Podcast appearances and mentions of Michael Schumacher

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German racing driver

  • 366PODCASTS
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 13, 2021LATEST
Michael Schumacher

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Best podcasts about Michael Schumacher

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Latest podcast episodes about Michael Schumacher

F1: Beyond The Grid
152: Lawrence Stroll's Aston Masterplan

F1: Beyond The Grid

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:25


Aston Martin is ‘the next big thing to happen in Formula 1'. So says Lawrence Stroll, who's brought the historic brand back into the sport. Stroll first entered the F1 world as a clothing sponsor for Lotus in the 90s before teaming up with Ferrari and Michael Schumacher. A life-long lover of beautiful cars, he tells Tom Clarkson what two things convinced him to buy the Force India team and transform it into Aston Martin. Now – with son Lance and Sebastian Vettel at the wheel of the dark green cars - Stroll's aiming to win in Formula 1. He explains his masterplan for a talented team and a state-of-the-art factory that he believes will change the face of Grand Prix racing.

Marketplace Morning Report
Many died from COVID without leaving behind wills. Probate courts feel the impact.

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:07


Thousands of people have died from COVID, and many of them didn’t leave behind a will. That leaves the probate court to figure out what to do with a person’s money, debt and property. Also today: Michael Schumacher joins us to discuss how the markets are dealing with the question of inflation. In Texas, the governor has issued an order that bans private companies from issuing vaccine mandates.

Marketplace All-in-One
Many died from COVID without leaving behind wills. Probate courts feel the impact.

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:07


Thousands of people have died from COVID, and many of them didn’t leave behind a will. That leaves the probate court to figure out what to do with a person’s money, debt and property. Also today: Michael Schumacher joins us to discuss how the markets are dealing with the question of inflation. In Texas, the governor has issued an order that bans private companies from issuing vaccine mandates.

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff
Introduction To Michael Schumacher's Wreck Of The Carl D.Bradley, Loss, Survival, & Rescue At Sea.

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 50:51


Learn how 1950's had brought its share of thrilling entertainment into people's homes via television, but yet was beset by a continuous uphill battle for Civil Rights Equality. Find out what happened on Tuesday, November 18, 1958 involving a 623 Foot Limestone Carrier. Discover what exactly makes the month of November along Great Lakes Waters so challenging to define. Find out which town in Michigan becomes Epicenter behind what will happen Tuesday November 18, 1958. Learn which businesses became largest employers to town that became Epicenter of tragedy. Learn about transportation company which stood out from others. Discover the name of 623 Foot Limestone Carrier and what one of the crewmen had done leading up to November 18. Find out how the weather itself had drastically changed throughout Tuesday November 18, 1958. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/support

In the Fast Lane
Episode 79: Mick Schumacher

In the Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 24:56


Mick Schumacher talks about the scale of the jump from F2® to Formula 1® in his rookie year with the Uralkali Haas F1® Team, how he's keeping his competitive fires burning in a backmarker team, growing up in the spotlight because of his father Michael and his thoughts on the 'Schumacher' Netflix documentary, while we review Sunday's Russian Grand Prix won by Lewis Hamilton.

The Race F1 Podcast
Russian Grand Prix review

The Race F1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 52:42


Scott Mitchell and Mark Hughes join Edd Straw to look back at a dramatic Russian Grand Prix. Visit NordVPN.com/therace or use code therace to take advantage of The Race's limited time offer for 73% off your two-year NordVPN plan plus four bonus months for free.To enter our F1 Authentics competition for the chance to win 1:2 scale replica Michael Schumacher 300th grand prix or Fernando Alonso 2021 helmets, or to get your name on the chequered flag for the Saudi Arabia Grand Prix, visit the wearetherace Instagram.

OverDrive
OverDrive - Hour 3 - September 24th, 2021

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:56


Hour 3 as we wrap up a Mail it in Friday on OverDrive presented by Coors Light Canada with Andi Petrillo, Jeff O'Neill & Jamie McLennan. Andi gets into her fondness for the Michael Schumacher documentary before TSN NFL Analyst Jabari Greer stops by to go around the NFL world. Plus we revisit out conversation with Maple Leafs Captain John Tavares!

OverDrive
OverDrive - Hour 3 - September 24th, 2021

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:11


Hour 3 as we wrap up a Mail it in Friday on OverDrive presented by Coors Light Canada with Andi Petrillo, Jeff O'Neill & Jamie McLennan. Andi gets into her fondness for the Michael Schumacher documentary before TSN NFL Analyst Jabari Greer stops by to go around the NFL world. Plus we revisit out conversation with Maple Leafs Captain John Tavares!

Los Time Pilots
Cruis'n Blast Arcades y Pizza - Los Time Pilots Ep 48

Los Time Pilots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 69:40


En este episodio de Los Time Pilots recordamos los 90's con el lanzamiento de Cruis'n Blast, además platicamos sobre el cierre permanente de SEGA Ikebukuro GIGO, los negocios de maquinitas/arcades en México y Las Vegas. Mucho hype por próximos estrenos en cine de Venom: Let There Be Carnage, The Last Duel, No Time to Die, Dune y varias recomendaciones de series que ver, Clau nos platicó del documental de Michael Schumacher en Netflix, terrores paranormales pandémicos en Host (2020) y en el Agrurómetro mucho cariño a la pizza del barrio y el banderazo oficial de la temporada de pan de muerto. ¡No olviden mandarnos sus recomendaciones! Visita La Pilot Shop: http://shop.lostimepilots.com/ Apóyanos en Patreon: www.patreon.com/lostimepilots Síguenos en: TWITTER https://twitter.com/lostimepilots INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/lostimepilots/ FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/lostimepilots

La soirée est (encore) jeune
Marie-Ève-Lyne Michel, Nimâ Machouf et Serge Denoncourt

La soirée est (encore) jeune

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 102:07


Marie-Ève-Lyne Michel, candidate du Bloc québécois, répond à des questions sur l'élection de demain; Serge Denoncourt, qui a passé l'été à l'étranger, explique pourquoi il revient pour une journée à Montréal; Charles Beauchesne fait le palmarès des pires moments vécus par un premier ministre canadien; Pierre Houde discute avec les membres de La soirée d'un nouveau documentaire sur Michael Schumacher; Olivier Niquet explique dans son billet idéologique pourquoi aller aux pommes est une mauvaise idée d'activité; Nimâ Machouf, candidate du NPD, parle de la dernière campagne électorale; et Jean-Sébastien Girard répond aux questions de jeunes auditeurs et auditrices.

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S4 E12: Your questions answered - part two

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 65:37


Series four of Bring Back V10s ends with us taking more questions from our audience. Edd Straw and Matt Beer join Glenn Freeman to tackle topics including what would have happened if Juan Pablo Montoya and Jacques Villeneuve were team-mates at Williams, which Hockenheim layout was best, how Michael Andretti would have got on at Ferrari rather than McLaren, the prospect of Ayrton Senna and Michael Schumacher as team-mates, the 107% rule, how good Luca Badoer really was, McLaren vs Williams in 1991, plus the best and worst seasons of the V10 era and much much more.

Fun With Cars » F1 Podcast
Episode 302: Palou is ahead after Two Great Indycar Races!

Fun With Cars » F1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 47:50


Documentary on Michael Schumacher’s racing career is fantastic, with the right mindset. Both Portland and Monterey Indycar races put on a great show. Robin is joined by Christopher Roche and they discuss The Michael Schumacher documentary on Netflix Martin Whitmarsh returns to Formula 1 Indycar releases 2022 schedule Alex Palou wins the Indycar Grand Prix … Continue reading Episode 302: Palou is ahead after Two Great Indycar Races! → The post Episode 302: Palou is ahead after Two Great Indycar Races! first appeared on Fun With Cars.

Inside Line F1 Podcast
Michael Schumacher Is An Emotion, Netflix Captures It Well - Documentary Review

Inside Line F1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 11:06


We're always up for discussing Michael Schumacher - and in this episode, Soumil and Kunal review the Michael Schumacher documentary that Netflix released a few days ago. We're probably a bit late with our review of the documentary, but then again, we had a slew of emotions to deal with before we sat to record.  (Episode description follows below) Use 'PUMAINSIDELINE' to avail a 5% discount on Puma's Motorsport merchandise collection (exclusive for our listeners in India). Subscribe to our newsletter! It's free, informative, insightful and visually appealing. You can read more and sign up. Did you watch the Michael Schumacher documentary on Netflix? What's your take on the stories they narrated? What part touched you the most and what part(s) left you wanting more? Tune in to hear our review!  (Season 2021, Episode 57) Follow our hosts on Twitter: Sundaram Ramaswami, Soumil Arora and Kunal Shah Image courtesy: Ferrari 

Zee Soccer Podcast
Zee Soccer Fund

Zee Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 35:08


9 games to go in MLS and the race for the playoffs in the East is very tight! Unfortunately, the Fire couldn't find a way into the mix this past week with two losses while DC United is right in the thick of it. We cover all of our games this past week, including ZeePodDerby and an emotional return to Atlanta for Jules! Most importantly, we created ‘Zee Soccer Fund' to start giving back to the community through this platform (more details to follow). At first though, we spoke a little bit about Formula 1 racing, especially about Michael Schumacher and how his documentary made us think back to our youth. Lastly, the Bundesliga stays tight with Ws from both Bayern and Dortmund, while Leipzig is a bit slacking behind.

DriveNation on Cars
Visiting a very special car collection – and being handed the keys #77

DriveNation on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 41:48


Dan Prosser and Andrew Frankel were invited to look at a truly remarkable collection of cars before being invited to drive any one they liked. Dan chose a Le Mans Aston Martin DB3S, while Andrew picked out Tazio Nuvolari's Alfa Romeo. They also discuss the Netflix documentary about Michael Schumacher. 

Meine Tage
Next Generation: Alles Weicheier, Zyklus 40

Meine Tage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:01


Zyklus 40 wurde an Nataschas Ehrentag aufgezeichnet. Nun, mit 51, fühlt sie sich so, wie sie sich immer fühlen wollte: weise und selbstbewusst. Und dieser Seinszustand lässt sie darüber philosophieren, ob die Eltern der Jetztzeit ihre Sprößlinge eventuell zu Weicheiern heranzüchten,, denn bei dieser ‚antiautoritären Erziehung‘ mag man das ‚Erziehen‘ gar nicht in den Mund nehmen. Der jugendliche Part des ‚Meine Tage‘ Duos, Mandana, stimmte der Weisen zu. Denn am wem liegt es denn, wenn die Kinder ohne einen Gruß zum Spielen ins Haus schneien?

