, one of the core requirements of a leader. You have to take responsibility for the state you're in. And we had some very clear examples of people who are completely oblivious to that in recent years. So, yeah, absolutely. Taking responsibility for the state you are in, also as an organization, by the way. This is really a big deal. Reading the emotional space Jorge: Right. And I don't know to what degree this is something that we are trained for. I think that as individuals, we have a sense for what it means to be angry, what it means to feel, I don't know, greed or what have you, but I would expect that it's harder to read the room when it comes to a group of people, whether it's your team or the organization, or what have you. Any pointers in that regard? Hans: Well, I mean, first of all, when you yourself are in a balanced state, you will be able to read the room. That what gets in the way is your own imbalance, right? If you had a fight at home in the morning and you walk into a meeting, that fight lingers in your system, if you don't know how to completely offset that emotion and you have a practice around it. You will bring this into the meeting. You will not see what's going on in the meeting and you will miss vital information. And information of course is communicated... only 5% or so is communicated verbally. The rest happens on completely different levels. You're missing all that because your system is blocked. It's clogged, literally, inside. Yeah, it's astonishing. I mean, I don't know if it comes across, but you really have it in your... when you become aware of that, of what it feels like to have a system that is clogged like that, and you know the difference between the two states, it's astonishing, you know? The level of information that you suddenly get because you're not clogged. Closing Jorge: Well, this all sounds really fascinating, and again, a lot of it is not new to me because we've talked about this in the past, but I'm very happy to be able to share it with folks here. I'm wondering where they might find out more about this particular framework. I mean, I've already mentioned, Jessica's post. Hans: Yeah. Jorge: But if there are any other resources? And then, where can folks follow up with you yourself, should they want to reach out? Hans: So, the second question is easy to answer. You find me on LinkedIn. I don't have... I'm not a big social networker, so, but on LinkedIn, you can find me. And if you put in Hans Krueger MetaDesign for example, that will lead you straight to me, I would imagine, because my name is fairly common, in Germany at least. So that's one thing. Also, if you're interested, take a look at a website called Now.Partners. That's actually the endeavor that I'm involved in currently, which is a decentralized global consultancy. We have not really talked about that — it's a fascinating topic — that, in service to regeneration of large multinational companies and family-owned businesses. So, Now.Partners, there's like 120 partners in there now. And you will find my portrait in there. I'm the CFO of that organization, so… Jorge: And you'll find me as well. Hans: Hey, you're also a partner? Fantastic. No, no, of course! Fantastic. Which is awesome. Yeah. So, you can also get in touch with me through that. So Yeah! The first part of your question, where to look for resources, that's not so easy to answer. So basically this thing, what I've just told you, you will find snippets of that in any Buddhist book. I'm not aware of a book that actually spells this out to the degree that it... how it would be applicable to our normal professional life. I'm not aware of that, really. There are various frameworks actually out there about, emotional frameworks, I should say, meaning frameworks that describe this whole system. I have to say, the knowledge that I've shared here a little bit comes out of a book that was written in the 15th century by a famous Buddhist teacher. 15th or 14th century. Incredible, when you read that. His name is Longchenpa. And the book has a beautiful title and I, say this slowly, Kindly Bent To Ease Us. What a title! Anyway, Kindly Bent To Ease Us. This is not the easiest thing to read, but it's all described in there. Fascinating! So, in the end, explore it where you can explore it if you're interested, and you will find the right place. Jorge: I am very grateful for you to come on the show and tell us about it, Hans. Hans: It was my pleasure, and, yeah! I hope it was interesting. Jorge: Thank you for being here. Hans: Thank you, Jorge. Thank you for having me.

The People's Car
62. Running out of Gas, Elephant in the Room, and Cheese

The People's Car

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 70:26


We talk about a plethora of things, including but not limited to Genoa salami, snow drifts, and Treser. Check it!

Let’s Talk Dubs
Ep 150 Bill & George answer listener questions

Let’s Talk Dubs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 77:53


Its our 150th episode. Bill & George update on current projects. We discuss evaporust liquid rust remover. Lowering your VW which way we think we like best. wheel tire and stance questions. Perfomace upgrades  for stock engines. Should you bench bleed your master cylinder. what oil should you use on your Volkswagen. and more good VW talk. Rosswulf lower pulley nut Subscribe today https://vwtrendsmagazine.com   https://www.letstalkdubs.com/store.html

FT News Briefing
EV market capitalisations go bonkers

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:12


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/eb7eaf32-597e-403a-bb3c-71290113ad92US President Joe Biden has called on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether the country's biggest oil companies are engaged in “potentially illegal conduct”, the euro fell to its lowest level in 16 months this week as currency markets bet on divergence between the ECB and other major central banks. Plus, the market capitalisation of electric vehicle upstart Rivian has surpassed that of VW and FT global motor industry correspondent Peter Campbell explains why investors are piling into EV shares. Joe Biden demands probe of ‘potentially illegal conduct' in oil sector - with Lauren Fedor https://www.ft.com/content/66df689f-8a8e-4adb-a57a-664142c8be46Euro hit by bets ECB monetary policy will diverge from major peershttps://www.ft.com/content/f09a8ba8-c196-46d0-8fe7-15d6ae64364fEV maker Rivian eclipses Volkswagen in value while Lucid overtakes Ford - with Peter Campbell https://www.ft.com/content/a0575122-404d-4d11-b54b-f1af77733a4eStaples Center in Los Angeles to be renamed Crypto.com Arena - with Sara Germanohttps://www.ft.com/content/0e4af0d3-0ae9-48c5-8aee-9a1a9a5721a4The FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Gavin Kallmann and Michael Bruning. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

You, Me, and Your Top Three
The Future of Work (a Solocast)

You, Me, and Your Top Three

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 18:16


The Future of Work | Join Gregg Garrett, host and CGS Advisors CEO, during this solocast as he discusses the future of work. Gregg explores three basic pieces: thinking of how automated work might be for you in the future, deciding if you're going to have a freelance or W2 automated workforce, and just how satisfied will your workers and non-workers be in this future era. About Gregg Garrett Greggory R. Garrett is the CEO and Managing Director of CGS Advisors, a boutique strategy and innovation advisory firm that works with senior leaders at public companies and select private organizations. He is a dynamic and experienced international keynote speaker, an adjunct professor of business and engineering, the host of the “You, Me, and Your Top Three” podcast, and author of the best-selling business leadership book, Competing in the Connecting World. Having addressed audiences from 20 to upwards of 1500 people in public and private/corporate events, Gregg is at his best when he can focus on industry shaping & transformational topics. Prior to launching CGS Advisors, Gregg was the Chief Strategy Officer for IT & Innovation at Volkswagen Group of America. Before his time with VW, Gregg led corporate strategy & marketing for a division of Deutsche Telekom and was part of Ernst & Young's Management Consulting practice. He is a visionary leader who prides himself in recognizing commonsense solutions for complex problems and supports “Corporate Bravery” by motivating teams to reach well beyond the typical boundaries to achieve greatness. Show Highlights The future of work: the essence of what work is and how humans will take part in work [0:43] The tension between labor markets and the availability and adoption of technologies [3:09] What will workforces look like over the next decade? [6:06] What will robotics/autonomation be the freelancer or the employee? [11:43] What will satisfaction of employees look like? [14:22] Additional Information I4.0 & Labor Market Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RX3VFZ3 Contact Gregg Garrett: Gregg's LinkedIn Gregg's Twitter Gregg's Bio Contact CGS Advisors: Website LinkedIn Twitter

Motoring Podcast - News Show
Facial Gymnastics - 16 November 2021

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 53:27


FOLLOW UP: VW LOSES APPEAL IN SUPREME COURTVolkswagen has lost their appeal, in the US Supreme Court, to have claims for damages brought by individual states thrown out. VW felt that the rules only allowed the federal government to make claims for damages under the Clean Air Act. This means the potential for further financial penalties is very real, with Ohio along with counties in Florida and Utah prosecuting Volkswagen and Bosch. To read more, click the Reuters article here. FOLLOW UP: TOWING RULES CHANGE POSTPONED The change in rules, to allow more people to tow larger trailers, has been quietly postponed, with no date yet given as when they will come into force. To see more, click the tweet from @thelorryist who shared the screenshot of the official site amendment, by clicking the link here. FOLLOW UP: “WINNER” OF UK EV CHARGER COMPETITION SHOWNThe Government has revealed the “iconic” charger, for the UK, following work from Royal School of Art and PA Consulting. The design is meant to put ‘ease of use and accessibility' at the heart of the final product. To read more, about this underwhelming concept, click here for the Autocar article. STRIKE ACTION NOT VOTED THROUGH AT DVLAStrike action will not be taking place at DVLA's headquarters, in Swansea, as there wasn't enough votes registered. There has been a long running dispute over the safety of staff, from Covid issues, which prompted this latest move by the unions. To read more, click here for the YesAuto article. COP 26 SOME OEMS SIGN SOME DO NOTAt the recent COP 26 global gathering, to discuss and plan our way out of the climate crisis we have, some manufacturers pledged to aim for deadlines well in the future to stop selling internal combustion engined vehicles, in some markets. On the surface it looks like hitting the targets already stated by many Governments. Not every company agreed to this but as Alan argues, does it matter if a piece of paper is signed if they are actually doing it? To find out more, click the Autocar article here. UK BATTERY INDUSTRY LOSES CHEMICAL FIRMS INVOLVEMENTJohnson Matthey, who were partners for a number of battery production firms, in the UK, has announced they are pulling out of the market and will now focus on decarbonising chemicals in the supply chain and hydrogen technologies. This is a blow to the UK industry. For more information, click here to read the Autocar article. TVR IN JOINT VENTURE WITH MINING COMPANYTVR has announced a joint venture with Ensorcia Metals, a lithium mining company, who will bring cash to help develop the V8 Griffiths and EV technology for future models. To read more and make up your own mind on whether we will actually see any Griffiths on the road, click the Auotcar article here. BRITISH BUILT EV BUSES IN TRIAL Electric double deckers buses, with a range in the region of 300 miles, will begin trials next year. Norfolk based Equipmake, Spanish coachbuilder Beulas and London's largest bus operator are partnering up to investigate the viability of such vehicles. To find out more, click here for the Autocar article. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-NEW NEW CAR NEWSVolkswagen TiagoThe VW Tiago, is known as the Nivus in South America, has been tweaked and brought to Europe next year. Starting at £21,960 and based on the same platform as the Polo and T-Cross, it is a B segment coupe SUV. For more information, click here for the Autocar article. Subaru SolterraSubaru will be revealing their new EV SUV, the Solterra, at the LA Motor Show. You will be unsurprised to hear that due to co-developing this with Toyota (who call their version the bZ4X, if you remember) that it looks almost identical to Toyota's version. More details are due when they pull the covers off at LA. To find out more now though, click the Autocar article here. LUNCHTIME WATCH: NEC CLASSIC CAR SHOW 2021 Alan went to an event last weekend, the NEC Classic Car Show. He met lots of lovely people, some of whom he even remembers their name (as well as actually meeting them!). You can hear him tell Andrew what a fab time he had and also, watch Ian Seabrook's two ace videos from the show here. For Video 1, click this link. After that has whetted your appetite, click here for Video 2. LIST OF THE WEEK: GOOD, BAD OR UGLY? THE BIGGEST AUTOMOTIVE FADSYou can run through the Autocar sideshow of some of the more memorable fads to have struck the motoring world. Once you've been through, don't forget to tell the chaps which is your favourite one and why. To have a look, click this link here. AND FINALLY: UK P1800 GASSER WINS HOT WHEELS LEGEND STATUSThe UK based Volvo P1800 gasser that was the UK's entry into the global finals for the next Hot Wheels Legend car has been picked as the overall winner! The car screams Hot Wheels and we are delighted for Lee Johnstone. To find out more, click the Elan PR post here.

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3205 - VW Faces More Diesel Lawsuits; Mazda CX-50 Ready for Outdoor Lifestyles; ZF Bolsters Its Cloud Services

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 8:48


- VW Faces More Diesel Lawsuits and Fines - Honda Asks Suppliers to Reduce Emissions - Honda Testing AV Work Vehicle - Mazda Introduces New CX-50 - ZF Bolsters Its Cloud Services - Cadillac Blackwings Full of Easter Eggs - F-150 Lightning Frunk Started as Cardboard Box - Renault Expanding Hydrogen Commercial Lineup

Autoline Daily
AD #3205 - VW Faces More Diesel Lawsuits; Mazda CX-50 Ready for Outdoor Lifestyles; ZF Bolsters Its Cloud Services

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 8:48


- VW Faces More Diesel Lawsuits and Fines- Honda Asks Suppliers to Reduce Emissions- Honda Testing AV Work Vehicle- Mazda Introduces New CX-50- ZF Bolsters Its Cloud Services- Cadillac Blackwings Full of Easter Eggs- F-150 Lightning Frunk Started as Cardboard Box- Renault Expanding Hydrogen Commercial Lineup

Rarified Heir Podcast
Rarified Heir Podcast Encore Episode #52: Morgan Margolis (Mark Margolis)

Rarified Heir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 65:37


Today on the Rarified Heir Podcast we are talking to Morgan Margolis, son of Mark Margolis aka Salamanca in Breaking Bad aka The Shadow in Scarface aka Mr. Shickadance in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. Morgan was our very first interview, done within the hallowed halls of The Federal Bar, which he runs as one small part of The Knitting Factory Entertainment where he is CEO. This is another episode taped in person, pre-Covid and we talk to Morgan about his time as a child growing up on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and his days skateboarding at the base of the World Trade Center in the 1970s. We hear all about his parents hippie existence putting on productions on the east coast in a VW van, his father's psychedelic awakening as a parent early, his lean, early years acting in small films and TV shows, waiting for his break while waiting tables and his first role on film in an adult film. Ahem. Morgan also waxes philosophical about his days acting in television, his own days waiting tables that led him to his current gig and his motley ‘crew' of friends who all went on to fame in acting, music and business. Curious? You won't be. Answers are coming up next on the encore episode of the Rarified Heir Podcast. Everyone has a story.

Tagesschau (320x240)
10.11.2021 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 15:39


Themen der Sendung: Diskussion über weitere Schutzmaßnahmen gegen die Corona-Pandemie, Neuer Höchststand seit Beginn der Pandemie: RKI meldet 39.676 Corona-Neuinfektionen binnen eines Tages, Erste Ergebnisse der Arbeitsgruppen in den Koalitionsverhandlungen der Ampel-Parteien, Gesundheitsminister Spahn verzichtet auf Kandidatur zum CDU-Vorsitz, Wirtschaftsweise senken erneut Konjunkturprognose für 2021, VW kündigt neues Werk für Elektroautos an, EU plant weitere Sanktionen gegen Belarus, Annette Kurschus ist neue EKD-Ratsvorsitzende, Die Lottozahlen, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)
10.11.2021 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 15:39


Themen der Sendung: Diskussion über weitere Schutzmaßnahmen gegen die Corona-Pandemie, Neuer Höchststand seit Beginn der Pandemie: RKI meldet 39.676 Corona-Neuinfektionen binnen eines Tages, Erste Ergebnisse der Arbeitsgruppen in den Koalitionsverhandlungen der Ampel-Parteien, Gesundheitsminister Spahn verzichtet auf Kandidatur zum CDU-Vorsitz, Wirtschaftsweise senken erneut Konjunkturprognose für 2021, VW kündigt neues Werk für Elektroautos an, EU plant weitere Sanktionen gegen Belarus, Annette Kurschus ist neue EKD-Ratsvorsitzende, Die Lottozahlen, Das Wetter

The People's Car
61. Alex Sweeney (Innovative Motorsports) joins us!

