Podcasts about Edd

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  • 742PODCASTS
  • 1,412EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Edd

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Latest podcast episodes about Edd

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton
Ep. 44 Who Holds the Purse Strings? ft. Lanhee Chen

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 34:46


Steve & Kristen talk to Lanhee Chen, candidate for Controller. They talk about what a controller does, how the $30 billion EDD scandal could have been avoided, and what he plans to do when he wins.

SHAPE America's Podcast - Professional Development for Health & Physical Education Teachers

Sean is joined by our Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Podcast group to introduce the upcoming podcast and hear about their whys. Meet the team:Kennedra Tucker is a K-12 Health & Physical Education specialist. A 14-year Maryland educator, Kennedra has been recognized as a 2017 Nationally Board Certified Teacher, the 2018 SHAPE Maryland Middle School Physical Education Teacher of the Year (TOY), and a SHAPE Maryland Past President. She is currently a member of the SHAPE EDI (Equity, Diversity & Inclusion) Committee and is presently pursuing an EdD from the University of Maryland, College Park in School System Leadership. Dr. Patricia Morgan is an innovative and passionate educator and leader with a heart for equity, access, inclusion, and social justice. She is an experienced coordinator of Science, Health, and Physical Education programs. In addition to her work in the K-12 sector, she works in higher education as an adjunct professor. In her spare time, she studies and presents on Culturally Relevant Pedagogy, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI), and STEM at local, national, and international conferences. Dr. Cara Grant is a supervisor for PreK-12 health and physical education supervisor in the 14th largest school district in the United States. She also supports the University of Maryland College Park Masters Degree with a teaching certificate in Physical Education. Her work infuses and prioritizes equity, diversity, and inclusion so all students are included and welcomed in curriculum, instruction, and teaching practices.Dr. Mara Simon is an assistant professor in the department of physical education and health education at Springfield College. Her research interests include culturally relevant pedagogy in PE and addressing racial inequity and whiteness in PE teacher education.John Strong is an Associate Professor within the HPE Department at Niagara County Community College in Sanborn, NY.  He is also the Chief Diversity and Equity Officer at NCCC, and enjoys using his capacity as CDEO to inform his interactions within SHAPE America's EDI Committee.Sue Scheppele is a Doctoral Physical Education Fellow at Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts.  She taught PreK - 8th Grade Physical Education for seven years and was a lead PE teacher in the Houston Independent School District.  In addition, she was a high school Health and Physical Education teacher for three years in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Sue is a certified DEI trainer for the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and received the Walter Kase Award for teacher excellence in 2017.Sean Nevills is a lifetime member of SHAPE America and current host for the podcast. As a former project director for SHAPE, Sean led the CDC funded COVID-19 initiatives for the 2020-21 school year. Prior to SHAPE, Sean served as Director of Health and Physical Education for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. He is a licensed K-12 physical educator having taught adapted PE, high school PE, and virtual classes throughout his teaching career. Sean's work in education includes curriculum development, employee and community wellness, and educational equity. Sean has nearly 15 years of football coaching experience from the youth level through college and several years coaching track and field. He is an active member of Missouri SHAPE and serves as chair of MOSHAPE's Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion committee.

Always A Lesson's Empowering Educators Podcast
250: Bonus Episode – Interview with Julie Warner

Always A Lesson's Empowering Educators Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:07


https://alwaysalesson.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/empowering-educators-podcast-1.png ()Julie Warner, EdD, left the classroom fewer than 10 years ago—close enough that she can still vividly remember her first few rocky years with their emotional and logistical landmines, but long enough to have had a career in education since then that includes obtaining a doctorate in education from Teachers College, Columbia University, stints as an Education Policy Advisor in the U.S. Senate and the White House, and overseeing the teacher issues portfolio within the U.S. Department of Education's internal think tank. Even as she's advised on high-level policy decisions in education, she's always stayed close to the classroom: she's a National Board Certified Teacher, has published books on teaching with technology, and is a freelance education writer.Tune in to hear this bonus edition episode with Julie Warner! Quotables "If you could help to influence one teacher's practice you're having influence with potentially 30+ students." "If students don't know you see them and don't know you care on a human level, then no one is going to learn anything." "Confusion has to come before you learn how to do something." "If you know what you're doing, you might be stagnant. If you're a little bit uncomfortable or out of your depth, you're growing." "No one can be everything to one person." Stamp of Approval https://www.amazon.com/Failure-Before-Success-Teachers-Describe/dp/1475857489 (Failure Before Success Book) Join the Always A Lesson Newsletter Join http://eepurl.com/lJKNn (here) and grab a freebie! Connect with Gretchen Email: gretchen@alwaysalesson.com Blog: https://alwaysalesson.com/blog/ (Always A Lesson) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlwaysALesson/ (Always A Lesson) Twitter: https://twitter.com/gschultek/ (@gschultek) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/always.a.lesson/ (Always.A.Lesson) Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/GretchenSchultekBridgers/ (Gretchen Schultek Bridgers) Book: https://alwaysalesson.com/product/elementary-educ-101-what-they-didnt-teach-you-in-college/ (Elementary EDUC 101: What They Didn't Teach You in College) Connect with Julie Warner Twitter:  https://twitter.com/newliteracy (@newliteracy) Website: http://www.juliemwarner.com (www.juliemwarner.com) Leave a Rating and Review: This helps my show remain active in order to continue to help other educators remain empowered in a career that has a long lasting effect on our future. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/always-lessons-empowering/id1006433135?mt=2 (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/always-lessons-empowering/id1006433135?mt=2) Search for my show in iTunes or Stitcher. Click on ‘Ratings and Reviews.' Under ‘Customer Reviews,' click on “Write a Review.” Sign in with your iTunes or Stitcher log-in info Leave a Rating: Tap the greyed out stars (5 being the best) Leave a Review: Type in a Title and Description of your thoughts on my podcast Click ‘Send'

Growth Edge Leadership Podcast
Diversity on the Executive Path

Growth Edge Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:47


In this week's Growth Edge podcast, I sit down for an important conversation with Dr. Diane Dixon about the state of diversity at the highest levels of executive leadership in healthcare. The business case for diversity in the c-suite of any organization is well-documented, but the challenge of achieving diversity in executive representation in organizations and the academic institutions that train future leaders is something that we continue to struggle with. Learn from Dr. Dixon's extensive research on this topic and hear key insights from her book, Diversity on the Executive Path. Listen in.   Diane Dixon, EdD - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ddixonorg/ Diane Dixon website - http://www.ddixon.org Diversity on the Executive Path book - https://www.ache.org/learning-center/publications/books/2401I

Kourting Happiness
55. How to Create a Career With No Limits with Dr. Sonya McCoy Wilson

Kourting Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 73:16


Have you often thought about creating a career with no limits?  We have a podcast guest that will empower you to transform your life and focus on what she likes to call soul work. Dr. Sonya McCoy-Wilson joins the Kourting Happiness studio with our host, Dr. Kortni Alston.  She is a Dean of Arts and Sciences, Executive Coach, and Consultant.  Learn more about creating change in your life, strategies for getting a doctorate, and designing a career with unlimited possibilities. 

Speaking of Psychology
Men, masculinity and mental health, with Ronald F. Levant, EdD

Speaking of Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:30


Stoic. Self-reliant. Unemotional. For many men, these watchwords of traditional masculinity still hold powerful sway. Men are less likely than women to seek help for mental health issues, they die by suicide more often, and they commit and are the victims of more homicides. Ronald F. Levant, EdD, discusses how cultural expectations of masculinity affect men's mental and physical health, how our ideas of masculinity have changed over time and what psychologists have learned about how to reach out to men.

Health and Medicine (Video)
Anti-Racism and Building an Inclusive Culture

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:28


The race equity movement has left us with greater awareness of the urgent need for changes in the way we interact and run our businesses and institutions. This discussion features a frank discussion on what one psychiatry department has done to address interpersonal and systemic racism, as well as insight from an expert on a compassion-based approach for insightfully seeing and discussing race, and being actively anti-racist. Panelists: Rhonda Magee, JD, Professor of Law, University of San Francisco; Michelle Porche, EdD, Associate Adjunct Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Matthew State, MD, PhD, Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor and Chair, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37477]

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
Anti-Racism and Building an Inclusive Culture

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:28


The race equity movement has left us with greater awareness of the urgent need for changes in the way we interact and run our businesses and institutions. This discussion features a frank discussion on what one psychiatry department has done to address interpersonal and systemic racism, as well as insight from an expert on a compassion-based approach for insightfully seeing and discussing race, and being actively anti-racist. Panelists: Rhonda Magee, JD, Professor of Law, University of San Francisco; Michelle Porche, EdD, Associate Adjunct Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Matthew State, MD, PhD, Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor and Chair, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37477]

Classroom Q and A
Seven Ways to Effectively Use Art in Any Classroom, With Any Subject and Why You Should

Classroom Q and A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:45


Art has the ability to be a powerful tool for engaging, differentiating, and humanizing virtually any subject. Join us as we cover several practical strategies for using art effectively in any classroom. Follow on Twitter: @klrembert @wendi322 @demacruz @larryferlazzo @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork Keisha Rembert is a passionate learner and fierce equity advocate. She is an award-winning educator who taught middle school ELA and United States History teacher for many years and now instructs future educators. She hopes to change our world one student at a time. Delia M. Cruz-Fernández, EdD has been in education for over 20 years as a Mathematics and Spanish teacher, High School Assistant Principal and is currently working in the Multilingual Education Team as a Secondary ESL Specialist in a School District in Central Texas. She is an advocate for Multilingual Learners Education. She published in the English Leadership Quarterly the article When Live Gives You Lemons… Learning to Learn during a Pandemic. Wendi Pillars, NBCT, has been teaching for more than two decades and has yet to teach the same exact lesson twice. Fueled by curiosity, a desire to innovate, and a slight ability to rock a stick figure, she is on a perpetual quest to make information understandable and engaging for others. She is the author of Visual Impact and Visual Notetaking for Educators.

The Nurse Practitioner - The Nurse Practitioner Podcast

In this episode of The Nurse Practitioner Podcast, Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos, EdD, WHNP-BC, IBCLC, FAANP discusses Filipino American Nurses.

Public Health Review
59: The Importance of Crisis Communications in Public Health

Public Health Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 32:02


As states continue to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the role of crisis communications is vital. How can states provide the public with relevant, timely information? What are the essential elements of a crisis communications response?    In our latest episode, Umair Shah (Director, Washington State Department of Health) and Khalilah LeGrand (Director of Communications, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services) share the latest insights from the field. Hear them discuss lessons learned during the pandemic, strategies public health communications departments can use to connect audiences with resources, and best practices of media relations. Guests: Umair Shah, MD, MPH, Secretary of Health, Washington State Department of Health Khalilah LeGrand, EdD, Director of Communications, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services Resources: Washington Department of Health COVID-19 Resources Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services COVID-19 Resources CDC Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) Training and Resources

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 3 (09/20)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 30:23


Mike Feuer went to the homeless encampment near the VA and it didn't go as planned. There is a growing homeless encampment near a preschool in Hollywood. A couple in Rancho Cucamonga has been getting EDD mail to their address for people who they do not know. Financial perspective from John & Ken.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Monday 9/20 - Hour 1

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 35:16


Kicking off the show with former Fresno State head football coach Pat Hill to discuss the Bulldogs' big win over UCLA at the Rose Bowl. California recognizes the EDD is busted and says it needs time, patience and money to fix it. Kent Ownings of Tree City Advisors and heard on KMJ's "Real Money Pros" joins the show to discuss the today's dip in Wall Street's major indexes. SF Mayor London Breed was photographed maskless in a club and makes no apologies.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CG Garage
Episode 342 - Edward Dawson-Taylor and Jacqueline Cooper - Becoming a CG Pro

CG Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 75:29


Real-time CG is quickly taking over the film industry — but learning about its virtual cameras, lenses, and sets can be tricky. Tackling this is “Becoming a CG Pro,” an online virtual production course aimed at filmmakers and CG artists hosted by Edward Dawson-Taylor and Jacqueline Cooper, a pair of VFX industry pros with credits on Jurassic World, The Jungle Book, and The Lion King. In this podcast, Edd and (returning guest) Jackie talk to Chris about what he learned through taking the course, and how virtual filmmaking brings back on-set collaboration and puts CG tools in the hands of traditional filmmakers. They also discuss the history of filmmaking, from Eadweard Muybridge to The Matrix, and the applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning in the real world.

Total Spotfest Wrestling Podcast
AEW Dynamite Review, Plus Interview with Walter from Journey Pro KC, NXT 2.0, InDex Wedding

Total Spotfest Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 149:32


JJ and Jamie discuss the final AEW Dynamite before next week's "Grand Slam" events in New York, the "new" NXT 2.0 (including the questionable booking of baby Steiner, Brunette Mandy Rose and a new NXT Champion), the InDex wedding, Impact Knockouts getting their own PPV, and take a trip down memory lane with memorable wrestling weddings of yore.

For Leaders
Catherine Rymsha on the connection between listening and leadership

For Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 50:16


www.forleadersglobal.com Helping organisations build leaders worth following and culture worth reproducing FLG_S2_E13 Catherine Rymsha on the connection between listening and leadership In the workplace, there is generally a constant stream of competing priorities, new information, and leadership “skills” that need to be developed. Even after all the professional development days or short courses, there is one skill that seems to have been overlooked in the corporate world for decades: Listening. In this episode, you'll hear Catherine Rymsha unpack the necessity of listening and the relationship it has with leadership and performance. The skill of listening can prevent double handling, can help colleagues understand the vision and intent of a task, and equates to better communication and leadership in the workplace. This episode will inspire you to prioritise developing the art of listening in your personal and professional life. By working on and mastering this foundational skill, you'll be surprised at how quickly it helps elevate your leadership through your ability to be more attentive, understanding & more connected with others.   ABOUT CATHERINE RYMSHA: https://www.theleadershipdecision.com/   Catherine M. Rymsha, EdD, is a lecturer at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, where she teaches courses on leadership. Catherine spent over ten years in marketing/communications leadership roles ranging from marketing healthcare conferences to writing speeches on payment card security. She now leads learning and development for a software company. Her TEDx Talk, "Want to Become a Better Leader? Here's How. Just Listen," focuses on the importance of listening to leadership. She holds a master of science in leadership and a doctorate of education with a focus on organizational leadership from Northeastern University in Boston.   For Leaders Global Resources:  www.forleadersglobal.com   Helping Organisations Build Leaders Worth Following & Culture Worth Reproducing Transforming Team Communication Program: The Exceptional Team Leader Executive Leadership Coaching Culture Formation & Development  To get in contact with us and talk about how we can help you build leaders worth, dynamic teams and culture worth reproducing email us here: hello@forleadersglobal.com or head to our website.  