Scuderia F1: Formula 1 podcast
Schumacher documentary | F1 engine news | Listener emails

Scuderia F1: Formula 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 115:51


This week we review the Michael Schumacher documentary that dropped on Netflix earlier this week and discuss the 7x World Champion's legacy in Formula 1. There's also plenty of F1 news including Aston Martin bringing back Sebastian Vettel and Lance Stroll for 2022, engine news and much more. All this and more tonight on the podcast that is always up to speed with Formula 1! All this and more on the podcast that is always up to speed with Formula 1! Contact & Feedback: Find us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you enjoy podcasts Website: http://www.scuderiaf1pod.com Email: scuderiaf1pod@gmail.com YouTube: http://ow.ly/gerq50CxM5S Twitter: @ScuderiaF1Pod Facebook: Scuderia F1 Podcast To advertise on this show, please visit https://www.advertisecast.com/ScuderiaF1 or email Overtime@AdvertiseCast.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Reality Life with Kate Casey
Ep. - 394 - WELLS ADAMS FROM BACHELOR IN PARADISE

Reality Life with Kate Casey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 49:08


Kate discusses Schumacher and Jack Whitehall: Travels With My Father, both on Netflix. Wells Adams was a contestant on the 12th season of The Bachelorette. He became the bartender on the fourth season of Bachelor in Paradise. This season he serves as a guest host. He discusses this season's couples, what makes Paradise more hilarious then Bachelor and Bachelorette, and whether the Boom Boom room is ever sanitized. Reality Life with Kate CaseyPatreon: http://www.patreon.com/katecaseyCameo: https://cameo.com/katecaseyTwitter: https://twitter.com/katecaseyInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/katecaseycaTik Tok: http://www.tiktok.com/itskatecaseyClubhouse: @katecasey Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/113157919338245Amazon.com: www.amazon.com/shop/katecaseySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

El Larguero
El Larguero a la 01.00 | De la Rosa y Ponseti analizan el nuevo documental de Michael Schumacher

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 30:04


Nuestros expertos de Fórmula 1 nos cuentan que les ha parecido el documental de la leyenda alemana 

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S4 E11: Your questions answered - part one

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 54:15


Gary Anderson and Mark Hughes join Glenn Freeman for the first of our two-part Bring Back V10s series finale, where we're taking questions submitted by our audience. Topics for this episode include: Mika Hakkinen vs Michael Schumacher, the loophole Williams and Jordan exploited in the 1996 head protection regulations, grooved tyres, why V10s took over in F1, Ferrari's brief disqualification from the 1999 Malaysian Grand Prix, Flavio Briatore's impact on F1, and why Mark doesn't rank Alain Prost as one of his top F1 drivers of all time.

Superlicense F1 Podcast -- Covering every Formula 1 race
195. Italian GP (Return of the Budgie Nine)

Superlicense F1 Podcast -- Covering every Formula 1 race

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 54:48


It's hard not to clebrate a Daniel Ricciardo victory, we discuss whether his win was sealed in Turn 1, the contentious Verstappen/Hamilton crash, Valtteri's real-time racing analysis, we look back at Ricciardo's victories (and shoeys) in the Superquiz and look ahead to a documentary looking back at the life of Michael Schumacher.

In the Fast Lane
Episode 75: Vanessa Nöcker

In the Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 28:37


Vanessa Nöcker, producer and director of the much-anticipated 'Schumacher' documentary premiering on Netflix this week, takes us behind the scenes on the creation of the film and working with Michael Schumacher's family from concept to completion, while we wrap up Daniel Ricciardo's brilliant win for McLaren in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

Dermot & Dave
Conor McGregor Caused A Bit Of A Scene At The VMAs

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 10:08


The MTV Video Music Awards were on in New York last night and Conor McGregor had a few words with Rapper, Machine Gun Kelly. [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/09/13131308/Telly_1309.mp3"][/audio] For Maria's Telly, Producer Maria Deveruex told Dermot and Dave what's on the box this week including all the goss from the VMAs and there's also a new Netflix documentary on the life of Formula One legend, Michael Schumacher. You can listen to the full chat by clicking the Play button above.

F1Mania - Fórmula 1 e muito mais
Em Ponto 09/09/2021 - F1 terá outro final de semana teste no GP da Itália

F1Mania - Fórmula 1 e muito mais

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 34:57


No 269º episódio do F1Mania Em Ponto, Carlos Garcia e Gabriel Gavinelli trazem a programação para o Grande Prêmio da Itália de Fórmula 1, 14ª etapa da temporada 2021, que acontece neste fim de semana, no tradicional circuito de Monza.   No segundo bloco, Stefano Domenicali, CEO da Fórmula 1, estuda mudanças no esporte para torná-lo mais emocionante, incluindo testes obrigatórios com jovens pilotos.   Fechando, as tradicionais rapidinhas: Toto Wolff reacende a ideia de um terceiro carro por equipe na F1, Jean Todt explica o motivo do GP de Bélgica ter distribuído pontos, Corinna fala sobre a rotina ao lado de Michael Schumacher e Nico Rosberg comenta “amor” de Lewis Hamilton sobre Valtteri Bottas.

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast
“We all drink the same water and breathe the same air”

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 25:48


Im Interview: Filmlegende und Ex-Gouverneur Arnold Schwarzenegger über die wirtschaftliche Power Kaliforniens, Donald Trump und seine eigenen Ambitionen Präsident zu werden. Datenkrake USA! Die Börsen Reporterinnen Sophie Schimansky und Annette Weisbach berichten über vermeintliche Richtungswechsel von FED und EZB in der Geldpolitik. Neue Dokumentation über das Leben von Michael Schumacher bei Netflix. Kein Anschluss unter dieser Nummer: Schwedischer Finanzbeamter legt mit Trick seinen Dienstanschluss lahm, um seine Ruhe zu haben.

DriveNation on Cars
Michael Schumacher – F1's fiercest competitor

DriveNation on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 46:08


Dan Prosser and Andrew Frankel discuss the great Michael Schumacher, a seven-time Formula 1 champion and one of the true greats of racing. His was a controversial career as well as an enormously successful one. Jingle by Stephen Harrington (ph.zero.entertainment@gmail.com). 

Past Gas by Donut Media
Michael Schumacher Could Be F1's GOAT (Episode 100!)

Past Gas by Donut Media

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 50:11


Please enjoy Past Gas' 100th episode! A special thanks to everyone who has listened to the podcast-- we truly couldn't make it without you. Who better to discuss on such a big episode than one of the biggest names in F1...Michael Schumacher? Despite the reverence his name invokes, Schumacher is not without his own set of controversies. Today, on Past Gas: is Michael Schumacher, known for his perfectionism and intimidating persona, the Greatest of All Time? More about Show: Follow James on IG and Twitter @jamespumphrey.   Follow Nolan on IG and Twitter @nolanjsykes.   Follow Joe on IG and Twitter @joegweber. Follow Donut @donutmedia, and subscribe to our Youtube and Facebook channels!   Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or using this link: http://bit.ly/PastGas. If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/PastGas. Thanks to our sponsors: Find out how Upstart can lower your monthly payments today when you go to upstart.com/GAS. Now anyone can easily create perfect and strong pocket-hole joints with the Kreg Pocket-Hole Jig 520PRO. It's available nationwide at Home Depot, Lowes, and other home centers, woodworking and hardware stores. Learn more at kregTool.com.  Do yourself a favor and make sure you choose Valvoline. Head over to valvoline.com/original to find the right oil for your engine. This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp and Past Gas by Donut Media listeners get 10% off their first month at betterhelp.com/pastgas. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cut To The Race | By FormulaNerds
Episode 60: News Roundup 28/8/21

Cut To The Race | By FormulaNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 30:36


On this week's episode of the Cut to the Race news roundup - it's finally race week again!Dan, Charlotte and Jay are back to cover all the biggest news from the last week including Fernando Alonso's contract extension at Alpine, Toto Wolff claiming he has no interest in signing Max Verstappen and rumours of Qatar replacing Australia on the calendar.There was also some pretty big news from Netflix this week, who have released the Michael Schumacher documentary trailer and confirmed a fourth series of Drive to Survive.The trio also looked ahead to all the action this weekend from Belgium with some bold predictions being made and previewed this weekend's Extreme E action.Follow FormulaNerds www.Facebook.com/FormulaNerds www.twitter.com/FormulaNerds www.instagram.com/FormulaNerds www.formulanerds.com

PR Racing Sports
Fernando Alonso y su Codigo Da Vinci

PR Racing Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 11:42


En este episodio hablamos del Tweet en clave que puso Fernando Alonso, tambien hablamos un poco del trailer del documental de Michael Schumacher entre otras novedades --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/prracingsports/support

F1: Beyond The Grid
145: Bertrand Gachot – The driver whose prison sentence handed Schumacher his F1 debut

F1: Beyond The Grid

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 57:37


The story of how Michael Schumacher made his debut, 30 years ago this week in Belgium, could have been lifted from a Hollywood movie. The German rookie got his chance when Jordan's regular driver Bertrand Gachot was dramatically sent to prison on the eve of the race – the rest, as they say, is history. But what of Gachot himself? This week the Luxembourg-born racer joins Tom to tell his incredible story – including the full, incredible story of how he ended up in prison, what life was like for an F1 driver behind bars, how he feels about Schumacher now, and how he got his career back on track after his release. This episode is sponsored by: Calm - go to calm.com/GRID for 40% off unlimited access to Calm's entire library

Marketplace Morning Report
Walmart has entered the delivery service arena

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 11:02


The nation's largest retailer wants other merchants ranging from local bakers to national chains to use its network of drivers to get their products to customers' doors. Nova Safo joins us to talk about Walmart’s move into delivery and logistics. The BBC’s Stephen Ryan reports on AirBnB’s charitable arm extending a hand to Afghan refugee housing efforts. We also look at how the pandemic has affected adult day care. Michael Schumacher talks to us about what to possibly expect out of the Jackson Hole economic symposium and how it could affect the markets. 

Marketplace All-in-One
Walmart has entered the delivery service arena

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 11:02


The nation's largest retailer wants other merchants ranging from local bakers to national chains to use its network of drivers to get their products to customers' doors. Nova Safo joins us to talk about Walmart’s move into delivery and logistics. The BBC’s Stephen Ryan reports on AirBnB’s charitable arm extending a hand to Afghan refugee housing efforts. We also look at how the pandemic has affected adult day care. Michael Schumacher talks to us about what to possibly expect out of the Jackson Hole economic symposium and how it could affect the markets. 