The People's Car

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 59:18


Its getting colder. Danny is changing his tires. PLUS Alex Sweeney from Innovative Motorsports joins us to talk about some of the wild stuff they have going on. Check it!!!

HeuteMorgen
Bundesanwaltschaft will Verfahren im Diesel-Skandal einstellen

HeuteMorgen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 13:34


Der so genannte "Diesel-Skandal" von VW sorgte vor gut 5 Jahren für Strafanzeigen und Schadenersatz-Klagen in Milliardenhöhe für den Deutschen Autokonzern. Auch in der Schweiz wurde die Bundesanwaltschaft aktiv. Nun allerdings plant sie, das Verfahren einzustellen. Weitere Themen: * Polen schliesst einen Grenzübergang zu Belarus, weil zu viele Migrantinnen und Migranten versucht haben, ins Land zu kommen. * Wo kommen die Bilder wirklich her? Historikerinnen fordern eine unabhängige Untersuchung zur Bührle-Kunstsammlung.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1272: F-150 Lightning Buyers Get Augmented Reality Intro | 09 Nov 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 21:38


Show #1272 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Tuesday 9th November. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Producer. That's you ED PETERSON TESLA FSD EARLY ADOPTERS GET AUTOPILOT CAMERA UPGRADE INVITES - Tesla has started sending out Autopilot Camera Upgrade invites to Model S and Model X owners who purchased Full Self-Driving when it was initially launched years ago. As per the communication, Tesla is now poised to start camera retrofits for its older cars, which would allow Model S and Model X vehicles with FSD to access the full suite of features currently offered by the company. - A screenshot of the communication has been shared online, and it reads as follows: “As an owner with Full Self-Driving Capability and early production cameras, you are eligible for complimentary Autopilot Camera Upgrade. Camera replacements are required to access a continuously expanding suite of Full Self-Driving Capability features. To arrange your complimentary camera replacements, schedule a new appointment from the Service menu in your Tesla App,” the message read. - Tesla also updated its official webpage for its Full Self-Driving Computer Installations. A new section titled “Camera Replacements” has now been added to the page. The section outlines which customers are eligible for the retrofit, when the service will be available, which camera units will be replaced, how long the hardware update would take, and how early FSD adopters could schedule an appointment for the Autopilot Camera Upgrade. Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-fsd-early-adopters-autopilot-camera-upgrade-invites VW LAUNCHES PRE-SERIES PRODUCTION OF THE ID.4 IN EMDEN - The conversion of the Emden site into Lower Saxony's first plant for electric cars is on the home straight, according to VW. The first pre-series vehicles of the ID.4 are already being produced in the body shop, the paint shop and soon in assembly. Volume production is scheduled to start in spring 2022. - the final decision to build MEB vehicles in Emden from 2022 onwards was taken in summer 2019. The conversion work started in July 2020 – parallel to the production of the Passat. In May, VW announced that the conversion work was still on schedule. - The ID.4 is to be built in Emden first, followed by two more MEB models from 2023 – a Passat-sized saloon and the accompanying estate. According to VW, a total of six additional production halls and logistics buildings will have been built on the 4,300,000 square metre factory site by then. Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2021/11/09/vw-launches-pre-series-production-of-the-id-4-in-emden/ BMW BEGINS FULL PRODUCTION OF ITS FUTURISTIC 75 MPH ELECTRIC SCOOTERS - BMW has just entered full series production of its CE 04 electric motorbike, a futuristic model that could be a taste of what's to come from the German manufacturer. - The CE 04 was first unveiled nearly a year ago, when many dismissed it as an overly ambitious futuristic concept vehicle - BMW followed up by announcing the CE 04 would actually enter production. And now that day has come, as the bike begins serial production at the company's Berlin Motorrad plant. The CE 04 falls somewhere between a maxiscooter and a light electric motorcycle. The peak-rated 31 kW (42 hp) frame-mounted electric motor puts it in the same power class as several electric motorcycles from leading manufacturers. - Pushed to the max, the CE 04 is rated for a top speed of 120 km/h (75 mph). - The internal battery in the higher spec model provides 8.9 kWh of capacity and is rated for up to 130 km (81 miles) of range. - the CE 04 will start at USD $11,795. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2021/11/09/bmw-begins-full-production-of-its-75-mph-ce-04-futuristic-electric-motorbike/ RIVIAN WILL START SELLING ELECTRIC VANS TO NON-AMAZON COMPANIES IN 2023 - Rivian says it will start taking orders for its electric delivery vans in 2022 and will deliver them to fleet customers in “early 2023,” calling into question the status of Amazon's exclusive rights to the vehicle. - It also said it will sell fleet versions of its R1T electric pickup truck and R1S electric SUV, meaning it will compete with Ford's commercial version of the F-150 Lightning, as well as a fleet management platform called FleetOS and a charging infrastructure solution. - Rivian's ability to make vehicles at scale is still unproven; it has only just started making and delivering the R1T and is still preparing the delivery van for mass production. - The new section of Rivian's site, which was tweeted by communications director Amy Mast, says customers will be able to use an “online fleet configurator to plan and place your fleet order” in “early 2022,” and that “[d]eliveries of the [van] are scheduled to begin in early 2023.”     · Original Source : https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/8/22765853/rivian-fleet-sales-amazon-exclusivity-van-r1t-r1s MOST F-150 LIGHTNING BUYERS GET AUGMENTED REALITY INTRO - Ford already has more than 160,000 reservations for its 2022 F-150 Lightning electric pickup, due for deliveries starting in 2022. Yet of the retail reservation-holders in that crowd, a recent survey suggested that nearly 80% have never owned a battery electric vehicle before. - Ford is launching an augmented reality (AR) experience that it says “will offer these knowledge-hungry customers an immersive, informative experience on the all-new F-150 Lightning.” - it's powered by Google Cloud and takes the form of thirteen interactive animations about everything from the frunk and battery range to charging—and the ProPower Onboard power takeoff plus, perhaps, the Lightning's potential as home power backup. Visitors also have the ability to select a color and trim—base, XLT, Lariat, and Platinum—for the truck and place it “anywhere in their own environment,” - Ford also says that its survey results suggest that 56% of F-150 Lightning reservation-holders haven't ever owned a Ford vehicle.  Original Source : https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1134108_most-f-150-lightning-intenders-are-ev-newbies-so-ford-is-helping-them-get-ready-with-ar GAC AION MODEL FIRST IN CHINA  WITH 1,000 KM RANGE - Longer range is the quest of electric vehicle (EV) companies, and now GAC Aion brings the competition to 1,000 kilometers. The Aion LX Plus from GAC's new energy vehicle subsidiary recently made it to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) product announcement in China with a 144.4 kWh battery pack, an energy density of 205 Wh/kg, and an impressive NEDC range of 1,008 km. - Entering the MIIT product announcement is the last major regulatory process for a model to become available in China, meaning local consumers are only a few months away from having an EV with a range of over 1,000 km. - The Aion LX Plus is an upgraded version of the currently available Aion LX, with a length, width and height of 4,835/1,935/1,658mm, a permanent magnet synchronous motor with 180 kW of power and a top speed of 170 km/h. - The Aion LX Plus is expected to be unveiled during the Guangzhou Auto Show on November 19, and its price information is currently unknown. For reference, the price range of the Aion LX is RMB 229,600 ($35,900) -349,600. Original Source : https://cnevpost.com/2021/11/08/this-gac-aion-model-will-be-first-available-in-china-with-nedc-range-of-over-1000-km/ GEELY TO LAUNCH 5 EV MODELS WITH BATTERY SWAPPING TECH BY 2023 - The Smart Geely 2025 strategy presented by Geely Auto Group outlined several initiatives aimed at increasing the automaker's sales, and among them is the plan to have 5,000 battery swapping stations deployed across 100 cities by 2025, the company said in a statement. - At present, the Geely Technology Group has already established approximately 100 battery-swapping stations across China, and these can swap batteries from vehicles in just 59 seconds with the use of automated technologies which allow for safe operation, says Geely. With this system, the driver of the electric vehicle simply drives into the station for the swap, and leaves the station without having to exit their vehicle. - Battery swapping will be for selected vehicle platforms in the Geely product line, and currently will not include models built on the SEA (Sustainable Experience Arhcitecture) platform as they have been designed with integrated battery technology with the aim of producing the lightest vehicle architecture possible. Original Source : https://paultan.org/2021/11/09/geely-to-launch-5-ev-models-with-battery-swapping-tech-by-2023-full-battery-charge-in-under-1-minute/ EVGO EXPANDS DEAL WITH UBER, GROWING EV CHARGING NETWORK WITH GM Original Source : https://www.bizjournals.com/losangeles/news/2021/11/09/evgo-expands-deals-with-uber-gm.html BP PARTNERS WITH BATTERY-SWAPPING COMPANY AULTON FOR JOINT BUSINESS Original Source : https://autonews.gasgoo.com/new_energy/70019092.html TERRA 360'S EV CHARGING SPEED UNMATCHED, BUT IS IT A GOOD THING? Original Source : https://www.ameinfo.com/tech-and-mobility/terra-360s-ev-charging-speed-unmatched-but-is-it-a-good-thing/ MOST ELECTRICITY IN INDUSTRIALIZED NATIONS COULD BE FROM WIND AND SOLAR, STUDY SHOWS Original Source : https://www.sciencealert.com/almost-all-industrialized-nation-electricity-demands-can-be-met-by-wind-and-solar BORGWARNER TO SUPPLY NEW 800V SIC INVERTER TO GERMAN OEM Original Source : https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/11/20211107-borgwarner.html QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns on Monday 22nd November after my short holiday. Email me a suggestion for a possible question and I might pick yours!  hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Scuderia F1: Formula 1 podcast
Red Bull team orders? | Mazepin wants a 'better team' | Mexico GP Preview

Scuderia F1: Formula 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 92:50


Tonight there's much to discuss including our preview of this weekend's Mexican Grand Prix and the possibility of Red Bull issuing team orders to their drivers. We also discuss Nikita Mazepin's wish for a 'better team', demand for 2022 Miami GP tickets, and rumour the VW board will meet to decide this month on whether they will enter F1 in 2026. All this and more on the podcast that is always up to speed with Formula 1! Contact & Feedback: Find us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you enjoy podcasts Website: http://www.scuderiaf1pod.com Email: scuderiaf1pod@gmail.com YouTube: http://ow.ly/gerq50CxM5S Twitter: @ScuderiaF1Pod Facebook: Scuderia F1 Podcast To advertise on this show, please visit https://www.advertisecast.com/ScuderiaF1 or email Overtime@AdvertiseCast.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 2 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 24:57