Plan A Konversations
You Do Not Have to Believe Everything You Think, Dr. Cedrick Bridgeforth, EdD, Author, Coach + Clergyperson

Plan A Konversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 56:34


Season 8, Episode 9 - You Do Not Have to Believe Everything You Think  - Dr. Cedrick Bridgeforth, EdD, Author, Coach + ClergypersonWELCOME TO SEASON 8! We're honored that you're here with us and very grateful to have you as a listener.About Rev. Cedrick D. Bridgeforth, EdDDr. Cedrick D. Bridgeforth is an author, educator, consultant, coach, and clergyperson. He is the Founder/Principal Consultant of 20/20 Leadership Lessons, Inc., an agency committed to helping nonprofit leaders and organizations develop and implement plans for impact and longevity. In addition to his service as a consultant and coach, he is the Director of Innovation and Communication for the Cal-Pac Conference (United Methodist Church) and the Director of Academic Programs at the Ecumenical Center for Black Church Studies (University of La Verne) where he is responsible for creating a full battery of continuing education events and post-graduate education courses. He holds degrees from Samford University, Claremont School of Theology and Pepperdine University and is a U.S. Air Force veteran. In addition to his work with community organizations, churches and in academia, Dr. Bridgeforth lends time and energy to various activities of his beloved Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Black Methodists for Church Renewal.Connect + learn more about Cedrick:Websites: cedrickbridgeforth.com + alabamagrandson.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cedrickbridgeforth/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cedrickbridgeforth/Klay's NoteWant more information on our custom meditations? Email: Assistant@PlanAwithKlay.com.If you're looking for a cool scripted podcast drama, check out Venice HERE by Marisa Bramwell.Thank you for listening to Season 8 of Plan A Konversations! Share your thoughts and follow Klay on your favorite social media: @PlanAwithKlay and use the hashtag #PlanA101​​​. Want more Plan A? Subscribe to Klay's website: KlaySWilliams.com.If you've been motivated, inspired and called to action by this podcast, please consider contributing with the link provided below. Support the show (https://paypal.me/PlanAEnterprises?locale.x=en_US)

On The Radar
Money EDD Interview: “Loopyano”, Experience Being Locked Up, The Lox Influence, Making Drill Music

On The Radar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 21:26


Harlem in the building today! Joining us onOnTheRadar we have none other than Money EDD! The rapper who just dropped off his “Looypano” project this year stopped by to share his story of getting locked up and coming back out and pursuing the music career he's always wanted. He also broke down the project, upcoming singles, The Lox's influence, and his decision on making drill music. Follow Gabe on IG: https://bit.ly/3cpvsEM​​Follow On The Radar On IG: https://bit.ly/3n3tP1Q​​Follow On The Radar On Twitter: https://bit.ly/2VYj8lm​​Follow On The Radar on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2VWjJnB​​Follow On The Radar on Tik Tok: https://bit.ly/2JNPcWI​​Follow On The Radar On iHeartRadio: https://ihr.fm/39UZUW1​​Follow On The Radar On Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/370ITYD#MoneyEdd #Ontheradar #Interview​​

Once Upon a Tech
Anatomy of a Research Paper with Dr. Jennifer Chiu

Once Upon a Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 24:37


Episode 1 in the Bringing CS Education Research into the K-8 Classroom series. This series is all about taking a deeper dive into current K-8 CS education research, so in this first episode Kim Wilkens, EdD student, and her advisor Dr. Jennifer Chiu, Associate Professor in the School of Education at the University of Virginia, take a look at the anatomy of a research paper. Find resources here.

NACDD
Ep 2, Pt 1. Working Together to Address Regional Needs

NACDD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 30:10


The Collective Voices for Diabetes: Partnering for Prevention & Management podcast series will inspire listeners to advance their diabetes prevention and management efforts through featured guests' ideas, solutions, and approaches. Through intimate and dynamic conversations hosted by NACDD, the podcast will promote guests' innovative public health practices, collective approaches, and unique achievements in the field of partnerships for diabetes prevention and management. In this two-part episode, hear stories about innovation, adaptions, and teamwork from the Co-Chairs of Tennessee's three regional diabetes coalitions: Justin Kirby, PharmD, BCACP, NBC-HWC, Middle Region, Kristy Merritt, BSN, RN, CDCES, West Region, Lynn Russell, MEd, EdD, West Region, and Elizabeth Renfro, BS, MS, East Region. For episode Show Notes and more information about NACDD's action on diabetes, visit www.chronicdisease.org/CollectiveVoices.

NACDD
Ep 2, Pt 2. Working Together to Address Regional Needs

NACDD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 28:34


The Collective Voices for Diabetes: Partnering for Prevention & Management podcast series will inspire listeners to advance their diabetes prevention and management efforts through featured guests' ideas, solutions, and approaches. Through intimate and dynamic conversations hosted by NACDD, the podcast will promote guests' innovative public health practices, collective approaches, and unique achievements in the field of partnerships for diabetes prevention and management. In this two-part episode, hear stories about innovation, adaptions, and teamwork from the Co-Chairs of Tennessee's three regional diabetes coalitions: Justin Kirby, PharmD, BCACP, NBC-HWC, Middle Region, Kristy Merritt, BSN, RN, CDCES, West Region, Lynn Russell, MEd, EdD, West Region, and Elizabeth Renfro, BS, MS, East Region. For episode Show Notes and more information about NACDD's action on diabetes, visit www.chronicdisease.org/CollectiveVoices.

Grad School Femtoring
80: Being a Black Grad School Mom and Balancing Family with Elissa Frazier

Grad School Femtoring

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 48:33


In this episode, we have a special guest, Elissa Frazier, who shares what's it like being a graduate student in an EdD program as well as a mother to four children. She reveals how she balances her personal and professional interests unapologetically by doing things like scheduling in protected time with her children, paying attention to the love language of those she cares about, and taking time to herself instead of powering through. Elissa Frazier is a 5th year EdD candidate, researching Culturally Responsive Tech Integration in urban schools. She is the co-founder of NAVCAP, a professional learning community, grad school coaching center, and resource hub for Black and LatinX grad students. And, she is also the host of The Grad School Soul Collective Podcast. Tune in to learn more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/yvette14/message

LIVE LOVE CREATE Podcast
psybient.org podcast ep28 - DJ Synergia - Microcosmos Records Selection

LIVE LOVE CREATE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 76:04


It's an honour to welcome Synergia @synergia_music from Russia with Microcosmos Records selection to the psybient.org (@psybient-org) podcast ! Bio, links and tracklist below. ENJOY THE MUSIC AND STAY AWAKE -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- SUPPORT PSYBIENT.ORG : MUSIC DOWNLOADS FOR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON => bit.ly/support-psybient-sc PAYPAL SUPPORT => bit.ly/donate-psybient-sc ORDER STICKERS => www.psybient.org/love/shop -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- Synergia (Microcosmos Records) - DJane and light elven shaman, master of deep sacred bass and magic chillout. Wonderful melodies, ethnic voices and powerful bassline mixed by Synergia into the mysterious sound stories and take listeners into the ancient tribal dance. Synergia will guide you into mystic rituals on the dancefloors and in personal journeys. Touch the magic! Follow Synergia http://microcosmosrecords.com/artists/synergia/ https://soundcloud.com/synergia_music https://www.facebook.com/djsynergia/ https://vk.com/synergia_music Tracklist 1. Cubering - Mass (Original Mix) 2. Vena Portae - Photogrephic Film (Matiguechua Remix) 3. Sasha Malkovich - Invisble Rays 4.Numatica - Just A Matter Of Time 5. Blue Lotus - Zafira 6. EDD-989 - Return from the Stars 7. Sundial Aeon - Love Shelter (Kyoto Remix) (Remastered) 8. Translippers - Secret Path (Album Version) 9. Aedem - A Wish (feat. Aurora WindDancer) 10. Jedidiah - Astrogenetic 11. Amriton - Inner Fire (feat. Lesya Kofanova) 12. Noraus - Wrong Warp #chill #chillout #dub #ambient #sacred #psyhodelic #psychill #psybub #electronic #microcosmosrecords #synergia

The Overcast
Overcast 155: Truer Love by Edd Vick

The Overcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 38:35


Truer Love by Edd Vick. Narrated by J.S. Arquin. #scifi #love #virus   My lover Dieter came to Duvall last month. I never expected him to drag his chain this far north; but such is love. Dieter only speaks German. His lover Minette had learned the language to please him, and translated. “He says his idol has died, Carl. He says he never stopped loving you.” We were sitting on rickety chairs in what had once been a Safeway. It was the largest space in the town, so we'd set it up for daycare and as an indoor playground. I was watching the toddlers that day. I handed Dieter a little girl that had been pulling at his shirt. “You know I gave up loving,” I said. “He says it's not that easy. He's fixated on you again and wants you to join the circle.” She looked me over. “We're a lot longer than when you were with us. After Anne died and you left, we linked with a chain in Colorado.” Anne. “You're not a circle--if you were, you wouldn't need me. I don't do that any more.”   Edd Vick, the son of a pirate, is a recovering Texan now living in Seattle. He is a bookseller whose library is a stuffed three-car garage. His stories have appeared in Analog, Asimov's, Year's Best SF, and about thirty other magazines and anthologies.  Find him on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Edd.Vick   Please help support The Overcast. Become a Patron Today! Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify so you never miss an episode. While you're there, don't forget to leave a review!  

Fanboy And The Snob
Our Hopes For The Rapture! And more! - FATS PODCAST 7

Fanboy And The Snob

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 89:34


We got a drunkenly silly show for you today! The boys discuss serious topics such as the Taliban, the Ed, Edd, and eddy movie, the rapture, getting into heaven, drinking, tinder and more! P. S. Refer to our apology video if Chris says anything offensive...

CPA Conversations podcast
CPA Professional Ethics and Working with Schools and Universities

CPA Conversations podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 14:03


As a follow-up to a presentation at our most recent PICPA School District Conference, Jacqueline Stefkovich, EdD, JD, professor emeritus at Pennsylvania State University, joins us to discuss codes of ethics for CPA personnel working with schools and approaches for navigating ethical dilemmas. To read the full transcript click here.

The Tales of Osteopathy Students
S3 Ep 6: Andrew MacMillan

The Tales of Osteopathy Students

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 83:08


This week we have an amazing conversation with the wonderful Andrew MacMillan.Andrew is a specialist paediatric Osteopath, is the unit leader for research at UCO and lectures in sports rehabilitation and technique at LSO on top of that he is an EdD student! There are some amazing insights into the wonder that is paediatric osteopathy and how wonderful research can really be.Here are some links to his research and also some great resources as recommend by Andrew.Info for people leaving the military and wanting to be AHPs.Career changers - the armed forces | Health Education England (hee.nhs.uk)OU free study skills course:  For Study - OpenLearn - Open UniversityGreat books for students: Stella Cottrell (Author of The Study Skills Handbook) (goodreads.com)Andrew's ResearchMasterclass: Axial Spondyloarthritis for Osteopaths and Manual Therapists - International Journal of Osteopathic MedicineInclusivity and accessibility in undergraduate osteopathic education for students with disability: a scoping review - International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine

Berkeley Talks
'Indigenous United' student podcast hosts on being Native at Berkeley

Berkeley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 57:52


In episode 121 of Berkeley Talks, graduate students Sierra Edd (Diné) and Ataya Cesspooch talk about their experiences at UC Berkeley as Native American students and reflect on the history and future of the Hearst Museum and Berkeley's relationships with Indigenous communities. Edd and Cesspooch are co-hosts of Indigenous United, a podcast from Native American Student Development at Berkeley that explores Indigenous issues through interviews with Native artists, scholars and activists. Listen to the episode and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Brotherhood Without Manners - A Game of Thrones reread Podcast

Brotherhood Without Manners, your favorite full spoiler reread podcast of George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, is back with another chapter from Storm of Swords. This episode we read Samwell 2 as he makes his return visit to Craster's. Sam attempts to prevent the death of Bannen due to their lack of supplies and men capable of healing. Sam is informed by Edd that they will be leaving at day break, as Craster has reached his limits with the Watch. A feast for crows is held to celebrate the Night's Watch leaving Craster's home. After offending Craster, all bets are off the table as Jeor Mormont sees his last day. As always we read listener emails and give some inductees! Support us on Podhero! https://podhero.com/259901-Pkv https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co/#donate   Leave us a review!   All Music credits to Ross Bugden INSTAGRAM! : https://instagram.com/rossbugden/ (rossbugden) TWITTER! : https://twitter.com/RossBugden (@rossbugden) YOUTUBE! : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kthxycmF25M   Intro Song - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kthxycmF25M&list=PLoM4PBVG7m75ry-RP5wdZWhSHWVkXFLcz&index=2&t=0s Transition Song - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnzKZw4lquQ

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Hour 3 - More On The Newsom Recall, A New iPhone Update, & EDD

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 37:34


With a large field of GOP contenders in the recall, Republican leaders are avoiding endorsement of any candidate so that they don't discouraging voters from casting a ballot September 14th. A new iPhone update will scan US phones for images of child sexual abuse, drawing praise from child protection groups and concerns from some security researchers. A California man is accused of obtaining unemployment benefits while in prison. He is actually a free man, who showed up to his court hearing to prove he wasn't in prison, but the EDD failed to appear.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Honestly Oversharing
EP65: Ed, Edd n Deady

Honestly Oversharing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 62:13


CONSPIRACY WEEK!!!! The boys talk about the interesting things behind one of the best shows to ever come into existence in the early 2000's. Apparently Ed, Edd n Eddy are dead. We're also very proud to announce that we are now allies, congrats Q!