Pushing The Limits
The Importance of Strength Training and Optimising Your Fitness with Russell Jarrett

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 60:31


Strength training is often associated with professional athletes who need to condition their bodies. However, the general public could benefit from it as well. It's not just people who want to bulk up who need strength training, either. Regardless of your age, sex, and occupation, strength training can have massive benefits for your wellness.  In this episode, Russel Jarrett joins us to share some insights from his 30 years of experience in the fitness industry. He talks about what makes an elite athlete and how talent is not the only determinant of success. We also dive deep into the benefits of strength training and optimising your fitness.  If you want to know how strength training can help you function better, then this episode is for you.    Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition, and mental performance to your specific genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training and coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com. We can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity, or want to take your performance to the next level and learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, then contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again, but I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books, Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, dramatically decreases over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting-edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost NAD+ levels in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity, rigorously tested by an independent, third-party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful, third-party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop Now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500 mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust: NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting-edge science) combats the effects of ageing and is designed to boost NAD+ levels. The NMN capsules are manufactured in an ISO 9001-certified facility. Boost Your NAD+ Levels: Healthy Ageing Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Know what propels an athlete towards an elite level.  Learn the various effects of strength training on our bodies. Discover the importance of hormones to our health.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to the Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron! Listen to other Pushing the Limits episodes: #187: Back to Basics: Slow Down Ageing and Promote Longevity with Dr Elizabeth Yurth #188: How to Increase Your Self-Awareness and Achieve High Performance with Craig Harper Connect with Russell: Website  The Australian Fitness Podcast The Future is Faster Than You Think by Steven Kotler Lifespan by Dr David Sinclair Dr Elizabeth Yurth's online course on longevity Kultured Wellness A new program, BoostCamp, is coming this September at Peak Wellness!      Episode Highlights  [03:10] Russell's Background Russel went into athlete strength and conditioning because he didn't want to teach.  He worked with various athletes in Australia for a long time while still working with the general population.  He has since branched out to several business enterprises related to health and fitness. [06:03] What Makes a Good Athlete Elite athletes have a strong belief in their abilities. They stay confident and driven, regardless of their performance. Some athletes are exceptionally talented and find a way to play at the highest level. Even if you don't have innate talent, you can improve. You just need the right combination of drive, dedication, and perseverance.  [11:22] Observations on Different Sports Athletes adapt their mentality and physicality based on their sport. For instance, footballers have high pain tolerance, while golfers possess intense concentration.     Endurance athletes used to think that strength training would inhibit their ability to do well in their sports.  Now, they're beginning to recognise the importance of incorporating the appropriate strength training for their sport.  Improvement of your form, minimisation of injury, and faster healing time are some benefits of strength training. Our bodies are predisposed towards either endurance or strength training. The key is finding the balance between what you enjoy doing and what your body responds to. [24:30] Strength Training for the General Public Strength training helps to prevent accidents such as broken hips when our body starts to lose muscle mass.  Women tend to avoid strength training because they don't want to bulk up. However, the more muscle you can maintain in your body, the better it is for your hormones.  Strength training also improves your quality of life and overall lifespan.  If you want a body that works better and feels better, incorporate strength training into your exercise regimen. [32:37] Optimising Your Hormones You're not going to see results from exercise and diet alone. You also have to consider your hormones.  Your motivation also hinges on your hormones, so it's crucial to optimise them first.  Strength training is a natural way to boost hormones, especially for women. The story of Russell's wife is a perfect example that training and nutrition are not the only things at play when it comes to our health. During menopause, his wife suddenly felt unwell and gained weight. Then, she dropped 10 kilos in 10 weeks. Listen to the full episode to know how she did it! [44:13] Bouncing Back From Life's Setbacks Training your body today can allow you to bounce back from health problems down the road. Listen to the full episode to hear about Lisa's amazing neighbour in his 60s who rapidly recovered from his hip operation! Russell had a client in her 40s who completely reinvented her body in three years. Russel's client soon became fit enough to participate in a competition called The Big Red Run.  [46:45] Taking Tiny Steps Towards Change You do not have to do everything today. Making small changes is better than overwhelming yourself.  Decide on a few things that you can commit to doing. Once you implement those changes, you will feel yourself getting better and wanting to improve even more. [52:35] Being Proactive About Your Health Lisa's husband is genetically three times more likely to develop Alzheimer's due to genetics. However, they actively mitigate that risk. Lisa shared a story about a man whose health was in decline at 65 but is now active again at age 75. Listen to the full episode for the details! Russell advocates for self-medication through exercise, nutrition, sunlight, and being outdoors.  Do your due diligence—do your research and take charge of your health.   7 Powerful Quotes ‘[Athletes are] not invincible, but I think that anyone who gets to the elite level has a mental belief, a strong mental belief in their ability.' ‘Good athletes and people that are considered elite have an ability to persevere when others might give up.' ‘Strength training pretty much is important for everybody in some way, shape, or form.' ‘If you train well and if you train consistently through your 20s, 30s and 40s, then your 50s, 60s and 70s will be a whole lot easier.' ‘It's not a disease model that we should be following. It's a prevention model. It's optimisation.' ‘You can't achieve anything in life, whether it's physical, or financial, or anything without dedication, discipline, and consistency.' ‘With your own health and what people are telling you to use or take or consume, you got to do your own due diligence.'   About Russell Russell has 30 years of experience in athlete preparation and training the general population. He has worked with the AFL, AIS, Cricket Australia, WNBL, and ABL. Today, he owns 24/7 fitness facilities and consults with clients from all over Australia.  He is also an educator and a speaker at different institutions. Furthermore, Russell built two registered training organisations and has coached hundreds of trainers over the years. He is a firm believer that physical performance improvement is for everybody.  If you want to reach out to Russell or know more about his work, you check out his website.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends, so they can understand the importance of strength training and optimising your fitness. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Full Transcript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com. Lisa Tamati: Well hi everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. This week, I have Russell Jarrett with me. Now Russell is one of Australia's leading strength and conditioning coaches, owns a number of gyms with his lovely wife Tara, and has also worked with many elite teams from the AFL, from soccer, from golf, to tennis. He's been around a while and done a lot of things. So you're going to really enjoy this conversation on strength and conditioning and how to optimise your fitness.  Before we go over to the show, just want to let you know that we have our BoostCamp live webinar series coming up on the first of September, it starts. It's eight weeks long, we're going to be doing a live seminar every week. You're going to be we're going to be learning everything around levelling up your life, basically. So how to age like a winner, how to reduce your stress, how to deal with all the things that are coming at us, and are overwhelmed today's society. We're going to teach you how to tap into your biology through your neurology. So we're going to be looking at how to optimise your sleep, health fundamentals, nutrition, exercise, all those sorts of good things, as well as things like circadian rhythms.  It's going to be a really good life program, basically. So we hope you can join us over there. If you want to find out more, go to peakwellness.co.nz/boostcamp, that's boost with an -st. No, it's not boot camp, it's BoostCamp. We won't be making you do burpees during the webinar, I promise. So make sure you come and join us over there: peakwellness.co.nz/boostcamp.  We also have our flagship program running, as usual, our epigenetics. This is all about understanding what your genes are about and how to optimise your life to your specific genes. Now we use it with lots of our runners. We also use it in the corporate sector for teams and leadership teams and building strong companies. We also use it for people who are going through different health crises and wanting to optimise their health fundamentals to help them through. So if you're interested in finding out about that, just go to peakwellness.co.nz. Okay, now over to the show, with Russell Jarrett.  Lisa: Well, hi, everyone, and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. Today, I have Russell Jarrett with me. Welcome to the show, Russell. Fantastic to have you! Russell Jarrett: Thanks, Lis. Good to be here.  Lisa: We have a mutual friend who's put us in contact, and we're very, very grateful. We're going to be sharing some good stuff around health, fitness, health optimisation, strength, and conditioning. That's your jam. Now you, Russell, can you give people a bit of background? You've got a hell of a lot of experience in working both with elite athlete teams and different sports, as well as, the general population through your gyms, and your studios, and so on. Can you just give us a bit of a synopsis on your career, if you like?  Russell: Yeah, sure. So it stretches back some 30 years now. I started like many other coaches do. You know, working on the gym floor and understanding what that environment looked like and felt like. Once I finished my physio degree, I decided I didn't necessarily want to teach. I moved into athlete strength and conditioning. That was an area which seemed to really raise my interest. I got involved in that. But back in those days, it was very much a part-time role and a part-time world. There wasn't really professional sporting teams as yet. So I had to then supplement with work in the fitness industry, and with general population.  I've always had one foot in either world, and I've worked with elite athletes in various sports in Australia for a long time. But I've also had my own business enterprises and studios or RTOs, and things like that, that I've used to provide myself with a stable career. Because one thing I have learned in the strength and conditioning world is that it's a great environment to work in. It's exciting. It's high pressure. It's always different. It's challenging. But it's unstable, and it can be volatile. Because as they say it's a results-based industry. So if the results aren't coming, for whatever reason, and that may or may not have something to do with what you do, it might not. But nonetheless, if there's a change in personnel, quite often you're part of that change. Lisa: That's so true. You know that that's what I love. You have to be flexible, adaptable, and being able to sort of go with the flow. When you're an entrepreneur, I mean, on this, similar sort of world, different but similar. You have to make that happen, basically, if you want things, if you want to keep in business, and you have to be good at your job, otherwise, yeah, people aren't going to come back.  I want to go a little bit into your experience with working with elite athletes for starters. Because I think it interests, a lot of my— so my listeners are endurance athletes, not everyone. Everyone's a lot of average, sort of people interested in health optimisation and being the best that they can be. My background is as an ultra-endurance athlete.  What is it that you think sets a good athlete up from a mindset point of view? Before we get into the strength and conditioning side of the equation, which is hugely important, but do you think that there's— like having worked with general population and lots of elite athletes, what is that some of the key differences that you see between the two groups, if you like? Russell: Yeah, look, I think when people start to figure out that they have a talent, or a gift, or an ability that is above and beyond what is considered normal, I think along with that comes a strengthening in their self-belief and their understanding of what they can do. That takes time. But there are still athletes that will, by their own admission, will struggle with their own self-belief and their own levels of doubt, and so forth. They're not invincible but I think that anyone who gets to the elite level has a mental belief, a strong mental belief in their ability. They know what they can do. They know what they're good at. They're obviously passionate about it.  