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Definitely, it's a history book, but it's not, because you really do get that flavor for who they are or what they were passionate about or what they were trying to express. I'm just curious; how did you distill all of this into counterculture? Was that something that you decided in a brainstorm? You could have come up with a lot of different things. Cindi: I'm going to let Susan to take that, because—and I admit this freely—I had a very specific idea of what the counterculture was and how people slotted into that. Through Susan and Damian, my understanding of the counterculture was broadened in such an incredible way. They really pushed me to open up my mindset and think about it in many different, layered ways, and I have benefited from that dramatically. So, Susan led that. Susan, I'll turn it over to you. Susan: O.K., and I'll try and answer. We had decided to focus on the 60s and 70s and limit it to that time period. That was the counterculture time period, and as I said before, there are so many in the craft world, which I was participating in during that time, that reflect the sensibilities of the counterculture. As we were interviewing these people, what was really interesting is that many of them didn't necessarily think of themselves of part of the counterculture. They thought of themselves as hardworking jewelers that couldn't be part of the counterculture because that was the dropout, don't do anything, take drugs part of the world. But that wasn't really the counterculture.  The counterculture was especially young people who were opposed to the way that people were living their lives. That got really defined in the 50s, which was a very austere, go to work, make money, buy a refrigerator, get a house and even if it was killing you, do this kind of life. They said, “We don't want that. We want a life that feels meaningful to us, that has real value.” In all kinds of different ways, that was what the counterculture consisted of: thinking in a different way about how life could be for us, something that's meaningful, something that you love doing, something that has some consideration of ecology and equal rights and all of the counterwar attitudes reflected in it. That was really what people wanted to do. The counterculture is big and broad.  A lot of people who thought, for example, that Fred Woell was a Boy Scout. If you asked Fred or you saw his papers or you asked his wife, “What kind of car did Fred drive?” A VW van. What kind of food did he eat? Natural foods. Did he build himself a house? Yes, he did, with solar panels on it. He was a counterculture guy. He just looked like a Boy Scout. A lot of the things you learn in the Boy Scouts were actually part of the counterculture, too, the survival skills and all of that. It's a funny thing to say, but I think in the process of writing this book, we convinced a lot of the jewelers we interviewed that they were part of the counterculture even though they hadn't realized it themselves either. Sharon: That's interesting. Did you enter this process thinking that these people were part of the counterculture, or was that something that came to you as put everything together? Susan: I think it was kind of there from the beginning, but not really. I think we discovered it along the way. In fact, I don't think we were thinking about having the word counterculture in the title. I think for a long time we thought it would be “American Jewelry in the 60s and 70s.” I think it was a provocative idea to put counterculture in the title. It might be that it was a bad idea because, as Cindi said, a lot of people have a narrow point of view as to what the counterculture is, but I hope that if anybody decides to pick up the book, they can find a much broader definition, which I think is the real definition. To limit it is not fair to the expression. Sharon: I think the book does broaden the definition. Before reading the book or looking at the book, I entered into it thinking of Sausalito. I grew up on the West Coast, so to me, the counterculture was Sausalito. My family and I drove through there once when I was a young person, so that was the counterculture, or Berkeley was the counterculture. I Googled the word counterculture, and it's interesting because it goes through all different periods of history that were counterculture. It wasn't just the 60s and 70s. Who did you feel it was wrenching to leave out of the book when you had make some decisions? Cindi: Before I would answer that specifically, to give a little more context, there were a number of jewelry artists who were personally active in all the ways we were highlighting in this book, but their jewelry itself didn't reflect that. We had long debates about how to deal with that. Ultimately, for better or for worse, it came down to the fact that at the end of the day, the book was about the jewelry. It was rooted in the actual works of art. There were artists whose jewelry did not reflect their personal lives. With those artists, we were able to include them in the book in terms of quotes and information that helped set the stage and provide information, whether it was about things from their own lives, if they were professors, what was in their program, but their jewelry wasn't necessarily featured. I'm thinking of someone like Eleanor Moty, who was incredibly helpful in terms of the interview that Susan did and being a sounding board, but her jewelry didn't make it into the book pictorially. There were others who were also like that.  I think I wouldn't necessarily call it gut-wrenching, but it was something we struggled with over a period of time, because these were artists who were very active; they were active in shows; they were teaching; they were going to Summervale; they were going to SNAG, some of them, some of them not. For me, Wayne Coulter is probably the big regret. I did an extensive interview with Wayne and his wife, Jan Brooks, and it was a great interview. He was very involved with Summervale, and a lot of his jewelry would have fit pictorially in the book, but we were never quite able to get the images and the materials we needed to include the jewelry. He's included, as is Jan, in terms of quotes and things like that. For me, that would be one that I regret. Sharon: This is not to say anybody's second tier. I don't mean that. Cindi: Oh no, not at all. Sometimes there are practicalities. This is a time when a lot of the artists don't even know, necessarily, where their jewelry from the late 60s or early 70s resides. Maybe they had slides of it, but those slides may not exist, or they may have been completely discolored. There were practical issues that made certain pieces and/or certain artists—we were unable to go as far as we wanted to. Susan, what do you think? Susan: Yeah, I completely agree with all that. I would say that we interviewed a lot of people that didn't get in the book. There was a lot of jewelry that started up right at the very end of the 70s and went into the 80s. We squeaked in a couple of those people, but what you have to think about is that we're showing you or talking about examples of people in various phases. Some people were very political. Some people weren't so political in their work necessarily, but they lived a counterculture lifestyle and participated in counterculture activities, and it shows up in their jewelry but not as strongly as in others. We tried to give a mix of examples of the things we were talking about, but as Cindi said, there were lots of people we interviewed that never showed up in the book. We must have interviewed Laurie Hall, for example, about three times. Her work isn't in the book, but Damian went on to write about her. That book will be coming out in the fall. We acquired an awful lot of information that didn't ever get in the book and people we interviewed that didn't get in the book. You just have to go with the most obvious choices at a certain point and think of them as examples of other people that you could have included, but you didn't. Maybe some people were upset by that, but you do have to make some decisions. As Cindi said, there are certain practical limitations. Sharon: I think I gave a birthday party when I was 13, and I was so traumatized by having to make decisions about the guest list. I always wonder about it, if you make decisions about who to put in and who to leave out. Do you know the name of the book about Laurie Hall? What's it called? Susan: It's called North by Northwest: The Stories of Laurie Hall. Or maybe The Jewelry of Laurie Hall. Sharon: That leads into my next question. Is there going to be a part two or an addition to the book you just wrote, In Flux? There's so much more material. Susan: Definitely, there's more material. Somebody needs to look at African-American jewelers. We barely got to include some aspects of that. Native American jewelers, too, have a whole history that we didn't really cover at all. These things are whole topics unto themselves, really. We hope someone will take up the mantle and find out more about that. There's a huge amount of continuing research. We don't have any plans to do that, so anybody listening can definitely take it up. Go for it. It's up to you. Sharon: It sounds like a great PhD project. Cindi: Yeah, it can be a PhD thesis. There could be a series of articles. It doesn't have to be a big book about something. You could do all whole symposium based on this topic. You started off with a question about our jewelry journey. I think this is and will be, for all of us, an ongoing journey. Susan and Damian have written this book on Laurie Hall. There will be other threads that, either collectively or individually, we'll want to take up in continuing our own journey off of this book, areas that piqued our interest and we'll go from there. As Susan said, we're hoping people will pick up the mantle. One of the things we learned through this process, and it's probably a lesson that should have been obvious to us beforehand, but the field of American jewelry is a young field. For most of its history, there have been dominant narratives. I'm part of that group of people who have helped with those dominant narratives. As a field evolves, you lay down the baseline, then you focus on individual artists, then you go back and start to layer in additional histories in a way that you can actually understand the full field. A lot of the artists we included in In Flux worked on the outskirts of what was previously the dominant narrative. I think as we proved, that doesn't make their work any less significant, influential, etc. from artists who were part of the dominant narrative. It's a phenomenal way for the field to continue to grow. I hope that as more institutions of all types focus on contemporary jewelry, it will engender additional layers of that story which will continue to propel the field forward. Sharon: Cindi, I noticed that when you look the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston website, you've been involved in a lot of online programming and symposia and things I didn't realize. I'm wondering when you're going to have a symposium on this subject. Cindi: It would be terrific. Up to this point, Susan and I have been invited to give talks. We did one with Craft in America last fall. We did with MAD. We've been invited on your jewelry podcast. I'm also going to be speaking for the Seattle Metals Guild Symposium next month. I would love to do a symposium. For me, in order to do a symposium right, it's not just about getting speakers together, which you can do virtually, but it's really about them coming together and having that in-person experience where you can have breakout sessions; you have the conversations in the hallways, all of those kinds of things. I would absolutely love to do that when it's safe to do it, which is not to say that—there are no current plans. I think our virtual talks have been fantastic, but it would be great to gather the tribe, so to speak, to gather people we interviewed for this book, to gather people who are interested and to share a day or two together to dive into this. I hope that can happen. Certainly, the door is open to it. I just think right now we're still figuring out what we can do in person and what we can't. Susan: I know many of those people are quite elderly at this point in time. Even as we were writing the book, people were dying. Cindi: Yeah, Ed Woell died. Ron Hill died, and now Nancy Gordon has died. Susan: Mary Tompkins passed away. Cindi: Mary Tompkins passed away. Several people had already passed away, but this history will not be quite the same unless people go and interview these older makers soon. This is part of the problem: with them dies a huge amount of information. It's impossible to know anything concrete about a jeweler unless you actually talk to them. Anyway, I hope that if people do want to take up this mantle or if they do a symposium, they do it soon, because they may be all gone by the time we get there. Sharon: People do it on Cartier and Renee Beauvois, and they're not around. Susan: They also kept better records and took better photographs. With those wealthy jewelry companies, it's very different than being a unique maker on your own in your little studio. Many of these people weren't even taking photographs of the work at the time necessarily, or if they were, certainly they were not great ones. They just clicked on a photo link on a slide back. This is not the wealthy, recorded advertising world of Cartier. This is a very different world. Cindi: As someone who has done a Cartier exhibition, I can also tell you that it's about the firm and about styles. You don't learn about who the individual designers were of X, Y and Z pieces, but Susan's right. For artists who are listening to this, it is incumbent upon you to document your work. Today, there are obviously tools that artists from the 60s and 70s could not have availed themselves of, which would have made it much easier. So, document your work, keep track of your work and update the way you document it, so that somebody 30 or 40 years from now who is wanting to do something in depth on you is not having to battle with an old technology that nobody knows how to use anymore, which then can make things invaluable. I'm old school. I'm a big believe in paper. I know that is completely against the way the world works, but I am wary. I have experience with recorded, even digital formats, that we don't have the equipment to use anymore; nobody knows how to use it. If you have a paper printout, you're never going to have that problem. I know that this is environmentally incorrect, that everybody's moving towards digital files. I have them myself, but I still like paper because it's what's going to be preserved for history. Sharon: That's very good advice about documenting. It benefits the artist now and makes life easier for those who follow as historians and people who want to look at it academically. Susan and Cindi, thank you so much for being with us today. It was so interesting. Susan, we look forward to your next part, 1A I guess we'll call it. Thank you so much. Susan: Thanks for having us, Sharon. It's been wonderful. Cindi: Thank you, Sharon. Sharon: Delighted to have you. Cindi: Please do let your audiences know that the book is widely available. My plug on all these things is that we know you can buy books from Amazon. Please buy your book from a local independent bookseller, or even better, come to the MFAH's website. You can buy it off of our website, which goes to support our museum's programs.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

The People's Car
60. We must have had 60 cars by now...

The People's Car

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 77:58


We talk about some new shit but most of all we just run through some of the 60 cars Danny and I have had in the past few years. 60!

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1266: VW, Ford Both Credit Tesla For EV Success | 03 Nov 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 24:21


Show #1266 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Wednesday 3rd November. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. VOLKSWAGEN ID.5 ELECTRIC CAR WILL RIVAL TESLA MODEL Y IN 2022 - VOLKSWAGEN has taken the covers off its new ID.5 electric SUV-coupé, which features sleeker styling, a 323-mile range and slightly upgraded tech compared to its ID.4 sibling. Both models could be considered rivals to the Tesla Model Y, which arrives in the UK from early 2022, as well as the Hyundai Ioniq 5, Kia EV6 - As the ID.5 is based on the same underpinnings as the recently-launched VW ID.4, the engineering and overall footprint is the same. It's only in profile and from the rear that the ID.5's visual differences become apparent; rather than a truncated hatchback rear end, the ID.5's roofline slopes down towards a rear spoiler atop the boot-lid. - One key difference between the ID.5 and ID.4 is that the former gets just a single (77kWh) battery option. The range is divided into three basic levels when it comes to powertrains — Pro, Pro Performance and GTX. - In Pro and Pro Performance models, a single electric motor drives the rear wheels delivering 172bhp and 201bhp, respectively. At the top of the tree, the GTX gets dual motors, one acting on the front axle and the second on the rear, making it all-wheel drive. Total power output of the GTX is 295bhp, which is enough to propel it from 0-62mph in 6.3 seconds — over a second slower than the Tesla Model Y Long Range and 2.6 seconds slower than the Model Y Performance. Original Source : https://www.driving.co.uk/news/new-cars/2022-volkswagen-id5-details/ Volkswagen ID.5 and ID.5 GTX: price, specs and release data - While the ID.4 can charge at a maximum of 120kW, the ID.5 accepts up to 135kW of power. That means an 80% top-up at a fast-charger takes just 26 minutes, compared to 35 minutes for the ID.4. VW's other ID. models will soon be able to charge at the higher rate, as the brand is rolling out an update. - Coupe-SUVs command a premium over the boxier models on which they're based, so you can expect the ID.5 to start from around £47,000. You'll be able to order the Volkswagen ID.5 in early 2022 and at that point we should have full prices and specifications. Original Source : https://www.carbuyer.co.uk/volkswagen/303582/volkswagen-id5-and-id5-gtx-price-specs-and-release-date VW ID.5 RWD And ID.5 GTX AWD Electric Crossover Coupes Are Here - Customers who will opt for the ID.5 GTX will need to settle for a lower estimated range of 480 km (298 miles) compared to the RWD models, but the performance gains and all-weather capability appear worth the upgrade.  The ID.5 GTX also features some subtle design upgrades over the regular ID.5, including sportier bumpers (with integrated DRLs at the front), IQ.Light LED matrix headlights, LED taillight clusters with a 3D design, dual-tone paints, and  a performance-themed cockpit. - The VW ID.5 and ID.5 GTX will launch in Europe in early 2022, but the automaker said nothing of a US debut. However, the dual-motor AWD powertrain of the ID.5 GTX is already available stateside in the ID.4 AWD Pro and Pro S. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/545110/vw-id5-id5-gtx-debut TESLA PLANT COULD THREATEN YOUR FUTURE, VW CEO TELLS GERMAN WORKERS - Volkswagen AG Chief Executive Officer Herbert Diess urged German workers to prepare for a deeper overhaul to remain competitive when Tesla Inc. ramps up vehicle production at its first European factory outside Berlin next year. - Tesla is swiftly improving quality and looks set to achieve a production time of just 10 hours per car at its Gruenheide plant, Diess said Thursday in a prepared speech at a staff meeting in Wolfsburg. - VW's new works council chief Daniela Cavallo called on Diess to focus his attention on resolving the persistent chip shortage that hit VW harder than Tesla or BMW AG instead of engaging in social media activities. - “I'm often being asked why I keep comparing us with Tesla; I know that it's annoying some people,” Diess told workers. “But it's my task and that of the entire management to assess the competition correctly, to prepare the group for it and make it future-proof.” Original Source : https://eu.detroitnews.com/story/business/autos/foreign/2021/11/04/tesla-plant-could-threaten-your-future-vw-ceo-tells-german-workers/6284035001/ VOLKSWAGEN COMMITTEE TO DISCUSS FUTURE OF CEO DIESS - A specially convened Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) committee will discuss the future of CEO Herbert Diess, three people familiar with the matter said on Wednesday, a week after a longstanding conflict with labour representatives flared up again. - The planned meeting of the rarely-summoned mediation committee of VW's supervisory board comes in response to tensions between management and its works council, after sources said Diess told a recent meeting of the board that 30,000 jobs were at risk as part of the group's electric vehicles push - The escalation of the tussle over Diess's future underscores the fragile balance of power at the world's second-largest carmaker, pitting Diess' ambition to make Volkswagen more competitive with Tesla (TSLA.O) against Germany's influential trade unions. - Diess, 63, has been singling out Tesla's success as a benchmark for Volkswagen, hailing the efficiency and lean management of entrepreneur Elon Musk's company, which has drawn the ire of labour representatives who fear this will lead to major job cuts. Original Source : https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/exclusive-volkswagen-mediation-committee-discuss-future-ceo-diess-sources-2021-11-03/ WORKS COUNCIL CONFLICT AT VW CONTINUES TO ESCALATE - Until the mediation committee reaches a result – possibly by the beginning of December – important decisions in the operative business will be suspended. These include investments that have not yet been approved. For this reason, some insiders say that the company is currently “blocked”. - Herbert Diess wants to continue to focus the company on electromobility and, for example, strengthen in-house software development. In addition, the plants are to become more efficient – the conflict with the works council recently escalated at the main plant in Wolfsburg. The works council did not oppose the change to electromobility, but rather the way Diess is pushing his course. - As reported, a compromise had emerged that Wolfsburg could receive the overflow production of the ID.3 and ID.4 from Zwickau – and would thus enter electric car production before the electric vehicle flagship announced for 2026. The so-called planning round, in which Volkswagen distributes models among the worldwide plants (and thus influences their capacity utilisation) had to be postponed most recently from mid-November to December. Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2021/11/04/works-council-conflict-at-vw-continues-to-escalate FORD CEO JIM FARLEY SAYS TESLA, RIVIAN, AND VW ARE MAJOR THREATS Original Source : https://fordauthority.com/2021/11/ford-ceo-jim-farley-says-tesla-rivian-and-vw-are-major-threats/ FORD CEO WARNS EMPLOYEES TO TAKE TESLA, RIVIAN, VW SERIOUSLY Original Source : https://eu.freep.com/story/money/cars/ford/2021/11/04/ford-ceo-jim-farley-tesla-electric-vehicles-rivian-vw/6250863001/ FORD'S 281-HP ELECTRIC CRATE MOTOR COSTS $3,900 AND YOU CAN BUY ONE NOW Original Source : https://www.thedrive.com/news/42974/fords-281-hp-electric-crate-motor-costs-3900-and-you-can-buy-one-now CHINESE CONSUMERS' FAVORITE EV BRAND IS NOT TESLA Original Source : https://www.benzinga.com/news/21/11/23847294/chinese-consumers-favorite-ev-brand-is-not-tesla-or-nio-but-this-warren-buffett-backed-company MORE PLUG-IN VEHICLES TO BE REGISTERED IN 2021 THAN THE WHOLE OF THE LAST DECADE Original Source : https://www.smmt.co.uk/2021/11/more-plug-in-vehicles-to-be-registered-in-2021-than-the-whole-of-the-last-decade/ TESLA HIKES PRICES ON MODEL 3 / MODEL Y AGAIN Original Source : https://www.thestreet.com/tesla/news/tesla-hikes-prices-on-model-3-model-y-again-tsla TESLA OWNER MANAGES TO INSTALL REGULAR STEERING WHEEL ON MODEL S PLAID Original Source : https://electrek.co/2021/11/03/tesla-owner-install-regular-steering-wheel-model-s-plaid/ TESLA'S LATEST PATCH HINTS AT CLOUD-SYNCED DRIVER PROFILES Original Source : https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/03/teslas-latest-patch-hints-at-cloud-synced-driver-profiles/ PANASONIC MOVES TOWARD MASS PRODUCTION OF TESLA'S NEXT-GEN BATTERIES Original Source : https://asia.nikkei.com/Editor-s-Picks/Interview/Panasonic-moves-toward-mass-production-of-Tesla-s-next-gen-batteries FISKER OCEAN WILL USE CATL CELLS, CHARGE AT MORE THAN 250 KW Original Source : https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1134050_fisker-ocean-will-use-catl-cells-charge-at-more-than-250-kw NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM With the COP26 climate summit now underway in Scotland, what would you like to tell the politicians or the rule makers about electric cars? Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3193 - Mercedes-AMG Unveils New SL Roadster; Tesla Triples VW's Profit Per Vehicle; Toyota Reveals More bZ4X Details

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 12:06


- Volvo Launches IPO - Peugeot Introduces Electric 208 In Brazil - SK Innovation Invests in Solid State Battery Startup - Hyundai Partners with Solid State Battery Startup - Tesla Triples Volkswagen's Profit Per Vehicle - Mercedes-AMG Unveils New SL Roadster - Honda Expands Battery Swapping Business - Toyota Reveals More bZ4X EV Details - You Said It!

