Podcasts about exchange server

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Best podcasts about exchange server

Latest podcast episodes about exchange server

The Practical 365 Podcast
Native Cross-Tenant Migrations, Exchange 2019 upgrades, New Teams client & Azure AD: Practical 365 Podcast S3 E14

The Practical 365 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 59:35


This week on the show, Steve and Paul are joined by Sigi Jagott, long-time MVP and Exchange Server expert, to find out why, and what the best practices are when upgrading on-premises servers to Exchange 2019. And, finally, cross-tenant migrations are possible natively for mailboxes and OneDrive for Business accounts. We discuss and find out if there's any caveats. Teams arrives on Linux (again!), and we discuss Azure AD resiliency and Microsoft's slowing cloud growth..

Enterprise Security Weekly (Video)
Zombies, Gen Z VS Boomers, ICMs, & Australian Breach Fines - ESW #294

Enterprise Security Weekly (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 55:07


Finally, in the enterprise security news, The company behind Basecamp and the Hey.com email service pulls anchor and exits the cloud, Your self-hosted Exchange Server might be a problem…Is Confidential Computing for suckers? Gen Z and Millennials found not taking things seriously in, survey fielded by Boomers, Industrial Cybersecurity Market expected to take off, Github adds fine-grained personal access tokens, Australia not playing around anymore, jacks up breach fines more than 20x, Layoffs and exit troubles, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw294

Paul's Security Weekly TV
Zombies, Gen Z VS Boomers, ICMs, & Australian Breach Fines - ESW #294

Paul's Security Weekly TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 55:07


Finally, in the enterprise security news, The company behind Basecamp and the Hey.com email service pulls anchor and exits the cloud, Your self-hosted Exchange Server might be a problem…Is Confidential Computing for suckers? Gen Z and Millennials found not taking things seriously in, survey fielded by Boomers, Industrial Cybersecurity Market expected to take off, Github adds fine-grained personal access tokens, Australia not playing around anymore, jacks up breach fines more than 20x, Layoffs and exit troubles, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw294

Enterprise Security Weekly (Audio)
ESW #294 - Gary Orenstein, Jason Oeltjen

Enterprise Security Weekly (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 121:36


For many companies, the pretenses of separation between work and home have completely disappeared. This has huge security implications for organizations, but creates some opportunities as well. How should organizations and vendors approach the new paradigm of shared devices and identities?   Economic tides are changing, making profitability and identifying efficiencies a priority for many IT teams. Reducing IT costs by modernizing and migrating identity infrastructure to the cloud is one of those projects to be considered. No more wasted time and effort on maintenance, patching, and upgrades. Join us as VP of Product Management at Ping Identity, Jason Oeltjen, will discuss cloud migration benefits, timelines, and how you can improve TCO by migrating your identity to the cloud as leadership seeks the most critical initiatives to fund. Segment Resources: https://www.pingidentity.com/en/lp/migrate-to-pings-cloud.html   This segment is sponsored by Ping. Visit https://securityweekly.com/ping to learn more about them!   Finally, in the enterprise security news, The company behind Basecamp and the Hey.com email service pulls anchor and exits the cloud, Your self-hosted Exchange Server might be a problem…Is Confidential Computing for suckers? Gen Z and Millennials found not taking things seriously in, survey fielded by Boomers, Industrial Cybersecurity Market expected to take off, Github adds fine-grained personal access tokens, Australia not playing around anymore, jacks up breach fines more than 20x, Layoffs and exit troubles, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw294

Paul's Security Weekly
ESW #294 - Gary Orenstein, Jason Oeltjen

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 121:36


For many companies, the pretenses of separation between work and home have completely disappeared. This has huge security implications for organizations, but creates some opportunities as well. How should organizations and vendors approach the new paradigm of shared devices and identities?   Economic tides are changing, making profitability and identifying efficiencies a priority for many IT teams. Reducing IT costs by modernizing and migrating identity infrastructure to the cloud is one of those projects to be considered. No more wasted time and effort on maintenance, patching, and upgrades. Join us as VP of Product Management at Ping Identity, Jason Oeltjen, will discuss cloud migration benefits, timelines, and how you can improve TCO by migrating your identity to the cloud as leadership seeks the most critical initiatives to fund. Segment Resources: https://www.pingidentity.com/en/lp/migrate-to-pings-cloud.html   This segment is sponsored by Ping. Visit https://securityweekly.com/ping to learn more about them!   Finally, in the enterprise security news, The company behind Basecamp and the Hey.com email service pulls anchor and exits the cloud, Your self-hosted Exchange Server might be a problem…Is Confidential Computing for suckers? Gen Z and Millennials found not taking things seriously in, survey fielded by Boomers, Industrial Cybersecurity Market expected to take off, Github adds fine-grained personal access tokens, Australia not playing around anymore, jacks up breach fines more than 20x, Layoffs and exit troubles, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw294

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More
Your Microsoft Exchange Server Is a Security Liability

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 9:03


Endless vulnerabilities. Widespread hacking campaigns. Slow and technically tough patching. It's time to say goodbye to on-premise Exchange.

Björeman // Melin
Avsnitt 328: Jävligt native

Björeman // Melin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022


Jocke tvingas jobba med Exchange Server, Fredrik blir söderkis för en dag och Christian är valberedare.

Björeman // Melin
Avsnitt 328: Jävligt native

Björeman // Melin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 68:01


Uppvärmning/uppföljning Föreningen har ju val varje år Dags att sälja sitt spabad? Jocke har löst sina batteriproblem med iOS 16 Jocke blir påmind om hur han hatar att arbeta med Exchange Server Snart vinterdäck på? Minusgrader ute på nätterna 11 år sedan Steve Jobs dog, och Siri har fyllt år Apple flyttar allt mer produktion till Indien och ber komponenttillverkare att göra det samma Fortfarande svårt att få tag i Raspberry Pi's Bok om Depeche Modes legendariska album Violator släppt Elon Musk ska tydligen köpa Twitter. Igen E-postklienten Spark byter till Electron och prenumerationsmodell Ämnen Kodsnack firar tio år, Fredrik på snabbvisit på Söder Film & TV Bosch legacy SE01 Big bang theory - de sista säsongerna är faktiskt riktigt bra och Jocke ska se om serien från början. Don't worry darling - lite Stepfordfruarna, lite Matrix. 3 / 5 BMÅ (J) Länkar Exchange Steve Jobs jakt Apple flyttar allt mer produktion till Indien och ber komponenttillverkare att göra det samma Fortfarande svårt att få tag i Raspberry Pi:s Halo - boken om Violators tillkomst Elon Musk och Twitter - den oändliga historien Spark blir prenumerationsapp Veckans Connected har utförlig kritik av Sparks gränssnittsförändringar 1password långa text om sin övergång till Electron BBEdit Textwrangler Bosch: legacy Big Bang Theory Don't worry darling Fullständig avsnittsinformation finns här: https://www.bjoremanmelin.se/podcast/avsnitt-328-javligt-native.html

MSP Dispatch (Audio)
MSP Dispatch 10/7/22: Exchange Server Zero Days, Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISA, Job Reductions? (Audio)

MSP Dispatch (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 26:28


MSP Dispatch is your source for news, community events, and commentary in the MSP channel.  Hosted by: Tony Francisco and Ray Orsini Give us your feedback by emailing news@mspmedia.tv   In today's MSP Dispatch we cover Microsoft Exchange Server Zero Days, Half of CEOs Considering Workforce Reductions Soon and Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISA. Register for Huntress's hack_it 22 at https://www.huntress.com/hack-it-2022 Apply for a chance to win one of five free 0-day sessions courtesy of MMN at https://go.oit.co/hackit2022 Story Links: Exchange Server Zero Dayshttps://www.darkreading.com/remote-workforce/microsoft-updates-mitigation-for-exchange-server-zero-days Half of CEOs Considering Workforce Reductions Soonhttps://www.marketwatch.com/story/more-than-half-of-ceos-consider-workforce-reductions-over-the-next-6-months-and-remote-workers-may-be-the-first-go-to-11664907913Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISAhttps://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/cisa-multiple-apt-groups-infiltrate-defense-organizationElon Wants Twitter (Again)https://techcrunch.com/2022/10/04/elon-intends-buy-twitter/?utm_source=tldrnewsletter USB-C Standard for IOS in 2024https://www.thurrott.com/mobile/274214/eu-usb-c-standard-charging-port-2024Competitive fishermen disqualified from Ohio tournament after getting caught adding weights to their fishhttps://www.cbssports.com/general/news/competitive-fisherman-disqualified-from-ohio-tournament-after-get-caught-adding-weights-to-their-fish/ Community Events: 10/7 @ 5:00 pm ET | 38 at 38 Ep. 5 featuring Tony Francisco10/10 - 10/12 In Person Event | GlueX: Miami Beach, FL10/12 @ 12:00 pm ET | Build IT Better Discussion Presented by Everything MSP10/13 - 10/14 In Person Event | GrrCON: Grand Rapids, MI10/14 @ 10:00 am ET | MSP Dispatch Week Wrap Up Presented by The MSP Media Network Connect with our hosts:  - Tony Francisco: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tonyjfrancisco/ - Ray Orsini: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rayorsini/ Be sure to follow us on social media:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mspmediatv/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mspmediatv LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/mspmediatv/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mspmediatv   Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/mspmedia Discord: https://discord.gg/Hc7b55cJPF 0:00 Intro 5:05 Exchange Server Zero Days 10:24 Half of CEOs Considering Workforce Reductions Soon 16:28 Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISA 20:48 Notable Mentions 21:37 Feedback 23:23 Community Events 24:41 Sign-off 26:02 Outtakes

MSP Dispatch (Video)
MSP Dispatch 10/7/22: Exchange Server Zero Days, Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISA, Job Reductions? (Video)

MSP Dispatch (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 26:28


MSP Dispatch is your source for news, community events, and commentary in the MSP channel.  Hosted by: Tony Francisco and Ray Orsini Give us your feedback by emailing news@mspmedia.tv   In today's MSP Dispatch we cover Microsoft Exchange Server Zero Days, Half of CEOs Considering Workforce Reductions Soon and Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISA. Register for Huntress's hack_it 22 at https://www.huntress.com/hack-it-2022 Apply for a chance to win one of five free 0-day sessions courtesy of MMN at https://go.oit.co/hackit2022 Story Links: Exchange Server Zero Dayshttps://www.darkreading.com/remote-workforce/microsoft-updates-mitigation-for-exchange-server-zero-days Half of CEOs Considering Workforce Reductions Soonhttps://www.marketwatch.com/story/more-than-half-of-ceos-consider-workforce-reductions-over-the-next-6-months-and-remote-workers-may-be-the-first-go-to-11664907913Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISAhttps://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/cisa-multiple-apt-groups-infiltrate-defense-organizationElon Wants Twitter (Again)https://techcrunch.com/2022/10/04/elon-intends-buy-twitter/?utm_source=tldrnewsletter USB-C Standard for IOS in 2024https://www.thurrott.com/mobile/274214/eu-usb-c-standard-charging-port-2024Competitive fishermen disqualified from Ohio tournament after getting caught adding weights to their fishhttps://www.cbssports.com/general/news/competitive-fisherman-disqualified-from-ohio-tournament-after-get-caught-adding-weights-to-their-fish/ Community Events: 10/7 @ 5:00 pm ET | 38 at 38 Ep. 5 featuring Tony Francisco10/10 - 10/12 In Person Event | GlueX: Miami Beach, FL10/12 @ 12:00 pm ET | Build IT Better Discussion Presented by Everything MSP10/13 - 10/14 In Person Event | GrrCON: Grand Rapids, MI10/14 @ 10:00 am ET | MSP Dispatch Week Wrap Up Presented by The MSP Media Network Connect with our hosts:  - Tony Francisco: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tonyjfrancisco/ - Ray Orsini: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rayorsini/ Be sure to follow us on social media:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mspmediatv/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mspmediatv LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/mspmediatv/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mspmediatv   Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/mspmedia Discord: https://discord.gg/Hc7b55cJPF 0:00 Intro 5:05 Exchange Server Zero Days 10:24 Half of CEOs Considering Workforce Reductions Soon 16:28 Defense Orgs Infiltrated Per CISA 20:48 Notable Mentions 21:37 Feedback 23:23 Community Events 24:41 Sign-off 26:02 Outtakes

Symantec Cyber Security Brief Podcast
Witchetty espionage group activity, Microsoft Exchange Server zero days, and U.S. defense sector targeted by APT groups

Symantec Cyber Security Brief Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 27:50


On this week’s Cyber Security Brief podcast, Brigid O Gorman and Dick O’Brien discuss a recent blog we published on the Witchetty (aka LookingFrog) espionage group, which has been progressively updating its toolset, using new malware in attacks on targets in the Middle East and Africa, including a new tool that employs steganography. We also discuss the recently discovered Microsoft Exchange Server zero days, the U.S. defense sector being targeted by multiple APT groups, and a newly discovered espionage actor called Metador, which was spotted operating in recent weeks. We also discuss the breach of Australian telecoms giant Optus, and some new information that has emerged about the takedown of the REvil/Sodinokibi ransomware gang.