The Tom Schimmer Podcast
Summer Series: Women in Leadership

The Tom Schimmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 91:14


The 2021 Summer Series continues with a roundtable discussion on Wome in Leadership. Joining Tom for this discussion are Zandra Jo Galván, Anisa Baker-Busby, & Brittany Rincón   Zandra Jo Galvan has been serving as Superintendent of the Greenfield Union School District since August 10, 2017. Zandra has worked in public education for the past 28 years. Prior to joining GUSD, she served as the Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services for Gonzales Unified School District where she coordinated all educational programs, the LCAP process and budgets, and managed all state and federal programs. She earned her Bachelor's Degree in Liberal Studies and Teaching Credential from the California State University of Fresno in 1993, her Master of Arts Degree in Curriculum and Instruction from CSU Monterey Bay in 2002, and her Master of Arts Degree and Administrative Credential in Educational Leadership from San Jose State University in 2008. She will begin at the University of Southern California in August 2021. She has also successfully completed the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) Superintendent Academy, served on the ACSA 2020 Superintendent Planning Committee, is a member of the National Superintendents Roundtable, is on the ACSA Region 10 Board of Directors, and is the president of California Association of Latino/a/x Superintendents and Administrators (CALSA). Superintendent Galvan is passionate about preparing students to be social-emotionally and academically prepared for college and career and ensures that every GUSD team member knows they are an ELITE team member dedicated to the arduous task of saving students from the cycle of poverty. She proudly is committed to “ALL Means ALL”: Fulfilling the Greenfield Guarantee for ALL students in the Greenfield Union School District.  Twitter: @zjgalvan Instagram: @zangalvan LinkedIn: Zandra Jo Galván Email: zjgalvan@greenfield.k12.ca.us   Dr. Anisa Baker-Busby, EdD, is an elementary school principal at Lindsey Elementary School in middle Georgia. In 2020, Solution Tree named Lindsey Elementary a national model PLC school. With more than 18 years of experience in high-poverty schools as an elementary teacher and administrator, Dr. Baker-Busby enjoys helping teachers and leaders use assessments to improve learning outcomes. She works with educators to create collaborative teams focused on using assessment data to make real-time instructional decisions. As an elementary principal, Dr. Baker-Busby helped high-performing collaborative teams embrace the PLC at Work process by focusing on the three big ideas—collaboration, learning, and results. As a result, teams created common formative assessments and used the results to improve their practices and determine students who need additional time and support. Dr. Baker-Busby was named the 2008–2009 Teacher of the Year at Miller Elementary School in Georgia. Twitter: @AnisaBusby Instagram: @anisa.busby Email: Anisa.busby@gmail.com   Dr. Brittany Rincón is a teacher, curriculum coordinator, and the host of The Teacher Leader Podcast. She helps teachers become leaders by finding their voice through podcasting and leadership mindset work. Brittany believes that every teacher is a teacher leader who has a story and a message worth sharing with the world. As a podcast coach, she helps teachers start, launch, and grow their podcasts through 1:1 coaching and her courses. She graduated from Rutgers University with a B.A. in Anthropology and from Johns Hopkins University with an M.A. in Educational Studies. She recently completed her Ed.D. at the University of Florida with a concentration in Curriculum, Teaching, and Teacher Education. She is always learning something new and eager to grow as a leader, educator, and person. Twitter: @brittrincon Instagram: @brittrincon LinkedIn: Brittany Rincon Email: hello@brittanyrincon.com   Tom Schimmer Podcast: Email the Podcast: tomschimmerpod@gmail.com Podcast on Twitter: @TomSchimmerPod Tom on Twitter: @TomSchimmer Instagram: tomschimmerpodcast Facebook: Schimmer Education Website: www.tomschimmer.com Amazon Author Page: Books

Geeks Crossing
A SOLID FOLLOW-UP?! - Ed, Edd n Eddy Season 2 Retrospective

Geeks Crossing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 30:05


Season 1 of Ed, Edd n Eddy may have been dated but it was still a good intro season nonetheless. However, the next season is when the show felt like it was hitting its mark. Eric continues from his previous retrospective by reviewing each episode of Season 2 of Ed, Edd n Eddy. Join our Discord server: https://discord.gg/9uqjdD Follow our Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/geeks_crossing/ #Ed Edd n Eddy #CartoonNetwork #AKA Cartoon #review #retrospective #comedy #entertainment #geeks #geekscrossing

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker
PMP255: Reconstructing Place and Space, Part 2 with Jen Schwanke

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 30:47


This week, Jen Schwanke, author and education leaders, shares the second half of a conversation on Reconstructing Place and Space. With credit to Dr. Miller,  director of the EdD in Educational Administration and an assistant professor – clinical in the Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University, Jen probes into several questions his […] The post PMP255: Reconstructing Place and Space, Part 2 with Jen Schwanke first appeared on Principal Matters.

Fearless Rebelle Radio with Summer Innanen
#202: Sexuality, Pleasure and Body Image - with Megan Stubbs

Fearless Rebelle Radio with Summer Innanen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 36:45


I'm interviewing Dr. Megan Stubbs, EdD, a sexologist, relationships expert, body image specialist, and author of Playing Without a Partner. We're talking about why you are powerful on your own, how to enjoy being single, how we learned about relationships and sexuality wrongly through our culture, why virginity is a social construct, how to connect with your body's needs and desires, and why vulva diversity is real. Show notes: summerinnanen.com/202 In this episode, we chat about: - How body image plays a huge role in how you live your day to day life, - How media makes us feel like we're not complete without a partner, - Some of the things Megan loves about being single, - Why virginity is a social construct and how it's not the same for men and women, - The mixed messaging on female sexuality, - Recommendations for someone who feels disconnected from sexual pleasure in their body, Plus so much more! Get the shownotes:  summerinnanen.com/202

Get Real! -Lithoscry
Raven's Heart_27 Leading In The Right Direction With Adam Oxendine

Get Real! -Lithoscry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 74:59


A necessary departure from a usual Raven's Heart livestream. Necessary because the world today, especially the church and the world of arts and entertainment, needs grounded and skilled leaders. Effective leadership is desperately needed to navigate the chaotic world that we live in. However, many are unaware of the basic fundamentals of effective leadership and how it applies to every area of life. Adam Oxendine, the host of the Breakout Leadership Podcast, joins the stream to discuss some fundamentals of effective leadership and shed light on several misconceptions concerning the science and art of leadership. Adam has served for 18 years in law enforcement, holds a Masters Degree in Organizational Leadership, was published in the October 2020 issue of "American Police Beat," and is currently working on his EdD in Organizational Leadership and Behavior. This edition is a must for those who are currently serving in leadership positions or believe they have been called to serve as a leader; especially those whose service is for the glory of God.

The EdUp Experience
277: Building Education Systems- with Dr. Manuelito Biag & Dr. David Imig, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 48:42


Welcome back to America's leading higher education podcast! In this episode of The EdUp Experience, sponsored by Claremont Lincoln University, we welcome Dr. Manuelito Biag, Senior Associate, Networked Improvement Science & Dr. David Imig, Senior Fellow, Strategic Initiatives, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching! Listen in as special guest cohost Dr. Stacey Gonzales and Liz talk with Manuelito & David about a range of topics including how the Foundation is working on creating education systems within K-12 & higher education. Manuelito Biag joined the Carnegie Foundation in 2016. As a senior associate, he provides leadership, instructional, and research support in the area of networked improvement science. Currently, he aids the Foundation's field-building efforts in higher education by directing the Improvement Leadership Education and Development (iLEAD) network – a community of 12 district-university partnerships committed to localizing leadership preparation through the use of improvement science principles, methods, and tools. Manuelito comes to Carnegie from Stanford University where he served as senior researcher at the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and their Communities at the Graduate School of Education. His work, which has been presented in community forums, professional conferences, and published in academic journals, policy briefs, and edited volumes, examines the organizational structures, policies, and programs that influence students' learning and overall development—particularly those from vulnerable and historically-marginalized backgrounds. David Imig, PhD, is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and a Professor of the Practice in the College of Education at the University of Maryland. He teaches courses in teacher education policy and practice, school and teacher leadership. A founder of the Carnegie Project on Education Doctorate (CPED), a national organization of some 85 graduate schools of education, he is co-leading an effort at Maryland to transform doctoral education to focus on “expectations, outcomes and achievements” of four professional cohorts of EdD students in large metropolitan school districts in areas surrounding the campus. Thanks so much for tuning in. Join us again next time for another episode! Contact Us! Connect with the hosts - Elvin Freytes, Elizabeth Leiba, and Dr. Joe Sallustio ● If you want to get involved, leave us a comment or rate us! ● Join the EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! ● Follow us on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube Thanks for listening! We make education your business!

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 2 (07/23)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 28:34


Jim Patterson comes on the show to talk about EDD. 1 out of 3 households can't pay for the basic living essentials. John has tested out if people are enforcing the mask mandate. The NFL is announcing certain restrictions for unvaccinated players and there potentially will be forfeited if there are games that have to be postponed due to outbreaks.

Work and Life with Stew Friedman
Ep 212. Jessica Bacal: Learning from Rejection

Work and Life with Stew Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 51:30


Jessica Bacal is director of Reflective and Integrative Practices and of the Narratives Project at Smith College. Her latest book is The Rejection That Changed My Life: 25+ Powerful Women on Being Let Down, Turning It Around, and Burning It Up at Work. It's is a sequel of sorts to Jessica's first bestseller, Mistakes I Made at Work: 25 Influential Women on What They Got Out of Getting It Wrong. The Narratives Project at Smith encourages students to explore their passions and articulate their values and goals through personal storytelling. Before her career in higher education, Jessica was an elementary school teacher in New York City, and then a curriculum developer and consultant. She received a bachelor's degree from Carleton College, an MFA in writing from Hunter College, and an EdD from the University of Pennsylvania.In this episode, Stew talks with Jessica about how to learn and grow from rejection, a kind of experience everyone has. She describes how to glean useful data from rejections, especially about your values; cultivate creativity on the other side of the awful feelings that follow rejection; build the “rejection muscle” by exposing yourself to small rejections regularly; and take a new path in a rejection's wake. All this comes to light through stories of fascinating women and from exercises derived from their wisdom. Here then is an invitation for you, a challenge, after you've had a chance to listen to this episode. What small rejections -- at work, at home, in your community, or in your private sphere -- can you induce in order to build your rejection muscle? Share your reactions to this episode and your suggestions for future shows with Stew by writing to him at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu or via LinkedIn. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker
PMP254: Reconstructing Place and Space with Jen Schwanke

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 34:08


This week, Jen Schwanke, author and education leader, shares thoughts on why education leaders should consider how ‘place and space' play a role in learning outcomes. With credit to Dr. Miller,  director of the EdD in Educational Administration and an assistant professor – clinical in the Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University, […] The post PMP254: Reconstructing Place and Space with Jen Schwanke first appeared on Principal Matters.

AML Conversations
Adverse Media Screening: A Powerful Tool

AML Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 36:15


Adverse Media Screening is a powerful tool for KYC and EDD. During this installment of AML Conversations, John Byrne discusses how AMS can be a key part of an effective financial crime compliance program with Adrian Gardner, Head of KYC at Cash App and Eve Whittaker, Senior Account Manager at Arachnys.

Talking To Change - A Motivational Interviewing podcast
Ep 46 – Reducing Burnout and Compassion Fatigue

Talking To Change - A Motivational Interviewing podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 60:06


Reducing Burnout and Compassion Fatigue Glenn and Sebastian welcomed Kristin Dempsey and Ali Hall to the podcast to discuss reducing burnout and compassion fatigue Kristin Dempsey, EdD is a psychotherapist, … Read More "Ep 46 – Reducing Burnout and Compassion Fatigue" The post Ep 46 – Reducing Burnout and Compassion Fatigue appeared first on .

The Mo'Kelly Show
New EDD Requirements, Disney's Job Relocations & MORE!!!

The Mo'Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 31:48


ICYMI: The Mo'Kelly Show Presents – California's new EDD requirements, Disney's Florida ‘job relocation' plans, a California prostitution ring posing as a production AND the will the spread of the Delta variant encourage Californians to mask up on KFI AM 640 – Live everywhere on the iHeartRadio app

Matt Report - A WordPress podcast for digital business owners
Recapture.io: From part time business to world domination