Autoline Daily
AD #3193 - Mercedes-AMG Unveils New SL Roadster; Tesla Triples VW's Profit Per Vehicle; Toyota Reveals More bZ4X Details

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 12:06


- Volvo Launches IPO- Peugeot Introduces Electric 208 In Brazil- SK Innovation Invests in Solid State Battery Startup- Hyundai Partners with Solid State Battery Startup- Tesla Triples Volkswagen's Profit Per Vehicle- Mercedes-AMG Unveils New SL Roadster- Honda Expands Battery Swapping Business- Toyota Reveals More bZ4X EV Details- You Said It!

FounderQuest
Talking SaaS With Garrett Dimon

FounderQuest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 47:11


Show notes:Links:Garrett DimonMinitest HeatHeat Map Reporter for MinitestReviewStarting & SustainingSifter AppAutomated transcript (only about 70% accurate)Ben  Welcome to FounderQuest, this has been Today, I'm interviewing Garrett Diamond Star and josh are taking the day off and I get a chat with Garrett, who's a longtime friend of mine and fantastic entrepreneur and all around great person in the world, so I'm excited to have you here. Gary, Thanks, Garrett  thanks for having me. Ben  It's always fun catching up with you. I think the last time we chatted was business of software a few years ago, wasn't it? Garrett  Yeah, not frequently enough, Ben  so that was, yeah, definitely not frequent enough. One thing I most remember about that business of software was that was when the hurricane was coming through and so I was standing out there in boston with all the wind and the Garrett  right, having grown Ben  up in the south, that was kind of ironic that I was there in the northeast and getting a hurricane. Mhm. So have you been Garrett  three, so just uh probably about the same as everybody else man, you know, just kinda one day at a time and keeping it going um and yeah, I just kind of dabbling and exploring and for once the last year just kind of let myself be undirected and just kind of followed what was interesting and pulled on threads and uh a little unnerving but also kind of nice and refreshing, I don't know, you know, so kind of bouncing around like a ping pong ball. Ben  Well, that's, that sounds pretty cool. Well, let's talk about that in a minute. I want to catch people up so I'm sure most people know you, but just for those who don't. So Garrett again, it's been a long time entrepreneur I think. I think I first bumped into you with doing sifter, your, your, your app from a few years ago, you built that from scratch solo entrepreneur and then you sold that. Then you're, you're at post uh, postmark for awhile for that. Right. Garrett  Well, wild bit at large, but primarily on postmark. Yeah. Ben  Okay. Right. Right. So you're a while, but for a while and then I guess it was a couple of years ago now that you've left wild. Garrett  Yeah, it's been about . years, I guess. No. Okay. Ben  Yeah. And so I guess also during that time you kind of did the starting and sustaining books slash video series slash thing. That was cool. Garrett  Yeah, I've been dabbling in all that, trying to share my battle wounds so that other people can maybe avoid them or less than them. Ben  Yeah, that's awesome. I remember, I remember buying that. It's good, good stuff. So also linked in the show notes. Maybe we'll get a sailor to uh, you spoke, you spoke at Microsoft a few times or at least once that I can remember Garrett  I can't even keep track now. Microsoft spoke once attended a couple of times. Yeah. Ben  And so now you're doing some, some interesting stuff. So I remember, remember when you left a wild bit, you were, you're really interested in getting started on helping amputees have a community and so you started adapted, right? So, we're gonna talk about that for a second, and then we can talk about, you know, how that plan kind of changed for you with the passage? Garrett  Um, I mean, so I'm a left below knee amputee. And when I was trying to make that decision, I couldn't find any information on what life is really like as an amputee, um, let alone specific information about, can I play basketball still, if so, how does that work? Or what other activities can I do? And there's just not a lot of detailed information, and with disability, even just within amputees, the range is incredible, like above me and bologna makes a complete difference in how you function and your body mechanics, and so I just couldn't find this information out there. And so that kind of planted the seed that obviously it's not out there and, you know, it's woefully under informed, which at first was kind of scary, it's like, oh, I guess nobody does any of this stuff Garrett  and for me, the whole, ironically, the whole point of amputating was so that I could get back to doing things because of my ankle fusion was horrible and all that, it's just hurt and was miserable and through the whole thing, I was blogging about it, and what would happen is people would email me because they'd go on google and search for amputation, ankle fusion, that kind of thing, and then they'd ask me like, I'm, because I was the only person that came up and I would get these emails, you know, it kind of varies and go ebbs and flows, you know, to a month, once a week, you know, so frequently enough. Um, and uh, one uh, young woman that reached out to me, she actually amputated and then just won a couple of gold medals in the paralympics and like, Garrett  it just blew my mind is like, how do you find the answers to this stuff? And uh, after being an amputee now about five years and trying stuff and just kind of figuring it out. Uh, my hope was originally, I was like, well, I'm a software developer, I'll build a platform so people can share that information, um, you know, and I figured I was really optimistic about that specifically, because, well I built sifter and rails has gotten way better and I learned a ton from sifters, it'll be way easier this time around, but I didn't really account for was now I've got a family and I'm  years older, uh and so it's been more challenging at the end of the day, I'm just tapped on software because I'm doing that all day and my brain is fried. Garrett  Um, but I've been doing videos kind of explaining this stuff to people about how legs work and the logistics of like how they change your body mechanics and um, how to do things like go to the beach and deal with sand in your foot and that kind of stuff. Uh, and I did that more is like an exploratory whimsical thing because that was the kind of content I hope people would create and put on the platform. So then you could filter and say, here's my disability, here's the activity I want to do. Give me all the information about that specific thing. Um, but I did it and it just kind of left it for a year, but it just kept going and then more people have been contacting me and so now what I'm doing is kind of Garrett  stepping back from the software side of it and I'm just gonna keep recording videos for the next short term, um, and having them produced and that kind of stuff and hopefully increasing the quality and the depth and then doing interviews with other amputees and really kind of getting into more stuff, um, and then eventually circling back to building a platform to help people find the right things that meet their needs and that kind of thing. Um, so, you know, it's, it's, it's been tough. I think the toughest thing is realizing that nonprofit side projects are the hardest thing to make time for, um because it's never going to offset my income or anything. And so like Garrett  now I've kind of been thinking, I guess I need to build a business again. So I've got more ironically more free time um, just because Sassen recurring revenue all that's so great that it would give me the flexibility to do that and to spend more time helping people and building um software and all that. So kind of just juggling things and figuring it out. And that's kind of where a lot of the exploration has come in. I haven't really prescribed where I'm taking things and uh um spending a lot of time dabbling and ruby and getting kind of deeper into it than I ever have previously. And uh exploring video and trying to help people with that stuff. So just kind of playing around and tinkering and trying to make ends meet at the same time and I'll figure it out, I guess Ben  that's cool. There's a whole lot to unpack in there. So let's, let's talk about some of that. So, Some of the, some of the themes, well, at first, I guess I should say I can totally relate to you with the whole, you know,  years later and now, there's. yeah, there's more demands on your time. There's less energy in the body and there's, you know, less energy in the brain probably is more importantly. Um, I've had that, that same thing I recently started picking up some side projects, you know, and like, yeah, they're just, you have fewer hours in the day that you really feel like being really into that kind of mode, you know, that your brain stuff and, Ben  and I've noticed that uh I can tell like when my blood sugar is getting low and now we're like, I've I've used up too many brain cells, I gotta go back and recharge, you Garrett  know? Uh Ben  So it's interesting that dynamics, like, I don't quite have the appetite that I used to have to just dive in and, and, you know, slog away at the keyboard for hours. And then Garrett  for me, it's also been awareness, like, I recognize it more now when I, when I was younger I would push through and be like, oh, grind and hustle and you know, and now I'm like, ok, I need to stop, this isn't, you know, if I don't stop, I'm going to be a complete mess tomorrow and not want to work and not be able to think. And so I catch it earlier and I just stopped and I hate it because I still, like, interested in whatever problem is in my head is still tugging on it and, you know, it's trying to and it's really hard to just turn it off and walk away. Um but I've gotten better at that a little, Ben  One of the things that I've noticed as, as I've gotten older in this tech world. So I guess I've been doing it  years or  years or so, is that, um, uh, so that that energy for doing all the things is not there? Like it used to be, but it seems like the deep thinking is more refined is more home. So like you said, like you're going to be, you know, you're just not going to have the energy, you're not going to be wasted the next day. And I think I've seen that too. And I think it's not just from like the energy of working, it's from the energy of thinking deeply about what's the right solution here, right? Ben  It's not so much like just powering through it. Okay, I'm gonna build this stuff and I'm gonna backtrack and I'm gonna redo and backtrack and redo now. It's like, oh, I'm gonna think about this and I'm going to get it right right? And then you apply that precision cut I guess. Garrett  And for me, the struggle is having the wisdom to recognize they should stop, but I can't turn off the excitement or the interest, right? And so I do still want to work on it. I just know better. And it's hard when those two don't align. Yeah, that's, that's been a struggle. Ben  Yeah, I've seen saying the same thing, but I think my living experience so far has been like the, the eventual outcome is better, even even when I have that, you know, I want to do more, but I don't know, I don't have the energy to more, But having that time to reflect more when I do sit down next time and have that  minutes an hour or whatever, like that time is much better spent coming up with the right solution rather than Garrett  just uh just the other day. I was and I mean, I think we've all had this happen a million times, but this just happened. I don't know, friday, I think banging my head on the desk for an hour and a half on this thing. That just makes no sense. There's a ruby thing like this doesn't make sense. What am I missing here? Like is there some really quirky ruby behavior I don't understand. Um And hour and a half and finally was like, I've got to give up, I've got to stop, this isn't getting anywhere. And it was only like , right? So I still was like, I had time in the day, I was like, I just got to stop The next morning. I sat down with in  minutes, Garrett  like solve cold, right? Like there's no, that was from the time I sat at my desk at the time, I solve the problem and it was just, you've got to step away and clear your head or you know, it just doesn't go well, Ben  yeah, yeah, I've had that same experience so many times and uh I think a lot of times you hear people say yeah just take a break, go for a walk whenever you're like yeah what everyone's gonna power through it but it actually does work Garrett  well for me. Walking doesn't cause then I'll just fix it on it too much and like I need to let go like my brain has to let it go. Um And so for me usually it's more getting a getting a night of sleep um is what kind of resets it for me at least from what I've found. But I've probably every three or four months. It's one of those where like This is going poorly and the next morning less than  minutes it's solved. Uh Ben  Yeah I have that too, like a good night. So definitely goes to reset. The one. The one problem I've had with that though is that then I will wake up at four a.m. I have the solution in my head, I'm like I got to go do it, Garrett  I do that too and for better or worse I don't even fight the sleep anymore, I just get up and go start working. Um And then if I need a nap later or something I just Ben  so be Garrett  it. Uh But like that's so much of that like We're so indoctrinated that like  is when people work. And that's been a really hard thing to let go of two and not feel that way every day and to basically, it's not about like working when you feel like it, but it's not like pushing back when the urge to get something done strikes, like go do it and then circle back, yeah, you know, and get some either for rest or whatever. Um you know, take a long lunch or whatever it is. Uh and that's uh I've found that to be helpful to just to try and not forced to work, but do it when it's fresh in my head and just go, Ben  yeah, yeah, I love having that flexibility as a, as an entrepreneur or business owner and being able to work when it's most effective. So You know, if it's  and then I take a break and maybe come back in a couple hours in the afternoon and then I'm done for the day, that's, it's cool. Right? So I wanted to hit on one other thing from, you're talking about there about with adaptable and you know, I love what you're saying about there's a, there's a software solution here, let me go build that, right? And then over time. Like uh maybe not. And I can totally relate to that because I feel the same way. It's like, oh if there's something missing in the world, there's, there's obviously assad's there that can satisfy that need, but Ben  but in reality like salad, you don't have to go all the way to says, right, you can uh, you can start with, you know, youtube videos or uh, maybe even just a reddit, right? Maybe maybe you're hanging out in the community and on offering back and building up that stuff that you want to see in the world. Garrett  Uh, so there's definitely still an element of that with what I want to do and uh, a lot of it is like, right now I'm focused on videos and more mechanics and uh, you know, here's things to think about if you want to get into mountain biking as an amputee or things to think about with snowboarding or, you know, whatever it is. Um, but there's this whole other facet or many facets really, um, of like limb care and recovery and you know, when you beat your leg up doing something active in a carbon fiber socket all day Garrett  and then you get home and it's destroyed, uh, you know, you got to take care of it. And so there's things like that and there's a financial aspect that like insurance only helped so much with prosthetics and they help with basic, like daily kind of day to day prosthetics, but they don't help if you need more advanced prosthetics, um, for certain activities. And so for that, you're either on your own or you need to find financial assistance and there's a ton of great organizations out there that help with that, but they're all non profits and their websites are less than stellar and less than informative. Um, Garrett  and in a lot of ways it's difficult to find the one that is right for you that will cover the type of equipment you need based on, you know, just your disability fall into the disabilities that they cover. Um, and so there's all these different requirements and details and it's difficult or you forget right, like life happens and some organization has an annual grant cycle and it's in october and then october blows by and you're like, oh crap, I totally forgot to apply for that grant and now you got to wait till next year. And so, you know, my thinking is that it's not just a tool to like educate people and help people find the information. They need something to proactively help reduce friction and remove the barriers that stop people with disabilities from being active. Garrett  Um, and that could be everything from pain to financial stuff to simply, you know, needing somebody to talk to who's done it. Um, and there's just, there's so many solutions and everybody, even within a category of disability is unique, even if they're not unique from the disability perspective, the activity they want to pursue might be more unique. Um, and so it's just really difficult to make it all work and to find answers and you kind of just gotta go try and you know, from experience the first couple of times I try new activity is miserable because I'm just figuring it out and that takes a lot of the fun out of it. And a lot of people like this isn't for me and you know, until you learn Garrett  kind of about that learning curve and how it exists and how it's a lot steeper than it is without a prosthetic or what have you. Um it's tough and it's easy to give up because it hurts and it's inconvenient and you know, there's just you're worried about your prosthetic, right? You've got this $, prosthetic that you need to survive day to day and you're like, oh I'm going to go paddleboarding, so what if it gets wet, can it get wet? I don't know, and there's just so many questions and so many easy reasons to give up or be intimidated and Garrett  you know, it doesn't need to be that way because more more importantly, like once you're in that situation is more important than ever to be active and to stay active and to not let it just lock you down on the couch or something. Um but it's not easy, you know, it's way harder than before and I don't think it needs to be, it doesn't need to be as hard as it is. So yeah, I'm hoping could help people get answers and you know, do their thing, whatever it is that moves them figuratively and literally Ben  yeah, yeah, that sounds like a tagline for the website Garrett  actually. Right. Ben  Right. Garrett  Yeah. Ben  Yeah. I I have uh so we have in our in our family some some experience with a kind of obscure medical issues like uh which is kind of similar to, you know, go into a prosthetic situation, right? Where all of a sudden you're into this community where you have to, you can get the speed really quickly on what does life look like now. And how do I do the things that I want to do and where do I go to find that information? And so often it seems that in our in our experience is that the only people who really know much of anything are the doctors that you're working with or the therapists or the nurses, right? And and they can connect with resources. But like if you just happen to have the wrong, you know, chemistry, Ben  you know, with with someone or you don't just happen to the right person, you can just feel pretty isolated. And uh so I thank you for having having resources for, for that is is so helpful because I've told my wife a number of times like you could write a book on on all the things that you've learned, you know, through this experience. And and then my my my brother's family there was a significant motorcycle accident that left someone with, you know, just a lot of parallelization from the waist down basically and his his, you know, going through all the things that he went through two surgeries and the rehab. And so to get back to a point where he could walk, you know, uh, which was, which was assisted so much by the great people that he had around him. Ben  But fortunately he had them right for those that don't, it's got to be a much, much harder rodeo Garrett  and it's just all over the board. Um, amputations really interesting is what most most frequently right into with people is there surgeon doesn't want them to amputate and is constantly trying to talk them out of it. But after you go through it, I saw my surgeon, I mean, my surgeon, I had to switch surgeons. Um, but he saw me twice after my amputation. He's never seen me with a prosthetic. He has no idea what I'm doing now. And so these people are asking their surgeons about amputation. The truth is the surgeons, unless they're actively helping. Um, you know, in other contexts and volunteering. Uh, they have no clue what life is like after amputation. They might read some stuff, Garrett  right. And you know, there's plenty of paralympians that are amazing. But then you wonder those people edge cases or you know, can anybody run and do that stuff again? Maybe not at that level. Um, and the, your surgeon just doesn't know. And so people are asking the surgeon because that's supposed to be the expert and then the surgeons giving them, I don't want to say bad information but incomplete information. And so it's tough for people because you can't get those answers, you know, and again, every disability so different how it affects people and how your doctor, what their background is in terms of how they understand like being active or you know, doing more than just day to day functioning. All right. Yeah. There's so many layers to it all. Mhm. Ben  So, one thing I wanted to go back to was talking about, you know, the time that you spend on that, obviously it's it's tough when you've got a family, you're the breadwinner. You know, you're trying to build a nonprofit thing. And at some point it sounds like you realize, you know what, I just gotta I gotta do some work. I got to bring the money in the door, right? I can't spend all my time focusing on this this nonprofit platform. So it sounds like you're doing that in your spare time and that you're you're paying the bills of freelancing doing a bunch of bunch of rail stuff. But as you've been doing that, you've actually built some tools that I want to talk about. So it sounds it sounds like Ben  you've been doing this work and this work has prompted you to build the review thing you've been working on. And also the heat map thing for many tests, let's talk about that a little bit. Garrett  Uh Yeah. So the nice thing, the one the only intentional thing I've done the last . years is to try and make sure that whatever I'm doing at all kind of syncs up somehow um and for the most part that was always leading back to ruby and or rails um and you know, so a lot of my client work is helping with legacy apps that are profitable now, but they built the app quickly and there's some, you know, legacy pain that needs to be fixed, re factoring that kind of thing. Um And then there was adaptable where I was starting with a Greenfield fresh modern rails app um and one of them was fun and the other one wasn't and I'll let you guess. Mhm. And so a lot of what I started thinking more about was like how does an app that Garrett  has all this legacy craft get from there to a point where it's not miserable to work on and you know, there's a lot of ways, there's a lot of paths, there's a lot of great books on re factoring um and a lot of that kind of stuff, uh what I started getting more interested in was how we've got all these great letters and static analysis tools for um security for syntax for just cleaning up code, right? And a lot of little auto correct and format stuff for you. Uh and the more I I dabbled with the tools previously but they were always so difficult to use because they're all command line um you know and they all have different syntax, different names for the same flags that do the same thing like Summer Garrett  auto, correct, some are right, some are, you know, and so like you gotta then remember the quirks, they're using the wrong flags with the wrong tools and it just gets tedious, right or like you know, you want to use a dozen tools, but if you run them all at once, like it's going to take  minutes to run through your whole project when really all you want is like just look at the files, I'm about to commit or uh you know look at the files, I just committed and let's do a pass it like with Robocop or whatever, clean them up and then I'll commit a separate one that's just pure clean up, you know, all these kind of things and but it was so tedious, I love these tools but I just wouldn't use them because there was too much friction. Garrett  Uh and so with adaptable and like when I start a Greenfield project, I was like I've got to use these tools from the beginning to make sure that never gets into a bad state because once that ship sails it's too much effort to go back and too much risk to like make those kind of wholesale changes and uh so it started with just that it's like how can I make it easier to use these tools and remove the friction so that they're enjoyable to use and kind of in the back of my mind was because like Guard does a lot of this, right, if you're running guard constantly. Uh But Guard also drove me nuts because it would my fans would spin up and make so much noise and I couldn't concentrate. Um Garrett  and so kind of and I still like guard, but my thinking was what if the tool could be so convenient that you didn't feel like you needed to use guard to watch files as you changed them and that you could do more than just have your automated test front, right? So like what if and I mean there's there's integrations for like Robocop and stuff, but like what if you change five files and you could just