Risky Business
Risky Business #681 -- It's Exchangehog Day

Risky Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 Very Popular


On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss the week's security news, including: More Exchange 0days cause more havoc A look at some earlier Exchange hack incidents How the CIA got its agents killed with its truly awful online opsec Ex NSA staffer arrested for espionage Much, much more This week's show is brought to you by Proofpoint. Ryan Kalember, Proofpoint's EVP of cybersecurity strategy, joins the show this week to talk about some overlooked detection opportunities – some simple stuff you can look for in your environment that should raise gigantic flashing red flags. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that's your thing. Show notes Microsoft confirms two Exchange Server zero days are being used in cyberattacks - The Record by Recorded Future CISA: Multiple government hacking groups had ‘long-term' access to defense company - The Record by Recorded Future Mexican president confirms ‘Guacamaya' hack targeting regional militaries - The Record by Recorded Future Mexican journalists targeted by zero-click spyware infections - The Record by Recorded Future Ex-NSA employee charged with violating Espionage Act, selling U.S. cyber secrets Putin grants citizenship to Edward Snowden, who disclosed US eavesdropping - The Washington Post U.S. fails in bid to extradite Brit for helping North Korea evade sanctions with cryptocurrency - The Record by Recorded Future Bill Marczak on Twitter: "NEW REPORT today from @Reuters @JoelSchectman providing more detail about fatal flaws in the CIA's defunct communications network. Iran and China compromised the network in 2011, and killed dozens of CIA assets https://t.co/AwN8pQtWL2" / Twitter Numerous orgs hacked after installing weaponized open source apps | Ars Technica 'Poisoned' Tor Browser tracks Chinese users' online history, location Mystery Hackers Are ‘Hyperjacking' Targets for Insidious Spying | WIRED A Matrix Update Patches Serious End-to-End Encryption Flaws | WIRED LA officials confirm ransomware group leaked students' personal data - The Record by Recorded Future Nearly 700 ransomware incidents traced back to wholesale access markets: report - The Record by Recorded Future Semiconductor industry faced 8 attacks from ransomware groups, extortion gangs in 2022 - The Record by Recorded Future CISA directs federal agencies to track software and vulnerabilities - The Record by Recorded Future Fake CISO Profiles on LinkedIn Target Fortune 500s – Krebs on Security House Democrats debut new bill to limit US police use of facial recognition | TechCrunch EP000: Operation Aurora | HACKING GOOGLE - YouTube

The CyberWire
Microsoft Exchange zero-days exploited. Supply chain attack reported. New Lazarus activity. Mexican government falls victim to hacktivism. Hacking partial mobilization. Former insider threat.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 35:37 Very Popular


Two Microsoft Exchange zero-days exploited in the wild. A supply chain attack, possibly from Chinese intelligence services. There's new Lazarus activity: bring-your-own-vulnerable-driver. The Mexican government falls victim to apparent hacktivism. Flying under partial mobilization's radar. Betsy Carmelite from Booz Allen Hamilton talks about addressing the cyber workforce skills gap. Our guest Rachel Tobac from SocialProof Security brings a musical approach to security awareness training. How's your off-boarding program working out? For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/190 Selected reading. Microsoft Releases Guidance on Zero-Day Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Exchange Server (CISA)  Customer Guidance for Reported Zero-day Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Exchange Server (Microsoft Security Response Center) Warning: New attack campaign utilized a new 0-day RCE vulnerability on Microsoft Exchange Server (GTSC) URGENT! Microsoft Exchange double zero-day – “like ProxyShell, only different” (Naked Security) Microsoft confirms two Exchange Server zero days are being used in cyberattacks (The Record by Recorded Future)Microsoft confirms new Exchange zero-days are used in attacks (BleepingComputer)  Two Microsoft Exchange zero-days exploited in the wild. (CyberWre)  CISA Adds Three Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog (CISA) Suspected Chinese hackers tampered with widely used customer chat program, researchers say (Reuters) Report: Commercial chat provider hijacked to spread malware in supply chain attack (The Record by Recorded Future)  CrowdStrike Falcon Platform Identifies Supply Chain Attack via a Trojanized Comm100 Chat Installer (crowdstrike.com) Amazon‑themed campaigns of Lazarus in the Netherlands and Belgium (WeLiveSecurity) Lazarus & BYOVD: evil to the Windows core (Virus Bulletin) Lazarus hackers abuse Dell driver bug using new FudModule rootkit (BleepingComputer) Mexican government suffers major data hack, president's health issues revealed (Reuters) Mexican president confirms ‘Guacamaya' hack targeting regional militaries (The Record by Recorded Future) Analysis: Mexico data hack exposes government cybersecurity vulnerability (Reuters) Russians dodging mobilization behind flourishing scam market (BleepingComputer)  Honolulu Man Pleads Guilty to Sabotaging Former Employer's Computer Network (US Department of Justice)

Cyber Security Headlines
Microsoft Zero days, Lazarus attacks Dell, NSA employee caught

Cyber Security Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 7:43 Very Popular


Microsoft confirms two Exchange Server zero days are being used in cyberattacks Lazarus hackers abuse Dell driver bug using new FudModule rootkit Ex-NSA employee charged with violating Espionage Act, selling U.S. cyber secrets Thanks to today's episode sponsor, Hunters Hunters is a SaaS platform, purpose built for Security Operation teams. Providing unlimited dataingestion and normalization at a predictable cost, Hunters helps SOC teams mitigate real threats faster and more reliably than SIEM. Visit Hunters.ai to learn more. For the stories behind the headlines, head to CISOseries.com.

Cyber Security Today
Cyber Securiity Today, Oct. 3, 2022 - Warnings to Exchange and Comm100 administrators, and how the CIA might have messed up

Cyber Security Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 6:51 Very Popular


This episode reports on fixes for Exchange Server, the Comm100  support chat application, a survey of Canadian post-secondary students' attitudes towards cybersecurity and more  

The Practical 365 Podcast
Security Updates for Exchange, Where's Mesh for Teams & Did you miss something when you migrated?

The Practical 365 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 79:05


In this week's show, Paul and Steve discuss the new Apple Silicon version of Teams: It was here, now it isn't - why? Exchange Server receives security updates; with Facebook getting a bashing for their Metaverse contributions, will Mesh for Microsoft Teams ever see the light of day; and Exchange Online changes that might affect software you use. Plus - Sean McAvinue and Jason Jacobo join us to help answer the question - what did you leave behind in your migration?