Matt Report - A WordPress podcast for digital business owners

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 45:21


I appreciate a good side hustle story. Someone slogging away in the cubical but slowly building up an audience on Twitter on the weekends. I’m sure you know all about the “build in open” movement, and today’s guest really shocked me with that. See, maybe like you, I’ve listened to Dave Rodenbaugh on his podcast (with my boss Craig) Rogue Startups, for years now. But what really got me in today’s story, is that he was never really even “part-time” into his business Recapture.io. In fact, the way he put it, he was only devoting 10% of his energy into the business while being contracted at a corporate gig he recently had the chance to exit from. There’s lots of fun stuff in today’s episode covering everything from managing a day job to which marketing skills you need as a developer to kickstart your business. I hope you really enjoy it. Transcription Recapture – Dave and Matt – Matt Report [00:00:00] This episode is brought to you by paid memberships pro well, actually it’s their other product. Site-wide sales at site-wide sales.com. It’s a complete black Friday cyber Monday and flash sales tool for WooCommerce or paid memberships pro. Before, you know it, the deal day holidays will be fast upon us. And you want to prepare your WooCommerce or paid memberships pro website. [00:00:20] With the site-wide sales plugin, use it to make custom sale banners, targeted landing pages or apply discounts automatically in the cart. Use it to track the performance of all of these promotional features using the reporting feature, which will paint the picture of your black Friday and holiday shopping sales. I use it to help make your woo commerce or paid memberships pro store more money. [00:00:43] Get the first 30 days for free. And then it’s an easy $49 a year. Check out site-wide sales.com. That’s site-wide sales.com to make more money. This holiday sale season. [00:00:56]Let me tell you about creator courses.com/matt and how you can save 20% off using code mat to grab a hold of the great courses instructed by none other than Joe Casabona. So, what can you get from creator courses.com/matt. Courses to help business owners create stuff with absolutely no code. Learn how to build a website using beaver builder, Gutenberg, or both. [00:01:23] [00:01:23]And that’s not all visit creator courses.com/matt and save 20% off Joe’s other courses on PHP, full site editing in my two favorites. Podcasting in automation. I think learning the automation stuff is well worth the ticket in my eyes. Go to creator courses.com/matt. Right now. Seriously, stop the podcast and use code mat at checkout to save 20% off that’s creator courses.com/matt and use code mat to save 20% off today. [00:01:52]I appreciate a good side hustle story. Someone’s slogging away in the cubicle, but slowly building up an audience on Twitter on the weekends. I’m sure you know, all about the building open movement and today’s guest really shocked me with that. See maybe like you I’ve listened to Dave Rohde and bond his podcast with my boss, Craig rogue startups for years now. [00:02:12] But what really got me in today’s story is that he was never really even part time into his business. recapture.io. In fact, the way he put it, he was only devoting 10% of his energy into the business. While being contracted at a corporate gig, he recently had the chance to exit from there’s a lot of fun stuff in today’s episode, covering everything from managing and day job to which marketing skills you need as a developer. [00:02:38] To kickstart your business. I hope you really enjoy it. You’re listening to the Matt report, a podcast for the resilient digital business builder. Subscribe to the newsletter@mattreport.com slash subscribe and follow the podcast on apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. Better yet. [00:02:54] Please share this episode. On your social media. We’d love more listeners around here. And side note, [00:03:00] I had to rerecord with Dave after some Zen caster snafoos so we’re picking up from our conversation a little bit, warmed up. Okay. I hope you enjoy. [00:03:09] Matt: [00:03:09] One of the things that I caught you at a great time last time because you were only, I think like two weeks a free man on your own you get out of that sort of day job slash consultancy that you were in. I had you at an interesting moment where you were like, everything’s coming at me. This is exciting. [00:03:28]I, I’m kind of like looking to go to the next chapter of, of running recapture. Is that feeling still here or now that we’re like a month into it, things have settled, like, oh my God, you [00:03:39] Dave: [00:03:39] know, it’s kind of funny. It hasn’t really, I have not felt that euphoria lift yet. I imagine at some point it probably will. [00:03:48]No, th this is, this is definitely the honeymoon phase, right. And at some point the honeymoon phase will always go. But I still feel it. In fact, I was just having breakfast with my wife this morning. We were sitting outside and, I noted her. I said, Hey, it’s been, almost two months since I left the freelance job. [00:04:03] And she went, I know. And I was like, and it’s still great. So, I still, I still get up in the morning and we go do our walk and I come back and I have breakfast and coffee and I’m like, I get to spend my day on whatever the hell I want to today, which is of course recapturing my business, but there’s something still very energizing about that. [00:04:27] Like, it’s all, it’s my own experience. I’m not really beholden to anybody other than the customers. I don’t have to do. Stupid bullshit meetings and phone calls and status reports and just all of that stuff that I had to deal with in the corporate world. It’s just all gone like that lift that sh that weight has still lifted off my shoulders. [00:04:47] And I am just as happy then as I am. One [00:04:51] Matt: [00:04:51] of the things I think you hide really well. And I don’t know if this was intentional or I maybe just never even saw it because I’ve always been just looking at what you were doing with the recapture. You’ve been on the show, my podcast, before you have the podcast with Craig, who’s a happens to be my boss. [00:05:07] I never knew how much. And then we had our discussion more in depth. I never knew how much that freelance gig. Was sort of like weighing you down or how much it consumed when you and I chatted. I think you, throughout the, the ratio of like, it was 90% day job in 10% recapture, and that was kind of mind blowing, like how you manage that, how did you manage like so much of recapture with only 10% of energy. [00:05:37] Dave: [00:05:37] That’s an excellent question. And some days I’m amazed that things were able to progress along as well as they had because of that exact issue. And in fact, that was one of the main things I think that sort of drove me into this direction, like recapture could be doing so much better and here I am barely giving it enough oxygen to survive. [00:06:00] [00:05:59] Why, why can’t I do more? So, but it wasn’t always this way. The freelance thing, it was probably at one point it was like 40% freelance and 60% everything else. But at the time that 60% was a good chunk of the WordPress plugins. I had that I sold last year and recapture, that was the directory, a business directory plugin that was business directory and AWP PCP. [00:06:25] So. Those were things that all consumed my time. And I think when you said, hiding, I think that’s an excellent observation because I. I definitely compartmentalize when it comes to things like here’s this chunk of my business, here’s this other chunk, here’s this other chunk. And, I could operate in each of those worlds fairly separately without letting them bleed into each other. [00:06:52] But there came a point when the freelancing just was such a mentally taxing thing to deal with. I had. Just all kinds of toxic stuff going on in the corporate culture that I was there and the project that I was working on and the direction that it was all going. And it just, at some point I was like, this is too much. [00:07:12] I can’t deal with this anymore. I can’t keep it in the box. It’s bleeding out into everything else. So usually when I got onto podcasts, like the Matt. It would give me an opportunity to express the enthusiasm for that box that I didn’t get to really express any other way. So, it was like my brief window into positive energy venting, if you will. [00:07:34] And then it was back to the slog of the corporate world and yeah. So [00:07:39] Matt: [00:07:39] that’s tough. How much of the success of recaptured thus far? Is because you chose, these are my words. These are not your words. So obviously I hope for you to color in the lines here, but how much of the success of recapture is the market and the product that you chose. [00:07:58] And I’ll preface that with saying is like abandoned cart problems are or solutions. I should say. There’s a lot of them. I feel like it’s a big space, which is. Some people might look from the sidelines going, God, I don’t want to get into that space. There’s so much competition, but I feel like maybe in your case, it is, and was a good thing. [00:08:19]If you look at I think cart hook probably was where you were at and then just matured into a much larger product and solution, I think right on the heels of. Recording that we had Jilt shut down, which was a sort of like another, I guess, benefit to you. How much of the success do you think has, has leaned on, Hey, I picked the right product and the right market, because sometimes I think that could be something that kind of goes under the radar. [00:08:44] That a lot of people aren’t aware of. [00:08:47] Dave: [00:08:47] Well, I talked about this on other podcasts and I’ll mention it here as well. I believe very heavily in the notion of luck, surface area. So just quick definition for [00:09:00] somebody who might not be familiar with this, basically. Everyone in business is going to encounter some level of luck and whether you’re prepared for that luck or unprepared for that luck has to do with the surface area that you’ve created. [00:09:17] So in other words, can I capitalize on this lucky opportunity that comes around at this time because. I’ve made some kind of preparation for it. I’m ready to accept it. I’ve got the bandwidth to deal with it. Like all of these things have to kind of line up. I’ve had opportunities that appeared in my space and I wasn’t ready to capitalize them. [00:09:37] So they weren’t within my luck surface area, but being, being ready for those opportunities makes a huge difference in whether you’re successful or not successful. So, there were definitely lots of. We’ll call them lucky moments. We all want to think that entrepreneurship is solely about hard work and hard work is a piece of it. [00:09:57] And you can’t succeed without the hard work, but at the same time, every element of luck that you encounter that you can capitalize we’ll will level up your business. And the more of those that you can do, the better off you will end up. The same thing is true of Castillo’s when Craig and I have talked about this on the podcast. [00:10:15] I Craig, you and Craig have encountered many lucky moments in Castro’s getting into tiny seed, him having an opportunity to hire you when you were available. Each of these helps build on all of the previous moments that you’ve had before. And the same thing is true with recapture. So like for example, When I was able to acquire a recapture back in 2016, that was a lucky moment for me because I happened to have the money to do it. [00:10:41] And I was looking specifically for something that was, e-commerce SAS, recurring revenue. And it was in a space that I understood and it was a space that I could be passionate about. So that is a lucky moment where all of those things that kind of I’ve been preparing for came together in one shot. [00:10:58] And then after that, like the pandemic was another lucky moment. I know this is not lucky for a lot of people that lost loved ones, but if you were in e-commerce. Everything kind of took off in certain verticals and certain services, right? Capture was one of those services. And because we had been spending a lot of time, integrating with woo commerce, integrating with easy digital downloads, integrating with restrict content pro being on Shopify at that point and optimizing our listing all of these things, when that massive uptick in e-commerce store interest went on. [00:11:33] We were there and able to capitalize on it because we were available to people. We, we had enough interest and awareness in the community that people were able to take us and, and use the service at the time that they needed it the most. So that’s another lucky opportunity we were able to capitalize on. [00:11:53] And, it’s just building on moments like that again and again and again, in your business. [00:12:00] Entails, like I said, a lot of hard work and you’ve got to get out there and you’ve got to do the homework. I had to network with, the, I have a relationship with nexus and liquid web, and I think I was trying to, I was badgering poor Chris lemma for life. [00:12:14] 12 months, no joke. Like every two months, I just like ping out and say, Hey, what’s going on? Are you guys ready to integrate this yet? And they were like, yeah, no, not talk to me in a little bit. And I just kept doing that and kept doing that and kept doing that. And eventually it turned out. Initial relationship and then Jilt shut down. [00:12:31] And now it’s a bigger relationship cause they were relying on Jill. So again, it’s about timing and persistence and hard work. And the more you can make that surface area, big, these lucky events that come flying through your space, you can grab a hold of them and, let it ride your busy. [00:12:49] Matt: [00:12:49] Where do you rank the priority of. [00:12:52]Like developing features versus being. Social and networky and markety in the grand scheme of your luck surface area, like if you were sitting in front of a class of one year WordPress plugin entrepreneurs who are mostly developers, Would you tell them to increase the lung surface area by creating those integrations or, Hey, you got to blog more, you got to outreach more, maybe start a podcast. [00:13:24] Where do you set those priorities to, to increase that luck surface? [00:13:30] Dave: [00:13:30] I would never prioritize features on that list until I had some understanding of what’s out there in the space. Like we didn’t integrate with WooCommerce and easy digital downloads because I love those two so much. It happens that I do, but that’s not why I integrated with them. [00:13:48] I integrated with them because there was a huge market opportunity and doing that. That I can go after those opportunities and it allows me to be in other spaces. So I understood the market well enough to know that those were good plays, but part of what I would say to that, younger group of plugin authors, is that the reason that I knew those things is that I created relationships first. [00:14:14] So I had attended events, like word camps, and PressNomics where I talked with these others. Hosting companies and plugin authors and agencies and all of these other things to understand what are their concerns, who are the people in the space that are the movers and the shakers that I can learn more from that. [00:14:34] If I connect with it’s going to, improve my sphere. Of being able to do better things in the world, right? It’s not about, me personally, it’s about how can I improve my impact on the world and that, you’re not going to get that sitting around typing features out on a keyboard. [00:14:50] So those things matter, but they don’t matter first. Like you need to get the other things before you can get. The features, because you won’t know the right features [00:15:00] to build until you’ve talked to people, talk to your customers, talk to other people that are going to use your tool. Talk to hosting providers that might find a way to use you to improve the offerings to their customers. [00:15:10] If you can make somebody better with your product, then they’re going to be interested in you, but you’re not going to know that unless you get out there and talk to other people and find out what the hell they’re doing, right. Podcasting is another great way to do that. [00:15:22]Matt: [00:15:22] I forget which episode of. Rogue startups. [00:15:24] It was, but it might’ve been a more recent one when you were talking about the new SMS functionality of the product. And you’ll have to remind me of like what the context was, but you said something like here I am working on something else. And like the SMS stuff is just sitting, waiting to go, or at least that’s how I kind of remember it. [00:15:45] And you were, you were like, oh God, if I just, I just got to get out there and launch this, like, what am I doing? Spending all this time in this area when I can just, this features almost kind of ready, let me just launch it. I think that that’s. Such a common, well, first of all, am I getting that right? [00:16:00] Am I remembering this, this tug of war you had at one point with releasing that feature and other things you were doing? [00:16:06] Dave: [00:16:06] I think so. So there was a, a combination of forces that were coming in at the time. And we were talking about trying to release SMS first. It was going to be an April, then it was going to be in may and then it was going to be in June. [00:16:16] And it finally got released on July 1st. So I don’t have to say that anymore, but thank God. But it. I got distracted by a bunch of other things. And one of the things I think that kills us as entrepreneurs is lacking focus. So you see, and I, I’m as guilty as anybody else. Here’s a new shiny object over here. [00:16:34] Ooh, look at that. If we develop that boy, that would really make a move on MRR. Oh wait. But we could be doing this marketing hack right here instead. And all of those things are just constantly coming up in your, your field of view and you’ve got to, nail it down and say, look, I did this. If I don’t shove it out the door now I’m in big trouble. [00:16:54] So, for me, with the SMS stuff, what that came down to was that I was distracted by content marketing. And I spent like a month trying to hire a content marketer. And then the Jilt shutdown came along in June and all of a sudden everything got shuffled. Right. So then it was like, oh, geez well, SMS, isn’t going to really move the needle with Jilt customers because Jilt didn’t support SMS. [00:17:15] So now what do I need to do to make it. Jilt customers would be better served by recapture. Well, I gotta add marketing emails, broadcast emails. And so we were really close on that one too. So we just bundled it all together. SMS was done. And so we just put these two and said, all right, July 1st is when we’re launching. [00:17:32] We finished that up inside of a week in June and then pushed it out the door. But yeah, focus was killing me there and that was totally my bad. [00:17:42]Matt: [00:17:42] Back to, I guess, the, the luck surface area. And you hinted about this before too, is, you have a plan. And we, everyone says good, create a plan, create a calendar, like have these automations in these processes and everything will be running smoothly. [00:17:56] And then suddenly it’s like, okay, well maybe this. [00:18:00] Yeah. And it blows up and you’re like, oh, maybe new feature. And then like you start building a new feature, then suddenly Jill shuts down and that’s just a matte, like now you have to be like, okay, I literally have to drop all this other stuff because this is just now a massive opportunity. [00:18:16] And, and this is not really a question, but more of a statement just to frame it. Like we went through this, we’re going through this at and I’m only bringing it up because you talked to Craig every week, but it’s like, we’re doing all of these things where new products, new features, new things are rolling out new enhancements, and then suddenly it’s. [00:18:36] There’s an opportunity to buy another company. Well, that’s pretty big deal. And like, now we do that. So it’s just like, there’s that? And then there’s right. Craig working in is working his butt off to raise money and he raises money for the company. And then it’s just like right back to the feature grindstone have finished the migration. [00:18:59] Now we’ve got this app that just launched literally yesterday. Yesterday. Yep. Monday. And now there’s just like right back to the feature grindstone and you’re like, wow. Like things move at a pace. That’s it’s exciting. But also, man, there’s no plan for this. There’s no playbook, there’s nothing, there’s nothing. [00:19:17] Dave: [00:19:17] There’s no question. Yeah, no. There’s, there’s a certain chaotic insanity to the whole entrepreneur journey. And in some ways you can do all the planning you want, but no plan survives first contact with the customer. And in many cases, no plan survives first contact. Random events that happen out in the real world, acquiring companies, getting funding, Jilt shutdowns, all of these things, just things happen. [00:19:47] And the speed at which you can react to something is definitely whether your business lives or dies in these events. And it definitely is also whether the business grows or fails in these times as well. Those that were not able to. Advantage of the dynamic nature of the e-commerce, if they weren’t pivoting hard during their vertical, like if you were in the travel vertical during COVID shutdown, people were just pounding on you with a sledgehammer into the ground, like six feet deep. [00:20:16] They didn’t stop, but if you were in like like a lounge wear sweat pants, hoodies, things like that, you couldn’t keep the stuff inside. Your warehouse long enough to sell it. So, you had to be reactive to the act of circumstances there, or it kills your business and, that’s what Craig’s doing with Castillo’s and that’s what I’ve tried to do with [00:20:36] Matt: [00:20:36] recapture, for sure. [00:20:37] Yeah. I want to go back to talking about partnerships which will eventually segue into word PR into woo commerce versus Shopify. But before we get to that flaming ball of chaos, Navigating partnerships in WordPress. I’m interested to hear just your opinion on it. Sometimes. I think, especially for somebody like you with a product that could [00:21:00] really latch onto a hosting company, those are very tricky waters to now. [00:21:04]I know I used to work at Pagely and it was just like, man, like people wouldn’t even say WP engine around me. Like it wasn’t like, [00:21:13] Dave: [00:21:13] like we don’t talk about that. No. Yeah. [00:21:16] Matt: [00:21:16] It wasn’t on any of those podcasts where there were other web hosts. Like, it is a very, I feel like in the hosting world, maybe it’s getting a little bit better that it was like, you gotta be in a camp and that’s the camp you’re in and there’s isolation there. [00:21:28]Any thoughts around navigating. And also just like critical feedback on products and services in the WordPress space. I feel like doesn’t exist in the normal zeitgeists like, I’m looking at my Sony camera right now. And like, if you went online to YouTube and you looked at, or a forum and you went to Sony versus Panasonic and there would be like great debate. [00:21:54] Like critical. Like, but every, at the end of the day, everybody’s fine about the two companies. But I feel like in the WordPress space, you don’t get that like damn EDD for doing this. And this is why I’m woo commerce. I don’t have the right phrase for it, but I feel like that partnership slash criticism in the WordPress space doesn’t exist. [00:22:14] Maybe. We’re all too friendly with each other. Can I say that like, we’re all friendly? I dunno, it’s just a weird thing. Like I feel like if you walk down the hall. And talked about your favorite brand of anything else. There could be clear debate, clear, concise, love it, hate it. I could go without it, but in the WordPress space that doesn’t exist. [00:22:33] Am I making sense with that? Like, do you feel that thing in the air, like I do. I, I [00:22:37] Dave: [00:22:37] totally hear what you’re saying