Then I think for the elite athletes, it's just an ongoing evolution of that ability to stay focused, stay driven, stay hungry, and stay confident when perhaps their performances are suggesting otherwise. I think that's, good athletes and people that are considered elite have an ability to persevere when others might give up. I think that's probably one of the things I noticed the most. Lisa: Perseverance. Do you think there's a difference between— is the most important thing talent? Or is the most important thing, a never quit attitude and I'm gonna keep fighting a fighting sort of attitude? What do you think's more important? Russell: I think there's a combination there. I think it's different for every person. I think there's definitely athletes that are extremely exceptionally talented: Michael Jordan, NBA, Tiger Woods in golf, Michael Schumacher in F1. These kinds of people are supremely talented. They're just playing on another level. I think for those people, they probably don't suffer the same levels of doubt or stress than others might.  Now, on the same environment, you've got people who are not that talented. So there were people that that played in the same team as Michael Jordan, right? So there was a guy from Australia called Luc Longley, who was one of the pioneers of Australians into the NBA. Luc Longley was a seven-foot centre, who played a couple of seasons with the Chicago Bulls. Now Luc Longley, and he'll tell you this, was in no way shape or form as talented as Michael Jordan. But he still managed to play in the same team, at the same level, and win championships alongside Michael Jordan.  Now, it's not talent that got Luc there. So it's got to be something else. Obviously, he had some talent. But he obviously had incredible desire, hunger, dedication, perseverance. He had some ingredients that he combined with his talent to allow him to play at the highest level. So I think it's different for every athlete. Some athletes do their thing because they're in extremely talented environments. They're just freaks at what they do. Then there's other people that you look at in all sorts of sports, and they don't— Lisa:  —work your ass off.  Russell: Yeah, they don't look that athletic. They don't look amazing. They don't do extraordinary things, but they just keep going and they hang in there. They find a way to play at the highest level. It's quite extraordinary.  Lisa: Yeah. I mean, that's certainly my background, I absolutely had no talent as a runner. Absolutely none. Just for sheer bloody-mindedness got sort of pretty good at it. I think, that's why, for me to ask the question because for me, talent is, if you've got it, then you're bloody lucky. But even if you haven't, if you're one of those people listening that goes, ‘You know, I haven't got any genetic abilities and talents and stuff, but I really want to do it.' Well, don't give up on your dream.  I remember going to Millennium Stadium in Auckland with the Auckland University doing VO2 max testing and all that sort of stuff. They said to me afterwards, like, ‘If you're a young athlete coming to see whether you'll be good at endurance sports, we'd tell you, don't give up your day job. You're actually below average, below average.' Small lung capacity, very low VO2 max. I said, ‘Well, lucky, nobody told me that back then. Because then I wouldn't have gone on to do the stuff that I did.' That's the point now that just because you don't have the talent doesn't mean you can't. You might have to work your way around things, you might have to work twice as hard as the guy next to you. You have to be prepared for that battle. But I think you can.  Okay, so you've worked in the AFL, cricket. What other sort of sports have you worked with? And what do you see as differences between the sport arts as well? Any sort of insights?  Russell: Yeah. I've spent some time in the AFL, with Cricket Australia, I've worked with netballers, basketballers, tennis, and golf. Look, physically, all of those athletes differ because they adapt according to what their sport requires of them. So footballers have exceptionally high levels of fitness capacity, strength, endurance, agility, power. They're very well-developed and well-rounded athletes. Then you've got golfers who essentially are not always very athletic, although the sport is getting better. But they have incredible levels of coordination, incredible levels of concentration, incredible levels of focus. Because that's what their sport requires. So I've been lucky to work in different sports.  Yeah, you're right. I always see these little nuances between different sports and what they bring to the table. Footballers, generally have really high levels of pain tolerance, because to play at that level, it's quite uncomfortable. Whereas golfers have incredible levels of concentration and mental resilience. Because you can stand over a putt, which might be four feet long, but that one shot over four feet might be worth a million dollars.  Lisa: Wow. Yeah.  Russell: So you better make sure that you've got incredible focus, and that your internal dialogue is very calm and very measured. Because if you're standing over that putt worth a million dollars, and you're like, ‘I don't know, if I can do this,' and your heart rate is pounding, you're not in a good position to make that putt.  Lisa: Wow. That's a good insight.  Russell: Yeah, isn't it? Lisa: It is because, I've often looked at golf and thought, ‘Why the hell are they so high pay when you've got some triathlete, or Tour de France winner, it gets, a pittance in comparison.' And you're thinking, the training and the dedication and these dangers and all of that. You think that. So it's interesting to see that there is a different lot of things at play and it's the brain. I mean, I watched Docker last night, I love neuroscience. There was a great one just on Netflix, actually, and it was looking at how the neurons in the nervous system work. It was looking at a boxer and all the stuff that's going on in the brain. It was like, wow, there is different types of coordination, fitness, reaction, emotional control, all of these things play into this game that we are, whatever sport you're into, and into life in general and staying healthy.  One of the things that I found interesting, they were talking about ultramarathon runners having the blood sugar levels of a diabetic and I was just like, ‘Really? Is that why—?' Because I've been monitoring my blood sugar levels over the last couple of years, and I'm going, ‘What the hell! They're extremely high at times.' I'll be doing like an interval training session and fast, evening hours and I was up at nine and a half and I'm like, ‘Oh, my God, I'm diabetic.'  I'm now like, listening to that yesterday, now I'm like, ‘Ah, ultramarathoners trained their body to respond with huge amounts of blood sugars, and they're very insulin sensitive.' So actually, the opposite is actually happening. But if you just took that at face value, you just took that 9.5 measurements on blood glucose, you'd think, ‘Oh, my god, she's got diabetes.' So it's a really interesting world. Or when you're recruiting, you're doing a big, heavy weight, the neurons as what you're training, not just the muscle fibers, isn't it? Russell: Yeah. In fact, with a lot of strength training, and that's what people find, especially people who are new to strength training, they actually develop new levels of strength quite quickly. If you take a beginner, and they've never done weight training before, strength training before, you can actually get them quite strong within two to three weeks. They'll notice a difference in two to three weeks. Now, that's not a physiological adaptation in the muscular system. That is a physiological adaptation in the nervous system. So their nervous system adapts and changes much more rapidly. So that's why you see that rapid increase in strength. Lisa: At the start.  Russell: At the start. That's right. Then after a couple of weeks, the muscular system also changes and starts to catch up. Lisa: Wow. Is that also why you have a little bit of a plateau after your initial gains? And you're like, ‘Ah, this is great, I'm gonna keep improving,' and then you don't. Russell: Exactly. So the nervous system changes rapidly. Then the adaptation to the stimulus of that starts to slow, and then you get more physiological adaptation in the muscular system. So, over time, the process of getting stronger is a combination of those two systems constantly being stimulated and constantly adapting to the changing stimulus.  Lisa: Wow. What sort of changes Is this making our body like from a health and well being and in longevity and anti-aging sort of stuff? I'm heavily into actually, resistance work, weight training, it doesn't have to be heavy, heavy stuff. But you have to be doing weight training as far as I'm concerned. So I'm coming from an endurance athlete background, that's not, that wasn't, certainly wasn't the conversation until our company, we're very big on the strength, we're big on the mobility, we're big on the not overdoing the running, not doing the high mileage models and ignoring the strengths, which is, the world that I sort of grew up in, when I was, learning as a young athlete, ultramarathon running.  There wasn't a guidance for starters. I remember ignoring strength and conditioning completely, and the strength side of it. Now realising, that's actually the base gains, the biggest weight changes, like isn't weight loss, the biggest metabolic changes, the biggest form changes for runners, strength trainers, the stability, the lack of injuries, like all of these things are just huge parts of that puzzle, even for endurance athletes.  Russell: Yeah, you're absolutely right. Going back maybe a couple of decades, strength training and endurance athletes, they didn't really talk to each other. It really wasn't part of the picture. Lisa: Yeah. Detrimental to don't do weights if you're a runner. Russell: You're absolutely right, there was a segment of the endurance world that believe that if you're lifting weights, that you could damage or inhibit your ability to run or do endurance sports. We know better than that now. We know that it is absolutely possible and actually recommended to combine endurance training with the appropriate level and type of strength training to benefit endurance athletes, no doubt.  Lisa: Yeah, it's a great insight.  Russell: When endurance runners, runners or cyclists or triathletes, when they get stronger, provided it's done in the correct fashion, as you say, it actually has benefits to their running technique, to their running form, to the minimisation of injury, to their ability to recover. Everything improves when you're stronger. Lisa: Yeah. And anabolic as opposed to the catabolic nature of our sport, which is tearing stuff down all the time instead of rebuilding. We need— on that point as well, the whole ‘I'm going to bulk up' mentality, it takes quite a lot to actually bulk up and there's different types of strength training to reach different types of goals. And the other aspect I wanted to ask you about like I do genetic testing and epigenetics, and understand the different sort of genetic combinations. If I put someone who is strength-based by genetics, and I put them into super long-distance endurance training, I'm going to be mismatching their genetics.  How that worked out for me in my life was I did ultramarathon running when my genetics are actually built around high-intensity sort of medium weights in shorter episodes, or shorter duration is actually what my genetics want. I decided to do ultramarathoning because I decided to do it. But I didn't know that, actually, from my genetics, it's actually really important to be doing some weight training. It's actually important that I don't overtrain as in the long distance.  Now, my active career time is over. So I've gone now for longevity and things that are more important to me now. I've found that I'm a lot healthier, a lot fitter. My hormones are in better balance because I'm doing what's in line with my personal genetics. It doesn't mean I can't even run an ultramarathon again. I can. But I shouldn't be doing them back to back if I want to live a long time and not break myself.  Do you see that? I mean, you were— without going deep into the embryology and epigenetic side of it, but you got your ectomorphs, your mesomorphs, and your endomorphs as a broad categories. The endomorph population really, really benefit from strength training. Like it's really important. It's counterintuitive, especially for females and the population, because they think they're already bigger, stronger people. And they think that when they go to do weight training, that's going to make them like really massively bulky. What would you say to that? Have you come across that experience at all? Look, I'm in the weeds here. But— Russell: No, you're right. Certainly, people are more predisposed to certain activities, which is essentially what we're saying. So I'm an ectomorph. But my body shape and my body composition is more ectomorphic. I'm quite slight, narrow shoulder. I don't weigh much. But I do still strength train. But what we're saying here is that because I'm not sort of genetically gifted or predisposed towards strength training, it also means that I'm what we call a slow gainer or a non-responder. For me to put muscle on my body, for me to get stronger, I've got to do a lot of hard work and I've got to eat a lot of food. Because it's really hard. My body does not want to get bigger. But if I put a pair of shoes on a winter run, my body is very happy. So you're absolutely right. Now, with females, yes, there are people that are going to respond better to endurance work, and respond better to strength work. But I guess what it comes down to is, how do you then combine that predisposition to what it is that your goals are, to what it is that you enjoy doing, and to what it is that your body responds to? That's the I mean, if I had the answer to that Lisa— Lisa: That's your secret sauce.  Russell: Yeah. If I had the answer to that, Lisa, I'll be making a fortune. Lisa: Well, that's right. That's why I study epigenetics. It's really key or we work with different platforms but then technologies and stuff. But what I get out of it is that gives me the black and white information and then as a coach, then I can help you piece together the right combination. So if I've got someone who's like me or is more suited to shorter, high-intensity CrossFit style workouts for the one a bit of description, and they want to do ultramarathons, then I'll tailor their programs or our company will tailor the programs to fit that so that they can still do their goals but without wrecking their body. And that will be a lower mileage program than what it would be for you if I was training you who is an ectomorph, who can take more of the distance.  I think what's also important to understand is that strength training pretty much is important for everybody in some way, shape, or form. Especially as we get older and like when we hit our 40s and we start losing muscle mass naturally like that's what happens. This is where I see lots of runners especially our you know becoming like beef jerky, for lack of a better description, sarcopenic, losing muscle mass, then losing bone mass, and they may be cardiovascularly fit. They're not going to die of diabetes and being overweight, but where they run into troubles is with stress fractures and osteoporosis and lack of muscle. And that can kill you just as quickly as well.  