The History of Computing
Research In Motion and the Blackberry

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 25:45


Lars Magnus Ericsson was working for the Swedish government that made telegraph equipment in the 1870s when he started a little telegraph repair shop in 1976. That was the same year the telephone was invented. After fixing other people's telegraphs and then telephones he started a company making his own telephone equipment. He started making his own equipment and by the 1890s was shipping gear to the UK. As the roaring 20s came, they sold stock to buy other companies and expanded quickly. Early mobile devices used radios to connect mobile phones to wired phone networks and following projects like ALOHANET in the 1970s they expanded to digitize communications, allowing for sending early forms of text messages, the way people might have sent those telegraphs when old Lars was still alive and kicking. At the time, the Swedish state-owned Televerket Radio was dabbling in this space and partnered with Ericsson to take first those messages then as email became a thing, email, to people wirelessly using the 400 to 450 MHz range in Europe and 900 MHz in the US. That standard went to the OSI and became a 1G wireless packet switching network we call Mobitex. Mike Lazaridis was born in Istanbul and moved to Canada in 1966 when he was five, attending the University of Waterloo in 1979. He dropped out of school to take a contract with General Motors to build a networked computer display in 1984. He took out a loan from his parents, got a grant from the Canadian government, and recruited another electrical engineering student, Doug Fregin from the University of Windsor, who designed the first circuit boards. to join him starting a company they called Research in Motion. Mike Barnstijn joined them and they were off to do research.  After a few years doing research projects, they managed to build up a dozen employees and a million in revenues. They became the first Mobitex provider in America and by 1991 shipped the first Mobitex device. They brought in James Balsillie as co-CEO, to handle corporate finance and business development in 1992, a partnership between co-CEOs that would prove fruitful for 20 years.  Some of those work-for-hire projects they'd done involved reading bar codes so they started with point-of-sale, enabling mobile payments and by 1993 shipped RIMGate, a gateway for Mobitex. Then a Mobitex point-of-sale terminal and finally with the establishment of the PCMCIA standard, a  PCMCIP Mobitex modem they called Freedom. Two-way paging had already become a thing and they were ready to venture out of PoS systems. So  in 1995, they took a $5 million investment to develop the RIM 900 OEM radio modem. They also developed a pager they called the Inter@ctive Pager 900 that was capable of  two-way messaging the next year. Then they went public on the Toronto Stock Exchange in 1997. The next year, they sold a licensing deal to IBM for the 900 for $10M dollars. That IBM mark of approval is always a sign that a company is ready to play in an enterprise market. And enterprises increasingly wanted to keep executives just a quick two-way page away. But everyone knew there was a technology convergence on the way. They worked with Ericsson to further the technology and over the next few years competed with SkyTel in the interactive pager market. Enter The Blackberry They knew there was something new coming. Just as the founders know something is coming in Quantum Computing and run a fund for that now. They hired a marketing firm called Lexicon Branding to come up with a name and after they saw the keys on the now-iconic keyboard, the marketing firm suggested BlackBerry. They'd done the research and development and they thought they had a product that was special. So they released the first BlackBerry 850 in Munich in 1999. But those were still using radio networks and more specifically the DataTAC network. The age of mobility was imminent, although we didn't call it that yet. Handspring and Palm each went public in 2000.  In 2000, Research In Motion brought its first cellular phone product in the BlackBerry 957, with push email and internet capability. But then came the dot com bubble. Some thought the Internet might have been a fad and in fact might disappear. But instead the world was actually ready for that mobile convergence. Part of that was developing a great operating system for the time when they released the BlackBerry OS the year before. And in 2000 the BlackBerry was named Product of the Year by InfoWorld.  The new devices took the market by storm and shattered the previous personal information manager market, with shares of that Palm company dropping by over 90% and Palm OS being setup as it's own corporation within a couple of years. People were increasingly glued to their email. While the BlackBerry could do web browsing and faxing over the internet, it was really the integrated email access, phone, and text messaging platform that companies like General Magic had been working on as far back as the early 1990s. The Rise of the BlackBerry The BlackBerry was finally the breakthrough mobile product everyone had been expecting and waiting for. Enterprise-level security, integration with business email like Microsoft's Exchange Server, a QWERTY keyboard that most had grown accustomed to, the option to use a stylus, and a simple menu made the product an instant smash success. And by instant we mean after five years of research and development and a massive financial investment. The Palm owned the PDA market. But the VII cost $599 and the BlackBerry cost $399 at the time (which was far less than the $675 Inter@ctive Pager had cost in the 1990s). The Palm also let us know when we had new messages using the emerging concept of push notifications. 2000 had seen the second version of the BlackBerry OS and their AOL Mobile Communicator had helped them spread the message that the wealthy could have access to their data any time. But by 2001 other carriers were signing on to support devices and BlackBerry was selling bigger and bigger contracts. 5,000 devices, 50,000 devices, 100,000 devices. And a company called Kasten Chase stepped in to develop a secure wireless interface to the Defense Messaging System in the US, which opened up another potential two million people in the defense industry They expanded the service to cover more and more geographies in 2001 and revenues doubled, jumping to 164,000 subscribers by the end of the year. That's when they added wireless downloads so could access all those MIME attachments in email and display them. Finally, reading PDFs on a phone with the help of GoAmerica Communications! And somehow they won a patent for the idea that a single email address could be used on both a mobile device and a desktop. I guess the patent office didn't understand why IMAP  was invented by Mark Crispin at Stanford in the 80s, or why Exchange allowed multiple devices access to the same mailbox. They kept inking contracts with other companies. AT&T added the BlackBerry in 2002 in the era of GSM. The 5810 was the first truly convergent BlackBerry that offered email and a phone in one device with seamless SMS communications. It shipped in the US and the 5820 in Europe and Cingular Wireless jumped on board in the US and Deutsche Telekom in Germany, as well as Vivendi in France, Telecom Italia in Italy, etc. The devices had inched back up to around $500 with service fees ranging from $40 to $100 plus pretty limited data plans. The Tree came out that year but while it was cool and provided a familiar interface to the legions of Palm users, it was clunky and had less options for securing communications. The NSA signed on and by the end of the year they were a truly global operation, raking in revenues of nearly $300 million.  The Buying Torndado They added web-based application in 2003, as well as network printing. They moved to a Java-based interface and added the 6500 series, adding a walkie-talkie function. But that 6200 series at around $200 turned out to be huge. This is when they went into that thing a lot of companies do - they started suing companies like Good and Handspring for infringing on patents they probably never should have been awarded. They eventually lost the cases and paid out tens of millions of dollars in damages. More importantly they took their eyes off innovating, a common mistake in the history of computing companies. Yet there were innovations. They released Blackberry Enterprise Server in 2004 then bolted on connectors to Exchange, Lotus Domino, and allowed for interfacing with XML-based APIs in popular enterprise toolchains of the day. They also later added support for GroupWise. That was one of the last solutions that worked with symmetric key cryptography I can remember using and initially required the devices be cradled to get the necessary keys to secure communications, which then worked over Triple-DES, common at the time. One thing we never liked was that messages did end up living at Research in Motion, even if encrypted at the time. This is one aspect that future types of push communications would resolve. And Microsoft Exchange's ActiveSync.  By 2005 there were CVEs filed for BlackBerry Enterprise Server, racking up 17 in the six years that product shipped up to 5.0 in 2010 before becoming BES 10 and much later Blackberry Enterprise Mobility Management, a cross-platform mobile device management solution. Those BES 4 and 5 support contracts, or T-Support, could cost hundreds of dollars per incident. Microsoft had Windows Mobile clients out that integrated pretty seamlessly with Exchange. But people loved their Blackberries. Other device manufacturers experimented with different modes of interactivity. Microsoft made APIs for pens and keyboards that flipped open. BlackBerry added a trackball in 2006, that was always kind of clunky. Nokia, Ericsson, Motorola, and others were experimenting with new ways to navigate devices, but people were used to menus and even styluses. And they seemed to prefer a look and feel that seemed like what they used for the menuing control systems on HVAC controls, video games, and even the iPod.  The Eye Of The Storm A new paradigm was on the way. Apple's iPhone was released in 2007 and Google's Android OS in 2008. By then the BlackBerry Pearl was shipping and it was clear which devices were better. No one saw the two biggest threats coming. Apple was a consumer company. They were slow to add ActiveSync policies, which many thought would be the corporate answer to mobile management as group policies in Active Directory had become for desktops. Apple  and Google were slow to take the market, as BlackBerry continued to dominate the smartphone industry well into 2010, especially once then-president Barack Obama strong-armed the NSA into allowing him to use a special version of the BlackBerry 8830 World Edition for official communiques. Other world leaders followed suit, as did the leaders of global companies that had previously been luddites when it came to constantly being online. Even Eric Schmidt, then chairman of google loved his Crackberry in 2013, 5 years after the arrival of Android. Looking back, we can see a steady rise in iPhone sales up to the iPhone 4, released in 2010. Many still said they loved the keyboard on their BlackBerries. Organizations had built BES into their networks and had policies dating back to NIST STIGs. Research in Motion owned the enterprise and held over half the US market and a fifth of the global market. That peaked in 2011. BlackBerry put mobility on the map. But companies like AirWatch, founded in 2003 and  MobileIron, founded in 2007, had risen to take a cross-platform approach to the device management aspect of mobile devices. We call them Unified Endpoint Protection products today and companies could suddenly support BlackBerry, Windows Mobile, and iPhones from a single console. Over 50 million Blackberries were being sold a year and the stock was soaring at over $230 a share.  Today, they hold no market share and their stock performance shows it. Even though they've pivoted to more of a device management company, given their decades of experience working with some of the biggest and most secure companies and governments in the world. The Fall Of The BlackBerry The iPhone was beautiful. It had amazing graphics and a full touch screen. It was the very symbol of innovation. The rising tide of the App Store also made it a developers playground (no pun intended). It was more expensive than the Blackberry, but while they didn't cater to the enterprise, they wedged their way in there with first executives and then anyone. Initially because of ActiveSync, which had come along in 1996 mostly to support Windows Mobile, but by Exchange Server 2003 SP 2 could do almost anything Outlook could do - provided software developers like Apple could make the clients work. So by 2011, Exchange clients could automatically locate a server based on an email address (or more to the point based on DNS records for the domain) and work just as webmail, which was open in almost every IIS implementation that worked with Exchange. And Office365 was released in 2011, paving the way to move from on-prem Exchange to what we now call “the cloud.” And Google Mail had been around for 7 years by then and people were putting it on the BlackBerry as well, blending home and office accounts on the same devices at times. In fact, Google licensed Exchange ActiveSync, or EAS in 2009 so support for Gmail was showing up on a variety of devices. BlackBerry had everything companies wanted. But people slowly moved to that new iPhone. Or Androids when decent models of phones started shipping with the OS on them. BlackBerry stuck by that keyboard, even though it was clear that people wanted full touchscreens. The BlackBerry Bold came out in 2009. BlackBerry had not just doubled down with the keyboard instead of full touchscreen, but they tripled down on it. They had released the Storm in 2008 and then the Storm in 2009 but they just had a different kind of customer. Albeit one that was slowly starting to retire. This is the hard thing about being in the buying tornado. We're so busy transacting that we can't think ahead to staying in the eye that we don't see how the world is changing outside of it.  As we saw with companies like Amdahl and Control Data, when we only focus on big customers and ignore the mass market we leave room for entrants in our industries who have more mass appeal. Since the rise of the independent software market following the IBM anti-trust cases, app developers have been a bellwether of successful platforms. And the iPhone revenue split was appealing to say the least.  Sales fell off fast. By 2012, the BlackBerry represented less than 6 percent of smartphones sold and by the start of 2013 that number dropped in half, falling to less than 1 percent in 2014. That's when the White House tested replacements for the Blackberry. There was a small bump in sales when they finally released a product that had competitive specs to the iPhone, but it was shortly lived. The Crackberry craze was officially over.  BlackBerry shot into the mainstream and brought the smartphone with them. They made the devices secure and work seamlessly in corporate environments and for those who could pay money to run BES or BIS. They proved the market and then got stuck in the Innovator's Dilemna. They became all about features that big customers wanted and needed. And so they missed the personal part of personal computing. Apple, as they did with the PC and then graphical user interfaces saw a successful technology and made people salivate over it. They saw how Windows had built a better sandbox for developers and built the best app delivery mechanism the world has seen to date. Google followed suit and managed to take a much larger piece of the market with more competitive pricing.  There is so much we didn't discuss, like the short-lived Playbook tablet from BlackBerry. Or the Priv. Because for the most part, they a device management solution today. The founders are long gone, investing in the next wave of technology: Quantum Computing. The new face of BlackBerry is chasing device management, following adjacencies into security and dabbling in IoT for healthcare and finance. Big ticket types of buys that include red teaming to automotive management to XDR. Maybe their future is in the convergence of post-quantum security, or maybe we'll see their $5.5B market cap get tasty enough for one of those billionaires who really, really, really wants their chicklet keyboard back. Who knows but part of the fun of this is it's a living history.    

RunAs Radio
Turning off Your Last Exchange Server with Tony Redmond

RunAs Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 36:03


Are you ready to turn off your last exchange server? Richard talks with Tony Redmond about the recent announcement by Microsoft around management tools for Exchange Hybrid. Tony discusses how organizations that migrated Exchange to Office 365 are stuck with one last server: The server that hosts management tools. The management tools move to a workstation, but they are PowerShell only. And the process of shutting down your last Exchange Server is very much a one-way trip, at least for now. Should you do it? Tony says it's time to get started!Links:Office 365 for IT ProsRetiring Your Last Exchange ServerProject MonadFastTrack EligibityMicrosoft Replication ServiceRecorded May 2, 2022

Windows Weekly (MP3)
WW 780: Call of Jury Duty - Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions

Windows Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 116:01 Very Popular


Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions  Report: Toxicity Continues at Nadella's Microsoft  HoloLens chief Kipman is out. So what's next for Microsoft's metaverse strategy?  Microsoft is Leaving Russia  Microsoft Will Respect Unionization Efforts from its Employees Windows 11  Microsoft begins rolling out Windows 11 22H2 to testers in the Release Preview channel  Microsoft Releases Windows 11 Insider Build 25131 and ARM64 Microsoft Store  Windows 11 Version 22H2 is Showing Up on Some Unsupported PCs Microsoft 365  Microsoft: Next version of Exchange Server not until 2025  Apple Revamps the iPad Multitasking Experience with iPadOS 16 Dev Microsoft Releases Windows App SDK 1.1 Xbox Minecraft: Java & Bedrock Edition Launches on PC Today E3 is Coming Back as a Physical and Digital Event Next Year  Announcing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II - Xbox Wire Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 Tip of the week: Add Windows 11 visual style to Microsoft Edge Tip of the week: Transcribe any audio or video file with Word for Web Enterprise pick of the week: Windows Customer Connection Program Enterprise pick of the week: IE users — June 15 is the day Beer pick of the week: Hudson Valley Demiurge sour IPA Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit Nuvei.com hover.com/twit

Windows Weekly (Video HI)
WW 780: Call of Jury Duty - Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions

Windows Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 116:33


Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions  Report: Toxicity Continues at Nadella's Microsoft  HoloLens chief Kipman is out. So what's next for Microsoft's metaverse strategy?  Microsoft is Leaving Russia  Microsoft Will Respect Unionization Efforts from its Employees Windows 11  Microsoft begins rolling out Windows 11 22H2 to testers in the Release Preview channel  Microsoft Releases Windows 11 Insider Build 25131 and ARM64 Microsoft Store  Windows 11 Version 22H2 is Showing Up on Some Unsupported PCs Microsoft 365  Microsoft: Next version of Exchange Server not until 2025  Apple Revamps the iPad Multitasking Experience with iPadOS 16 Dev Microsoft Releases Windows App SDK 1.1 Xbox Minecraft: Java & Bedrock Edition Launches on PC Today E3 is Coming Back as a Physical and Digital Event Next Year  Announcing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II - Xbox Wire Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 Tip of the week: Add Windows 11 visual style to Microsoft Edge Tip of the week: Transcribe any audio or video file with Word for Web Enterprise pick of the week: Windows Customer Connection Program Enterprise pick of the week: IE users — June 15 is the day Beer pick of the week: Hudson Valley Demiurge sour IPA Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit Nuvei.com hover.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Windows Weekly 780: Call of Jury Duty