on that one and I know exactly what you mean. Yeah, there’s, there’s definitely this weird space where it seems like. You can talk about one hosting company, but you can never say hosting company a versus B, right. [00:22:50] Or if you do like that discussion gets shut down real fast. And I don’t think it’s a conscious thing, but I’ve seen it on chats. And just over the years on blog posts, like it’s very rare that somebody sits down and truly compares one to the other. Head to head and say, look, if you really like these things, this hosting company makes a lot of sense. [00:23:11] And if you like these things, then this other hosting company is a better fit for you. But yeah. So, you were talking about navigating partnerships. I think it’s kind of the same thing. Like as soon as you declare allegiance to one. It’s almost like the others kind of look at you with a little side eye and with a little bit of stink-eye on top of it. [00:23:32] And they’re like, well, you’ve already got them in your camp, so we can’t be in your camp at the same time. I think that goes to the detriment of all WordPress users. Like there’s nothing that says you can’t be friendly and competitive in the same thing. And I think when you say that they’re overly friendly, I wouldn’t characterize it like that. [00:23:55] I would characterize it. Yeah. Unwilling to criticize in general, it’s something about the [00:24:00] community. I don’t know what it is. If they are looking not to drum up drama and they feel like that’s going to create unnecessary drama or unhelpful drama, it probably could. I definitely could see that that could get into some real nasty debates that just degenerate into ad hominem attacks. [00:24:16] And, you suck because you picked oh, well, okay. Yeah. Back off, man. That’s it. That’s that’s not necessary. So yeah, I don’t know. I’ve, I’ve felt that and it’s weird, but the partnership thing. [00:24:31] Matt: [00:24:31] Because it’s farther back now. Like, I’ll say, well, you can do, you can define it. Is it a, is it a partnership with nexus? [00:24:38] And if so, like, do you feel like one, maybe you can’t because you’ve signed something or two, like, do you feel like, ah, man, it’s gonna be a little bit harder for me to knock on the door, WP engine to do this because they see me over here with nexus and Chris. So like that kind of friction that you think that holds you back. [00:24:55] Dave: [00:24:55] It doesn’t hold me back. Let me say that. Okay. To sign because like the stuff that I set up with nexus, it wasn’t exclusive anyway. And it was very friendly. Like, look, I’ve got this thing, your customers can use this thing. You got this offering and it makes it more valuable to your customers. If we say we put this on your dashboard here, like, it was very much like how can we make this a win-win thing and like help. [00:25:15] I will be happy to help create content to make your customers more successful. Like at the end of the day, That story should play well with any hosting company, right? If I can give you something that helps your customers be more successful and you help me bring more customers, and we’re both winning in this relationship, it shouldn’t matter how many people I’ve set that deal up with because your customer success should be the foremost thing at the top of your mind. [00:25:42] But, I don’t know from if I have this deal going on with nexus, does that make me. A bit of a hot potato with WP engine. I don’t really know. I noticed that before I had any deal in place of any hosting company at all, like just getting to the right person who was interested in what I had to say, and that saw the value of it. [00:26:02] Was kind of a non-trivial thing to navigate, especially when, folks are coming and going and coming and going. Even if you have the right contacts at these companies and the network relationships I’ve made gives me some ins to most of these hosting companies where I can say, Hey, I want to talk to so-and-so. [00:26:20] It still doesn’t necessarily mean that that company is interested in your offering or that they’re thinking about things the same way that you are. So. It kind of is another thing where it has to all line up. They’ve got to be thinking about this the same way that you’re thinking about this. And that’s where I’ve met. [00:26:39] The most resistance, I think is that, I say, Hey, are you thinking about a managed WooCommerce hosting? And I’m like, okay, well, we’re, we’re already missing this each other here. And I don’t, maybe it’s going to be a better fit in a year or two years or something like that. [00:26:53] So with nexus, they were very much like, yep. We’ve got that. Yep. We want this. All right. Let’s make it all happen. [00:27:00] With a little bit of persistence. It’s so. [00:27:02] Matt: [00:27:02] It almost, and really almost makes you appreciate like a bigger business. Right. You kind of have an appreciation for it. And, and again, I’ll frame that is when you look at somebody like Austin, like SIADH from awesome motive. [00:27:16] Right. And you see. Well, the, the sheer size, the competency of business and you have a relationship there because that’s where you sold the plugins to. Right? So you kind of see there’s a trust there. And then you can kind of make sense, because if you’re just solo developer, Dave knocking on the door of, big web hosting conglomerate. [00:27:38]They’re going to look at you and be like, well, man, we can’t, this is way too much of a risk to just take your software, slapping it in front of 30,000 customers potentially. And we are just going to trust you. You start to kind of appreciate, okay. The bigger businesses can kind of win. There’s more sustainability, there’s better trust. [00:27:56]There’s just more invested in the whole thing. And as a small business owner, like you kind of get it once you start going through the throws of, of navigating those, I dunno, corporate waters, enterprise waters whatever you want to call it. Kind of appreciate a little bit more, at least I do anyway. [00:28:10] Yeah, [00:28:11] Dave: [00:28:11] no, I would agree with that. And it’s interesting. These larger companies. Because they’re so big, like, it’s the difference between moving like a cheetah and moving like an elephant. You’re the small start-ups. So you can navigate pretty quickly make the fast sprints and turn quickly. They’re kind of plotting along in a very straight direction and they’re not going to change their direction very quickly. [00:28:34] So it takes them awhile to get going in a direction. And then once they’re going in that direction, it takes them a while to change directions. And the bigger the company gets, the bigger the elephant gets, right? Yeah. So by bringing in small companies, I think a lot of them want to increase their agility in that sense. [00:28:53] But of course, there’s that whole trust aspect. Like we know you’re smaller than us, but are you big enough that you can handle what we hand the hand over to you? And if that trust isn’t there, then yeah. That’s, that’s all gone. So again, this is part of the networking aspect. If you can have that relationship with another person and that they get to know your business and they’re like, oh yeah, you’ve been around for awhile. [00:29:13] Oh, look, you’ve got some customers. Oh, look, you served a lot of customers. Oh, you’ve done a pretty decent volume. Hey, maybe you not, might not be a fly by night. Business and we might be able to trust you like that. Trust isn’t something that just happens overnight. Right? You got to build it slowly over years. [00:29:28] Matt: [00:29:28] Yeah. Shopify versus a woo commerce when we chatted. Yeah. Forget [00:29:33] Dave: [00:29:33] it. We’re done. Now. I have a lot to say about this. Go ahead. [00:29:37] Matt: [00:29:37] We chatted last time. I think one of the things now, look, I have only set up a handful of Shopify. Generally out of just helping some friends and some local entrepreneurs in my area do it. [00:29:47]I think one of the things I’ll try to make this a quick question. Like one of the things I really appreciate from Shopify is. On the outside anyway, like their partnership program looks more mature. Like the way they work with [00:30:00] agencies looks more mature. And generally, I feel like they’re willing to work with the freelancers of the world versus. [00:30:07] WordPress and WooCommerce is kind of just like, see you later. Bye. Like, we’ll see it at the end of the road, by the way, we’ll sell $5,000 websites@wordpress.com. Right. And to me, that’s like, man, like I look at it Shopify and I’m like, yeah woo commerce, WordPress should have something like this. But I guess at the end of the day, it’s not all roses and rainbows from the outside because Shopify is going to. [00:30:35] I guess watch like a watchful eye of, what you’re doing as an, as an app, as an integrator, as an agency. And if they see something that’s super profitable, I guess they could just go. Yeah, we’ll just do that. We’ll just do that in house and just demolish your app, I guess in the matter of seconds is what they could do. [00:30:52] So again, sharp road to navigate. I like it from the outset. Like it’s an opportunity for a freelancer or a small agency to get more work. But curious on your thoughts on partnership program in generally working with a Shopify versus a WooCommerce. [00:31:09] Dave: [00:31:09] Yeah. So you wanted a short answer, right? Well, I [00:31:14] Matt: [00:31:14] was, I was trying to make a short question, [00:31:16] Dave: [00:31:16] which is okay, so I can have a long answer. [00:31:18] Yeah, yeah, yeah. So. Let me talk about the platforms first in general. So I think when you’re picking Shopify versus woo, there’s a lot of things that go into that decision in general, that should make you, focus on what are the strengths of each of those platforms. So with Shopify very easy to get started, low tech threshold, to understand there’s lots of stuff that you can do without being a full stack developer. [00:31:47] Integrate apps and just basically get a store up and running. So if you aren’t sure, like you’re doing it drop shipping or it’s a new product and you’re trying to find product market fit or product audience bit or whatever it is. I think Shopify gets you up and running quicker to something that’s pretty polished that comes at a y’all are costs. [00:32:10] So, the hosting that Shopify, the apps that you’re adding on and all of that, but. That can be managed and I think it’s simplifies things and gets you going pretty well to where you want be. With that said, once you reach a certain point and you’re like, now I want my store to do this. And I want my checkout to have this in it. [00:32:32] And I want to use these payment methods, but not these other ones. And I also want this post purchase, checkout flow to be going on. And I want these kind of abandoned cart emails, and I want this, and I want that like for somebody who knows exactly what they want, Shopify can be incredibly expensive and very frustrating because it has been traditionally difficult to cut it. [00:32:53] So, this is where Woo’s strength comes to play. In my opinion, is that, if you’re on the right hosting provider [00:33:00] and you have a good agency that you can work with, that knows what they’re doing with Boone. These are out there. You can do a nice build and you can customize the hell out of it. [00:33:08] Yeah. And get exactly what you want. And if you’ve got a good developer on Wu, you can make it run as fast or faster than a Shopify store. So performance, isn’t an issue necessarily if you’ve done the right things and you’ve done your homework. And, there are plenty of smart wound stores that do that. [00:33:25] The downside to that, of course is complexity. And you got to have a higher threshold of technical knowledge either for yourself or a team to put that together. And, you’ve got to find the right agencies and the right developers. And if you’re talking about the energy and the Wu space and the energy. [00:33:43] Shopify space. They’re pretty different. And there’s a lot of energy in Shopify and it’s hard to ignore that and there’s energy and Wu too, but to like sort out the wheat from the chaff is a little more challenging because those really good Wu developers aren’t necessarily out there trumpeting themselves, talking about how great their agency is. [00:34:04] I can tell you the top five shops. Development agencies right off the top of my head because of what I see on Twitter, because of what I see in their blogs and just general social media activity, I would have a harder time doing that for woo commerce based on those factors. I know a few of them, but they’re harder to pick out. [00:34:21] Matt: [00:34:21] Right. So do you think that’s because Shopify helps prop those agencies up to part of their marketing and sales? [00:34:28] Dave: [00:34:28] Yes. So WooCommerce as a platform, doesn’t do enough for partners and agencies, not the way that Shopify does, like here at Shopify at unite announced that they were abolishing the 20% at a revenue share on all of their partner apps up to your first million dollars a year. [00:34:49] So basically it’s like everybody on the platform got a 25% raise, including recapture, which I was thrilled about. WooCommerce. If you want to go to their store, there was this discussion in post status that I was contributing to. If you are exclusive to the woo commerce store, 40% revenue share. If you’re non-exclusive it’s 60%. [00:35:09]I understand why WooCommerce didn’t want. To just let every person possible onto the platform and turn it into the repo, like the repo turned out to, it’s kind of a, we’ll call it a mixed bag. I think that’s the, the most politically correct way I could say it. Yeah. There’s a lot of garbage out there and there’s a lot of good stuff and it does take some time to sort through it and figure out, I think they were trying to curate the woo commerce store experience to be a little higher quality than that. [00:35:41] But I think they went about it wrong. And it’s [00:35:43] Matt: [00:35:43] been it’s 60% to automatic [00:35:45] Dave: [00:35:45] or 60, 60% to automatic. Yes. Wow. Which is, like, come on really. You’re taking more than half of my business. How am I supposed to be profitable at that point? It’s not this isn’t a charity to you. So these numbers are just [00:36:00] wrong in my, like, they don’t encourage [00:36:02] Matt: [00:36:02] catches a lot of flack for 30%, right? [00:36:05]Dave: [00:36:05] Come on, apple, apple at 30 bucks percent is considered untenable and you all at WooCommerce that are doing 40 and 60%. Come on, give me a break. That’s why my plugins are never going to be on the WooCommerce repository. I know I’m not alone in this. So, there are some plugins that are there, but guess what? [00:36:23] They’re all free. 40% of zero is still zero. So you’re good. They’re, they’re asking for me to share my revenue 60% a month. You just killed my profitability to the point where I can’t run my business anymore. So it’s that sort of mentality. That I think is hurting the Wu commerce ecosystem. Like there isn’t an agency support program. [00:36:44] There isn’t a big conference every year. That has the energy of Shopify unite. There isn’t a partner program that really nurtures everybody along. Like with Shopify partners. Like you sign up, you’re getting an email a day for like 30 days telling you here’s some partner tips. Here’s this development thing. [00:37:01] Here’s this resource. Here’s this? Here’s this here’s this guess how many times we got from WooCommerce? Zero. Yeah. Yeah. I, it they’re very different ecosystems and I think it’s to the detriment of WooCommerce, that they are not putting more energy into that, that piece of it, because that is a big part of why Shopify has been successful. [00:37:23] Matt: [00:37:23] Yeah. I agree a hundred percent. And again, I have very little experience from the Shopify side. I just know from what I don’t receive from support from WordPress and seeing what everything else is happening. And I guess look at when you. Zoom out and take a look at the sheer size of WordPress compared to Shopify just I’m talking like installed platform based like that kind of thing. [00:37:46] Yeah. The, the, the play for WordPress and automatic is when it comes to open source. How are you going to monetize it? It has to be done through like that trust factor. So it’s open source. It’s super flexible. It’s the same message. Automatic and you and I can go out and tell a customer and they’ll just win by having the most trusted plugin, a jet pack or a premium ad-ons from woocommerce.com or something like that. [00:38:17] And they’ll win. On that trust level where Shopify, you’re just going to go there and spend money. Like you’re choosing that platform. So you’re you, you’ve made the decision to go there and they’re telling you, the whole platform is trusted with WordPress it’s. Hey, it’s great. It’s open source. Do whatever you want. [00:38:34]But by the way, Jetpack is the most trusted way to secure and manage your site. And that also comes with whatever WooCommerce add ons that you buy for those bundles that they have for like 2 99, 3 99 or whatever. And their argument will be you trust it because it comes from ashore. You can go get Dave’s go ahead and get Dave’s. [00:38:53] But you know, you’re going to trust us better because we’re the, the company behind it kind of thing. So I can’t fault them [00:39:00] for it. It’s just, one of those things. So many people have pushed towards jet pack or excuse me, to WooCommerce and WordPress because they love the software and there’s no, there’s that love doesn’t come back to us. [00:39:15] What are we going to do? [00:39:16] Dave: [00:39:16] Nothing we can do. There’s nothing we can do, unfortunately. And the other thing. I, I don’t like, is that w well, so to contrast this, let me say, oh, Shopify does this. So Shopify does do acquisitions on things, but not like, not at the same level that I’ve seen automatic do it, where they pull in things like mail poet, right. [00:39:35] Or there pull all this stuff in and turn it into Jetpack. Like Shopify is not doing that. They build stuff and they’ll build it to a level like, there was a year, I think it was like the first unite I went to and it was me. Two years after I’d acquired recapture and they released the abandoned cart emails. [00:39:52] And those that knew me at the conference were like, so how do you feel about abandoned cart emails on Shopify now is like, I feel okay about it because they’re just, they’re 60% solution and I’m a hundred percent solution. And I can tell you like all the shortcomings, it’s great for people getting started out and it gives you those tools to get going and get your store off the ground. [00:40:14] It’s never serious enough to like take you to the next level. So it’ll get you to like the 5,000 a month rate. But after that, it’s going to break down pretty quickly. Cause you’re just not doing as good of a job as you could be with other apps that are more professional. And I’ve seen this a little bit in big commerce, too, where they build in these features and then know they’re okay, but they’re not great. [00:40:35] And you build your store up to a certain level and then you get these other things and you use them instead. I don’t see that with WooCommerce. They’re trying to pull in everything and say, okay, we’re going to be really good at email. We’ve got mail poet now, but are you really the best at email? Because you got all these other things you’re doing too. [00:40:54] And you’ve got this team, that’s doing mail poet, and I don’t want them to fault the male poet folks. They’re a great plugin and they do a lot. It’s just, your priorities are going to be driven by the platform, not the customers that are using it. So. Is that going to make it the best it could possibly be and truly drive be driven by the needs of the customers on the platform, as opposed to the benevolent dictator for [00:41:18] Matt: [00:41:18] life. [00:41:19] Yeah. What’s next from, is there a next platform play for you to integrate with? I think I was looking at another W3C techs report the other day and it for specifically for, e-commerce and. I would have to go back and dig this report out. Maybe, I saw woo commerce and in the Squarespace, e-commerce almost like neck and neck. [00:41:41] Is that true? Is there square? I was like, suddenly like what Squarespace e-commerce is this big and even realize it is that like an area you’re going into or another platform? That’s interesting. [00:41:50]Dave: [00:41:50] We’ve, I’ve taken a quick look at Wix and Weebly and Squarespace, all kind of in the same breath. [00:41:57]There is definitely a. [00:42:00] We’ll call it an economic shift on this platform where it is. It is aiming for a tier of store that doesn’t want to pay as much as you get in Shopify, or you want to get in Wu. And it’s difficult for me to convince a customer who’s paying $4 a month for their e-commerce website to pay 29 for mine. [00:42:23] And I know this because of how the pricing worked in Shopify, like the base level in Shopify as 29. And the fact that I aligned with that. It makes it easier for me to sell my product because they’ve already made that mental commitment for 29. They’re getting another 29. Isn’t that bad. But when you’re at four and you jumped to 29, that’s too big and that’s not a, that’s not a battle I want to fight. [00:42:45] That’s not a set of customers that I think are easy to deal with in that regard. So, I’ve looked at other platforms where we can head up markets. So our other e-commerce spaces. So things like Salesforce, cloud commerce. Things like that, but it’s a little trickier to get into that because you kind of need to know some stores to have the testability. [00:43:09] Cause it’s not like you’re just downloading this, installing it and testing it out. You kind of have to work in tandem with somebody else. So, I I’ve got some plans. We’re kind of cooking that up right now. I don’t see, I’m keeping an eye on Squarespace and Wix and Weebly. And if they start moving up market. [00:43:25] Mid tiers, which is quite possible. They could, then it would make a lot of sense to integrate because there’s going to be a large customer base there, but right now it doesn’t look economically viable. Yeah, yeah. [00:43:37] Matt: [00:43:37] Yeah. That makes, that makes total sense. I guess that’s probably why I was so shocked at the footprint of the Squarespace. [00:43:42] Cause I was like, yeah, it makes sense. Because then you’re like, well, what are these people selling? They’re really seriously. Probably something like photo prints, and a couple of handmade things. That’s probably about it, certainly not an apparel line or kayaks, which you’ll probably find on Shopify, right? [00:44:00] People who are manufacturing, things, stuff like that. Very cool. Dave wrote ball, recapture.io. Congrats on being a free man than the last time I talked to you running the business day to day. Where else can folks find you? What else can they look forward to from. [00:44:15] Dave: [00:44:15] Well, we just did our big release the 1st of July for SMS card abandonment and order notifications on recapture. [00:44:23] So if you’ve been itching to try that out or see what that’s like, come to recapture.io and check that out. We also have broadcast emails out after Jill announced their shutdown, we had to make sure that was working to be able to seamlessly migrate folks over. So if you’re. A former Jilt customer and you’re looking for a place to land. [00:44:41] We’d love to talk to you at recapture and see if we can make things work for you. If somebody is looking to get a hold of me, you can find me on Twitter at Dave. [00:44:51] Matt: [00:44:51] I heard you’re actually making phone calls too. Right? You’re calling people up, doing it the old fashioned way [00:45:00] [00:45:00] Dave: [00:45:00] because your cell phone fashioned way, I would like, knock on their doors and press the flashes as it were, but that’s not happening. [00:45:08] Matt: [00:45:08] Everyone else. Matt report.com maryport.com/subscribe. Join the mailing list. Don’t forget to tune in to your weekly dose of five minute WordPress news every week@thewpminute.com. Thanks for listening. We’ll see you. In the next episode.