I mean, a lot of people die of osteoporosis and breaking hips. You break a hip when you're above 60 and you're in trouble. That can lead to death. The stats for that is worse than it is for cardiovascular disease. That's just pretty scary when you start unraveling the whole bone. So it's really important for me to have people who aren't just endurance junkies, if you like, understanding, especially once I've hit the 40 and above that they get into that weight training, that they get into some strength training of some sort, at least. Russell: Yeah, with all my general population clients, if they are, if they are above the age of 50, I recommend to all of them strongly that some part, small to significant, but some parts of their weekly exercise routine has to include some form of relatively heavy strength training. Because if you want to look at one form of exercise that can improve your quality and length of life, it's strength training.  Lisa: We're on the same page. Yeah, and that's, you know, me coming from an endurance background saying that. And this is super important for a woman to hear as well, because I think women have a natural tendency, ‘I don't want to get bulky. I don't want to get muscular.' I can tell you now ladies, the more muscle you can maintain in your body, the better, the better your basal metabolic rate is, your human growth hormone. When you do strength training, you're going to up your levels of human growth hormone, which is going to help with your anti-aging, which is going to keep you younger, which is going to help with all of these different areas of cognitive, as well as physical, as well as sleep as well— every area of life is impacted. If you're doing heavy weight training, you go to sleep better, I'll tell you that much.  It's not just cardio, cardio, cardio, I think is the message that I'm trying to get across here. That's very important. Everybody should be doing a certain amount of cardio. It's absolutely crucial that we sweat, that we get our heart rate up and we do all that stuff. But it's the combination. In every decade where you go through, you basically need a new approach, I'm saying. You know, the ratios. We all need cardio. We all need strength training. We all need mobility as the other part of that conversation, which is your Pilates, yoga, foam rolling, all that sort of good stuff. Then it's the ratios that become different as you age. Then how heavy are you lifting and what body type do you have.  If you're a big, strong endomorphic body type, I can put some heavier weights through your joints, that's going to be good for you. If you're an ectomorph, I'm going to put some lighter weights, but I'm still going to put weights for you.  Russell: I did a podcast with Craig Harper the other few weeks ago, you've been—  Lisa: A couple times. Yeah man, he's awesome.  Russell: I said to Craig, ‘What I say to people all the time, “If you train well, if you train well, and if you train consistently through your 20s, 30s, and 40s, then your 50s, 60s, and 70s will be a whole lot easier.”' Lisa: Hell yes. This is gold man. Because the older you get, the more you have to focus on this. And the more you have to train, not volume-wise, but the more you have to focus on this and get that combination right because it becomes more and more important, not less and less important. And what I see when the over 50s, and 60s, and 70-year-olds is that they go, ‘Oh, I'm older now I don't have to do as much.' That's the opposite of what you should be doing. I'm older, therefore I can get away with less therefore I have to do more in the right context. I have, you know, a story. People who listen to my podcast know about my mom's journey. And she had an aneurysm five years ago, and she is at the gym five days a week. This afternoon, we'll be at the gym. We'll be doing weight training, and cardiovascular work, and coordination work, and yoga. Those are all parts of her rehabilitation. Now it's relative to her age; she's 79 years old.  Unfortunately, I didn't know all this back in the day. So I missed the boat in her 40s, and 50s, and 60s. And we've started in her 70s and coming back from a massive rehabilitation project, like, five years in now. God, I wish I had known what I knew then now. Like what I knew, what I know now, I don't, didn't know then because she would be in so much better shape. So now, I have to work that much more strategically in order to keep her where she is and to keep her moving forward into her 80s, and 90s, and hopefully beyond that. It's doable. Russell: Yeah, it is. It absolutely is. The understanding in the general population, in the general community, the understanding of our strength training is still poor. It's getting better because people like you and I are out there banging the drum saying, ‘Get strong. Lift heavy. Do your weights. You're not going to blow up. You're not going to give bulky. It's going to give you nothing other than a better, a better body that works better, moves better, feels better, functions better—' Lisa: —and dies later.  Russell: Exactly. Well, yeah, I mean, we haven't, we probably haven't come up with the anti-aging drug. But I think weight training is pretty close.  Lisa: Yeah, absolutely. Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years, and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody. And we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's P-A-T-R-O-N dot lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from, you can do it for as little as $7 a month, New Zealand or $15 a month if you really want to support us. So we are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us, everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much much more. So check out all the details, patron.lisatamati.com, and thanks very much for joining us. This year another aspect that I've been really deep in the weeds on lately is hormones. A study under Dr Elizabeth Yurth, and she's a longevity doctor and orthopedic surgeon in America, brilliant lady, love her to pieces. I just did one course with her and it was like what to fix first. She was like, ‘I'm not going to tell you to do the right diet or the right exercise program. The very first thing that I'm going to get you to do is optimise your hormones.' Your hormones need to be— if you don't have testosterone and estrogen in the right levels in your body, and human growth hormone, and all the other hormones, and the right combination, and the right thing, then you are not going to be able to exercise.  She said, ‘If I tell someone who's severely overweight in their 60s who hasn't trained before just to go to the gym and start working out and their hormones are in the gutter, they're not going to be able to. They don't have the motivation. Because hormones are related to motivation. They don't have the ability. They don't have the energy, all of these aspects.' So optimising our hormones is a really important piece of a puzzle. I think this is a new conversation that's starting to open up. This is not about whether you know, like, we're not talking about, you know, illegal anabolic what bodybuilders or whatever have traditionally done. This is about optimising your hormones as you age and we start to lose, drop our testosterone, you guys especially in the late 40s, 50s start to really notice a big drop. If we can actually optimise that. That leads you know— like I do hormone consults and stuff. This needs to be done under doctors or people that are specialised in this. But if you can get that right, then you're going to have the energy to go and do the right exercise and you'll be more likely to eat right as well. Because you won't be having this downward spiral because if you get your hormones wrong and you start to feel lethargic, you start to have less energy, less cognitive ability, and, and, and, and, and.  For me I'm actually like, ‘Right, how do we optimise people's—?' Or, ‘Let's have some conversations around this.' Because to date, it's either been, okay woman, maybe hormone replacement therapy. Okay, if they're going through menopause or something like that. For guys, it's only the bodybuilders who have been getting testosterone.  I'll tell you now, men, if they get their testosterone levels checked, and if you can work with a good doctor, and that's a big if, trying to find the right one to work with. And get them optimised for your age and for where you're at so that you're actually— because then you will age a lot slower. But it needs to be done carefully because you go the wrong way and you can end up with cancer. So you need to understand your innate pathways and all that.  Without getting into that conversation, but just getting into the fact that hormones are absolutely crucial. And we can do things to boost our testosterone naturally: weight training. And women, you need testosterone as well. That's where your estrogens come from, for starters. They come from progesterone, to testosterone, to estrogens. And men when you do, so the more weight training you do, and the more, you'll have more human growth hormone and more testosterone available to you. And doing things like sauna and things also huge, huge. Like you do three days of sauna, you're going to have a 1600%, I think it is, increase in human growth hormone for the next couple of days. Russell: You're absolutely spot on. About two years ago— my wife is 51.  Lisa: Wow. She doesn't look it.  Russell: Has always been really good with her diet, really good with her training, always strength trained, always been a strong lady, and fit. About two years ago, started to feel unwell, started to be, kind of a little unmotivated with regards to exercise. But she still kept fighting through it. And she goes, ‘I'm just going through a flat phase.' Anyway, long story short, started putting on a little bit of weight, which was unusual because her diet was very good, her training was very good. In 12 weeks, she put on 12 kilos without explanation.  Lisa: It's menopause.  Russell: Exactly. So got hit fair and square between the eyes by the menopause bus. But she went to three different doctors, and none of them were prepared to explain, or assist, or advise, or refer. They all said to her, ‘You know what, for your age, you're in pretty good shape. I wouldn't worry about it too much.' Lisa: Ah, this makes me so— Russell: Then one guy, one doctor looked at her and said, ‘Oh, you're an attractive lady. What are you worried about?' Lisa: It's not about attractive lady. It's about optimisation. When will the doctors start to understand that it's not about the disease? It's not a disease model that we should be following. It's a prevention model. It's optimisation. That's the change that's going to happen. I can see it coming. Keep going. Russell: She finally, we made some phone calls to some friends. We did some research. She stumbled across an anti-aging doctor in Melbourne who was in his mid-90s and was still practising.  Lisa: That says something about him already.  Russell: Right. And he sat with her for, I guess, an hour and a half. And he explained to her what he did and how long he'd been doing it. And he said, ‘No one will tell you this.' He goes, ‘No regular doctor refers to me or believes in what I do.' He then met her for sort of an extended consult in which she did three blood tests over the space of six hours. He then managed her hormone profiles and prescribed her some medication and some testosterone. She lost, without changing her diet, without changing her exercise, she dropped 10 kilos in 10 weeks.  Lisa: Yup. That's an extremely important story. Russell, I hope the hell that she's sharing that out in the world because I have to get her on and share that in depth. Russell: There's a lot more to that story. That's the brief version.  Lisa: I want the full version. You should get your wife on my show.  Russell: Lisa, it really upset me and it really made me frustrated, as I'm sure you've been through the same process. I've heard your story about your mum. It just made me really upset that our medical profession is so— not all. I don't wanna generalise, but a large percentage of conventional doctors are so far behind. They're so far behind. Lisa: They're so far behind, and this is changing. I mean I'm reading a book at the moment called The Future is Faster than You Think by Steve Kotler. Unbelievable what's going to happen in the healthcare space. The data that's coming, the AI and all this sort of stuff, it's exciting because it's putting the power back into our hands because we'll be able to have the diagnostic tools. At the moment, I'm frustrated and frightened too because this stuff I know about I want to get from my mum or for myself and I can't get them, peptides and all this sort of crazy awesome stuff. I'm a biohacker, I experimenting the hell out of myself.  I've just been, I'm going through menopause. I'm 52, I've gone through menopause. I started on a product called NMN which I'm now importing to New Zealand and I work with a molecular biologist in this area. And this is an anti-aging longevity supplement that Dr David Sinclair, who wrote the book Lifespan, you have to read that book if you haven't. So I've been on that now for seven months— eight months. I've reversed my own menopause. I was already aware. I'm already on TTA. I'm on progesterone. I'm on estrogen. I already am optimising. I understand my genetic risk factors so I'm on all over that because I don't just do this willy-nilly. People, if you want a hormone consult, I can do that. That's what I do now.  I'm the leanest, fittest, I'm not fit in the ultramarathon sense, I couldn't go out and run a 200k race like I used to be able to. But I wasn't fit then. I was fit in that one thing, but I wasn't— I didn't feel athletic. I was overweight. I was puffy. I was hormonal. I was up the walls. My body was in overtraining. Now at 52,  I'm leaner than I've ever been, I'm stronger than I've ever been, and I've got more energy than I used to have.  When I went, you know, the last few years have been pretty rough. I've had a rough life, with mum, losing my dad, and losing my baby, and spit some shit towards their way. And still, you know, like, okay, I've been through the wringer and I've had a few things along the way. But this is why it's so important. Because you're going to get that from life. It's gonna come, sooner or later, you're going to get smashed in the face. The more stronger you can make your body so that it bounces back if you have an injury, or sickness or a virus or whatever, the better.  I mean, I've just been through shingles the last four weeks, which has been bloody awful. But now I'm back, and I'm training, and I'm back into life, and I'm optimising. That's not surprising because the stress levels that I've been through and exposed to are the reasons why my body was hammered. So you can't always avoid these things. These things are still going to happen to you. But if you're strong and resilient, and you've got the right nutrients, and you've got the right training, you will bounce back 100 times faster.  