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 116:01


Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions  Report: Toxicity Continues at Nadella's Microsoft  HoloLens chief Kipman is out. So what's next for Microsoft's metaverse strategy?  Microsoft is Leaving Russia  Microsoft Will Respect Unionization Efforts from its Employees Windows 11  Microsoft begins rolling out Windows 11 22H2 to testers in the Release Preview channel  Microsoft Releases Windows 11 Insider Build 25131 and ARM64 Microsoft Store  Windows 11 Version 22H2 is Showing Up on Some Unsupported PCs Microsoft 365  Microsoft: Next version of Exchange Server not until 2025  Apple Revamps the iPad Multitasking Experience with iPadOS 16 Dev Microsoft Releases Windows App SDK 1.1 Xbox Minecraft: Java & Bedrock Edition Launches on PC Today E3 is Coming Back as a Physical and Digital Event Next Year  Announcing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II - Xbox Wire Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 Tip of the week: Add Windows 11 visual style to Microsoft Edge Tip of the week: Transcribe any audio or video file with Word for Web Enterprise pick of the week: Windows Customer Connection Program Enterprise pick of the week: IE users — June 15 is the day Beer pick of the week: Hudson Valley Demiurge sour IPA Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit Nuvei.com hover.com/twit

Radio Leo (Audio)
Windows Weekly 780: Call of Jury Duty

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 116:01


Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions  Report: Toxicity Continues at Nadella's Microsoft  HoloLens chief Kipman is out. So what's next for Microsoft's metaverse strategy?  Microsoft is Leaving Russia  Microsoft Will Respect Unionization Efforts from its Employees Windows 11  Microsoft begins rolling out Windows 11 22H2 to testers in the Release Preview channel  Microsoft Releases Windows 11 Insider Build 25131 and ARM64 Microsoft Store  Windows 11 Version 22H2 is Showing Up on Some Unsupported PCs Microsoft 365  Microsoft: Next version of Exchange Server not until 2025  Apple Revamps the iPad Multitasking Experience with iPadOS 16 Dev Microsoft Releases Windows App SDK 1.1 Xbox Minecraft: Java & Bedrock Edition Launches on PC Today E3 is Coming Back as a Physical and Digital Event Next Year  Announcing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II - Xbox Wire Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 Tip of the week: Add Windows 11 visual style to Microsoft Edge Tip of the week: Transcribe any audio or video file with Word for Web Enterprise pick of the week: Windows Customer Connection Program Enterprise pick of the week: IE users — June 15 is the day Beer pick of the week: Hudson Valley Demiurge sour IPA Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit Nuvei.com hover.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
Windows Weekly 780: Call of Jury Duty

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 116:33


Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions  Report: Toxicity Continues at Nadella's Microsoft  HoloLens chief Kipman is out. So what's next for Microsoft's metaverse strategy?  Microsoft is Leaving Russia  Microsoft Will Respect Unionization Efforts from its Employees Windows 11  Microsoft begins rolling out Windows 11 22H2 to testers in the Release Preview channel  Microsoft Releases Windows 11 Insider Build 25131 and ARM64 Microsoft Store  Windows 11 Version 22H2 is Showing Up on Some Unsupported PCs Microsoft 365  Microsoft: Next version of Exchange Server not until 2025  Apple Revamps the iPad Multitasking Experience with iPadOS 16 Dev Microsoft Releases Windows App SDK 1.1 Xbox Minecraft: Java & Bedrock Edition Launches on PC Today E3 is Coming Back as a Physical and Digital Event Next Year  Announcing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II - Xbox Wire Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 Tip of the week: Add Windows 11 visual style to Microsoft Edge Tip of the week: Transcribe any audio or video file with Word for Web Enterprise pick of the week: Windows Customer Connection Program Enterprise pick of the week: IE users — June 15 is the day Beer pick of the week: Hudson Valley Demiurge sour IPA Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit Nuvei.com hover.com/twit

5bytespodcast
Apple WWDC Highlights! Exchange Server 2025! Free Microsoft Cert Exam Offer!

5bytespodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 26:18


This week's has covers highlights from Apple WWDC 2022, info on the standardization on USB-C for chargers, details of the Windows Autopatch preview and much more! Reference Links: https://www.rorymon.com/blog/episode-233-apple-wwdc-highlights-exchange-server-2025-free-microsoft-cert-exam-offer/

Talk Microsoft 365
S03E10 - #MicrosoftTeams #Exchange #MECisBACK #MTR

Talk Microsoft 365

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 49:34


Hallo liebe Zuhörer:Innen, Hallo liebe Community,in unserer aktuellen Episode sprechen wir sehr viel über #MicrosoftTeams, über #Exchange vNext und etwas über #SharePoint.Speziell im Bereich Microsoft Teams geht es um die demnächst entstehenden Kosten bei der Nutzung der GraphAPI für Abfragen in Richtung Microsoft Teams, den Teams-Knopf am Headset und der Konferenzspinne, sowie um Microsoft Teams Rooms Systems (MTR).Das wir dann noch über die anstehende, virtuelle MEC (Microsoft Exchange Conference), Exchange vNext, sowie über SharePoint, rundet diese Episode ab. Für einige der Themen haben wir die Links für mehr Details in die Beschreibung gepackt.Wie immer freuen wir uns über Euer Feedback und wünschen Euch viel Spaß bei unserem Talk,Michael und Thorsten--------------------------------------------------Exchange vNext: Exchange Server Roadmap Update - Microsoft Tech CommunityMEC is back: Microsoft Exchange Community Airlift | HomeExchange open enrollment in TAP: Open Enrollment for Exchange Server 2019 TAP - Microsoft Tech CommunityFeature Übersicht SharePoint Subscription Edition: New and improved features in SharePoint Server Subscription Edition - SharePoint Server | Microsoft Docs-------------------------------------------------Link zum Blog findet ihr hier: https://talkm365.netAuf Twitter unter: @TalkM365Twitter Michael: @plemichTwitter Thorsten: @thorpickLink zum YouTube-Kanal: https://link.talkm365.net/YouTubeLink zum Teams UG - Meetup: https://link.talkm365.net/TeamsUGMeetupLink zu Thorstens YouTube-Kanal (Quick-Tipps): Thorsten Pickhan - YouTube--------------------------------------------------Reference-Links:Music Intro/Outro: Vacation - AShamaluevMusic.Music Link: https://soundcloud.com/ashamaluevmusic/vacationMusic Background: Inspirational Corporate Ambient - AShamaluevMusicMusic Link: https://www.patreon.com/ashamaluevmusic--------------------------------------------------

Radio Leo (Video HD)
Windows Weekly 780: Call of Jury Duty

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 116:33


Alex Kipman leaves Microsoft, Windows 11 gets updates, Microsoft unions  Report: Toxicity Continues at Nadella's Microsoft  HoloLens chief Kipman is out. So what's next for Microsoft's metaverse strategy?  Microsoft is Leaving Russia  Microsoft Will Respect Unionization Efforts from its Employees Windows 11  Microsoft begins rolling out Windows 11 22H2 to testers in the Release Preview channel  Microsoft Releases Windows 11 Insider Build 25131 and ARM64 Microsoft Store  Windows 11 Version 22H2 is Showing Up on Some Unsupported PCs Microsoft 365  Microsoft: Next version of Exchange Server not until 2025  Apple Revamps the iPad Multitasking Experience with iPadOS 16 Dev Microsoft Releases Windows App SDK 1.1 Xbox Minecraft: Java & Bedrock Edition Launches on PC Today E3 is Coming Back as a Physical and Digital Event Next Year  Announcing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II - Xbox Wire Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Learn about the new features in Windows 11 Tip of the week: Add Windows 11 visual style to Microsoft Edge Tip of the week: Transcribe any audio or video file with Word for Web Enterprise pick of the week: Windows Customer Connection Program Enterprise pick of the week: IE users — June 15 is the day Beer pick of the week: Hudson Valley Demiurge sour IPA Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit Nuvei.com hover.com/twit

Business of Tech
Tue Jun-7-2022: SMB IT perspectives, B2B Saas Percentages via partners, and the next Exchange Server

Business of Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 6:05


Three things to know today New SMB perspectives on the value of IT What percentage of B2B SaaS is via partners? AND The next Exchange Server gets a release date   Want to get the show on your podcast app or the written versions of the stories? Subscribe to the Business of Tech: https://www.businessof.tech/   Support the show on Patreon:  https://patreon.com/mspradio/   Want our stuff?  Cool Merch?  Wear “Why Do We Care?” - Visit https://mspradio.myspreadshop.com   Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mspradionews/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mspradionews/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mspradio/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/28908079/

For Cloud's Sake
#18 Lang verwacht nieuws over Exchange, Nieuwe app container mogelijkheden en meer

For Cloud's Sake

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 10:05


In deze aflevering duiken we dieper in waarom de meest recente update van Exchange Server voor iedereen met Office 365 de moeite waard is om te bekijken. Verder zijn er heel veel nieuwe dingen gebeurd in Azure Container Apps en hebben we nog een paar kleine nieuwtjes. Presentatie: Barbara Forbes & Jos van Schouten Productie / edit: Nils Bloem Powered by OGD ict-diensten https://www.ogd.nl/ ------ Exchange Server 2019: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/exchange-team-blog/released-2022-h1-cumulative-updates-for-exchange-server/ba-p/3285026 Azure Container apps: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-gb/azure/container-apps/ Service tags & user defined routing: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/generally-available-service-tags-support-for-user-defined-routing/ Differentiated protection for priority accounts: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/microsoft-defender-for-office/introducing-differentiated-protection-for-priority-accounts-in/ba-p/3283838