Med-Surg Moments - The AMSN Podcast
Ep. 62 - Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Med-Surg Nursing Practice

Med-Surg Moments - The AMSN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 23:02


Chelsea and Dr. Terri Hinkley discuss issues and approaches to improving diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) within med-surg nursing practice and patient care, including the announcement of a new AMSN program focusing on DEI.  GUEST & HONORARY CO-HOST AMSN & MSNCB CEO Terri Hinkley, EdD, MBA, BScN, RN, CAE   Chelsea Parker RN, BSN, CMSRN was born and raised in Newport News, Virginia. She attended the University of Virginia and graduated in 2016 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Since then she has pursued geriatric and palliative care nursing and developed a love for general medicine, which is where her foundation for med-surg nursing was built. As a young nurse looking for ways to bridge engagement between generations of nurses, she is excited about what this podcast will mean for AMSN.   

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 3 (07/09)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 30:34


Dr. Monica Ghandi comes back on the show to talk about the COVID-19 Delta variant. We are officially in a flex alert. A trip to Bidenville. EDD officially extended their contract with Bank of America.

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 2 (07/08)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 29:27


EDD is still experiencing a log jam of calls and has a huge backlog of claims. Businesses are still struggling to hire people. UCSD research says there is no “exodus” out of California.

Coordinated
Episode 63: Just Do Good

Coordinated

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 22:44


The AP coordinator role can be challenging… And to be a first-year AP coordinator in 2020-21? Wow! No easy feat! Assistant Principal, EdD student, and rookie AP coordinator, Dennis Soares, from Middletown High School in Rhode Island, shares his first-year coordinator tale. Fumbles, recoveries, and touchdowns included! Experience not required to kick back and enjoy an incredible journey on this episode of Coordinated.Register for an AP Coordinator Workshop:  https://collegeboard.org/apcoordinatortrainingAP Coordinator Community:  https://apcommunity.collegeboard.org/web/apcoordinatorsMusic by Jackie Rae:  https://www.jackierae-music.com/Logo design by Amy Oh:  amyjyo.com  /  Instagram: amyjyoh

Matt Report - A WordPress podcast for digital business owners
Eight years and 100,000 active installs later