I've got a mate up here who is 60, I think he's 65 years old, and he's a kitesurfer. Legend of a bloke. He's been a waterman. And he's just had a hip operation. Within two days he was out walking. Within three hours of the operation, he was up. And I see him all day, every day. Now he's on the bike. Now he's down there watching the waves. He can't get out there yet, but he's walking every day. Like, that guy's gonna come back and bounce back like nothing because he is fit and he's just raring to go.  That attitude, it doesn't matter that he's 65. He's a kickass athlete. You want to watch them kite surfing, I'm in awe of him. He's out there for three, four hours and the biggest scariest, like stuff I would never touch. I don't know where to start. This guy's just killing it or up our mountain skiing. You don't have to accept that, ‘Oh you're now 50. So it's time for you to settle down and get a bit more sedentary. And you probably put on some weight, and you're— that's just life.' No it isn't! Russell: No, that's right. You're absolutely right. I've got it reminds me of one more little story. I had a lady who sat with me in my office about six years ago. I'll paint you the picture. Early 40s, quite overweight, very unathletic, very inexperienced with exercise, very intimidated by the gym, poor nutrition. Like the classic sedentary person. Anyway, we started talking and I managed to convince her to just gently start something. I made some adjustments with regard to her diet because it was horrendous. She started eating better, drinking less sugary drinks, eating more fruit and vegetables, meats, eating less processed food, started training, then started feeling better, losing weight, started getting more excited by the process. Three years later, she competed in an event in Central Australia called The Big Red Run.  Lisa: Oh, yeah. I've done that. Russell: Yeah. Well, there you go. She covered, what was it, 160 something kilometres in four days.  Lisa: Amazing.  Russell: Just, this was a woman, when she sat with me, she couldn't run. She wouldn't be able to run more than 500 meters without stopping. In three years, she did the Big Red Run. In one day, she had to cover nearly 80 kilometres. Lisa: Yeah, that one kicked my ass. I ended up with a back injury and didn't make it. So I know how hard that one is. Like rain, it's hot— Russell: It's amazing. She literally reinvented her body in three years. Lisa: In her 40s. Not 20s.  Russell: Yeah. In her 40s, yeah.  Lisa: That is just gold. What an incredible story. And even for me, you don't have to— I had a lady on the podcast a couple days ago: Cindy O'Meara, nutritionist. She was teaching me stuff about numbers, and preservatives, and shit. And I'm like, ‘Oh, my God, you know. And that's even like a—' But I didn't have any idea of that level of information and how they feed them on plastic bacteria and put it in our food. I'm like, ‘Wow, this is just horrific.' But she said to me, ‘You don't have to go out and do everything today.' Just decide, ‘This week, okay, I'm going to eat a little bit more organic. This week, I'm going to go and switch out for my, you know, something organic, better chocolate.' If that's what you're into, and you want to eat chocolate, then you don't want to be having the cheap and nasty. Go and find a good one.  You know, so it's just, in other words, taking tiny steps and every day that we make those little wee changes and those little wee steps, don't overwhelm yourself, because then you'll chuck it in. You don't have to be perfect. It doesn't mean you can never ever have an ice cream again. It doesn't mean that. It just means that you're making these incremental changes in your life, and slowly you start to get better. We're all on this continuum of change. And I'd bet you don't need 100% perfect to train, 100% perfect. I have days when I have a ‘F-it day' and you know stuff. Because I've had a bad day and I know I've done it. And then I'm like, ‘Okay, well, you know that this happened. We'll get back on the bandwagon.' Russell: Yeah, yeah, look, you're absolutely right. We're not saying to people that you need to eat like a monk and run marathons like David Goggins, not saying that. We're just saying, as you rightly pointed out, just small adjustments over time, identifying, okay, if you're unfit, if you're not eating well, what are two or three things that you could change today that would not feel like we're making your life incredibly uncomfortable? What are just three things that you could change?  Eventually, you change them. You realise that it wasn't that hard. You realise that you feel better for it. So then you start looking for what else can I do? What else can I change? You know, what else can I optimise? Then over the process of three years, this lady completely changed and completely optimised to the point where you would consider her somewhat of an elite athlete.  Lisa: Wow, this legend.  Russell: Yes. It's a great story. But it just shows you, with dedication, with discipline, consistency, all those words, that they're not necessarily easy or pleasant, but they're irreplaceable, and they're critical.  Lisa: Yeah. And education.  Russell: Yeah. You can't achieve anything in life, whether it's physical or financial, or anything without dedication, discipline, and consistency. Lisa: Yeah. And don't over— then the big piece of the puzzle is don't overwhelm yourself. Just take it one step at a time. I'm studying cryptocurrencies at the moment because I can see the writing on the wall. This is what's coming at us is a complete new system, right? And I'm like at the moment, in that phase of like, ‘I don't get any of this.' Like, you must have been talking Latin to me. But I know if I keep reading, if I keep listening, if I keep on, I will start to pick up the terminology. I will start to understand that I know the process of learning.  I know that's how I learn languages. That's how I learn medical stuff. That's how everything I don't understand at the beginning. I don't worry about the confusion. I just let it wash over me. And then my brain starts to create these patterns of recognition. Then I start to get, ‘Hey, I understood what that person says,' and ‘Oh, I'm a little bit clever.' Then you're away and you're off to the races. Because then you start to become curious, then you start to become passionate. Then you're like, well, then it's up to you. Like how far you take that one. And that's how you do it. You don't go, ‘I'm going to sit down here and I'm going to study cryptocurrency for five hours today because that's what I'm studying.' That will blow your mind, you know? But if you just take that little bit. Russell: Absolutely. Lisa and I think as I age, I'm 53. As I age—  Lisa: Same as me.  Russell: Yeah. I'm trying to become more aware of where are my weaknesses, and I don't mean physical. Because my physical— because I've been exercising for 30 years. Physically, I'm in good shape. My blood pressure is fine. My body composition is good. My strength is good. It's all fine. I'm trying to keep my mind strong. Because my, I guess my internal fear is, at what stage in my life will I cognitively start to decline? I know it's probably going to happen. But I'm trying to keep my mind strong. Lisa: You don't need to, it doesn't need to. This is my area, man. Yeah, we'll have the talk offline. Yeah, there are lots of things. Like having brought my mum back from a massive brain damage, like she had hardly any higher function, I do understand what it takes to keep the brain going. You'd be doing a lot— I don't— because you've got a good diet and all that sort of thing, and you're exercising, those are two massive factors for brain function, you're much less likely to get Alzheimer's and so on. And with a bit of sauna and things like that, then you can lower the risk. And then you understand what your genetics and your predispositions, and then you can understand what to do to mitigate it, then you hop and things like that, like the hyperbaric which is the corner of my room, that type of thing, that will keep your brain function going.  We don't— I don't, I don't see Alzheimer's or any of those things. Because I have so many things in my war chest, if you like, with my tools that I can pull out. For example, my husband has a genetic, three times risk of the normal for developing Alzheimer's. So I bought him a sauna. I chuck his back into the hyperbaric. I watch it. I make sure he's getting good fats in his diet. I try to keep the beers down. That's the biggest struggle I've got with that one. He's training, and he's running 100 miles, and he's doing all these good things. So I don't see it even though he has a three times risk, genetically speaking. I can control that risk by a large degree, by the diet, by the exercise by the right interventions. So we're not passive.  When people— I just had another interview with another fellow Australian this morning, Kirsty from Kultured Wellness, lovely lady. And she had a dad that she talked about. He was 65, starting to cognitive decline. She changed his diet to keto, she started getting more exercise, doing all that sort of stuff. Now he's 75 and he's back teaching. And then he's fully functioning again. You don't need— you can't just go to the doctor and they'll give you a magic anti-Alzheimer's pill. There's nothing there yet. They are working on stuff. They've got some things that can slow things down. But don't rely on that. Bet on the lifestyle, and intervention, and this training, and the diet, and all of those sorts of things that you can control and you might not even develop it. Russell: Yeah, well my goal is with my training, exercise and nutrition, is to self-manage my health. Because I just feel that if I can avoid interaction, If I can avoid the need to be a part of the medical system, then I'm okay.  Lisa: I'm desperate to be apart, away from.  Russell: I don't want to have to rely on a doctor, or a hospital, or a treatment, or a drug. I don't want to. I want to self-medicate through exercise, nutrition, reading, learning, being outdoors, sunlight, all of this stuff. I want to self-medicate for as long as I can. Lisa: That's the one. That's the one. If we have an accident we'll be very glad for their brilliant abilities, plastic surgeries. Not saying that they're brilliant, absolutely brilliant. What we're falling down is in the chronic disease management. Russell: Yeah, but I also feel, Lis, that it's my responsibility to manage my own health. I don't— It's not up to the doctors and the nurses. I want them to be looking after truly sick people who are injured, or unwell, or have cancer, or— I don't want to give them like, ‘Don't look after me. I'll do it myself.' If one day, I fall over and break a leg or do something stupid, then I'll need your help. But until then, I'm happy for them to look after people that really need them. And I'll look after me. Lisa: Yeah. And this is, even from a macro perspective, we'll wind it up in a second, but I'm loving this, but the social, you know, from an economic point of view, if they understood that if they were educating people, then there would be less load on the health system. I mean what's coming at the health system, as far as diabetes, when you look at our teenagers and our children who are already obese, who are already pre-diabetic in some cases, who have all sorts of hormonal issues, and what's coming 20 years down the line when they reach their 40s and 50s. Oh, Crikey, we're in for a hard ride, then. From an economic, macro-economic standpoint.  Even in the slight, you know, the latest COVID situation, started again, but why is there not a bigger conversation around boosting your immune system so that if you do happen to get it, that you're at least able to cope? Because people with comorbidities that are least likely to come out the other side, or to come out with some serious— not always, it's a part of it's a genetic thing. But also, let's be proactive again. Let's take your vitamin D on full load. Let's look at the, you know, magnesium and vitamin C's at the school. It's a simple, easy things that we can do to boost our immunity, it's lower stress levels, it's try and do all of it. Then we might, if we are unlucky enough to get hit with it, maybe we'll be able to come out the other side without, you know, dying or having some long-term consequences. Hopefully. Where is that conversation? Russell: Well, sadly, Lis, we're not having that conversation. The simple reason for that, and I don't want to sound sceptical, but it possibly may, there's no money in healthy people. But there's a lot of money, there's a lot of money to be made, when your population is unwell and sick. And unfortunately, we're fighting big, big organisations that make a lot of money when people are unwell. Lisa: Yeah, that's just the truth. When you're on a, even a blood pressure medication or something like that, that you're on for life, that's a hell of a lot better than them giving you something that actually might fix it and you're off it in two weeks' time. That's why there's no money going into antivirals, medications and things because you'll be on it for a couple of weeks, and then it's over. So they can't really make money. Well, they can't make money out of repurposing drugs that are off-patent. You know, get into the bloody weeds on that stuff.  I think what's important for us to do is just to shine a light on the positive things that we have been through and be proactive. And be aware that there are forces at play that are not always got your best interests at heart, not to just accept whatever is dished up to you. Go and do your own research. Go and talk to this. Listen to the scientists. Listen to people who are really educated in the space. That's not me and it's not you. But I listen to the people who are at the top of this game, and then I make my decisions over what I do. We won't always get it right. But make your own mind up and be responsible for your own as best you can. There'll always be a left-field thing. The shingles came out of me even though I'm on all the right things and doing the right things. Because probably I've got too much stress in my life. And I take accountability for that and trying to mitigate that which I'm trying to do. Russell: My summary to all of that is with your own health and what people are telling you to use or take or consume, you got to do your own due diligence.  Lisa: Always, always. Hey, Russell, you've been absolutely magnificent. I want to have you back on. I'd love to talk to your wife about her journey too at some point because yeah, really excited to meet you to have you on the show. It's been a real honour. Another you know, like-minded person, keep fighting the battle. Right?  Russell: That's it, it's been great. I really appreciate you having me. Thank you, Lisa.  Lisa: And where do people go to if they want to find out more about you, what you do? Russell: The best place to just go to my website where you can understand what I do, what I've done, who I work with, and how you can connect and it's just www.russelljarrett.com.au Lisa: www.russelljarrett.com.au. We'll put that in the show notes people. Check it out and we'll see you on the other side. That's it this week for Pushing the Limits. Be sure to rate, review, and share with your friends and head over and visit Lisa and her team at lisatamati.com.