The History of Computing
Whistling Our Way To Windows XP

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 11:31


Microsoft had confusion in the Windows 2000 marketing and disappointment with Millennium Edition, which was built on a kernel that had run its course. It was time to phase out the older 95, 98, and Millennium code. So in 2001, Microsoft introduced Windows NT 5.1, known as Windows XP (eXperience). XP came in a Home or Professional edition.  Microsoft built a new interface they called Whistler for XP. It was sleeker and took more use of the graphics processors of the day. Jim Allchin was the Vice President in charge of the software group by then and helped spearhead development. XP had even more security options, which were simplified in the home edition. They did a lot of work to improve the compatibility between hardware and software and added the option for fast user switching so users didn't have to log off completely and close all of their applications when someone else needed to use the computer. They also improved on the digital media experience and added new libraries to incorporate DirectX for various games.  Professional edition also added options that were more business focused. This included the ability to join a network and Remote Desktop without the need of a third party product to take control of the keyboard, video, and mouse of a remote computer. Users could use their XP Home Edition computer to log into work, if the network administrator could forward the port necessary. XP Professional also came with the ability to support multiple processors, send faxes, an encrypted file system, more granular control of files and other objects (including GPOs), roaming profiles (centrally managed through Active Directory using those GPOs), multiple language support, IntelliMirror (an oft forgotten centralized management solution that included RIS and sysprep for mass deployments), an option to do an Automated System Recovery, or ASR restore of a computer. Professional also came with the ability to act as a web server, not that anyone should run one on a home operating system. XP Professional was also 64-bit given the right processor. XP Home Edition could be upgraded to from Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Millineum, and XP Professional could be upgraded to from any operating system since Windows 98 was released., including NT 4 and Windows 2000 Professional. And users could upgrade from Home to Professional for an additional $100.   Microsoft also fixed a few features. One that had plagued users was that they had to gracefully unmount a drive before removing it; Microsoft got in front of this when they removed the warning that a drive was disconnected improperly and had the software take care of that preemptively. They removed some features users didn't really use like NetMeeting and Phone Dialer and removed some of the themes options. The 3D Maze was also sadly removed. Other options just cleaned up the interface or merged technologies that had become similar, like Deluxe CD player and DVD player were removed in lieu of just using Windows Media Player. And chatty network protocols that caused problems like NetBEUI and AppleTalk were removed from the defaults, as was the legacy Microsoft OS/2 subsystem. In general, Microsoft moved from two operating system code bases to one. Although with the introduction of Windows CE, they arguably had no net-savings. However, to the consumer and enterprise buyer, it was a simpler licensing scheme. Those enterprise buyers were more and more important to Microsoft. Larger and larger fleets gave them buying power and the line items with resellers showed it with an explosion in the number of options for licensing packs and tiers. But feature-wise Microsoft had spent the Microsoft NT and Windows 2000-era training thousands of engineers on how to manage large fleets of Windows machines as Microsoft Certified Systems Engineers (MCSE) and other credentials. Deployments grew and by the time XP was released, Microsoft had the lions' share of the market for desktop operating systems and productivity apps. XP would only cement that lead and create a generation of systems administrators equipped to manage the platform, who never knew a way other than the Microsoft way. One step along the path to the MCSE was through servers. For the first couple of years, XP connected to Windows 2000 Servers. Windows Server 2003, which was built on the Windows NT 5.2 kernel, was then released in 2003. Here, we saw Active Directory cement a lead created in 2000 over servers from Novell and other vendors. Server 2003 became the de facto platform for centralized file, print, web, ftp, software  time, DHCP, DNS, event, messeging, and terminal services (or shared Remote Desktop services through Terminal Server). Server 2003 could also be purchased with Exchange 2003. Given the integration with Microsoft Outlook and a number of desktop services, Microsoft Exchange.  The groupware market in 2003 and the years that followed were dominated by Lotus Notes, Novell's GroupWise, and Exchange. Microsoft was aggressive. They were aggressive on pricing. They released tools to migrate from Notes to Exchange the week before IBM's conference. We saw some of the same tactics and some of the same faces that were involved in Microsoft's Internet Explorer anti-trust suit from the 1990s. The competition to Change never recovered and while Microsoft gained ground in the groupware space through the Exchange Server 4.0, 5.0, 5.5, 2000, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 eras, by Exchange 2019 over half the mailboxes formerly hosted by on premises Exchange servers had moved to the cloud and predominantly Microsoft's Office 365 cloud service. Some still used legacy Unix mail services like sendmail or those hosted by third party providers like GoDaddy with their domain or website - but many of those ran on Exchange as well. The only company to put up true competition in the space has been Google. Other companies had released tools to manage Windows devices en masse. Companies like Altiris sprang out of needs for companies who did third party software testing to manage the state of Windows computers. Microsoft had a product called Systems Management Server but Altiris built a better product, so Microsoft built an even more robust solution called System Center Configuration Management server, or SCCM for short, and within a few years Altiris lost so much business they were acquired by Symantec. Other similar stories played out across other areas where each product competed with other vendors and sometimes market segments - and usually won. To a large degree this was because of the tight hold Windows had on the market. Microsoft had taken the desktop metaphor and seemed to own the entire stack by the end of the Windows XP era. However, the technology we used was a couple of years after the product management and product development teams started to build it. And by the end of the XP era, Bill Gates had been gone long enough, and many of the early stars that almost by pure will pushed products through development cycles were as well. Microsoft continued to release new versions of the operating systems but XP became one of the biggest competitors to later operating systems rather than other companies. This reluctance to move to Vista and other technologies was the main reason extended support for XP through to 2012, around 11 years after it was released. 