Matt Report - A WordPress podcast for digital business owners

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 39:55


Probably just like you, the exploration for the secret ingredient to running a successful business is a tricky one. Speaking for myself, I can tell you that I’m constantly trying to learn and dissect what some of the most successful brands are in my space. How did she do it?What does the website look like?Productized service or digital product?Smash that like button on a secret formula to generating $5m in Facebook ad sales All of this with our blinders on. Sometimes, the real secret, is just staying in the game. Jason joined us eight years ago, right when he and his wife Kim were making the transition to full-time product sales, leaving custom client work behind. Now, Paid Memberships Pro has over 100,000 active installs according the WordPress.org directory and his business is getting a lot more focused on…doing what works. Has he considered convergent PMP into a hosted solution? What about outside acquisition? You’ll have to listen to the episode to find out! Transcription This episode of the Matt report is brought to you by how to market your plug-in dot com a framework for the sleep deprive developer. If you ask yourself, how do I get more downloads for my plugin? What about more sales? Should I do this lifetime license thing? You need to pick up the book, how to market your plugin over app. How to market your plugin.com. Programming is about computer behavior. Marketing is about human behavior. Fortunately for us both a fairly predictable and you can learn more inside the book. How to market your plug-in dot com. This book will help you market while you’re building your plugin. Instead of treating your marketing as a last resort. I can’t tell you how many times. How many interviews I’ve had, where the developer has just fallen upon luck and chance that they have a business in front of them. People are downloading their plugin. People are buying their plugin, but they hit a certain point of plateau where they need to scale. They need to get the word out there and this book will help you do it. Check it out@howtomarketyourplugin.com. Thanks for supporting the show. This episode is also brought to you by media, ron.com media ron.com Ronald Ereka he’s back. He creates WordPress plugins. In fact, one of his plugins I was searching for the other day. Totally forgot that he made it called highlight and share. He creates a highlight and share plug, and you can highlight sections of texts and share them with your network right on your WordPress website. Event tracking for gravity forms, simple comment editing and custom query blocks. I’m going to click into the event, tracking for gravity forms. Of course you’ll need gravity forms, but you can download event tracking for free, right from either his website, media, ron.com or search for it on wordpress.org. It’s got 30,000 plus active installs. Well at the time of this recording, it was, it was updated a week ago. But if you’re looking to connect Google analytics, Google tag managers, to your gravity forms. Well to do a vent trackings, this plugin will do the trick. Check out media, ron.com for more of his plugins, reach out the Ronald you reca. If you have any other questions about building a WordPress plugin for yourself. Thanks for supporting the show. Probably just like you, the exploration for the secret ingredient to running a successful business is a tricky one. Speaking for myself. I can tell you that I’m constantly trying to learn and dissect what some of the most successful brands are doing in my space. How did she do it? What does the website look like? Product I service or digital product. Smash that like button on a secret formula to generate $5 million in Facebook ad sales. And all of this with our blinders on. Sometimes the real secret is just staying in the game. Today’s guest first joined us eight years ago. Right? When he and his wife were making the transition to full-time product sales, leaving custom client work behind. Now paid memberships pro has over 100,000 active installs, according to the wordpress.org directory and his business is getting a lot more focused on doing what works. Has Jason considered converting, paid memberships pro into a hosted solution. What about outside acquisition? You’ll have to listen to the episode to find out. You’re listening to the Maryport. A podcast for the resilient digital business builders. Subscribe to the newsletter at maryport.com/subscribe or follow the podcast on apple or Spotify or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts better yet. Share this episode on your social media. We’d love more listeners around here. Okay. Let’s get into today’s episode. With Jason. hey, Jason, welcome to the program. Hey, it’s great to be here. I’m a big fan, a big listener, and it’s good to just get to chat with you again. Um, I’m going to do this every couple of weeks. Like there’s a thunderstorm today and I’m going to, you know, the thunder storm is gonna cancel this one too, and I’ll have to reschedule for next week. so I last had you on eight years ago, when you were one of the founding. Interviewees of the Maryport podcast, a lot has changed. And a lot hasn’t changed. Uh, for paid memberships pro and your business. Uh, and for WordPress. Chris lemma re recently wrote a post about, uh, the future success of WordPress, which we’ll get into in a little bit and sort of how he sees hosts playing a role in the adoption of WordPress, uh, streamlining WordPress onboarding, even specific flavors of let’s say membership sites, e-commerce sites, that kind of thing. But go back in your time machine and let me know, where were you mentally? Eight years ago with the business. And when we first interviewed. Yeah. Um, so that, that would have been 2013, which would have been a couple of years after paid memberships pro launched. And at that point PM pro was really a loss leader for our consulting business. So it was mostly just Kim and I, and we had a couple of contractors, um, you know, who helped out with random things. But we, you know, we had a membership plugin for WordPress and we parlayed that into, you know, 10 to $30,000, you know, gigs installing WordPress from membership sites and things like that. Um, and we were, we were doing that transition of like, Hey, how do we transition from a consultant company to a products company? We were just starting that around 2013 and, and also like figuring out our first hire. I remember how hard, like the first hire was, um, And now it’s kind of like, you know, we’re hiring all the time. It’s like, it has to be a process where we’re constantly, like we have relatively low turnover of employees and we’ve been like, grateful for that. But even that, like just growing and, you know, people go occasionally that, you know, we have to, as a process now, like hiring people as a process, it was like a huge deal. The biggest thing of the year, you know, in 2013. And now it’s just another process. Yeah. Probably one of the most, uh, popular, free membership plugins that are out there. I know there’s a lot of plugins out there that sort of skate by semi membership. You know, they’re doing like log-in and access control, but certainly not to the degree of integration, ad-ons support general reach that you have memberships a hot space. Uh, when we’ve chatted a little while ago, I was curious of how do you. Competitively make the distinction between membership LMS. Like how do you fit yourself in the market so that you get the right customers and not the wrong ones? So you’re arguably the most popular free memberships plugin. Um, you know, and there’s some other plugins out there that are sort of like a third degree from a membership, like they do user profiles and they’re also a membership. But a pure membership platform play that is you. How do you make the distinction amongst the third party competitors? The ones that have kind of sorta a membership plugin. And those have like an lms like a lifter lms a full-fledged learning management system where do you make the distinction with your marketing and your messaging? Yeah. So there’s a ton of competition. And I remember one of our first, uh, kind of big web ventures for Kim and I was a wine website, like a wine tracking website, and that was another kind of niche. That like every week there was a new competitor and people like, what about this? What about this one here? Like, it’s just part of business, like they’re here. Um, and I feel like membership plugins are the same way. And maybe that’s just because it’s what I’m focused on. Any business is the same. Um, but yeah, there’s a lot of membership plugins and they specialize, we like to call our homepage. We’ll say that, you know, we’re the most complete membership solution for WordPress. Um, and we really focus on. Members as like the core unit. And so you mentioned like LMS plugins, we integrate with LMS plugins. Um, you know, a lot of people who run membership sites want to also have courses. A lot of people who run core sites also want to have memberships. And so when we’re talking to like a prospective user and trying to figure out if our solution is good for them, you know, we like to ask them like, what’s the focal point of your business? Like, if it’s. The members are the focal point of your business. Like you’re an association or just, you know, in your mind, do you think about your members as like the important component and then how do I sell them things and how do I give them lessons? Like you might want to start with paid memberships. Pro is like the center component of your website and use like our courses add on or use an LMS that integrates with ours, you know, but focus on PM pro. And similarly, if you start with like a course and you really care about all the features that they have, like quizzes and progress, right. Um, you know, certificates and all the things that they do really well, like that’s the most important part and you really just want to charge monthly for access to that. You could probably get by just using their membership add on. Um, and there there’s so many different ways to like build these things. I really feel like that’s, our job is to like find ways. To cut through all the options for the customer. Cause it’s like overwhelming, they’re overwhelmed with options and they just like, just tell me what I’m supposed to use. And we’d like to be the default choice, but you know, sometimes other solutions are better than ours in cases. So it’s really like a conversation has to happen to figure that out. It seems like it’s balancing. Being like the core engine I’ll call it. I’ll call it the engine of a membership for somebodies WordPress website. It’s a fine balance to say that we’re the engine, but you can also use lifter or you can use our ad-ons. Maybe you can even use another membership plugin, if somebody’s crazy enough. So, how do you balance that? Uh, that messaging to say, look, we can act as the core component, almost like the routing. Of the commerce section, maybe even the permissions and access, uh, section. Of your membership site man, it’s tough. Like, cause we early on, so like 2013, we would have been just getting into it. We had a plan called like do it for. Uh, so we offered for like $500 at the time, like, Hey, we’ll install, paid memberships pro for you and do like a little bit of coding. And a lot of those little bit of coding were kind of these add ons that we’ve developed like, oh, integrate with, you know, event plugin integrate with BB press. Um, and so we, we built this footprint of integrations that kind of worked if a developer would wire it up for them. And the most popular ones were like, well, everyone keeps asking about this and they say, it’s complicated. They don’t know how to code, so we try to make it easier. And so, yeah, we kinda have that process of like, it’s a platform where a press can do anything. Let’s kind of have a, just that does it. Then when the just becomes popular, let’s kind of streamline it into a plugin that still has some. Potentially like settings or it needs a developer to set up and then let’s try to streamline it into something more user-friendly because as you go up that scale, like, it definitely becomes more and more to develop and maintain and support. Um, and we had ad-ons like our MailChimp add on early on was like more fully featured than the general MailChimp add ons that were out at the time. And we were like, Hey, let’s build this in a way that you could use it even without paid memberships. But we didn’t really market it that way. Um, but then it was kind of like, so we see this again. And again, like people will build a plugin. That’s like one of our ad-ons, but in a general way. And it was like, it was as much work to build it for PM pro in the sense. And now I’m, you know, uh, not giving them credit for everything they have to do. And all the MailChimp solutions are kind of, you know, have surpassed our ads. Now, but at a time it was like, oh, like we could, so it’s tempting to like, oh, we should just start an LMS business. Cause our little, you know, courseware plugin is pretty close to what they do, but we’re kind of finding our space where like for the courses plugin that we built, we built it’s launching soon. And it’s um, you know, we tell people who want a course, like maybe you don’t need a plugin. Maybe it’s just a PDF or a page with content or a video. Like if your course is pretty straight forward, you don’t have to conflict. But the, the plug-in that we have, we’ll just add CPTs for like the basic structure of a course in the lesson and have a little bit of kind of progress tracking. And we felt like that’s the bare minimum and we don’t want to get into anything else. So if you want anything more than that, that same plugin will just integrate with learn dash lifter, um, learn, press, and like the most popular LMS. And that way we have kind of one plug and the maintain integration with all those LMS plugins, instead of like a bunch of different integrations went off with each one. So we’re hoping that’s easier to maintain, I’m just going to speak as a product maker and owner in a very small scale compared to what you’re doing. But going back to my days with a conductor. I know one of the challenges is when you try to stay lightweight and you try to have like this modular approach. Like you could get into LMS, but that’s another add on. Uh, the ad-ons and extending your core product. It can be another tricky thing because you have both, you have customers that request ad-ons Hey, it’d be great. If we worked with MailChimp convert kids, Salesforce, like all these other add ons that work. That customers are requesting. So you start looking at that as like market opportunity, and then you have the ones that you build and like, oh, wouldn’t it be great to again, have that LMS section. Um, Is there a process that you work with internally? To reign that in. Because I know from building conductor. Creating ad-ons is a, is like, It’s another micro product that you have to support in the sustain and look longterm. For example, when we were building conductor, we were building out Genesis templates. Um, before it became studio, press. So it was one of those things where. It was. Before, you know, it was like six months to a year to two years and like, oh God, like. This add on, hasn’t been touched. It’s no longer. Really doing what it was supposed to be doing, but we don’t really have that many people using it. Uh do you have a balance to that is there a way to work through that methodically Yeah. Um, we try, I don’t know. Yeah, it’s a challenge. I don’t know if we handle it. Well, a couple things that we do differently that maybe some other companies are coming around to as well. Um, but definitely like we have one big bundle. Um, like one price for everything. And so we don’t have a marketplace. Like we have more, there are third party plugins, but they’re like outside, you know, we don’t have a marketplace where we sell the third already plugins, which is a good thing and a bad thing. So like it’s bad in the sense that having a marketplace really does encourage developers to get involved because they’re going to get paid. And I remember back in the day of like, I made a Jigoshop plug. Uh, for Braintree integration. And I think it sold like one copy per month, but like it just the fact that there was a marketplace encouraged me to kind of like generalize it and push it out there. Whereas I wouldn’t have done that otherwise. So it encourages involvement, but what happens then is it’s really hard to manage all these different people. You don’t really have control over the add-ons that are important. And we saw companies like EDD and WooCommerce did this too, where they bought up a bunch of the most popular ones to kind of bring them in house. So we started with that. We were like, Hey, we kind of get it. Important to us and we, we bring it in house. Um, and we just try to like tell the developer community like, oh, we’re working on, of course this plugin, you probably shouldn’t or like, you know, if you want to help, this is what it looks like. It’s all open source. Um, the other thing we do with that with integrations is I always try to make those plugins available for free and in the.org repository. So our rule of thumb is if it’s an integration with another service or. We’re not going to charge for, we’re going to make it free and.org. And that incentivizes like both us and the other party to kind of maintain the plugin, the integration plugin, because sometimes it’s awkward. Like if they’re selling it for $50, but you know, you’re not. And so you’re like, wait, why am I helping to maintain like the thing you make money on? But I don’t, or like, It’s open source. So I could take your code or if I really feel like you’re not doing it well, I’m going to make my own version. And so that’s awkward when like, you know, who’s plugged into you buy ours or theirs, or it doesn’t encourage us to work together. Whereas like upfront, you know, when I reached out to integration partners, I’m like, Hey, we’re going to make it free. We’re going to make in.org. And the business model is not to sell this integration. It’s, you know, the support, both our platforms. And in some ways that’s leaving money on the table because it’s a little bit opposite of how. The market has been, you know, how things have been in the past or what they expect. And it feels kind of right where if you’re like, Hey, I don’t use MailChimp. I use convert kit. So I’ll just buy the convert kit one, you know, I don’t have, instead of like, I’ll pay $300 and I get all of them, but I only need one, one of the ad-ons. So, um, I guess, I mean, if it’s free, it’s free, but like, so like people are kind of trained to pay. It’s it’s such a great value. If they’re like, Hey, for $50, I solve exactly the problem you have. Like that, like that business transaction is so much better than kind of like supporting the platform and all the crazy things you might do, you know? So it’s, so we give up the opportunity to sell something like really direct to just say, but it it’s better for the unuser and that, you know, we may we’re the incentives are in alignment for everyone to maintain that integration. Yeah. And that’s the most important we feel like at the software level is good. Like the business will work its way out. So I’ll pull from the hint of Chris Lemon’s article and I’ll, I’ll have that linked up in the show notes. But what is your opinion on web hosts being in the perfect position to. Well, not only own the customer, but be able to own the experience. So if they own. A web hosting customer who maybe isn’t even using WordPress right now. No. Oh, okay. I’ve got the static site. I’ve got this other thing that I’m using. Uh, and I’m going to launch a WordPress site. I can click a button launch, a WordPress site. And what I feel is like what Chris and many other folks are leaning into in the hosting space is we’ll have these ready, built. Websites for you. So in the case of membership sites, Uh, you know, they’ll want to click of a button and you’ll have all your membership plugins ready to go. Ready to host. Uh, without all of the fuss of going too well, folks like you or searching the directory and knowing which pieces of the puzzle they have to put together as the end user. And, um, you know, controlling that experience for, you know, for the better of the customer, it’s less stress for the customer, less head-scratching. Uh, but it could eventually take money out of your pocket from some never having to search for paid memberships pro because they clicked a button. They got. Uh you know uh, another membership plugin powering their website so your thoughts on the hosting market creating these experience for customers I think it makes sense, you know, this kind of, uh, you know, um, what do you, bigger businesses are buying up the smart businesses and consolidation that’s happening in the space. Makes sense, because from, uh, from my perspective, um, There’s a couple of things. One is like, as our business grows, we kind of need more middle management. We need more kind of structure. Um, you know, I, I sometimes joke like, oh, the next, you know, four hires are like, you know, like a lawyer, an accountant and an HR person. And it’s like, not really stuff that like, you see, like, Producing in the company. Um, and so like it’s for companies of our size, it’s like, oh, instead of doing that, you know, just, you know, sell yourself a bigger company and adopt, you know, their management team. So that’s enticing, like from a business perspective. Um, but then also like hosting, like a hosted version of a product makes a lot of sense. Um, we capture all these customers and a lot of them already have a website or they’re transitioning, but some of them don’t and it’s like kind of weird to be like, okay, well, like go build a website and then come back to me. Um, or like, we start to like help them earlier in the process. And we’re like, you know, Hey, we could take it’s really then tempting the business opportunity of like instead of $300 a year, take like a hundred dollars a month and give them like a standard hosting package. It makes our support a little bit easier in the sense that like we know exactly. You know how they’re set up. We kind of cancel a lot of issues. Um, but then we have all these hosts, like hosts have fake. Whenever people say, just do that. I’m like, that’s actually really hard. Like, you know, I’d have to like, You know, help support people’s email and, uh, you know, cashing on their server and like when they want to do crazy things and if they get hacked and the security, and I was like, we’d have to figure all that out. And the host I’ve already figured that out. So it makes sense to partner with them. So that’s like our perspective. And then I think on the host side, like hosting has become commoditized. So they need things to differentiate themselves from their competition and they need