run a tool that will automatically run all of the relevant things you have against those files that you updated and potentially auto correct them if you want or um you know, this is all theory and it's it's come together and I'm using it on itself but it's not ready to like use in other projects yet. Um that's kind of the next step. Uh Garrett  But yeah and that's what I just I wanted that I want to be able to take it on a project that's raw and has a ton of craft and then every time I commit basically start cleaning up there and just make sure it doesn't regress, right it only gets better, you know and basically it makes it easier to or hopefully it will make it easier to just make constant steady improvement, right? It's not you run it and then it's like you know the tool just throws up its hands, it's like this code base is a mess, Ben  don't even Garrett  use this tool. Um Instead I want it to be you know what okay make some progress, let's start there and eventually, you know, over the course of a year, two years you're gonna touch so much of the code and eventually it's gonna get cleaner and it's gonna get better right? And it's not just formatting but like you've got things like brake man and things that are for scanning for security issues and all this stuff and there's so much bundler audit right and all these things to make sure that your dependencies and you know there's a lot of great tools out there like code, climate for reporting. But what drives me nuts is when I commit and then it gets to see I Garrett  and then the ci finds the mistake because the tool you don't run it locally like okay well now I've got to fix it and I gotta wait for ci again and like I want all these tools to be so frictionless to use, it never even makes it to see i like CS board because it never has anything to complain about because by the time it gets there it's already perfect. Um So yeah, so that's kind of the that's a reviewer um and it'll hopefully be more like the end of the year. Um And then I've also been obsessed with many tests lately because I used to use ours back and I just it never messed with me. It was too, I don't know, it's Garrett  the way I've always described, feels like it's the only thing in ruby that I feel like is simultaneously very ruby and very un ruby and it's just never worked with my head. Um And all the I'm very dependency averse from years of you know dependency breaks or has a security issue and the chain reaction of things that need to be updated and can't be updated because and so I'm very dependency averse. Um and uh so that's another reason I've gone with many tests because it's just there there's fewer dependencies, it's simpler. Um But many tests output even with all the formatting options out there just always, I felt like I was doing way more work than I should have to to figure out what failed what went wrong and how to fix it Garrett  and so what I've done is really over engineered to test reporter for many tests to uh when a test fails, it kind of catalogs what file was in the stack trace what line number in that file. Um and so what it's doing is in the background, it's kind of building up a heat map of everything that triggered a problem. And it's also differentiating between like failures and exceptions because if your test fails, okay, that's interesting. You want to start with the assertion, what was the assertion that failed? But if there is an exception, then the assertions kind of irrelevant. You want to go dig into the exception. But what if the exception came out of the test, Garrett  then you don't want to waste your time and source code just fix the test. Otherwise you're not. And so it differentiates between failures, a broken test and an exception. And it presents the output differently to kind of guide you in the right direction based on those. And if you've got anything that's failing or broken, it's not going to harass you about skipped tests or slow tests, right? It suppresses those until everything's fixed. And it's like, hey, by the way, you've got four tests here that you've skipped, you need to go right? Those, uh, and actually won't bother you about slow tests until all your skip tests are fixed, Right? Garrett  Uh, and so it kind of lets you focus on what's important at the time without reminding you of the fact that you've got a lot going on that is pending and problematic or whatever it is. Um, you know, so there's a lot of little things like that and like when you make that one change that breaks  things across your whole project, you're renaming a class or whatever it is. Uh And then it's just you will go from like a perfect test suite  failing tests like crap. Okay. Where do I even start? Uh And so the heat map will show you like look all of these problems come back to this one file, you know, whatever it is so you can get to the heart of the matter instead of having to like Garrett  visually scanned through  failures and try to find and recognize a pattern. Uh So it's kind of uh a proactive pattern matching reporter. Um you know with a few other tweaks to just help uh nudge and simplify kind of the output so that you can my hope be, you know, you see a test failure and you know exactly what you need to do to fix it before you even go back to your text editor because you've got enough context. Um And obviously that's not always possible, but more often than not and definitely more often than with just the generic reporter. Uh That's been the case and has been really helpful and saves me a ton of time fishing for what needs to be fixed and what what's worth fixing first and that kind of thing. So I have to think a lot less. Garrett  I just have to go fix it. Ah And so both of those combined are going to kind of I'm hoping work in a way that you know you type R. V. W. And it's just smart and it says here's all your problems. You're like oh my gosh, everything's perfect. But you could stand to improve your documentation here in this file, you're like okay I can do that real quick. Um You know so it kind of nudges you in the right direction without like wearing you out about how horrible your code is. Um Because when you're one of those tools just raw, that's basically what it feels like. It's like oh my gosh I'm horrible. I have no idea, I have no business writing code. Uh Garrett  And that's not a good feeling but if it's like hey you can fix this, here's how okay I can do that. Um You know there's a lot of really interesting ideas. There are like you know you ever run your test suite and it fails and you run it again and it passes. They're like oh crap what was the seed that it used when it failed? And uh so what reviewer does too in the background, it's recording a bunch of history. Um And so it will remember that last failed seed and so you can you be able to type our VW rerun and it would rerun just the failure and let you zero in on that and focus on fixing that. Um So there's a lot of little things like that that Garrett  I just want to make it easier. I mean there's bisect and some great tools out there. Um, but sometimes they're overkill and slow and they take you out of the zone and I want to make it easier to stay in the zone and get things done and get back on track. Ben  That sounds sounds really cool. Yeah, we um, remember having done some a few major rails version upgrades with the honey badger card base, you know, go from  to  or  or whatever it is. And like all of a sudden half your tests, you got thousands of tests and like thousands of them. It's the Garrett  most defeating feeling. You're just like, oh, okay, I quit for today. Ben  Yeah. And then, and then, you know, you dive through all those things like, okay, these all look the same. It's all the same. It's all the same and go and try this thing here and that thing there and oh, I made this one change and now half of those failing tests are now passing okay. Now, you know? So yeah, having the heat map I think is uh, it sounds like a great idea. And then of course, you know, you mentioned, uh, if it's an exception, you know exactly where to go, like it sounds like honey badger, right? You get the context that you need to know what to fix, right, yep. Yeah. Although I must say I'm, I'm an I respect fan Ben  have been for a long time and I've tried, you know, going back to many tests because I'll start your rails app like this, this new side project, I started a few a few months ago, like it's a new rails happen to me, you know, let me try any test again because that's the default and so I'll get in there for a bit. But then like one of the things I've come to realize is that I, what I love about our spec is despite how, you know, I can feel you about the dependency aversion, but at the same time our spec is kind of like a batteries included kind of thing. Like Ben  you've got the mocking right? Not the stubbing, you don't have to worry about what I do. I do, I do many test mock or do I do mocha, you know, like all that's kind of rails itself, right? It's kind of kind of its own duck and it has everything included. So you don't think about, you Garrett  know, and don't get me wrong, I don't dislike our spec, it just doesn't work with my head and like, I just get overwhelmed with how much it has. And so for me with many tests, like you're like, oh, which marked thing to use neither. Like if I feel like I need to mock something, I need to re factor it so it's more easy to test efficiently and directly. Um, because like marks, I mean that has all has its own issues, right? Like uh and so for me uh and and it was very much a mental thing. Like I just fully embraced accepted many tests limitations and now I use that as kind of a nudge to be like, all right, if this is really difficult to do, Garrett  then it's not that I need better testing tools. It's that I need my code to be organized in a way that lets me test this appropriately And efficiently without getting to set up  unrelated models so that it won't fall over. Uh And so that's kind of been more of a philosophical thing for me because previously when I drive many tests, that's exactly how to drive me nuts. I'm like, how the hell do I do any of this? Because my brain what little I did understand of our respect. I had learned to think that way about things. And so then I found myself doing all this like how do you mock in many tests and how do you, And it's like you don't, you know, use mocha or you know what have Ben  you. Garrett  Uh and so kind of accepting that and just saying, you know what, When it, when many test pushes back, I'm going to listen and I'll just re factor. Um and at first was a little painful. But now it actually has been really, really nice. Uh But I will say to a lot of that goes hand in hand with like I've been doing a lot of like deeper deeper reading on ruby and thus kind of understanding patterns, you know being able to see more patterns to re factor like oh this is why this is hard to test really. Just need to re factor using this pattern and take this approach instead or whatever. Um And so that's helped because otherwise I feel like I know I need to change this but I don't even know where to start. Um Garrett  So you know, that's definitely been a philosophical thing I had to accept. Ben  Yeah, that makes sense. So you mentioned code climate and I know, you know in the early days when kokonas started like it was basically a wrapper on top of flay and flaw right and eventually break man and stuff. Right? They assembled all these open source tools and put a nice ui on top of it, which is fine, you know, but you could just run off tools yourself, right? Um But review sounds pretty cool because you're basically giving that code climate kind of experience, but it's on your own right, in your own cli and you could I mean conceivably you could even use it like with left hook or something to do get pre commit kind of thing which might have its own problems but still it's an option. Garrett  It's definitely on the radar, there's a lot of get integration that I'm planning on. So you can do like our VW staged and it'll just look at the staged files or R. V. W untracked, it'll just looked at your file that you haven't staged, That kind of thing. Ben  Super handy. So do you do you see a path where review because there's some sort of commercial component to review or do you think it could always be pure, Garrett  there's, I've got a bunch of ideas that I think could um I mean the core one is just gonna be an open source jim. Um if I do follow any model um you know, it's probably going to be something more like sidekick where there's the core thing that is helpful and useful and free for eternity. Um and then there would be more advanced, either team functionality or kind of sharing of configuration files. Um There's a whole ton of tools that I've thought about building to to um things like if you have an existing app, it kind of auto detect and suggest, hey you might want to use these gems, these tools um obviously it's built in ruby but the idea is that it has to be ruby centric. It's really at the end of the day, it's just a wrapper for command line tools Garrett  that gives you some kind of either pass fail or score output. Um and so like if you've got  tools set up, like one reviewer, I've just gone overboard. Like I'll use everything because I want to kind of test it, you know, and dog food it um And so like if one fails it doesn't bother running the rest of them. And so the idea is if you can figure in the order of priority, like start with bundler audit right? Because if you've got a gym that's out of whack, then you need to fix that because that'll ripple And so it'll just stop there, so you have to wait  minutes for a whole suite to run on a huge project, it just fails immediately, insist fix this and then you fix that and then it runs Garrett  um and then two and this is all theoretical at this point because I haven't played with it, but I've got some, I'm really excited about the idea potentially. Um and I hate to make it ruby three only, but playing with tractors and some some threading and stuff so that you can have Robocop running in parallel with, you know, especially with multi core processors picking up and all this kind of stuff, I feel like there's a lot of potential Like what if you could run  tools in parallel and have the whole thing run in seconds instead of minutes and that could be really cool, There's other challenges there, but um you know that reporting obviously um like code climate, I feel like that's one of code climates really big things, Garrett  but for me the reporting is gonna be more an afterthought, I wanted to be a local thing that you can use friction free and then if people like it, which I hope they will, I mean I'm really excited about, I love using it to build itself, it's been wildly helpful. Um you know, then yeah, I'd start thinking about, you know, what other options are there for, how it could be better um and do even more cool stuff for teams or people who are just really serious about using it or you know, what have you? Ben  Mhm Yeah, I think, I mean I love, I love the sidekick model uh you know, give that great open source core that has great functionality and then build on top of that, you know, things that are useful to people who are going to use it more intensely and I think, I think the psychic definitely has that sweet spot, if it's it's an operations kind of thing where you're gonna be, you're gonna be running this forever in your production environment. So you want to pay that licensing fee, you know, every month, every year or whatever. And then there's also like the ASCII corp model, right? Where they have very, very good open source tools, you know, you can use Packer or Terror Form or whatever, Ben  you know, never paying them a dime but they also have great team collaboration tools if you want to move to their platform, you know, and coordinate your Terror Form running or you know, your console, you know, or your vault or whatever, right? They have a pro or enterprise offering for every one of those that can do additional stuff enhancing it, you know? So yeah, some great options there, Garrett  yeah, you know, I will say to a lot of my Garrett  thinking since selling sifter has been, I don't really want to run a sas app again, uh and I'm sure you can guess all the reasons uh at the end of the day, the simplest thing um and I mean I knew it when I was running sifter but I didn't fully appreciate it was the degree to which I let it change me to notifications and alerts of problems and a never ending fear that as soon as I went camping or hiking out of cell service was the day it was going to fall over in a bad way and uh like it wasn't this like huge thing, but it was just in this like ever present anxiety and after I didn't have that anymore, it was just such a like epiphany Garrett  that was like, I don't really want to go back there and if I build a SAS up, it needs to be something that can be designed in such a way that it's resilient and I know that, you know, if it goes into a certain state and it's like that for six hours or something, nobody's gonna be too upset. Um and I couldn't think of anything and uh so yeah, so then I just started building these gyms and I was like, I'm just gonna build the gyms and see where that takes me. I mean really, I feel like I'm just kind of pulling on a thread right now based on my personal curiosity and then just trying to also keep in mind like let's make sure this would also be useful for other people at some point, wherever that is. Ben  Yeah, I'm of course totally with you on the whole like it's tough to run this as because yeah, it is and yeah, I think about this the other day as this, this side project, I'm working on it, like, well it's it's actually right now just for fun, but of course it's like well how would I how to make money on this if I wanted to? And I could run a sad and this is a sad thing, it integrates with GIT hub. And uh so it's it's definitely a web based kind of stuff you do. Um Ben  but you know, if it went down for a few hours, people wouldn't be screaming like screaming about honey badger going down for a few hours. So like that's like that's okay. And then on the other hand, it's like, well it's it is very tightly integrated to get hub. So I could do a self hosted, here's a doctor image kind of thing, you go run this and it talks to your get up enterprise installation behind your firewall. Right? Ben  So I think, yeah, it's really good for entrepreneurs today who are so low to be thinking about that because there are a lot of options. There's the, you know, there's a psychic model. We just give one some someone some code, right? They license it, they run it and it's it's all them right. Or maybe you build a SAAS app that is also a docker image that they can deploy themselves. Maybe the codes available, you know, as maybe it's an open source thing, even like a matter most right, you can they have a hosted option, they have an open source options, have a self host adoption. Um Yeah, I think really good to be thinking about these things as you're, you know, deciding what you're doing day to day because it does, does affect quality of life. Like Ben  my first thought was, and I was when I think about this says I was like this side project, as I says, I was like, well then I got to have the laptop in the night time because Garrett  I'm like, I think I would much rather have an imac, but like as long as I'm involved in anything that can go offline, I don't think I can survive with just an imac, I've got to have a laptop and like yeah, I don't like that, feel like, I don't know, I mean, I don't think anybody but uh Yeah, Ben  Yeah, well that's, and I sometimes I think about a kind of metal level like oh that's a problem to solve, like how do you help? So the entrepreneurs run saAS operations without having to be, you know, always on like yeah, that's an unsolved problem. If someone solves that, that will be I think worth some. I mean Hiroko has done a pretty good job solving that problem, but it's not % solved yet. Garrett  So Well there's Ben  for me, Garrett  like I built a job board for our community here in the valley um because tourism based economies like the turnover and stuff is high and ah and so like for me I was staying with that and I haven't done this because it's just not critical enough. Um but the only thing I thought it would be like with a job board, if you could have it fall into read only mode where it's basically heavily cached on the front end and that's something that could work. But most apps where you're interacting with them because posting jobs, it's not like you constantly post jobs, you post a job and if you can't post a job right now you can come back in six hours and that's fine. It's not the end of the day, you know, into the world. Garrett  Uh but that's the only thing I've been able to come up with that has felt like it wouldn't be a huge issue as long as you designed and built it, right, so that I could do that. But everything else I'm like, nope, that won't work, That won't work. Like, I think that's why haven't start another business yet is because I've become really picky, like after selling stuff to, I'm like, what do I really want to do and not do again? And so much of the sad stuff while it's great. Um it was just like, it took a toll. Like, it made me not want to do so many things that now I love doing, like camping and hiking and like getting out of cell service. Um, and so I don't want to give that up anymore. Ben  So I guess the moral of the story is do all that kind of stuff when you're in your twenties have plenty of energy, right? You don't hate it yet, right? And then try to come up with something different by the time you're in your s, Garrett  use the experience to uh more wisely choose your battles. Ben  Yeah. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Well, this has been total fun. Yeah. Yeah. Garrett  Glad, Glad to catch up. Ben  Is there anything that we should have talked about that we didn't? Garrett  Oh, probably a ton of stuff. Uh, no, I mean, I wish this stuff was all in a better state. Many test heat is good to use now, I need to add a little bit more exception handling because now every now and then something goes wrong with many test heat and like you can't see your own test failures because it fell over. Uh so that's kind of my next step is to add some resiliency to that so that if it breaks, it says, hey many test heat fell over on this, but your things fine and have some like simple output. So you at least can see something because every now and then I have to go disable it and switch back to the regular reporter so I can actually see the the failure. Um but uh you know, it's ready to use, I'm using it Garrett  every day on all my projects now. Um and it's been pretty, pretty fine. Today was the first time in like a week that I've seen any kind of issue that didn't work so that people can use it. It definitely needs some tidying up and improvements, but that's forthcoming, then reviewer will hopefully be the end of the year will kind of see how, how things shake out with the holidays and all that, how much work I'm able to get done, but um I'm optimistic because I want it, I want to use it on other projects, like every time I go work on reviewer, I'm like, I really wish I had this for my other projects where I've just got dumb scripts that just run the same commands in order and you know, it's close, but it's not the same. Um Garrett  you know, I'm really excited about how much I know it's going to help my day to day work flow and I'm hopeful anybody else that's using rubio find those same benefits. Um And hopefully other languages too. I don't know. I haven't really tried, I mean in theory, javascript and a lot of that stuff will work like with the rails app. Um and like er be learning and and what night. Um So hopefully, but I haven't tried anything wholly outside of a ruby project to see if it could be useful there, but it should be, it's just a wrapper around command line, right? Strings. So hopefully Ben  and then next step V. S. Code plug in right where it's all just running all the time Garrett  code, right? Ben  Yeah, maybe that's your thing you sell. I don't know. Garrett  Yeah. You know, I haven't thought about that too much because most of them you can plug in on their own. Uh But then that gets overwhelming when you're trying to edit your file and it's like just yelling at you about everything. Like just let me think first, then yell at me after the fact after I've like figured it out. Yeah, I'm excited about it. It's kind of the most fun I've had programming in a long time. Um So we'll see. Ben  I love it. Well, scratching your niche is always fun and if you can make some money while you're at it. Hey, even funny Garrett  right? Well and so like that's the thing, like just kind of circle back and wrap it up, like part of it is in order for me to really pursue adaptable, I've got to have some kind of automatic income and like with sifter that would've been perfect, you know, it's recurring revenues, Great. And uh so a lot of it too is like, I'm really gonna unlock adaptable potential. I need to not be, you know, have an income tied to hourly rates. It's got to be divorced from how much time I'm actually sitting at my computer and uh so that's kind of been a driver too, but again, more just wandering and figuring it out, hoping it all comes together somehow. Ben  That's, we're all in the same boat. Garrett  Right, Ben  well, we will definitely link up uh the heat map and review and uh definitely get some people check it out if you're ruby ist and we'll link up your twitter so people can follow you and keep track of what you're doing. Uh Thanks again, yeah, hanging out with, Garrett  thanks. Great to catch up Ben  and thanks everybody for listening Again, you've been listening to found request from the founders of honey badger. We're excited to continue to bring you exciting episodes on podcast and a fantastic product, honey badger of course. So check us out on the bed, radio and you know, as star always says, review as if you like and don't review us, if you don't like, have a great one. 