Screaming in the Cloud
The Multi-Cloud Counterculture with Tim Bray

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 41:50


About TimTimothy William Bray is a Canadian software developer, environmentalist, political activist and one of the co-authors of the original XML specification. He worked for Amazon Web Services from December 2014 until May 2020 when he quit due to concerns over the terminating of whistleblowers. Previously he has been employed by Google, Sun Microsystemsand Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Bray has also founded or co-founded several start-ups such as Antarctica Systems.Links Referenced: Textuality Services: https://www.textuality.com/ laugh]. So, the impetus for having this conversation is, you had a [blog post: https://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/202x/2022/01/30/Cloud-Lock-In @timbray: https://twitter.com/timbray tbray.org: https://tbray.org duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats V-U-L-T-R.com slash screaming.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today has been on a year or two ago, but today, we're going in a bit of a different direction. Tim Bray is a principal at Textuality Services.Once upon a time, he was a Distinguished Engineer slash VP at AWS, but let's be clear, he isn't solely focused on one company; he also used to work at Google. Also, there is scuttlebutt that he might have had something to do, at one point, with the creation of God's true language, XML. Tim, thank you for coming back on the show and suffering my slings and arrows.Tim: Oh, you're just fine. Glad to be here.Corey: [laugh]. So, the impetus for having this conversation is, you had a blog post somewhat recently—by which I mean, January of 2022—where you talked about lock-in and multi-cloud, two subjects near and dear to my heart, mostly because I have what I thought was a fairly countercultural opinion. You seem to have a very closely aligned perspective on this. But let's not get too far ahead of ourselves. Where did this blog posts come from?Tim: Well, I advised a couple of companies and one of them happens to be using GCP and the other happens to be using AWS and I get involved in a lot of industry conversations, and I noticed that multi-cloud is a buzzword. If you go and type multi-cloud into Google, you get, like, a page of people saying, “We will solve your multi-cloud problems. Come to us and you will be multi-cloud.” And I was not sure what to think, so I started writing to find out what I would think. And I think it's not complicated anymore. I think the multi-cloud is a reality in most companies. I think that many mainstream, non-startup companies are really worried about cloud lock-in, and that's not entirely unreasonable. So, it's a reasonable thing to think about and it's a reasonable thing to try and find the right balance between avoiding lock-in and not slowing yourself down. And the issues were interesting. What was surprising is that I published that blog piece saying what I thought were some kind of controversial things, and I got no pushback. Which was, you know, why I started talking to you and saying, “Corey, you know, does nobody disagree with this? Do you disagree with this? Maybe we should have a talk and see if this is just the new conventional wisdom.”Corey: There's nothing worse than almost trying to pick a fight, but no one actually winds up taking you up on the opportunity. That always feels a little off. Let's break it down into two issues because I would argue that they are intertwined, but not necessarily the same thing. Let's start with multi-cloud because it turns out that there's just enough nuance to—at least where I sit on this position—that whenever I tweet about it, I wind up getting wildly misinterpreted. Do you find that as well?Tim: Not so much. It's not a subject I have really had too much to say about, but it does mean lots of different things. And so it's not totally surprising that that happens. I mean, some people think when you say multi-cloud, you mean, “Well, I'm going to take my strategic application, and I'm going to run it in parallel on AWS and GCP because that way, I'll be more resilient and other good things will happen.” And then there's another thing, which is that, “Well, you know, as my company grows, I'm naturally going to be using lots of different technologies and that might include more than one cloud.” So, there's a whole spectrum of things that multi-cloud could mean. So, I guess when we talk about it, we probably owe it to our audiences to be clear what we're talking about.Corey: Let's be clear, from my perspective, the common definition of multi-cloud is whatever the person talking is trying to sell you at that point in time is, of course, what multi-cloud is. If it's a third-party dashboard, for example, “Oh, yeah, you want to be able to look at all of your cloud usage on a single pane of glass.” If it's a certain—well, I guess, certain not a given cloud provider, well, they understand if you go all-in on a cloud provider, it's probably not going to be them so they're, of course, going to talk about multi-cloud. And if it's AWS, where they are the 8000-pound gorilla in the space, “Oh, yeah, multi-clouds, terrible. Put everything on AWS. The end.” It seems that most people who talk about this have a very self-serving motivation that they can't entirely escape. That bias does reflect itself.Tim: That's true. When I joined AWS, which was around 2014, the PR line was a very hard line. “Well, multi-cloud that's not something you should invest in.” And I've noticed that the conversation online has become much softer. And I think one reason for that is that going all-in on a single cloud is at least possible when you're a startup, but if you're a big company, you know, a insurance company, a tire manufacturer, that kind of thing, you're going to be multi-cloud, for the same reason that they already have COBOL on the mainframe and Java on the old Sun boxes, and Mongo running somewhere else, and five different programming languages.And that's just the way big companies are, it's a consequence of M&A, it's a consequence of research projects that succeeded, one kind or another. I mean, lots of big companies have been trying to get rid of COBOL for decades, literally, [laugh] and not succeeding and doing that. So—Corey: It's ‘legacy' which is, of course, the condescending engineering term for, “It makes money.”Tim: And works. And so I don't think it's realistic to, as a matter of principle, not be multi-cloud.Corey: Let's define our terms a little more closely because very often, people like to pull strange gotchas out of the air. Because when I talk about this, I'm talking about—like, when I speak about it off the cuff, I'm thinking in terms of where do I run my containers? Where do I run my virtual machines? Where does my database live? But you can also move in a bunch of different directions. Where do my Git repositories live? What Office suite am I using? What am I using for my CRM? Et cetera, et cetera? Where do you draw the boundary lines because it's very easy to talk past each other if we're not careful here?Tim: Right. And, you know, let's grant that if you're a mainstream enterprise, you're running your Office automation on Microsoft, and they're twisting your arm to use the cloud version, so you probably are. And if you have any sense at all, you're not running your own Exchange Server, so let's assume that you're using Microsoft Azure for that. And you're running Salesforce, and that means you're on Salesforce's cloud. And a lot of other Software-as-a-Service offerings might be on AWS or Azure or GCP; they don't even tell you.So, I think probably the crucial issue that we should focus our conversation on is my own apps, my own software that is my core competence that I actually use to run the core of my business. And typically, that's the only place where a company would and should invest serious engineering resources to build software. And that's where the question comes, where should that software that I'm going to build run? And should it run on just one cloud, or—Corey: I found that when I gave a conference talk on this, in the before times, I had to have a ever lengthier section about, “I'm speaking in the general sense; there are specific cases where it does make sense for you to go in a multi-cloud direction.” And when I'm talking about multi-cloud, I'm not necessarily talking about Workload A lives on Azure and Workload B lives on AWS, through mergers, or weird corporate approaches, or shadow IT that—surprise—that's not revenue-bearing. Well, I guess we have to live with it. There are a lot of different divisions doing different things and you're going to see that a fair bit. And I'm not convinced that's a terrible idea as such. I'm talking about the single workload that we're going to spread across two or more clouds, intentionally.Tim: That's probably not a good idea. I just can't see that being a good idea, simply because you get into a problem of just terminology and semantics. You know, the different providers mean different things by the word ‘region' and the word ‘instance,' and things like that. And then there's the people problem. I mean, I don't think I personally know anybody who would claim to be able to build and deploy an application on AWS and also on GCP. I'm sure some people exist, but I don't know any of them.Corey: Well, Forrest Brazeal was deep in the AWS weeds and now he's the head of content at Google Cloud. I will credit him that he probably has learned to smack an API around over there.Tim: But you know, you're going to have a hard time hiring a person like that.Corey: Yeah. You can count these people almost as individuals.Tim: And that's a big problem. And you know, in a lot of cases, it's clearly the case that our profession is talent-starved—I mean, the whole world is talent-starved at the moment, but our profession in particular—and a lot of the decisions about what you can build and what you can do are highly contingent on who you can hire. And you can't hire a multi-cloud expert, well, you should not deploy, [laugh] you know, a multi-cloud application.Now, having said that, I just want to dot this i here and say that it can be made to kind of work. I've got this one company I advise—I wrote about it in the blog piece—that used to be on AWS and switched over to GCP. I don't even know why; this happened before I joined them. And they have a lot of applications and then they have some integrations with third-party partners which they implemented with AWS Lambda functions. So, when they moved over to GCP, they didn't stop doing that.So, this mission-critical latency-sensitive application of theirs runs on GCP that calls out to AWS to make calls into their partners' APIs and so on. And works fine. Solid as a rock, reliable, low latency. And so I talked to a person I know who knows over on the AWS side, and they said, “Oh, yeah sure, you know, we talked to those guys. Lots of people do that. We make sure, you know, the connections are low latency and solid.” So, technically speaking, it can be done. But for a variety of business reasons—maybe the most important one being expertise and who you can hire—it's probably just not a good idea.Corey: One of the areas where I think is an exception case is if you are a SaaS provider. Let's pick a big easy example: Snowflake, where they are a data warehouse. They've got to run their data warehousing application in all of the major clouds because that is where their customers are. And it turns out that if you're going to send a few petabytes into a data warehouse, you really don't want to be paying cloud egress rates to do it because it turns out, you can just bootstrap a second company for that much money.Tim: Well, Zoom would be another example, obviously.Corey: Oh, yeah. Anything that's heavy on data transfer is going to be a strange one. And there's being close to customers; gaming companies are another good example on this where a lot of the game servers themselves will be spread across a bunch of different providers, just purely based on latency metrics around what is close to certain customer clusters.Tim: I can't disagree with that. You know, I wonder how large a segment that is, of people who are, I think you're talking about core technology companies. Now, of the potential customers of the cloud providers, how many of them are core technology companies, like the kind we're talking about, who have such a need, and how many people who just are people who just want to run their manufacturing and product design and stuff. And for those, buying into a particular cloud is probably a perfectly sensible choice.Corey: I've also seen regulatory stories about this. I haven't been able to track them down specifically, but there is a pervasive belief that one interpretation of UK banking regulations stipulates that you have to be able to get back up and running within 30 days on a different cloud provider entirely. And also, they have the regulatory requirement that I believe the data remain in-country. So, that's a little odd. And honestly, when it comes to best practices and how you should architect things, I'm going to take a distinct backseat to legal requirements imposed upon you by your regulator. But let's be clear here, I'm not advising people to go and tell their auditors that they're wrong on these things.Tim: I had not heard that story, but you know, it sounds plausible. So, I wonder if that is actually in effect, which is to say, could a huge British banking company, in fact do that? Could they in fact, decamp from Azure and move over to GCP or AWS in 30 days? Boy.Corey: That is what one bank I spoke to over there was insistent on. A second bank I spoke to in that same jurisdiction had never heard of such a thing, so I feel like a lot of this is subject to auditor interpretation. Again, I am not an expert in this space. I do not pretend to be—I know I'm that rarest of all breeds: A white guy with a microphone in tech who admits he doesn't know something. But here we are.Tim: Yeah, I mean, I imagine it could be plausible if you didn't use any higher-level services, and you just, you know, rented instances and were careful about which version of Linux you ran and we're just running a bunch of Java code, which actually, you know, describes the workload of a lot of financial institutions. So, it should be a matter of getting… all the right instances configured and the JVM configured and launched. I mean, there are no… architecturally terrifying barriers to doing that. Of course, to do that, it would mean you would have to avoid using any of the higher-level services that are particular to any cloud provider and basically just treat them as people you rent boxes from, which is probably not a good choice for other business reasons.Corey: Which can also include things as seemingly low-level is load balancers, just based upon different provisioning modes, failure modes, and the rest. You're probably going to have a more consistent experience running HAProxy or nginx yourself to do it. But Tim, I have it on good authority that this is the old way of thinking, and that Kubernetes solves all of it. And through the power of containers and powers combining and whatnot, that frees us from being beholden to any given provider and our workloads are now all free as birds.Tim: Well, I will go as far as saying that if you are in the position of trying to be portable, probably using containers is a smart thing to do because that's a more tractable level of abstraction that does give you some insulation from, you know, which version of Linux you're running and things like that. The proposition that configuring and running Kubernetes is easier than configuring and running [laugh] JVM on Linux [laugh] is unsupported by any evidence I've seen. So, I'm dubious of the proposition that operating at the Kubernetes-level at the [unintelligible 00:14:42] level, you know, there's good reasons why some people want to do that, but I'm dubious of the proposition that really makes you more portable in an essential way.Corey: Well, you're also not the target market for Kubernetes. You have worked at multiple cloud providers and I feel like the real advantage of Kubernetes is people who happen to want to protect that they do so they can act as a sort of a cosplay of being their own cloud provider by running all the intricacies of Kubernetes. I'm halfway kidding, but there is an uncomfortable element of truth to that to some of the conversations I've had with some of its more, shall we say, fanatical adherents.Tim: Well, I think you and I are neither of us huge fans of Kubernetes, but my reasons are maybe a little different. Kubernetes does some really useful things. It really, really does. It allows you to take n VMs, and pack m different applications onto them in a way that takes reasonably good advantage of the processing power they have. And it allows you to have different things running in one place with different IP addresses.It sounds straightforward, but that turns out to be really helpful in a lot of ways. So, I'm actually kind of sympathetic with what Kubernetes is trying to be. My big gripe with it is that I think that good technology should make easy things easy and difficult things possible, and I think Kubernetes fails the first test there. I think the complexity that it involves is out of balance with the benefits you get. There's a lot of really, really smart people who disagree with me, so this is not a hill I'm going to die on.Corey: This is very much one of those areas where reasonable people can disagree. I find the complexity to be overwhelming; it has to collapse. At this point, it's finding someone who can competently run Kubernetes in production is a bit hard to do and they tend to be extremely expensive. You aren't going to find a team of those people at every company that wants to do things like this, and they're certainly not going to be able to find it in their budget in many cases. So, it's a challenging thing to do.Tim: Well, that's true. And another thing is that once you step onto the Kubernetes slope, you start looking about Istio and Envoy and [fabric 00:16:48] technology. And we're talking about extreme complexity squared at that point. But you know, here's the thing is, back in 2018 I think it was, in his keynote, Werner said that the big goal is that all the code you ever write should be application logic that delivers business value, which you know rep—Corey: Didn't CGI say the same thing? Didn't—like, isn't there, like, a long history dating back longer than I believe either of us have been alive have, “With this, all you're going to write is business logic.” That was the Java promise. That was the Google App Engine promise. Again, and again, we've had that carrot dangled in front of us, and it feels like the reality with Lambda is, the only code you will write is not necessarily business logic, it's getting the thing to speak to the other service you're trying to get it to talk to because a lot of these integrations are super finicky. At least back when I started learning how this stuff worked, they were.Tim: People understand where the pain points are and are indeed working on them. But I think we can agree that if you believe in that as a goal—which I still do; I mean, we may not have got there, but it's still a worthwhile goal to work on. We can agree that wrangling Istio configurations is not such a thing; it's not [laugh] directly value-adding business logic. To the extent that you can do that, I think serverless provides a plausible way forward. Now, you can be all cynical about, “Well, I still have trouble making my Lambda to talk to my other thing.” But you know, I've done that, and I've also deployed JVM on bare metal kind of thing.You know what? I'd rather do things at the Lambda level. I really rather would. Because capacity forecasting is a horribly difficult thing, we're all terrible at it, and the penalties for being wrong are really bad. If you under-specify your capacity, your customers have a lousy experience, and if you over-specify it, and you have an architecture that makes you configure for peak load, you're going to spend bucket-loads of money that you don't need to.Corey: “But you're then putting your availability in the cloud providers' hands.” “Yeah, you already were. Now, we're just being explicit about acknowledging that.”Tim: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And that's highly relevant to the current discussion because if you use the higher-level serverless function if you decide, okay, I'm going to go with Lambda and Dynamo and EventBridge and that kind of thing, well, that's not portable at all. I mean, APIs are totally idiosyncratic for AWS and GCP's equivalent, and Azure's—what do they call it? Permanent functions or something-a-rather functions. So yeah, that's part of the trade-off you have to think about. If you're going to do that, you're definitely not going to be multi-cloud in that application.Corey: And in many cases, one of