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S4 E7: Brazil 2003 - The crazy F1 race with the wrong winner

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 76:22


The 2003 Brazilian Grand Prix will forever be remembered as a race of chaos where the wrong driver was declared the winner straight after the race.Mark Hughes and Gary Anderson join host Glenn Freeman to revisit their memories of being at Interlagos that day, including Gary's first-hand account of how Jordan pulled off its shock victory with Giancarlo Fisichella in one of the slowest cars on the grid. We also look at Ferrari's rocky start to 2003, how McLaren was leading the championship with an updated 2002 car, why Williams hadn't hit the ground running yet, the debate around F1's sweeping rule changes for the new season including one-shot qualifying, the FIA getting tough with implementing the HANS device, Jordan's 200th race, why Michael Schumacher was a fan of driver aids, how Gary upset Ross Brawn with a suggestion made to Charlie Whiting before the delayed start to the race, the difference between Michelin and Bridgestone's intermediate tyres, why no teams had full wets for the awful conditions, what caused the car park of crashed cars at Turn 3, where Jordan's clever strategy might have put Fisichella without the huge accidents that ended the race early, and why there was so much confusion over which driver had won the race - which didn't become official until five days later! ASK US ANYTHING: Get your questions in about F1 from 1989-2005 for our series finale using #BringBackV10s on Twitter or email bringbackv10s@the-race.com

Purple Sector
Ep257 - Eggplant Emoji

Purple Sector

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 48:31


Tune in as we dive into the MailBoxBoxBox and cover some breaking news stories. Listeners loved to see the Slender Man Esteban Ocon sprinting around the track, made some Haas jokes, and brought it with Formula Brunch. We discuss the top 10 richest Formula 1 drivers of all time. Valterri Bottas accidentally revealed his recently used emojis. A Michael Schumacher documentary is coming to Netflix. Hungary seems to be an F1 maiden win dreamland. Why don't F1 teams have spotters during wet races? What does Ferrari plan to "unleash" later this season? Listen for all the banter and answers. SUBSCRIBE to Purple Sector wherever you get your podcasts FOLLOW @PurpleSectorPod on Instagram and Twitter CALL/TEXT Purple Sector at +1 904-8-PURPLE

F1: Beyond The Grid
143: Jock Clear on engineering Villeneuve and Schumacher, coaching Leclerc and developing Ferrari's next generation

F1: Beyond The Grid

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 72:19


This week's guest has spent 30 years in F1, working with some of the sport's greatest drivers. As Driver Coach of Ferrari's vaunted academy, Jock Clear's job is to help the likes of Charles Leclerc and Mick Schumacher perform to the best of their ability – a role he's performed with others before. Clear became widely known to many F1 fans as race engineer to Jacques Villeneuve at Williams in the late Nineties and then – surprisingly – as engineer to the man who famously ran into the Canadian in 1997, Michael Schumacher, when the German ace was at Mercedes. He also worked with and alongside the likes Rubens Barrichello, Nico Rosberg, and Jenson Button – and as a result has great stories and insight to offer about all of them!

Scuderia F1: Formula 1 podcast
Ferrari ready to 'unleash' the beast? | FIA tosses out Vettel's Hungarian GP DQ appeal

Scuderia F1: Formula 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 113:20


In years gone by the summer break usually meant that world of F1 went pretty quiet for the most of the month of August, but that's not the case in 2021! On the show tonight we discuss news that Aston Martin's appeal for Sebastian Vettel's disqualification in Hungary has been dismissed by the FIA, Ferrari is set to 'unleash' some major engine upgrades in the next few weeks, and we discuss Netflix's upcoming documentary on the legendary Michael Schumacher set to drop in just a few week's time. All this and more on the podcast that is always up to speed with Formula 1! Contact & Feedback: Find us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you enjoy podcasts Website: http://www.scuderiaf1pod.com Email: scuderiaf1pod@gmail.com YouTube: http://ow.ly/gerq50CxM5S Twitter: @ScuderiaF1Pod Facebook: Scuderia F1 Podcast To advertise on this show, please visit https://www.advertisecast.com/ScuderiaF1 or email Overtime@AdvertiseCast.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

In the Fast Lane
Episode 65: Takuma Sato

In the Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 27:00


Former F1® racer and two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Takuma Sato remembers his 2002 debut for Jordan in Australia, racing against Michael Schumacher at Indianapolis and the impact of his Indy 500 wins in his native Japan, and assesses the 2021 F1® rookie season of compatriot Yuki Tsunoda with AlphaTauri.

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S4 E5: Monaco 2004 - Trulli's only win and chaos behind him

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 82:56


Jarno Trulli's only F1 win was utterly convincing, as he claimed the 2004 Monaco Grand Prix from pole position. But this was an eventful few days on and off track for F1, as Mark Hughes and Scott Mitchell discuss with host Glenn Freeman.As well as Trulli's heroics, we look back on Takuma Sato's engine blowing up in front of the whole field, a war of words between Fernando Alonso and Ralf Schumacher, plus the controversial collision between Michael Schumacher and Juan Pablo Montoya... in the tunnel... behind the safety car! Off track there were plenty of stories in the news, including rumours of Williams discussing a 2005 seat with out-of-work Jacques Villeneuve, another war of words for Ralf Schumacher - this time with Patrick Head from his own team, the latest on McLaren's much-needed B-spec to its horrible 2004 car, why Toyota offended David Coulthard, plus a huge amount of discussion about F1's future rules packages and the unpopular tweak made to the one-shot qualifying format for 2004. Plus the small matter of Jaguar supposedly losing a $300,000 diamond from one of its cars in a crash.ASK US ANYTHING: Submit your questions about anything to do with F1 from 1989-2005 for our series finale, using #BringBackV10s on Twitter, or email bringbackv10s@the-race.com

The Functional Tennis Podcast
Timo Glock - Former F1 Driver

The Functional Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 31:07


This week Timo Glock joins us. Timo is an avid tennis fan/player, a former F1 driver & currently races for BMW in BMT

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S4 E3: France 2002 - Raikkonen's near miss, Schumacher makes history

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 71:16


The 2002 French Grand Prix will forever be remembered as the day Michael Schumacher made history by equalling the great Juan Manuel Fangio's then-record of five Formula 1 world championships. But it so nearly went down in F1 folklore as the scene of Kimi Raikkonen's maiden victory. Gary Anderson and Mark Hughes join Glenn Freeman to recall their memories from being at Magny-Cours that weekend. As well as hearing Gary's first-hand insight from a dramatic weekend for Jordan - which included almost bringing back Heinz-Harald Frentzen as a last-minute stand-in one year on from him being fired by the team - we look back on the beginning of the end for Arrows, why Ferrari was so dominant in 2002, what made Williams so fast on Saturdays and so underwhelming on Sundays, how Jenson Button lost his Renault drive and ended up at BAR for 2003, and the controversy surrounding Schumacher's pass for the win as Raikkonen slid wide on oil - which almost resulted in a McLaren protest after the race. ASK US ANYTHING: Get your questions in for our series finale by using #BringBackV10s on Twitter to ask us about anything you like to do with F1 from 1989-2005. Or leave us a five-star podcast review and submit a question there too!