Autoline After Hours
AAH #577 - Jeep

Autoline After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 67:56


GUESTS: Jim Morrison, Head of Jeep Brand North America PANEL: Mike Austin, Hemmings; Gary Vasilash, on Automotive; John McElroy, Autoline.tv

Let’s Talk Dubs
Ep 147 BMX & VWs with Craig Turner

Let’s Talk Dubs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 39:56


Craig Turner is the Son of Gary Turner of the famed GT bicycles. VWs & BMX have had a long history of cross over. Craig had Gary Turner BMX set up at the Volks Jam VW Show. We sat down and talked about taking over the family legacy. What it takes to make BMX frames in the USA today. He also makes custom frame & fork sets for any size riders. The quality of Gary Turner bikes lives on. He can even build you a custom BMX frame and fork to match your VW's. The pride of the work shows in the builds. Keep it USA Order a bike HERE Follow on Instagram Buy shirts here subscribe to my YouTube here

Alles auf Aktien
Facebooks Tabak-Move und Machtwechsel an der Börsenspitze

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 12:31


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Holger Zschäpitz über gruselige Zahlen bei Apple und Amazon, die Chipkrise bei VW und einen Zahlungsgiganten, der sich mit Krypto verjüngen will. Außerdem geht es um Aurubis, Beiersdorf, Porsche Holding, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Altria, Philip Morris, Mastercard. "Alles auf Aktien" ist der tägliche Börsen-Shot aus der WELT-Wirtschaftsredaktion. Die Wirtschafts- und Finanzjournalisten Holger Zschäpitz, Anja Ettel, Philipp Vetter, Daniel Eckert und Nando Sommerfeld diskutieren im Wechsel über die wichtigsten News an den Märkten und das Finanzthema des Tages. Außerdem gibt es jeden Tag eine Inspiration, die das Leben leichter machen soll. In nur zehn Minuten geht es um alles, was man aktuell über Aktien, ETFs, Fonds und erfolgreiche Geldanlage wissen sollte. Für erfahrene Anleger und Neueinsteiger. Montag bis Freitag, ab 6 Uhr morgens. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören.

Auto Insider
Automakers' US Sales ARE DOWN! (Ford Q3 Profit Falls 24%) + Special Guest Marko - WhiteBoard Finance | Episode 37

Auto Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 32:53


Daily News You Can Use from YAA. Today, Ray and Zach are joined by a special guest, Marko - WhiteBoard Finance. The trio will discuss recent Q3 earnings from major automakers. Ford's profit fell 24%. VW's fell 12%. GM's was down 40%. We'll also discuss Hertz and their partnership with Uber and recent deal with Tesla. It should be an action packed show!

Millionærklubben
Regnskaber og Facebook-nørderi

Millionærklubben

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 54:51


Bodil Johanne Gantzel og Lau Svenssen ser på friske regnskabstal fra bl.a. Carlsberg, Drägerwerk og VW. Med på en telefon leverer Mads Christiansen en fyldig analyse af de 3 elementer, han særligt hæfter sig ved i Facebooks regnskab. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Bremen: Plattdeutsche Nachrichten
Plattdüütsche Narichten vun'n 28. Oktober 2021

Radio Bremen: Plattdeutsche Nachrichten

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 3:29


Lüüd ahn Impfung wüllt sik ok in Tokunft nich impfen laten +++ Düütsche Krankenhüüs hollt Corona-Laag wedder för leeg +++ Flegerboer Airbus böhrt Gewinnziel an +++ Dusende vun Puten starvt bi Füer +++ VW in Emmen wiest för November wedder Kortarbeit an +++ Dat Weer

Alles auf Aktien
Facebooks Filmchen-Wunder und Tesla im Billionen-Club

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 13:57


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Holger Zschäpitz über eine schnöde Absage in der Social-Media-Welt, neue Pläne mit altem Namen bei Facebook und über das diversifizierte Investieren in die spannende Fintech-Welt. Außerdem geht es um Vantage Towers, Siemens Energy, Baidu, ASML, Taiwan Semi, Varta, Social Chain Group, Coinbase, Porsche, VW, SAP, Bitcoin, Ether, PayPal, Pinterest, Hertz, Toyota Motors, Invesco KBW Nasdaq Fintech (WKN: A2DHWJ), Ark Fintech Innovation (WKN: A2PEAN) und Global BIT Fintech Leaders (WKN: A2QJLA). "Alles auf Aktien" ist der tägliche Börsen-Shot aus der WELT-Wirtschaftsredaktion. Die Wirtschafts- und Finanzjournalisten Holger Zschäpitz, Anja Ettel, Philipp Vetter, Daniel Eckert und Nando Sommerfeld diskutieren im Wechsel über die wichtigsten News an den Märkten und das Finanzthema des Tages. Außerdem gibt es jeden Tag eine Inspiration, die das Leben leichter machen soll. In nur zehn Minuten geht es um alles, was man aktuell über Aktien, ETFs, Fonds und erfolgreiche Geldanlage wissen sollte. Für erfahrene Anleger und Neueinsteiger. Montag bis Freitag, ab 6 Uhr morgens. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören.

PeerView Heart, Lung & Blood CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
"Peter A. Kouides, MD - Advancing Treatment of von Willebrand Disease: A Visual Exploration on Personalizing Care With Current and Emerging Management Strategies"

PeerView Heart, Lung & Blood CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 27:39


Go online to PeerView.com/NRZ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, a hematology expert discusses the diagnostic assessment and management of von Willebrand disease, as well as available treatment options and strategies for shared decision-making. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Review the clinical presentation, phenotypic classification, and diagnostic workup of von Willebrand disease (VWD), Assess the latest evidence for available VWD treatments, including recombinant VW factor and other novel strategies, Engage patients and caregivers in shared decision-making to personalize VWD treatment, promote adherence, and minimize complications associated with poor adherence.