the stated goals for going multi-cloud is that you can avoid the downtime of a single provider. People love to point at the big AWS outages or, “See? They were down for half a day.” And there is a societal question of what happens when everyone is down for half a day at the same time, but in most cases, what I'm seeing, your instead of getting rid of a single point of failure, introducing a second one. If either one of them is down your applications down, so you've doubled your outage surface area.On the rare occasions where you're able to map your dependencies appropriately, great. Are your third-party critical providers all doing the same? If you're an e-commerce site and Stripe processes your payments, well, they're public about being all-in on AWS. So, if you can't process payments, does it really matter that your website stays up? It becomes an interesting question. And those are the ones that you know about, let alone the third, fourth-order dependencies that are almost impossible to map unless everyone is as diligent as you are. It's a heavy, heavy lift.Tim: I'm going to push back a little bit. Now, for example, this company I'm advising that running GCP and calling out to Lambda is in that position; either GCP or Lambda goes off the air. On the other hand, if you've got somebody like Zoom, they're probably running parallel full stacks on the different cloud providers. And if you're doing that, then you can at least plausibly claim that you're in a good place because if Dynamo has an outage—and everything relies on Dynamo—then you shift your load over to GCP or Oracle [laugh] and you're still on the air.Corey: Yeah, but what is up as well because Zoom loves to sign me out on my desktop whenever I log into it on my laptop, and vice versa, and I wonder if that authentication and login system is also replicated full-stack to everywhere it goes, and what the fencing on that looks like, and how the communication between all those things works? I wouldn't doubt that it's possible that they've solved for this, but I also wonder how thoroughly they've really tested all of the, too. Not because I question them any; just because this stuff is super intricate as you start tracing it down into the nitty-gritty levels of the madness that consumes all these abstractions.Tim: Well, right, that's a conventional wisdom that is really wise and true, which is that if you have software that is alleged to do something like allow you to get going on another cloud, unless you've tested it within the last three weeks, it's not going to work when you need it.Corey: Oh, it's like a DR exercise: The next commit you make breaks it. Once you have the thing working again, it sits around as a binder, and it's a best guess. And let's be serious, a lot of these DR exercises presume that you're able to, for example, change DNS records on the fly, or be able to get a virtual machine provisioned in less than 45 minutes—because when there's an actual outage, surprise, everyone's trying to do the same things—there's a lot of stuff in there that gets really wonky at weird levels.Tim: A related similar exercise, which is people who want to be on AWS but want to be multi-region. It's actually, you know, a fairly similar kind of problem. If I need to be able to fail out of us-east-1—well, God help you, because if you need to everybody else needs to as well—but you know, would that work?Corey: Before you go multi-cloud go multi-region first. Tell me how easy it is because then you have full-feature parity—presumably—between everything; it should just be a walk in the park. Send me a postcard once you get that set up and I'll eat a bunch of words. And it turns out, basically, no one does.Tim: Mm-hm.Corey: Another area of lock-in around a lot of this stuff, and I think that makes it very hard to go multi-cloud is the security model of how does that interface with various aspects. In many cases, I'm seeing people doing full-on network overlays. They don't have to worry about the different security group models and VPCs and all the rest. They can just treat everything as a node sitting on the internet, and the only thing it talks to is an overlay network. Which is terrible, but that seems to be one of the only ways people are able to build things that span multiple providers with any degree of success.Tim: Well, that is painful because, much as we all like to scoff and so on, in the degree of complexity you get into there, it is the case that your typical public cloud provider can do security better than you can. They just can. It's a fact of life. And if you're using a public cloud provider and not taking advantage of their security offerings, infrastructure, that's probably dumb. But if you really want to be multi-cloud, you kind of have to, as you said.In particular, this gets back to the problem of expertise because it's hard enough to hire somebody who really understands IAM deeply and how to get that working properly, try and find somebody who can understand that level of thing on two different cloud providers at once. Oh, gosh.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: Another point you made in your blog post was the idea of lock-in, of people being worried that going all-in on a provider was setting them up to be, I think Oracle is the term that was tossed around where once you're dependent on a provider, what's to stop them from cranking the pricing knobs until you squeal?Tim: Nothing. And I think that is a perfectly sane thing to worry about. Now, in the short term, based on my personal experience working with, you know, AWS leadership, I think that it's probably not a big short-term risk. AWS is clearly aware that most of the growth is still in front of them. You know, the amount of all of it that's on the cloud is still pretty small and so the thing to worry about right now is growth.And they are really, really genuinely, sincerely focused on customer success and will bend over backwards to deal with the customers problems as they are. And I've seen places where people have negotiated a huge multi-year enterprise agreement based on Reserved Instances or something like that, and then realize, oh, wait, we need to switch our whole technology stack, but you've got us by the RIs and AWS will say, “No, no, it's okay. We'll tear that up and rewrite it and get you where you need to go.” So, in the short term, between now and 2025, would I worry about my cloud provider doing that? Probably not so much.But let's go a little further out. Let's say it's, you know, 2030 or something like that, and at that point, you know, Andy Jassy decided to be a full-time sports mogul, and Satya Narayana has gone off to be a recreational sailboat owner or something like that, and private equity operators come in and take very significant stakes in the public cloud providers, and get a lot of their guys on the board, and you have a very different dynamic. And you have something that starts to feel like Oracle where their priority isn't, you know, optimizing for growth and customer success; their priority is optimizing for a quarterly bottom line, and—Corey: Revenue extraction becomes the goal.Tim: That's absolutely right. And this is not a hypothetical scenario; it's happened. Most large companies do not control the amount of money they spend per year to have desktop software that works. They pay whatever Microsoft's going to say they pay because they don't have a choice. And a lot of companies are in the same situation with their database.They don't get to budget, their database budget. Oracle comes in and says, “Here's what you're going to pay,” and that's what you pay. You really don't want to be in a situation with your cloud, and that's why I think it's perfectly reasonable for somebody who is doing cloud transition at a major financial or manufacturing or service provider company to have an eye to this. You know, let's not completely ignore the lock-in issue.Corey: There is a significant scale with enterprise deals and contracts. There is almost always a contractual provision that says if you're going to raise a price with any cloud provider, there's a fixed period of time of notice you must give before it happens. I feel like the first mover there winds up getting soaked because everyone is going to panic and migrate in other directions. I mean, Google tried it with Google Maps for their API, and not quite Google Cloud, but also scared the bejesus out of a whole bunch of people who were, “Wait. Is this a harbinger of things to come?”Tim: Well, not in the short term, I don't think. And I think you know, Google Maps [is absurdly 00:26:36] underpriced. That's hellishly expensive service. And it's supposed to pay for itself by, you know, advertising on maps. I don't know about that.I would see that as the exception rather than the rule. I think that it's reasonable to expect cloud prices, nominally at least, to go on decreasing for at least the short term, maybe even the medium term. But that's—can't go on forever.Corey: It also feels to me, like having looked at an awful lot of AWS environments that if there were to be some sort of regulatory action or some really weird outage for a year that meant that AWS could not onboard a single new customer, their revenue year-over-year would continue to increase purely by organic growth because there is no forcing function that turns the thing off when you're done using it. In fact, they can migrate things around to hardware that works, they can continue building you for the things sitting there idle. And there is no governance path on that. So, on some level, winding up doing a price increase is going to cause a massive company focus on fixing a lot of that. It feels on some level like it is drawing attention to a thing that they don't really want to draw attention to from a purely revenue extraction story.When CentOS back-walked their ten-year support line two years, suddenly—and with an idea that it would drive [unintelligible 00:27:56] adoption. Well, suddenly, a lot of people looked at their environment, saw they had old [unintelligible 00:28:00] they weren't using. And massively short-sighted, massively irritated a whole bunch of people who needed that in the short term, but by the renewal, we're going to be on to Ubuntu or something else. It feels like it's going to backfire massively, and I'd like to imagine the strategist of whoever takes the reins of these companies is going to be smarter than that. But here we are.Tim: Here we are. And you know it's interesting you should mention regulatory action. At the moment, there are only three credible public cloud providers. It's not obvious the Google's really in it for the long haul, as last time I checked, they were claiming to maybe be breaking even on it. That's not a good number, you know? You'd like there to be more than that.And if it goes on like that, eventually, some politician is going to say, “Oh, maybe they should be regulated like public utilities,” because they kind of are right? And I would think that anybody who did get into Oracle-izing would be—you know, accelerate that happening. Having said that, we do live in the atmosphere of 21st-century capitalism, and growth is the God that must be worshiped at all costs. Who knows. It's a cloudy future. Hard to see.Corey: It really is. I also want to be clear, on some level, that with Google's current position, if they weren't taking a small loss at least, on these things, I would worry. Like, wait, you're trying to catch AWS and you don't have anything better to invest that money into than just well time to start taking profits from it. So, I can see both sides of that one.Tim: Right. And as I keep saying, I've already said once during this slot, you know, the total cloud spend in the world is probably on the order of one or two-hundred billion per annum, and global IT is in multiple trillions. So, [laugh] there's a lot more space for growth. Years and years worth of it.Corey: Yeah. The challenge, too, is that people are worried about this long-term strategic point of view. So, one thing you talked about in your blog post is the idea of using hosted open-source solutions. Like, instead of using Kinesis, you'd wind up using Kafka or instead of using DynamoDB you use their managed Cassandra service—or as I think of it Amazon Basics Cassandra—and effectively going down the path of letting them manage this thing, but you then have a theoretical Exodus path. Where do you land on that?Tim: I think that speaks to a lot of people's concerns, and I've had conversations with really smart people about that who like that idea. Now, to be realistic, it doesn't make migration easy because you've still got all the CI and CD and monitoring and management and scaling and alarms and alerts and paging and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, wrapped around it. So, it's not as though you could just pick up your managed Kafka off AWS and drop a huge installation onto GCP easily. But at least, you know, your data plan APIs are the same, so a lot of your code would probably still run okay. So, it's a plausible path forward. And when people say, “I want to do that,” well, it does mean that you can't go all serverless. But it's not a totally insane path forward.Corey: So, one last point in your blog post that I think a lot of people think about only after they get bitten by it is the idea of data gravity. I alluded earlier in our conversation to data egress charges, but my experience has been that where your data lives is effectively where the rest of your cloud usage tends to aggregate. How do you see it?Tim: Well, it's a real issue, but I think it might perhaps be a little overblown. People throw the term petabytes around, and people don't realize how big a petabyte is. A petabyte is just an insanely huge amount of data, and the notion of transmitting one over the internet is terrifying. And there are lots of enterprises that have multiple petabytes around, and so they think, “Well, you know, it would take me 26 years to transmit that, so I can't.”And they might be wrong. The internet's getting faster all time. Did you notice? I've been able to move some—for purely personal projects—insane amounts of data, and it gets there a lot faster than you did. Secondly, in the case of AWS Snowmobile, we have an existence proof that you can do exabyte-ish scale data transfers in the time it takes to drive a truck across the country.Corey: Inbound only. Snowmobiles are not—at least according to public examples—are valid for Exodus.Tim: But you know, this is kind of place where regulatory action might come into play if what the people were doing was seen to be abusive. I mean, there's an existence proof you can do this thing. But here's another point. So, I suppose you have, like, 15 petabytes—that's an insane amount of data—displayed in your corporate application. So, are you actually using that to run the application, or is a huge proportion of that stuff just logs and data gathered of various kinds that's being used in analytics applications and AI models and so on?Do you actually need all that data to actually run your app? And could you in fact, just pick up the stuff you need for your app, move it to a different cloud provider from there and leave your analytics on the first one? Not a totally insane idea.Corey: It's not a terrible idea at all. It comes down to the idea as well of when you're trying to run a query against a bunch of that data, do you need all the data to transit or just the results of that query, as well? It's a question of, can you move the compute closer to the data as opposed to the data to where the compute lives?Tim: Well, you know and a lot of those people who have those huge data pools have it sitting on S3, and a lot of it migrated off into Glacier, so it's not as if you could get at it in milliseconds anyhow. I just ask myself, “How much data can anybody actually use in a day? In the course of satisfying some transaction requests from a customer?” And I think it's not petabyte. It just isn't.Now, there are—okay, there are exceptions. There's the intelligence community, there's the oil drilling community, there are some communities who genuinely will use insanely huge seas of data on a routine basis, but you know, I think that's kind of a corner case, so before you shake your head and say, “Ah, they'll never move because the data gravity,” you know… you need to prove that to me and I might be a little bit skeptical.Corey: And I think that is probably a very fair request. Just tell me what it is you're going to be doing here to validate the idea that is in your head because the most interesting lies I've found customers tell isn't intentionally to me or anyone else; it's to themselves. The narrative of what they think they're doing from the early days takes root, and never mind the fact that, yeah, it turns out that now that you've scaled out, maybe development isn't 80% of your cloud bill anymore. You learn things and your understanding of what you're doing has to evolve with the evolution of the applications.Tim: Yep. It's a fun time to be around. I mean, it's so great; right at the moment lock-in just isn't that big an issue. And let's be clear—I'm sure you'll agree with me on this, Corey—is if you're a startup and you're trying to grow and scale and prove you've got a viable business, and show that you have exponential growth and so on, don't think about lock-in; just don't go near it. Pick a cloud provider, pick whichever cloud provider your CTO already knows how to use, and just go all-in on them, and use all their most advanced features and be serverless if you can. It's the only sane way forward. You're short of time, you're short of money, you need growth.Corey: “Well, what if you need to move strategically in five years?” You should be so lucky. Great. Deal with it then. Or, “Well, what if we want to sell to retail as our primary market and they hate AWS?”Well, go all-in on a provider; probably not that one. Pick a different provider and go all in. I do not care which cloud any given company picks. Go with what's right for you, but then go all in because until you have a compelling reason to do otherwise, you're going to spend more time solving global problems locally.Tim: That's right. And we've never actually said this probably because it's something that both you and I know at the core of our being, but it probably needs to be said that being multi-cloud is expensive, right? Because the nouns and verbs that describe what clouds do are different in Google-land and AWS-land; they're just different. And it's hard to think about those things. And you lose the capability of using the advanced serverless stuff. There are a whole bunch of costs to being multi-cloud.Now, maybe if you're existentially afraid of lock-in, you don't care. But for I think most normal people, ugh, it's expensive.Corey: Pay now or pay later, you will pay. Wouldn't you ideally like to see that dollar go as far as possible? I'm right there with you because it's not just the actual infrastructure costs that's expensive, it costs something far more dear and expensive, and that is the cognitive expense of having to think about both of these things, not just how each cloud provider works, but how each one breaks. You've done this stuff longer than I have; I don't think that either of us trust a system that we don't understand the failure cases for and how it's going to degrade. It's, “Oh, right. You built something new and awesome. Awesome. How does it fall over? What direction is it going to hit, so what side should I not stand on?” It's based on an understanding of what you're about to blow holes in.Tim: That's right. And you know, I think particularly if you're using AWS heavily, you know that there are some things that you might as well bet your business on because, you know, if they're down, so is the rest of the world, and who cares? And, other things, eh, maybe a little chance here. So, understanding failure modes, understanding your stuff, you know, the cost of sharp edges, understanding manageability issues. It's not obvious.Corey: It's really not. Tim, I want to thank you for taking the time to go through this, frankly, excellent post with me. If people want to learn more about how you see things, and I guess how you view the world, where's the best place to find you?Tim: I'm on Twitter, just @timbray T-I-M-B-R-A-Y. And my blog is at tbray.org, and that's where that piece you were just talking about is, and that's kind of my online presence.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to it in the [show notes 00:37:42]. Thanks so much for being so generous with your time. It's always a pleasure to talk to you.Tim: Well, it's always fun to talk to somebody who has shared passions, and we clearly do.Corey: Indeed. Tim Bray principal at Textuality Services. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that you then need to take to all of the other podcast platforms out there purely for redundancy, so you don't get locked into one of them.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