kind of products. People like both the products themselves, but also I think the personnel is important too. Like we need people who can like think from a product perspective, um, to build solutions for the end-users. Like, I think. Some of the hosts. I mean, they had some really great people inside, but they need more of those people, you know, thinking in that, that way. And I’m in alignment with, with Lama that, you know, a lot of end-users don’t, they’re not buying hosting, they’re not buying WordPress or paid memberships pro they’re like, you know, build me a, uh, you know, a trade association website or build me, you know, like a website for my business guru business, or build me a newsletter subscription website. And if we can connect with the customer at that experience, you know, It’s a, it’s a more direct sale. And part of that, like a huge part of that stack is the host and, you know, you know, they fill it with the product. So it all makes sense to me, I guess, So just lots of competition coming at you everywhere you have other free. Plugins competing with you in the WordPress repo. Now you have potentially have web hosts coming with pre-packaged membership plugins. You have standalone membership. Software as a service solutions that are out there already. Tons of competition. Have you ever just thought about like picking up your toys from this playground and going and building your own playground and doing the hosted route? Uh and going that maybe more traditional software as a service model with paid memberships pro Yeah. Uh, so still now committed, like our goal is to be the default membership platform for WordPress sites. Um, like if you are going to do memberships on WordPress, like we should be in the consideration. Like we should be one of the ones that you think about using. Um, and when, like I said, we’re not going to always be the perfect fit, but we’re good. And we’re, we’re pretty tied to WordPress. Like it is tempting, but like I said, to kind of, you know, build a hosted solution because. There’s like when you do the math in a spreadsheet, there’s kind of money there. And then it’s kind of a simpler experience for the customers. Um, but to do that, well, we’d have to kind of joint venture with at least joint venture with a hosting company or someone who knows how to handle that. I think, um, which is like a little daunting. And like, whenever we really toy with those ideas, I feel like I’m taking my eye off the ball. You know, it’s kind of like the, the core business we have. Is isn’t stable enough that, you know, to take all that attention away and try to like build basically competing business. Um, so we’re like really focused on WordPress and I feel like we’re like, has a spot, like definitely like the competition, you know, like Stripe itself as a competitor. Like when we built Stripe integration, we were like probably the first membership plugins. Um, I almost said like e-commerce player. I don’t know. Like we really jumped on strike really early. Um, probably when they were like beta labeled, but we built tripe integration and like Stripe, just handle payments and subscriptions. And like, if you wanted to cancel your subscription, we built a GUI for that. If you wanted to see your invoices, we had to gooey for that and we kind of managed everything, but now Stripe has like, um, it’s called like Stripe payments or billing. I forgot how they brand it, but it like, they have more of that UI on the stripes. Um, and you can envision a plugin that kind of is way more bare bones than ours. Um, that just everything’s in Stripe. And like, so like a Stripe straight up Stripe, WordPress membership, plugin, um, could compete with us where people just use Stripe. They don’t even have to use a WordPress plugin, you know, they just put the button on their site. Um, so there’s just, but anyway, yeah, there’s, there’s competition like that. And there’s other competition of like all-in-one solutions, but there’s always going to want to be a type of site, especially ones that are being built by agencies. That need more control and need more flexibility, want more ownership of their data and how things work. One, to be able to scale up in a certain way and kind of. We’re going to just keep trying to target that user both like on the DIY side, you know, so it’s like a lot of stuff is easy to set up, you know, just out of the box and follow our instructions and our videos. Um, and then the beauty of WordPress is, is flexible and you can make it, do whatever you want. So it’s like, ah, I got a really cool idea to integrate with this thing and I can get to the code it’s open source and we can have a developer do it. So we’re always going to be focused on that, that user and. We’re tempted and we build proof of concepts and we think about it all the time, but we’re kind of focused actually on like the WordPress experience for now. Let’s shift gears just a little bit, instead of talking about only the challenges. Uh, assess where you are. With the success of your product. Through the lens of what you’ve done with marketing, messaging, content, social. What have you done really well there. And I’m also thinking of. I know what it’s like to operate a product, not even just with like my own stuff, but what we do at, at Casos is. We’re always at that stage, like, man, what? Just one more, one more feature. If we just add this one more feature, we’d have X more sales or X more downloads or many more customers, and then you get that feature built in. You’re like, oh, One more feature. I just want to add. One more feature to this list. When a lot of us should take a step back and say, look, I’ve got a solid product. I mean, you’ve been proving it now for eight plus years. Uh, maybe we should be focusing more on messaging, marketing, outreach, distribution, that kind of thing. So where are you with that? Uh mental tug of war as a owner and product create. So, I guess like the pat myself on the back, we did do a great job of like content marketing, you know, Kim, myself, you know, Travis and other team members that helped, like, since 2013, we were just constantly blogging. And the method works is like, when we get a question, like we’re like, oh, let’s answer that question and make a blog post where we answer it and put it out on the website. Um, and there was good tips in that area where like, you know, We would always try to generalize the questions, like solve a very specific problem, but yet don’t say like, you know, doing X, Y, Z with paid memberships pro it’s just doing XYZ. Um, yeah, it kind of increases the range of people who like one of our best performance. Blog posts is like how to name your membership level. And so if you’re not using WordPress or paid members for anything, you just started trying to figure out, do I call them my tribe or my peeps? Or like, you know, like Kim did a bunch of research on like what the most common words are and kind of ways to brainstorm it. Um, so that, I mean, that post gets like, I don’t know, like a few dozen, a hundred visits a day. And so it’s posted like that, that kind of drove traffic. And we, we played the long game with developers in terms of like, I remember talking with agencies and developers, like our solution is the best you should use it. And they’re like, yeah, sure. And then like a year later at a, at a conference, like you’re still not using our plugin. And it’s like, oh yeah. I mean, to do that. And after a while, you’re like, we’ve kind of, we’ve kind of survived into our success, you know, but marketing could be better. Like we were focused on it. We’re focused kind of on a lot of stuff, but marketing general, we just hired like, uh, Patrick Rolin to help out with marketing and we’re hitting, you know, we’re going off to a good start. I’m trying to figure out. And there’s lots of little things like. We, you know, we struggle with like who our audiences, because like we’re a platform and it’s like, who uses your website or your, your software? And they’re like all kinds of people. And you’re like, you know, the marketers and the business people say like, well, just focus on one, you know? And it’s like, well, how do I do that while also keeping them, you know, a platform because WordPress did that. Well, automatic did that with WordPress and WooCommerce did that, but full commerce, like they, you know, I was like, we want to still keep a platform. But there are things we could do. Cause I was sitting here just thinking about like, we really are like probably like the easiest way to just charge for access to a post page or category with WordPress and like our homepage we’ll get into the technical stuff and the, you know, the kind of important stuff. And I was like, oh, there’s a customer that just wants to charge $5 for access to a page. And like our homepage doesn’t sell that really well to that customer. So we’re figuring it out, both like. How do we take our levels and make them products and know who to target audience of all those products are and kind of sell that better. How do we, we also like there’s kinds of all this data collected and we’re going to do like, um, you know, tagging and kit or we’re, we’re switching to convert kit, but MailChimp has tags and other ones too, where it’s kind of like, Hey, if you read this blog post, if you kind of click this button on our site, if you read this email, okay, we can guess that, like, you don’t even have a WordPress site yet. And we should just send you our affiliate link for liquid web, um, you know, or something like that. They were like, you know, oh, you’re, you’re importing from something else. So let’s kind of show you. Our tools for importing from our competition and stuff like that. Um, so kind of gathering more data so that we can send more specifically targeted messages, uh, is something that we’re working on and that that’ll probably help us get to the next level in terms of competing with the other membership. How much do you look at the success of your customers? Uh, membership sites. And how does that weigh into the overall success of paid memberships pro. And again, I’ll preface this with a couple of things. So at Casos, one of the things I’m always challenged with was, well, if you don’t. If you never create a podcast and then you’ll never be successful with a podcast because you haven’t found the time to commit to the podcast. So I can’t help you be successful as a podcaster. If you can’t. Manage, uh, the time commitment you, you need to put into creating at least one episode a month. I recently spoke to Dave Rodenbach, recaptured.io, sort of the same thing. If his customers aren’t selling. Uh, product through their e-commerce store, largely in his world. If you don’t have a good product or you don’t have a good price or a good experience, and you’re not going to buy in, how can we reclaim and help you reclaim sales? If you’re not selling any product? How do you measure that in the marketing world of membership sites, digital products, digital access to content. Um, that seems even. Harder of a uh, of a challenge because of the just the wide breadth of that marketplace Yeah. I mean, that is an issue. I know, um, you know, we get like churn stats and we share some of them and I forget exactly where it is, but it’s. W I think we retain like 60% of people who sign up pay this year, or six only 60% will pay next year. And people will be like, oh, SAS industry standards or something is like higher. Um, and it’s like, so we’ve got to, we got to do better. There’s stuff we could do better, but I’m like, how many of those just are not in business anymore? Like, you know, like you can’t get that customer. Like they don’t, they’re not making money anymore. They’re not, you know, no matter what you’re going to do, like, you know, their business failed. Um, so that’s definitely an issue. There’s a couple of things we could do is like one is like help them. So one thing that’s exciting is an update that’s coming out for paid memberships pro, which like almost every other e-commerce related WordPress plugin did is how we integrate with Stripe in particular called Stripe connect so that our Stripe account is kind of linked to theirs. Um, so that when we get a percentage of the, you know, it’s like a half a percent or something of what comes through, um, we’re launching this and, um, so. That aligns you with your customers. So it’s like, oh, the more money they make, the more money we make. And it’s kind of exciting once it gets to scale is that, oh, we can just like put out a seminar for free that helps people do better and be more successful with their business because it’s going to benefit us in the end. Um, so that’s exciting. The other thing we try to do is, um, potentially focus on customers where that’s less of an issue. Like I never got into the, what do they call it? Kind of like the entrepreneur or the kind of like hustle porn or, um, You know, like I’m not a fan of selling in that way where it’s like, I know you don’t have a business now, but you know, it’s really easy. And like, you can have a business. I think if you, yeah. I mean, I like to joke about, so some of those, like here’s a car I bought my mom. Um, but yeah. So I think like not marketing to them is like a first step. And instead, like there’s, especially in the membership space, like there’s associations that like, yeah, we have 5,000 members. We’ve had 5,000 members every year for the past 20 years. Like never changes and like, we’re just going online. So it’s kind of like, you can find those businesses that are already successful. Um, and I was just saying this to him. Another, like a presentation for like GoDaddy’s a webinars series that was targeted at agencies. And I think for consulting, it’s important to like, I mean, if someone wants to give you money to build a website from scratch that may or may not work, like take their money, set their expectations and try to do a good job. But if you focus on customers that, you know, already have a business already have, um, you know, some kind of a relationship with a potential customer, like to have a mailing list or, you know, um, You know, so, so we will try to focus our marketing on those marketing, on those kinds of customers that already have a business that’s working, um, which should help that. Like it’s when sometimes when I’m. Uh, when people are. Are are, are complaining and griping because something’s difficult about setting up a website, which I, I tell you, I relate to you by the way. Cause it’s like, I do this for a living. I wrote a book on WordPress, but like I was helping a friend every once in a while. I don’t do it for paid, but I’ll help friends set up websites sometimes. And I’ll just be surprised at how hard it is for me. It’s hard for me. It takes a lot of time. But when people gripe about the effort that’s involved, I’m like, did you realize like you’re starting a business and it’s not easy. Like, I don’t know where you got, like, just wait until you, you have your own angry customers or like. Other stuff, you know, you got to deal with taxes and all the random stuff and in part of business. , Speaking of business, not being easy recently talked about this on the WP minute podcast. Uh, WP engine did a report that the WordPress economy is like $600 billion. Uh, right around that, that mark. Lots of talk recently with acquisitions, um, you know, smaller developers picking up even smaller developer plugins, hosting companies like nexus purchasing every plug and that they can get their hands on. I’m sure this is not. Done, uh, automatic acquiring, um, Day one journal, like so much acquisition happening. In this space. Have you ever thought that? Well, maybe we can build a bigger business with PMP. If we went that route, we were able to go. To nexus and joined them with a membership plugin or wp engine that kind of thing what are the cards hold for acquisitions or investments in that space Uh, yeah, we have thought about like acquiring, um, other plugins products and, you know, it’s kind of sparing some of that potentially is that the programmers are in demand. Um, and so. It feels, uh, like I feel bad about it, but I see some products that are, yeah, I’ve actually, I see products that people are side projects that people are doing. And I have a saying that like when they get to a thousand dollars a month, Sometimes it’s really tough. And they’re like, this isn’t enough. You know, I think I’m going to stop. And I’m always like, no, a thousand dollars a month. Like you’re halfway to $10,000 a month. Like you’re not halfway to $2,000 a month. Like all that work you did to like collect any money whatsoever and build up to a thousand. Like usually if you have a product that’s going to fit like your, at the time, it took you to get to a thousand dollars a month. You’re going to get the $10,000. Um, so that’s me like pumping up other entrepreneurs and trying to push them at the same time. I’m like, man, if it doesn’t work out that guy’s really sharp. And like, if he he’s, he’s, he’s kind of shown that he can think product minded and build something. And like, if he can’t make enough money to make a living, like, Hey, let me like give you a salary and kind of give you a job, you know, and you can build cool stuff for us. So I, yeah, I’ve kind of had that thought, um, of like, oh, like, Product people, if it’s not working out their side gig, like when they look for, you know, a salary job, like, Hey, we get like a really smart developer that proves that they can ship. Um, and so I think there’s some of that mindset at every scale, you know, I’m sure like, you know, something, some of the size of automatic would just by people or by business for the people behind it, you know? Um, and that’s part of liquid, but like I said, hosting companies want product people, um, and people who can handle that to kind of, you know, maintain things. Um, and then. If you ask me, like any business idea, like, have you considered, like, it’s almost funny, like, yeah. I consider everything, man. Like I love the staff. I probably have a spreadsheet that models it. And like, I’m like, I’m always talking and like, um, you know, like I can’t wait to get back to like the conference circuit and like, you know, having drinks with Chris lemma late at night. Cooking up schemes of, you know, like, I feel like at one point I said, like, I was like, oh, can I just like sell my company to, and then work on machine learning. I was like nerding out about machine learning. And he was like, I have an idea for a machine learning thing. And it was like, yeah. So like, have I talked to Chris Lama about like quitting my job and like doing machine learning stuff for him? Like that happened once. Um, yeah, but we haven’t really ever been serious about it. I did take a month earlier in this year where I was like, Hey, I’m going to have kind of informal talks, you know, with different people that just see. What might happen. And I was like, I gave myself a deadline of a month and made that clear. Um, and at the end of the month where like, no, like the current plan of like, you know, hire really great people, kind of get them handover the responsibilities that Kim and I have so that we don’t have to spend as much time on kind of like maintaining what we have and we can push out a new directions. Like I like being my own boss. I like having control and I think we still fit and we it’s good to have independent businesses in the WordPress space. Um, Yeah, but like, I mean, this space is valuable and all these companies are valuable. So it’s, it’s kind of exciting from that sentence. I mean, you know, a market is really growing booming even is when you see. I saw recently a small product that was announced in January of this year. So 2021. Um, already being sold. I mean, it has a nice website, has a nice name, nice brand. You know, it looks good, but it probably has less than a hundred customers. If that may be, I don’t know, unless it’s really doing much better than I thought it would be. Already for sale. And like in the back of my mind, I already know that somebody’s going to buy that. Uh, there was, uh, on startups or the rest of us. Uh, Rob walling. Had I think he tweeted something or somebody sent him an email. I forget where it was, but somebody who was doing like 80,000 ARR in their business sold for one point something million. And it’s almost like if you’re a product maker, developer, this is almost like your way in. You know, to get acquired. So it’s like, it’s almost like the absolute best sort of resume. So if you can build like a micro product, get some traction and then turn to a business that you would actually like to work for. And there is some synergy between your little product and their big product. You could even sell that to them. As like a signing bonus, almost like here, I’ve already proven this. And I’ve got a customer base that comes with me and I can develop it for you. Uh it’s an interesting world for the small product creator uh at the end of the Yeah. Yeah. So, I mean, it’s analogous to like how not, you know, Programmers and people who can build products on demand, like people who can, you know, build engaging podcasts are in demand. And there’s like a big gap between like building it and then making money for it and, you know, running a business. I mean, I’m spoiled that, like I have Kim as a partner who is like COO of the company and like get stuff done and can handle, you know, a lot of the, the business end and the accounting and stuff like that. And like, we get help for a bunch of individual things, but it’s like, if I was like, just me by myself as like, I’m, I’m a pretty creative person. I can like build stuff and think strategically and stuff, but like actually like keeping the business running and not falling apart, I would have been lost like years ago without someone like him. So. Um, it’s hard. Yeah. To make that leap from building something cool that people can use to like making enough money on it, to make it your data. But it’s still really hard to make a compelling podcast. So I’m with you like people and there’s demand like, you know yeah. Instead of finding something and hoping they can build a podcast, you know, the resumes they’ve already, you know, shipped a podcast. Jason Coleman everybody. Jason, where can folks find you to say thanks. Yeah. So I’m on Twitter, Jason underscore Coleman. Um, and my blog is the real Jason coleman.com. And yeah, we got a courses out on that’s shipping in a week or two, and we have a big, like a 2.6 update, the paid memberships pro, which is wrapping up some, some features and, um, uh, it’s got better Stripe integration, you know, that’s going to be good there. Fantastic stuff. Everyone else. matterport.com. airport.com/subscribe. Join the mailing list. Don’t forget to tune into your weekly dose of WordPress news in five minutes or less@thewpminute.com.

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 3 (06/17)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 29:09


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