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
Motores de 6 cilindros: ¡Los mejores!

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 17:59


Son muchos los técnicos, aficionados y expertos que pensamos que los motores de seis cilindros son los mejores o al menos los más equilibrados. ¿Por qué? Ya hemos hecho vídeos sobre los motores Bóxer, los motores de 5 cilindros y los de 3 cilindros. Pero faltaba éste, el de los motores de 6 cilindros, curiosamente, el que más me habéis pedido. Pero ¡ya está aquí! Y tenéis razón en pedir este vídeo porque sin duda los motores de 4 cilindros son los más extendidos, pero los de 6 cilindros van a continuación y son mucho más refinados que los de cuatro. Alternativas: En línea, en V o bóxer. Hay diversas manera de configurar un 6 cilindros. En su momento los motores de 6 cilindros en línea eran los reyes. Pero no podemos olvidar un motor mítico, el 6 cilindros bóxer del Porsche 911. Y luego tenemos los motores en V. Además, dentro de la disposición en V el ángulo puede variar desde los famosos 6 cilindros de V estrecha de VW con los cilindros formando un ángulo de 14 grados, hasta los 90 grados de motor Mercedes M112 de 1997, muy criticado en su momento. Flexibilidad: De 1,6 a 4,5 litros. Un motor de 4 cilindros tiene una cilindrada máxima operativa de unos 2,5 litros. Hay ejemplos de buenos motores de más cilindrada con 4 cilindros, como el motor de 3 litros del Porsche 968… excepciones que confirman la regla. Por su parte, un motor V8 compensa a partir de una cilindrada de 3 litros o mejor 3,5 litros… Poder, se pueden hacer más pequeños, Morbidelli hizo un V8 de solo 850 cm3 y 120 CV. Una miniatura. Más aún la Moto Guzzi de 1955 con 8 cilindros cada uno de sólo 62,31 cm3 y que llegó a ofrecer 80 CV a 14.000 rpm. Pero un motor de 6 cilindros se encuentra cómodo con cilindradas que van desde los 1.8 litros a los cinco, pero a partir de 2.5 y hasta los 4.0 es una opción ideal por rendimiento, tamaño, peso y precio. Sonido, pura música. Los motores de 6 cilindros son los que mejor suenan, junto con los V12, que suenan mejor sencillamente porque son dos motores de seis cilindros juntos. ¿El motivo? Porque un buen 6 cilindros tiene una explosión cada 120 grados de giro del cigüeñal, tres cada vuelta, lo que hace al motor más silencioso, equilibrado, con menos vibraciones… y de una musicalidad incomparable… ¿En línea o en V? Según optemos por una u otra configuración tenderemos unas u otras ventajas. El Bóxer es casi territorio exclusivo de Porsche y su mayor ventaja es su bajo centro de gravedad. Nos quedan dos opciones: -6 en línea: Medio V12 Desde los comienzos del automóvil el empleo de 6 cilindros en línea con un encendido cada 120º de cigüeñal demostró ser ideal. ¿El motivo? El funcionamiento de los 6 en línea permite un equilibrio perfecto de fuerzas e inercias, el movimiento de los pistones consigue que las vibraciones sean casi nulas y los ruidos se atenúen. ¿El inconveniente? Un 6 cilindros en línea es un motor largo, complicado de montar transversal, pero es que incluso longitudinal requiere disponer de mucho espacio longitudinal en el vano motor. -V6: Compacidad, más corto que un 4 línea. Un motor V6 es más ancho que uno de 4 cilindros… pero es más corto. Para montarlo en un coche de tracción delantera, ya sea longitudinal o sobre todo transversal, esto supone una ventaja decisiva. Un 4 cilindros de 2.5 litros es claramente más ancho que un 6 cilindros de la misma cilindrada. Historia: Los 6 cilindros más famosos. He elegido solo dos, uno con cilindros en línea y otro con cilindros en V. Para el Bóxer… os remito al vídeo de la Historia del Porsche 911. BMW M3 CSL (2003) La historia de amor de BMW con los motores de seis cilindros en línea se remonta a 1933. Pero quizás el mejor 6 en línea de BMW sea el 3,2 litros empleado en el BMW M3 CSL de 2003. Alfa Romeo 75 V6 América (1987) En 1979 debutó el Alfa Romeo 6. El coche no llamó la atención, pero sí su motor, que fue alabado por la prensa de la época. Se trataba de un bloque V6 con cilindros a 60 grados, carrera corta con 2.5 litros de cilindrada y seis carburadores. ¿Hasta dónde se puede llegar con 6 cilindros? Cómo os decía, para acabar este vídeo he elegido tres modelos actuales con motor de 6 cilindros, uno de cada configuración, para ver hasta dónde se puede llegar con 6 cilindros. En línea: BMW X3 M Competition: 510 CV De lo más bestia que hay en BMW, alcanza los 510 CV, frente a los 431 CV del M4, por ejemplo. Cuenta con una transmisión automática de ocho relaciones y tracción total. En V: Nissan GT-R NISMO: 600 CV “Godzilla” gracias a esta versión sigue en plena forma, gracias a los 600 CV de su V6 biturbo, montado en posición longitudinal. Tiene tracción total, cambio de doble embrague y seis marchas y es una verdadera bestia. Bóxer: Porsche 911 Turbo S: 650 CV Actualmente, el motor de 6 cilindros más potente del mercado, con un bloque bóxer biturbo, con turbocompresores de geometría variable, 650 CV, por supuesto tracción total y a la transmisión de doble embrague PDK con ocho 0 a 100 km/h en solo 2,7 velocidades.

Let’s Talk Dubs
Ep 146 Dominick Luppino Dragon Slayer

Let’s Talk Dubs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 74:46


Dominick Luppino has been known in the VW drag Racing scene since the 70's. Starting in the heart of So Cal Orange County. He started racing single port 1835cc. He frequented the street races with the like of Gary Berg & many other young  kids racing. He went on to have a long campange starting in his plumb crazy then in to the famous dragon slayer. Now you can find him cruising the streets of Lake Havasu Az in his super sano 67 Cal looker that's pushing 230hp all motor.  buy merch here https://rosswulf.com https://vwtrendsmagazine.com

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
We Are Signal Intelligence Specialists [RR 685]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:08


Gary Smith started in the car business in 1979 and never looked back. Throughout a 25 plus year career with new car dealerships and OEMs, he was blessed to have experienced all fixed operations positions, having been a Certified ASE and GM Master Technician, Shop Foreman, Service Advisor, Parts & Service Manager and Fixed Ops Director over many years for Cadillac/Oldsmobile, Mercedes, VW and Chevrolet stores. Gary worked as a technical field engineer and warranty audit consultant to OEMs and dealership groups in the late 80s and 90s, this experience uniquely positioned Gary to form GSS Enterprises, Inc. in 2000. Gary specializes in teaching advanced diagnostic techniques and methodology; including physical testing (Lab Scopes, Pressure Transducer, Scan Data and 5-Gas Analysis), signal acquisition & analysis, fuel and lubrication technology as well as vehicle communications data bus diagnostics. Gary teaches technical and management classes and his www.automastertraining.com hotline currently supports technicians with on-car remote technical assistance in 8 Metro markets. Gary also teaches “Train the Trainer” sessions for schools and college automotive programs. Listen to Gary's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22gary+smith%22 (HERE) Key Talking Points “Diagnosing difficult deposit related drivability concerns” Carbon build-up affecting engine  Cars are what they eat- drivability problems/check engine lights   Diag Nation- remote support line, single call or membership base. Remote in and take control, guide technician through the repair.   “Technology is exceeding the human's brain ability to absorb it.” Basic electricity laws is a critical foundation for correct interpretation  The definition of a new, desperately needed class of technician; The Automotive SIGINT (signal intelligence) Specialist. COMMINT (communication intelligence) understanding the network, MASSINT (measurement and signature) measure circuit and signatures of signals, IMINT (image intelligence) circuit description and operation, wiring diagrams, HUMINT (human intelligence) service advisor, technician, owner. MECCINT (mechanical intelligence). Process for productive and accurate diagnosis.  gsmith@diagnation.com Connect with the show: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Gold Certification recognizes top tier NAPA AutoCares with a high level of participation in the AutoCare program. The program was built by AutoCare Centers for AutoCare Centers to provide a consistent consumer experience, maximize technology leverage, and reward NAPA's most committed partners. In other words, Gold Certified AutoCare Centers are the standard bearers for the AutoCare brand nationwide. Simply put, the Gold Certified NAPA AutoCare program, powered by your local shop brand, will separate you from the rest helping you boost your bay counts and your average repair orders. Learn more about NAPA AutoCare, Gold Certification, and the hundreds of other benefits the NAPA family has to offer by talking with your servicing NAPA store or visiting www.NAPAAutoCare.com.

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis
TSLA Stock Rallying, Volkswagen Turns to Elon Musk, Model X Deliveries, Germany Energy Plan (10.18.21)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 12:00


➤ Volkswagen CEO invites Elon Musk to speak to top VW management ➤ TSLA stock continues to rally towards all-time high ➤ Tesla begins delivering refreshed Model X ➤ Tesla partners to launch electricity plan in Germany ➤ Update on EV tax credit status ➤ Foxconn unveils EV plans Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/teslapodcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tesladailypodcast Tesla Referral: https://ts.la/robert47283 Plaid producer Who Why Executive producer Jeremy Cooke Executive producer Troy Cherasaro Executive producer Andre/Maria Kent Executive producer Jessie Chimni Executive producer Jeffrey Yu Executive producer Michael Pastrone Executive producer Richard Del Maestro Executive producer John Beans Music by Evan Schaeffer Disclosure: Rob Maurer is long TSLA stock & derivatives

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1246: Elon Musk Joins Volkswagen Management Conference | 17 Oct 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 21:31


Show #1247 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Sunday 17th October. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. TESLA'S MUSK DIALS INTO VOLKSWAGEN EXECUTIVE CONFERENCE "Tesla (TSLA.O) boss Elon Musk has addressed 200 Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) executives via a video call after an invitation from the German carmaker's CEO Herbert Diess, who wants to galvanise VW's top brass for a faster pivot to electric vehicles." reports Reuters: "The comments on Thursday by Musk to a VW managers gathering in Alpbach, Austria, confirmed by Diess via Twitter on Saturday after a report in Handelsblatt daily, included praise of VW for being an "icon" and Tesla's greatest challenger, Handelsblatt said. The paper said that when asked by Diess why Tesla was more nimble than its rivals, Musk said it came down to his management style and that he is an engineer, first of all, and has an eye for supply chains, logistics and production." Diess said on Linkedin: ""Happy to hear that even our strongest competitor thinks that we will succeed (in) the transition if we drive the transformation with full power" Read more: https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/teslas-musk-dials-into-volkswagen-executive-conference-2021-10-16/ ELON MUSK GETS ALMOST $13 BILLION RICHER IN ONE WEEK AS TESLA STOCK HITS 8-MONTH HIGH "The boom times made Musk richer than Jeff Bezos in late September and pushed his net worth past $200 billion for the first time. He's having fun with the competition. After telling Forbes he would send Bezos a silver medal upon his ascent to the top spot, he followed through on that promise on Monday by replying to one of Bezos' tweets with a silver medal emoji." writes Forbes: "Although Musk widened the gap this week, Bezos still got $5.6 billion richer on Friday with Amazon stock rising 3.3%. Since stepping down as CEO of Amazon in July, Bezos has spent more time in the public eye promoting his commercial spaceflight company Blue Origin" https://www.forbes.com/sites/hanktucker/2021/10/16/elon-musk-gets-almost-13-billion-richer-in-one-week-as-tesla-stock-hits-8-month-high/ KIA AND HYUNDAI SALES RISE IN SEPTEMBER "Kia reports global car sales of 223,593 (down 14.1% year-over-year) in September, although the all-electric sales are booming. The company reports 2,654 Kia EV6 sales in South Korea, which is 7.4% of the total volume (35,801). We noted that an additional 90 units were delivered in Europe, which means 2,744 total for the month of September." reports InsideEVs: "An interesting thing is that the Kia's older electric models - the Soul EV and Niro EV - also do pretty well. The manufacturer reports 975 Soul EV and 7,451 Niro EV sold outside South Korea (we don't have number for Kia's home market), which is 8,426 total (up 27% year-over-year). 80% of that falls on Europe. It means that the BEV sales already exceeds 11,000 (or 5% of the total volume) in a single month." As as for their sister company: "Hyundai reports a big 24% decrease of its global car sales (wholesale, on the manufacturer level) in September - to 279,307. Fortunately, the plug-in segment expands. The  ompany's sales of plug-in cars amounted to 16,400 (up 27% year-over-year), which is a record 5.9% share of the total volume." according to InsideEVs: "So far this year, Hyundai reports sales of over 110,000 plug-in car sales (up 35% year-over-year), which represents 3.8% of the total volume. The Hyundai Ioniq 5 continues its expansion at a rate of over 7,000 units a month (the 5-month average), followed by still quite good results for the Hyundai Kona Electric (over 4,100 in September)." Read more: https://insideevs.com/news/541051/kia-ev6-sales-september-2021/ Read more: https://insideevs.com/news/540619/hyundai-plugin-car-sales-september2021 CHINA LAGS IN IMPORTANT ELECTRIC CAR TECHNOLOGY DESPITE RARE EARTHS ADVANTAGE "Chinese electric carmakers are still lagging behind their foreign rivals in permanent magnet (PM) motor innovation despite the fact that China is the world's dominant supplier of the rare earth metals required for making them, a top Chinese British scientist said in an interview." according to the South China Morning Post: "The comments suggest a key weakness in China's industrial development as Beijing pushes to transform advantages in resources, market size and academic research into technological leadership. Zhu, a fellow at the Royal Academy of Engineering in the UK, is known for his work in electrical machines and permanent magnets, which won him the 2021 IEEE Nikola Tesla Award." Read more: https://www.scmp.com/tech/tech-trends/article/3152477/china-lags-important-electric-car-technology-despite-rare-earths EUROPE WILL LEAD ELECTRIC VEHICLE REVOLUTION "Tesla may be an American company, but it looks like the USA as a market will not be leading EVs into the mainstream. At least, that is, according to Prabhakar Patil, who was CEO of LG Chem Power, Inc from 2010 to 2015, as well as spending five years working on Ford's hybrid technologies. The former battery company head has estimated that 50% of cars sold in Europe could be EVs by as soon as 2025, when globally the figure will probably be more like 20%." says Forbes: "Many European countries are setting strict deadlines for the phasing out of sales of new fossil fuel cars and hybrids, such as the UK, as well as enforcing stringent emission standards for key cities. This is providing yet another incentive for residents to go electric. In the USA, in contrast, there is a struggle between the governing bodies of states that want similarly tough deadlines and incumbent economic interests. When Californian Governor Gavin Newsom announced there would be a ban on gasoline-powered cars by 2035, even the Environmental Protection Agency weighed in to say it could be illegal. There has been much discussion of how the magic $100 per kWh price boundary for batteries will enable battery-electric vehicles to become cheaper than internal combustion engine ones. Bloomberg NEF predicted 2027 as the likely year for the changeover." That's an article by James Morris from Whichev. Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesmorris/2021/10/16/europe-will-lead-electric-vehicle-revolution-not-usa-says-ex-lg-chem-ceo/ TESLA'S MOST BASIC MODEL 3 VARIANT WON'T BE DELIVERED UNTIL AUGUST '22 "Tesla's most basic variant of the affordable Model 3 sedan is sold out nearly a year in advance. The Model 3 Standard Range+ is as basic as you can get with Tesla's vehicles. It is the most affordable car available from Tesla, starting at $41,990. When ordering the sedan with its standard Aero wheels, orders are now advised that the soonest delivery dates are set for August 2022." reports Joey at Teslarati: "Tesla's online Design Studio, the portion of the automaker's website that allows potential owners to design their vehicles, now shows an estimated delivery for the Model 3 Standard Range+ with Aero wheels for August. Other more expensive car variations are available for delivery as soon as November, but the cheapest combination of the vehicle won't be available until Q3 2022." https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-3-standard-range-plus-august-2022-deliveries/ TESLA ROLLS OUT SAFETY SCORE-BASED INSURANCE PRODUCT IN TEXAS "Tesla is now selling insurance to customers in Texas, two years after first launching the offering in its now-former home state of California. But the version in Texas is different. The company says it will evaluate driving behavior in real-time using the “Safety Score” feature that it recently launched to screen drivers who want to join the beta test of the company's “Full Self-Driving” beta software." according to The Verge: "That means drivers might wind up paying less — or more — per month based on how many forward collision warnings they rack up, how hard they brake, how “aggressively” they turn, how much distance they leave to the car in front, and whether they keep their hands on the wheel when using Autopilot. Tesla used some driving behavior metrics to develop premiums in California, but they were not real-time and relied more on statistical evaluations. The offering in Texas represents a big break from how other insurance companies arrive at their quoted premiums. Even ones that rely on data from telematics dongles plugged into a car still consider other factors like age." https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/15/22728411/tesla-insurance-texas-safety-score-premiums-california NOT EVEN A PANDEMIC CAN STOP SOLAR'S EPIC GROWTH "Despite the pandemic, the United States built more utility-scale solar power plants in 2020 than any other year, with Texas leading the way. All those new solar plants added up to 9.6 gigawatts of renewable energy added to the U.S. power grid, bringing the nation's total solar capacity to 48 gigawatts. That's enough to allow further retirements in the nation's coal fleet, which had 223 gigawatts of capacity in 2020." says Grist.org: "Before 2017, California was putting up the lion's share of solar projects. But in recent years Texas has become the leader. In 2020, the state installed enough solar panels to generate 2.5 gigawatts of electricity under full sun, while Florida and California each built 1.6 gigawatts of utility-scale solar. Fewer projects are going up in California because panels are flooding the grid with electricity when the sun is shining." https://grist.org/energy/2020-record-year-for-solar-energy/?utm_source=pocket_mylist BMW BATTERIES POWER COLDPLAY WORLD TOUR "BMW has just found a way to make its recyclable i3 EV batteries do good outside of the automotive industry: BMW batteries are going on tour with Coldplay. The Music Of The Spheres World Tour will be powered by 40 recyclable i3 batteries, which promises to drastically cut down on emissions, and will feature a kinetic dance floor that will recharge said batteries by the fans themselves. That rocks." says CarBuzz: "The 40 batteries going on tour will provide enough power to run live shows, and will be supported by solar installations, hydro-treated vegetable oil generators, power bikes, and coolest of all, a kinetic dance floor, which will turn Coldplay fans' moves into energy." https://carbuzz.com/news/bmw-batteries-power-coldplay-world-tour?utm_source=pocket_mylist MAKE ELECTRIC VEHICLES LIGHTER TO GET MORE BENEFITS https://www.treehugger.com/study-make-electric-vehicles-lighter-for-more-benefits-5205834 NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM When buying a used electric car, how do you feel about servicing? Do you want the previous person to have been back to a dealer every year? Do you care? Some manufacturers like Tesla don't even have a service schedule so how do you feel about buying a used EV and it's service history, or lack of. Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Let’s Talk Dubs
Ep 145 Der Speed Shack's Randy Long