RunAs Radio
Email Transport Security with Gareth Gudger

RunAs Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 41:41


How do you secure your email transport? Richard talks to Gareth Gudger about the various additional protocols and approaches essential to transporting email. Gareth reminds us that SMTP, like the Internet, was not designed with security in mind, so we have to add layers to try and improve things. It is an acronym soup of SPF, DKIM, DMARC, MTA-STS, and DANE - but every acronym gets a definition! Sure, there is more to email security than just transport, but arguably, this is the place to start. And after that - focus on identity security!Links:Office 365 for IT ProsHAFNIUM ExploitMTA-STS for Exchange OnlineEmail Encryption in M365Advanced Message EncryptionM365 MapsSPF in M365Gareth's BlogRecorded February 15, 2022

Things Learned
TL0057 - 2012, Week 05 and 06 Highlights

Things Learned

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2022 21:12


1/31/12 - The 4th Lateran Council 2/1/12 - About the Ming Empire 2/4/12 - What a "dirt block" drink is. Dirt Block (Minecraft cocktail) 2/5/12 - Using Foobar2000 2/6/12 - Christopher Columbus did a lot of terrible things. Was Christopher Columbus a Hero or Villain? 2/7/12 - Setting up Google Sync with Exchange on iOS. Sync heck: DalDAV vs Exchange Server – a Google Apple review | What are the pros and cons of IMAP/CalDAV vs. Exchange for Gmail and Google Calendar for iOS 4? 2/8/12 - iMovie has a built in way to move projects to other drives. Problem Solved: How to Move iMovie 09 Projects to Other Drives 2/11/12 - About QTTabBar QTTabBar| QTTabBar fork Extra topic - random things about DTV - The Final Moments of Analog Broadcast This episode's music comes from archive.org, YouTube free music repositories, the Free Music Archive, and Apple iMovie Tracks featured in this episode include: TrackTribe - Walk Through the Park Kevin MacLeod - Virtutes Instrumenti [ Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) | Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 | http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ] Siddhartha Corsus - Count Your Blessings, Count Your Stars Siddhartha Corsus - Bhagavan Siddhartha Corsus - Pure of Heart

Geek Speak - Tech Talks with Envision IT
Episode 28: Log4J and Exchange Server Issues

Geek Speak - Tech Talks with Envision IT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 5:22


Join us for updates on recent Log4J news and the Exchange Server issue users encountered starting out the new year.

Windows Weekly (MP3)
WW 758: An Encyclopedia of Chipsets - Azure vs. AWS, Ryzen 6000, Android on Windows

Windows Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 146:28


Azure vs. AWS, Ryzen 6000, Android on Windows CES 2022: Better together with Android and beyond AMD Unveils Its Ryzen 6000 Series Mobile Processors 12th-Generation Intel Core Chipsets Come to Mobile PCs CES 2022: Microsoft, Qualcomm to collaborate on custom augmented-reality chips Intel says foldable screen laptop PCs are coming to market in 2022 | Windows Central Acer Announces the Aspire Vero National Geographic Edition CES 2022: ASUS refreshes its gaming lineup and introduces new form factors, CPUs and GPUs | Windows Experience Blog Dell Announces XPS 13 Plus HP Announces New Dragonfly, Many More Portable and Desktop PCs CES 2022: Lenovo ushers in new looks and approaches for hybrid work, gaming and everything else | Windows Experience Blog First Microsoft Pluton-powered Windows 11 PCs to start rolling out this year Samsung Launches the Galaxy S21 FE at $699 OnePlus Previews the OnePlus 10 Pro Where is the December Update for the Pixel 6 Series? Google Finally Addresses the December 2021 Update for Pixel 6/6 Pro Google Delivers January Update for Pixel, But Not for Pixel 6 Series I'm Switching to the iPhone More Microsoft Report: Microsoft Cloud Still Half the Size of AWS Microsoft issues emergency fix for Exchange Server date-check bug Windows Developer Team Tweets a Programming Mistake Apple is First Company to Hit $3 Trillion Valuation Xbox Microsoft Reveals Games with Gold for January Microsoft Announces First Xbox Game Pass Titles for January Rainbow Six Extraction Coming to Xbox Game Pass on Day One Sony Announces VR2 and VR2 Sense Controller for PlayStation 5 Samsung Gaming Hub to Bring Stadia, More to Samsung TVs Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Understand the history of Windows via software development App and Codename pick of the week: Project Monarch (One Outlook) Enterprise pick of the week: Out of band Win Server and Win 10 Enterprise updates Beer pick of the week: Salted Caramel Barrel Aged Framinghammer Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin.

Gadget Detective - A selection of free tech advice & tech news broadcasts by Fevzi Turkalp on the BBC & elsewhere

Fevzi Turkalp, the Gadget Detective, joins David Harper on LBC News to discuss the Y2K22, an email glitch being likened to the Millennium Bug discovered by Microsoft in Exchange Server, one which affects the way dates are stored and could stop emails being delivered. You can follow and contact the Gadget Detective on Twitter @gadgetdetective #Fevzi #Turkalp #Gadget #Detective #Tech #News #Reviews #Help #Advice #LBC #News #Radio #David #Harper #Microsoft #Exchange #Server #Y2K22 #Bug #Millennium #2000 #2021 #2022 #Data #Email #Code #Virus #Scan #Software #Problem #Glitch #Code

Windows Weekly (Video HI)
WW 758: An Encyclopedia of Chipsets - Azure vs. AWS, Ryzen 6000, Android on Windows

Windows Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 147:10


Azure vs. AWS, Ryzen 6000, Android on Windows CES 2022: Better together with Android and beyond AMD Unveils Its Ryzen 6000 Series Mobile Processors 12th-Generation Intel Core Chipsets Come to Mobile PCs CES 2022: Microsoft, Qualcomm to collaborate on custom augmented-reality chips Intel says foldable screen laptop PCs are coming to market in 2022 | Windows Central Acer Announces the Aspire Vero National Geographic Edition CES 2022: ASUS refreshes its gaming lineup and introduces new form factors, CPUs and GPUs | Windows Experience Blog Dell Announces XPS 13 Plus HP Announces New Dragonfly, Many More Portable and Desktop PCs CES 2022: Lenovo ushers in new looks and approaches for hybrid work, gaming and everything else | Windows Experience Blog First Microsoft Pluton-powered Windows 11 PCs to start rolling out this year Samsung Launches the Galaxy S21 FE at $699 OnePlus Previews the OnePlus 10 Pro Where is the December Update for the Pixel 6 Series? Google Finally Addresses the December 2021 Update for Pixel 6/6 Pro Google Delivers January Update for Pixel, But Not for Pixel 6 Series I'm Switching to the iPhone More Microsoft Report: Microsoft Cloud Still Half the Size of AWS Microsoft issues emergency fix for Exchange Server date-check bug Windows Developer Team Tweets a Programming Mistake Apple is First Company to Hit $3 Trillion Valuation Xbox Microsoft Reveals Games with Gold for January Microsoft Announces First Xbox Game Pass Titles for January Rainbow Six Extraction Coming to Xbox Game Pass on Day One Sony Announces VR2 and VR2 Sense Controller for PlayStation 5 Samsung Gaming Hub to Bring Stadia, More to Samsung TVs Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Understand the history of Windows via software development App and Codename pick of the week: Project Monarch (One Outlook) Enterprise pick of the week: Out of band Win Server and Win 10 Enterprise updates Beer pick of the week: Salted Caramel Barrel Aged Framinghammer Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin.

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Windows Weekly 758: An Encyclopedia of Chipsets

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 146:28


Azure vs. AWS, Ryzen 6000, Android on Windows CES 2022: Better together with Android and beyond AMD Unveils Its Ryzen 6000 Series Mobile Processors 12th-Generation Intel Core Chipsets Come to Mobile PCs CES 2022: Microsoft, Qualcomm to collaborate on custom augmented-reality chips Intel says foldable screen laptop PCs are coming to market in 2022 | Windows Central Acer Announces the Aspire Vero National Geographic Edition CES 2022: ASUS refreshes its gaming lineup and introduces new form factors, CPUs and GPUs | Windows Experience Blog Dell Announces XPS 13 Plus HP Announces New Dragonfly, Many More Portable and Desktop PCs CES 2022: Lenovo ushers in new looks and approaches for hybrid work, gaming and everything else | Windows Experience Blog First Microsoft Pluton-powered Windows 11 PCs to start rolling out this year Samsung Launches the Galaxy S21 FE at $699 OnePlus Previews the OnePlus 10 Pro Where is the December Update for the Pixel 6 Series? Google Finally Addresses the December 2021 Update for Pixel 6/6 Pro Google Delivers January Update for Pixel, But Not for Pixel 6 Series I'm Switching to the iPhone More Microsoft Report: Microsoft Cloud Still Half the Size of AWS Microsoft issues emergency fix for Exchange Server date-check bug Windows Developer Team Tweets a Programming Mistake Apple is First Company to Hit $3 Trillion Valuation Xbox Microsoft Reveals Games with Gold for January Microsoft Announces First Xbox Game Pass Titles for January Rainbow Six Extraction Coming to Xbox Game Pass on Day One Sony Announces VR2 and VR2 Sense Controller for PlayStation 5 Samsung Gaming Hub to Bring Stadia, More to Samsung TVs Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Understand the history of Windows via software development App and Codename pick of the week: Project Monarch (One Outlook) Enterprise pick of the week: Out of band Win Server and Win 10 Enterprise updates Beer pick of the week: Salted Caramel Barrel Aged Framinghammer Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin.

Radio Leo (Audio)
Windows Weekly 758: An Encyclopedia of Chipsets

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 146:28


Azure vs. AWS, Ryzen 6000, Android on Windows CES 2022: Better together with Android and beyond AMD Unveils Its Ryzen 6000 Series Mobile Processors 12th-Generation Intel Core Chipsets Come to Mobile PCs CES 2022: Microsoft, Qualcomm to collaborate on custom augmented-reality chips Intel says foldable screen laptop PCs are coming to market in 2022 | Windows Central Acer Announces the Aspire Vero National Geographic Edition CES 2022: ASUS refreshes its gaming lineup and introduces new form factors, CPUs and GPUs | Windows Experience Blog Dell Announces XPS 13 Plus HP Announces New Dragonfly, Many More Portable and Desktop PCs CES 2022: Lenovo ushers in new looks and approaches for hybrid work, gaming and everything else | Windows Experience Blog First Microsoft Pluton-powered Windows 11 PCs to start rolling out this year Samsung Launches the Galaxy S21 FE at $699 OnePlus Previews the OnePlus 10 Pro Where is the December Update for the Pixel 6 Series? Google Finally Addresses the December 2021 Update for Pixel 6/6 Pro Google Delivers January Update for Pixel, But Not for Pixel 6 Series I'm Switching to the iPhone More Microsoft Report: Microsoft Cloud Still Half the Size of AWS Microsoft issues emergency fix for Exchange Server date-check bug Windows Developer Team Tweets a Programming Mistake Apple is First Company to Hit $3 Trillion Valuation Xbox Microsoft Reveals Games with Gold for January Microsoft Announces First Xbox Game Pass Titles for January Rainbow Six Extraction Coming to Xbox Game Pass on Day One Sony Announces VR2 and VR2 Sense Controller for PlayStation 5 Samsung Gaming Hub to Bring Stadia, More to Samsung TVs Tips and Picks Tip of the week: Understand the history of Windows via software development App and Codename pick of the week: Project Monarch (One Outlook) Enterprise pick of the week: Out of band Win Server and Win 10 Enterprise updates Beer pick of the week: Salted Caramel Barrel Aged Framinghammer Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin.

The CyberWire
Log4j updates, including an Aquatic Panda sighting. Cyberattacks hit news services in Norway, Israel, and Portugal. Addressing Y2K22.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:29


Aquatic Panda has been found working Log4shell exploits against an academic institution. Apache fixes new Log4j issues reported last week, and Microsoft also updates Windows Defender to address Log4j risks. Cyberattacks, criminal or hacktivist in motivation, hit news outlets around the new year. Microsoft works on fixing a Y2K22 bug in on-premise Exchange Server. Andrea Little Limbago from Interos on technology spheres of influence. Our guest is Mark Dehus from Lumen's Black Lotus Labs with DDoS insights. And CISA issues some ICS security advisories. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/1