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S4 E2: How Schumacher's Ferrari move rocked F1

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 70:00


Michael Schumacher's move to Ferrari for 1996 changed F1 forever. In this episode Karun Chandhok and Matt Beer join host Glenn Freeman to revisit what was going on in the F1 driver market during 1995, when Schumacher resisted offers to drive a faster car or for more money to take on the project of rebuilding Ferrari. We also look at the other drivers affected by his move, from those who had to wait for Schumacher to decide his future before they could sort their drives out for 1996, to the ones who turned down opportunities to be his team-mate before Eddie Irvine got the drive. We then follow the start of Schumacher's life at Ferrari all the way from a tense first meeting with car designer John Barnard, through winter testing, the late arrival of an ugly and unreliable car, to a Ferrari debut that offered more promise than had been expected when the F1 world set off for Australia in March 1996. ASK US ANYTHING: Get your questions in about anything in F1 from 1989-2005 for our series finale episodes using #BringBackV10s on Twitter, or email bringbackv10s@the-race.com

In the Fast Lane
Episode 57: Andreas Seidl

In the Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 22:59


McLaren Racing team principal Andreas Seidl remembers being inspired by Michael Schumacher as a teenager in Germany in the 1990s, makes sense of Lando Norris' rapid rise in 2021, talks about his confidence in Daniel Ricciardo and reveals the one meal he can't do without on race weekends.

Starting Grid – meinsportpodcast.de
Vintage – The Past of Formula 1 mit Nick Heidfeld (F1 von 2000 – 2011)

Starting Grid – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 105:26


Quick Nick is here! Wir freuen uns sehr, dass unser Vintage-Gast im Juli niemand geringerer als Nick Heidfeld ist. In der Ankündigung für diesen Podcast hat Moderator Kevin Scheuren euch ein bisschen in die Irre geführt. Wenn man seine Zeit als Testfahrer bei McLaren-Mercedes mit einberechnet ist Nick schon 1997 in die Formel 1 gekommen. Details! Auch wenn Heidfeld kein F1-GP-Sieger ist, eine Menge Geschichten gab es dann doch zu erzählen. Er hat sich sehr viel mehr Zeit genommen als geplant und aus dem Nähkästchen geplaudert. Das Ergebnis könnt ihr euch jetzt direkt anhören. Keine Bitterkeit gegen McLaren Nick Heidfeld ist nicht auf Rosen gebettet in die Formel 1 gekommen. Er musste sich hocharbeiten und für alles kämpfen. Durch seine tolle Performance in Macau hat er sich die Aufmerksamkeit von Mercedes ergattert und konnte sich über die Förderung freuen. Diese war aber kein Blanko-Ticket für die Formel 1. Auch mit dieser Unterstützung im Rücken musste er in der Formel 3 und Formel 3000 weiter Leistung bringen. Das gelang ihm auch, er bekam d...

F1: Beyond The Grid
138: Norbert Haug on bringing Mercedes back into F1, buying Brawn GP and more

F1: Beyond The Grid

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 66:47


This week's guest, Norbert Haug, held one of the most influential jobs in motorsport for more than 20 years. As the boss of Mercedes-Benz motorsport, he oversaw all of the company's racing activities – indeed it was him who decided to return the Silver Arrows to F1 as an engine supplier in 1993. Once back, Mercedes enjoyed great success in partnership with McLaren – and Haug has great anecdotes to tell about Mika Hakkinen, David Coulthard, Kimi Raikkonen and Lewis Hamilton. He also opens up on his role in Michael Schumacher's career, and Mercedes' decision to buy Brawn GP at the end of 2009, setting them on the path to their recent glory as a fully-fledged works team… This episode is sponsored by SumUp Express VPN

Add To Cart
What Can't Michael Schumacher Do? | The Airtasker Story

Add To Cart

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2021 34:10


In this episode of Add To Cart, we are joined by Tim Fung, founder of Airtasker, the community platform that connects people who need jobs done with people who want to work. Started in Australia in 2012, Airtasker now operates in New Zealand, Singapore, the UK, Ireland and the US and listed on the ASX earlier this year. In this chat, Tim shares how he got started with Airtasker and effectively scaled a two sided marketplace that now lists over 80,000 tasks every month. He gives us insights on how eCommerce skills are in demand and how some businesses are turning to Airtasker to fill skill gaps. And he reveals some of the most fascinating tasks that the platform has listed - including removing spiders from light fittings, entertaining drag queens and even Tim himself helping review your pitch deck. Links from the episode:AirtaskerAmaysimFlotespaceSteve JobsJeff BezosZaarlySignet & Flora and Fauna (sponsored)Shopify & Rollie Nation (sponsored)Questions answered:How did Airtasker get started?How does Airtasker manage and organise such a huge amount of product to give users a great online experience?What is your top tip for an effective pitch deck?This episode was brought to you by… Shopify PlusAustralian brand Rollie Nation makes footwear that is lightweight and one of the favourites of suitcase stuffers around the globe, so when Rollie Nation wanted to put a greater focus on direct to consumer, they migrated to Shopify Plus, with integrations into Gorgeous for customer service, , Smile for loyalty, Klaviyo for direct marketing and Okendo for customer reviews, Rollie Nation were able to deliver a site that was as lightweight as their shoes. They immediately achieved a 62% improvement in page speed, which contributed to a 3.5% increase in conversion. As Limp Bizkit would say they're now rollin' rollin' rollin'. To read more of Rollie Nation's story and see other case studies visit the customers sections on shopify.com.au/plus.SignetIf I asked you who you thought the Captain Planet was of Australian retail, I am sure the team over at Flora & Fauna would get most of your votes. They continue to set the benchmark for sustainable retail - and business in general. So, we are proud to share that they partnered with our friends at Signet to create plastic free packaging. Using Signet's eco friendly protective packaging range, Flora & Fauna have been able save 30 tonnes of plastic from landfill while keeping their 8,000 products safe in transit. As captain planet would say, “with our powers combined…” Visit signet.net.au/blog to find out more.About your host: Nathan Bush from 12HIGHNathan Bush is the founder and lead strategist at eCommerce consultancy, 12HIGH. He has led eCommerce for businesses with revenue $100m+ and has been recognised as one of Australia's Top 50 People in eCommerce four years in a row. You can contact Nathan on LinkedIn, Twitter or via email.About your co-host: Tim Fung from AirtaskerFounder of Airtasker, a local services marketplace connecting people and businesses who need work done with people wanting to work. Fascinated by marketplaces, user generated content and network effects. Spends his spare time with high quality 80s/90s movies (eg. Point Break, Coming to America, Back to the Future), Formula One, karting, track days, ice hockey, bouldering and alpine sports. You can contact Tim at LinkedInPlease contact us if you: Want to come on board as an Add To Cart sponsor Are interested in joining Add To Cart as a co-host Have any feedback or suggestions on how to make Add To Cart betterEmail hello@addtocart.com.au We look forward to hearing from you! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Purple Sector
Ep246 - Fashionable Frenchman

Purple Sector

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 59:28


Tune in for our preview of this weekend's Formula 1 French Grand Prix and the creation of our Formula Brunch menu! We also cover news and last weekend's racing in other motorsport series. Pierre Gasly's amazing form is still not enough for Helmut Marko. Yuki Tsunoda's daily schedule is very busy and even involves English lessons. Esteban Ocon received a big extension, and we recap the status of other drivers' contracts ahead of the Silly Season. Lewis Hamilton wants to pursue acting after F1 (as if he isn't acting already). Formula 1 castoffs had a banner weekend in Detroit, and Romain Grosjean played firefighter. We are crowdfunding to purchase Michael Schumacher's 7-Up car. Pirelli is still trying to spin the tire failures in Baku. Grab a fresh croissant and café au lait and enjoy our chatter! SUBSCRIBE to Purple Sector wherever you get your podcasts FOLLOW @PurpleSectorPod on Instagram and Twitter CALL/TEXT Purple Sector at +1 904-8-PURPLE

F1: Beyond The Grid
133: Roberto Moreno on fighting his way into F1, life as a super sub, and being replaced by Schumacher

F1: Beyond The Grid

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 84:43


Some drivers seem destined to race in F1. Others have to fight for it. Roberto Moreno was in the latter camp. He arrived in Europe from Brazil with no money, yet he managed to climb the racing ladder on talent alone. An F3000 champion, he got test roles with Lotus and Ferrari, yet the bulk of his career - for one reason or another - was spent with teams at the very back of the grid. In this week’s show he tells us his inspirational story, from performing heroics to make the cut in Monaco with Andrea Moda (described by some as F1’s worst team), his dream debut podium with Benetton in Japan in 1990, his childhood friendship with Nelson Piquet, and how his frontline F1 career was abruptly ended by the sudden emergence of one Michael Schumacher…

The V8 Sleuth Podcast
Ep. 122 - The Power of 7

The V8 Sleuth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 69:21


Aaron Noonan and Will Dale explore the #7 throughout the world of motorsport in this episode of the V8 Sleuth Podcast powered by Repco, from Formula 1 world champions to NASCAR legends, Supercars heroes and a swathe of iconic racers to carry the number on a wide array of two and four-wheeled machines.V8 Sleuth Bookshop: https://bookshop.v8sleuth.com.au

Shift+F1: A Formula 1 Podcast
145 - Portuguese GP & Spanish GP Prerace 2021

Shift+F1: A Formula 1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 75:10


The races are coming fast and loose these days! Try not to slip on the tarmac or get BLOWN OFF THE DANG TRACK. IndyCar spoilers from 1:10:24 to 1:12:43 SHOW NOTES Sprint race details from PlanetF1 (article) and Chain Bear (video) David Coulthard and Michael Schumacher’s blue flag miscue RAI’s radio confusion in Bahrain Support the show on Patreon and get all our bonus episodes! Email us at shiftf1podcast@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter at @shiftf1podcast Join our fantasy league with invite code 7350a6d919 New to F1? Check out our primer episode