Let’s Talk Dubs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 117:12


From electrician to car painter to business owner. Randy has been involved with re launch of DKK car club. From the early 80s till now he's had the VW passion running through his veins. Hear the story of Der Speed Shack. The difficulties trying to  start a small parts shop in todays world. Growing up in Fullerton and cruising Whittier Boulevard. Follow randyinstagram    

The People's Car
58. RA's, Roundabouts, and Rides

The People's Car

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:50


Just a chill conversation, no shows, no guests. Just me and Danny, Join us!

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast
“Keine Diktatur der Wissenschaftler”

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:59


Im Interview: Prof. Dr. Katrin Böhning-Gaese, die Direktorin des “Senckenberg Biodiversität und Klima-Forschungszentrums” in Frankfurt/M., spricht anlässlich der UN-Artenschutzkonferenz über die Gefahren des weltweiten Fleischkonsums für die Biodiversität. Steht die Ampel in Berlin auf GRÜN für legales Cannabis? Das ThePioneer World Briefing mit Sigmar Gabriel zu den Folgen des Brexits für die Briten. An den Finanzmärkten spricht man über den geplanten großen Stellenabbau bei VW und die BaFin. Habseligkeiten von Amy Winehouse werden in Beverly Hills versteigert. “Jeder Mensch sollte das erleben!” - Captain Kirk fliegt erstmals ins All und wird danach sehr emotional.

Car Talk
#2143: Have You Lived a Good, Clean Life?

Car Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 37:33


Broadcasting again this time from their new think tank -The Bushings Institute, Tom and Ray advise Cynthia that the fate of her beloved 1980 Chevy Citation is inextricably linked up with her personal life choices. Jim's shaking VW, Eileen's Nissan and Dave's Subaru get more conventional- but equally entertaining- diagnoses.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1231: VW Workers Push For Faster EV Rollout | 04 Oct 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 21:32


Show #1234 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 4th October. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to new PATREON EXECUTIVE PRODUCER REALTERS CHOICE PHOTOGRAPHY VW WORKERS URGE FASTER EV ROLLOUT  "Volkswagen's (VW) main plant in Wolfsburg might face historically low output this year and needs a faster shift toward electric vehicles to remain competitive, according to the German automaker's top labour officials." reports News24.com: "The rollout of electric car, Trinity, due in 2026 may be too late, according to VW officials. Furthermore, a global chip shortage also happens manufacturing at Wolfsburg. Due to the persistent scarcity of semiconductor chips, the output at Wolfsburg this year could even fall below the level of 2020, when the Covid-19 pandemic pushed production to just below 500 000 cars, according to VW's works council. VW's initial goal agreed in a labour pact five years ago was to make at least 820 000 vehicles in Wolfsburg last year." https://www.news24.com/fin24/companies/industrial/vw-workers-urge-faster-electric-vehicle-rollout-at-worlds-largest-biggest-car-factory-20211002 MERCEDES-BENZ GIVES SMALLER 60 KWH BATTERY TO EVITO TOURER, EQV "The Mercedes-Benz eVito Tourer (the all-electric variant of the Metris Passenger Van sold in the US) and the more luxurious EQV are getting a new battery pack option. Up until now, both models came with a 100 kWh battery (90 kWh usable), so is Mercedes-Benz giving them an even bigger pack for more range? Well, no. Actually, the new battery option has a 60 kWh net capacity, enabling a range of 217–239 kilometers (135-148 miles) on the eVito Tourer." says InsideEVs: "The standard fast charging function has an output of 50 kW, but an 80 kW option is also possible, in which case the battery can be charged from 10% to 80% in around 35 minutes. Mercedes-Benz argues that the smaller battery will appeal to customers “who cover easy-to-plan routes or who only drive short distances, such as in school transport operations.” Furthermore, it should also be interesting for those buyers looking for a weight saving of 150 kg (330 lbs) and a corresponding payload increase. Last but not least, the 60 kWh battery drives the eVito Tourer's price down by approximately €3,600 ($4,175) compared to the equivalent 90 kWh model (€60,678 versus €64,248)." Read more: Read more: https://insideevs.com/news/537885/mercedes-evito-eqv-60kwh-battery MERCEDES-BENZ EACTROS TRUCKS ON TEST IN SOUTH TYROL Two near-series battery powered eActros trucks have crossed the Alps as part of a series of tests in Italy's South Tyrol region. During the tests, the electric trucks tackled a total of 54,000 metres of altitude. The highest point of the trip was reached during measurement runs at the Kaunertal Glacier, at a height of 2,750 metres. In order to validate the trucks' performance and durability, the testing engineers at Mercedes-Benz Trucks then subjected the electric vehicles, which were loaded to their gross vehicle weight of 27 tonnes, to an extremely gruelling series of tests in the area surrounding Bolzano, South Tyrol. The Alpine terrain enabled the engineers to make particularly extensive use of the vehicles' energy recovery feature, which can be exploited by driving with foresight. Series production of the eActros will start at the Mercedes-Benz plant in Wörth at the beginning of October 2021. Read more: https://media.daimler.com/marsMediaSite/en/instance/ko/All-electric-mountain-climbers-Mercedes-Benz-eActros-trucks-on-test-in-South-Tyrol.xhtml?oid=51462413 SK INNOVATION SPINS OFF BATTERY DIVISION "SK Innovation officially completed the spin-off of its battery business on 1 October. The now independent battery division of the South Korean company is called SK On. With the announced spin-off, the Korean company wants to enable the battery division to better focus on the fast-growing market for electric cars and their batteries – independently of the other business lines of the listed company." writes electrive: "The plan is to expand global battery production capacity from the current 40 GWh per year to 85 GWh by 2023, to 220 GWh by 2025 and to over 500 GWh by 2030. In addition, it was announced a few days ago that SK Innovation, together with Ford, will invest in the construction of two new sites with assembly and battery plants in Tennessee and Kentucky – with a total capacity of 129 GWh per year." Read more: https://www.electrive.com/2021/10/01/sk-innovation-spins-off-battery-division TESCO TAKES TOP SPOT AMONG UK SUPERMARKETS FOR ELECTRIC CAR CHARGING  "Tesco is the UK supermarket chain with the greatest proportion of stores that offer customers electric vehicle (EV) charging facilities. That's according to new research from electric car website Electriying.com, which has ranked the UK's biggest supermarkets in order of EV-friendliness." reports UK Motor1.coM: "Tesco topped the list, with almost half (45 percent) of its UK superstores boasting charging facilities, while Morrisons came second with four in 10 (40 percent) of stores offering EV charging. At the opposite end of the scale, just seven percent of Sainsbury's stores offer at least one EV charging point." Read more: https://uk.motor1.com/news/537265/tesco-top-uk-supermarket-charging/ AL GORE PUTS $600M INTO UK GREEN ENERGY-TECH STARTUP OCTOPUS ENERGY GROUP "Former Vice President Al Gore has invested $600 million of equity into U.K. energy startup Octopus Energy Group via his Generation Investment Management vehicle, taking a stake of approximately 13% in the business. The investment means Octopus has attained a valuation of around $4.6 billion."£ says TechCrunch: "Octopus has made a name for itself in energy circles largely because of its “Kraken” technology platform, which it claims is able to reroute energy from renewable sources around a network far more efficiently than competitors. Octopus is now managing 17 million energy accounts in 12 countries in this manner. Octopus has also earlier launched Electric Juice, an electric vehicle “roaming network” of 100,000 charge points across Europe that allows users to charge their personal Octopus Energy account when they charge their EVs. It's also partnered with Tesla to launch Tesla Power in the U.K. and Germany." Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/01/al-gore-puts-600m-into-uk-green-energy-tech-startup-octopus-energy-group BATTMAN WILL QUICKLY DETERMINE EV BATTERY HEALTH "With plenty of older EVs on the roads today, the issue of residual battery life and recycling is more pressing than ever when it comes to shopping for vehicles or making decisions about what to do with EVs whose batteries are just about spent." reports Autoweek: "VW Group Components has developed a system dubbed BattMan ReLife (Battery Monitoring Analysis Necessity) that can check the health of a battery in just minutes, taking the guesswork and hours of charging out of the process. The first version of the software was created by the Audi Brussels quality management department for testing the Audi e-tron's battery, and then received further work from VW Group Components at Salzgitter, which is the site of VW's new battery laboratories. The device first checks whether a given battery is able to communicate, after plugging in the low-voltage connectors. BattMan then detects and brings up any error messages present, in addition to the insulation resistance, temperatures, cell voltages, and capacity." Read more: https://www.autoweek.com/news/green-cars/a37824638/battman-ev-battery-health CHINA'S NIO INC. (NIO) REPORTS RECORD MONTHLY AND QUARTERLY ELECTRIC VEHICLE DELIVERIES "China's NIO Inc. (NIO) reported record monthly and quarterly deliveries for the company's fleet of electric vehicles. The auto manufacturer, founded in 2014, has provided investors with news regarding the firm's positive September 2021 delivery results" says Investors Observer: "NIO announced that its deliveries for its top-selling eclectic vehicles (EC6, ES6 and ES8) have now hit 142,036 units in total. In further news, NIO also revealed that it has recently opened NIO House in Oslo, Norway and that the company has “completed its first batch of vehicle deliveries in Norway.”" Read more: https://www.investorsobserver.com/news/stock-update/chinas-nio-inc-nio-reports-record-monthly-and-quarterly-electric-vehicle-deliveries CHINA'S EV MAKERS SAW MONSTER DELIVERIES "XPeng had a huge month, with deliveries of 10,412 vehicles in September topping the 10,000 milestone and tripling from year-ago levels. The numbers included more than 7,500 P7 sports sedans and more than 2,650 G3 and G3i SUVs. XPeng also got a solid start with its P5 family sedans, which launched mid-month and accounted for 244 vehicle deliveries. For the quarter, 25,666 deliveries was a record, also tripling year over year. Year to date, XPeng has delivered more than 56,400 cars and SUVs, more than 300% higher than at the same time in 2020." says Nasdaq.com: "Li Auto had promising numbers compared to last year's results, but the company noted some pressures that weighed on its sequential performance. Monthly deliveries of 7,094 vehicles were more than double what Li delivered in September 2020. " Read more: https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/chinas-ev-makers-saw-monster-deliveries.-will-tesla-follow-suit-2021-10-01 WHAT IF… THE GM EV1 ELECTRIC CAR HAD BEEN A SUCCESS? "In issue one of T3, we reported on the release of the EV1, a fully electric car from General Motors, one of America largest automobile manufacturers. The sleek two-door, two-seater is generally regarded as the first mass-produced EV available to the public. It had a 0-60 time of around 8.4 seconds and a range of between 70 and 100 miles – and up to 140 miles for the second generation model. (BMW's i3 will only do around 150 and that was released in 2013.)" says T3: "The EV1 launched in 1996, with the improved model II appearing in 1999. But instead of losing interest – or being pressured out of the market – let's imagine GM stuck with it…" Read more: https://www.t3.com/us/news/what-if-the-gm-ev1-electric-car-had-been-a-success NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns on Sunday 10th October! Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Snacks Daily

Universal Music popped on its IPO because your Insta stories are powering music. Sorare just landed the biggest deal in NFT history because it turned Lionel Messi into a game. And Volkswagen is Netflixing cars… we're calling it VW+. $ETH $UMG $VWAGY Got a SnackFact? Tweet it @RobinhoodSnacks @JackKramer @NickOfNewYork Want a shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form: https://forms.gle/KhUAo31xmkSdeynD9 Got a SnackFact for the pod? We got a form for that too: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe64VKtvMNDPGSncHDRF07W34cPMDO3N8Y4DpmNP_kweC58tw/viewform Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices