Podcasts about Barefoot

Common term for the state of not wearing any footwear

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Best podcasts about Barefoot

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Latest podcast episodes about Barefoot

Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 89:00


Barefoot Is Legal Radio is hosted by Audrey and Phoenix every Saturday.   Barefoot is Legal is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to sharing the health benefits, giving support, & providing information for living a completely barefoot lifestyle. Most people want the freedom to go barefoot, but think going barefoot is illegal. There are zero laws about driving a car, going to a store, or eating in public barefoot. No such laws have ever existed. We share the message and freedom of choice to your body without prejudice or discrimination.   Get In Touch ! Our website is http://www.barefootislegal.org Facebook Business Page: https://www.facebook.com/BarefootIsLegal/ Instagram: @realbarefootislegal (Audrey is the manager of this account) Tiktok: @barefootislegal2 Twitter: @BarefootIsLegal

Jump on the Bat-Wagon
58. The Demon's Quest, Pt 2 (or Talia Walkin' Barefoot in the Hot Hot Snow) - Batman: The Animated Series

Jump on the Bat-Wagon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 98:54


Greetings, dear listener, and welcome back to "Jump on the Bat-Wagon" with James and Brian, where we watch through the entire DC Animated Universe from start to finish in the controversial airdate order, to experience these shows the way human beings experienced them in the far-gone days of the 1990s. The twist? Brian has never seen any of the DCAU. Will he become a super-fan like James or regret his decision? This week's episode: "The Demon's Quest," Part 2 "Batman: The Animated Series" Original airdate: 5/4/1993 Timecodes: 0:00 - Intro 8:19 - Review and Ratings 57:14 - Yoppie Mail 1:33:55 - Outro BUY A YOPPIE DUDE SHIRT! https://teespring.com/stores/dcauwatchtower New episodes debut Fridays on the Podtower YouTube channel and your favorite podcast feed! https://www.youtube.com/thepodtower Subscribe to the Watchtower Database for more DCAU videos! https://www.youtube.com/watchtowerdatabase Subscribe to Brian's new podcast, “Next Best”! https://anchor.fm/nextbest --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/batwagon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/batwagon/support

Cukrfree Podcast
#67: A. Součková & K. Souhradová (naBOSo & Kinisi) o barefoot

Cukrfree Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 74:51


Dlouho očekávaný podcast o barefoot je tady! S majitelkou barefoot obchodů naBOSo Andreou Součkovou a fyzioterapeutkou s centra Kinisi Mgr. Kristýnou Souhradovou jsme si povídaly o všem, co vás ohledně barefoot chůze a obuvi zajímá!

Be Right
Danny Woodhead on a barefoot Bill Belichick, testing the newest golf clubs and why he's unimpressed by Tom Brady

Be Right

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 77:33


Former NFL running back Danny Woodhead joins this week's episode to recap his epic week as a club tester at the Golf Digest Hot List, where he hit thousands of golf shots with all the latest and greatest sticks (00:17:05). Plus, he gives us an A+ Bill Belichick story from his time in New England, and dishes on the biggest “trap game” of his career, which involves a request from his wife. Finally, the boys make their Houston Open and NFL Week 10 picks, and CP and Steve break down their golf rounds with an Emmy-winning actor and recent podcast guest Doug Smith.As always, check GolfDigest.com for our full array of gambling content, including picks from our anonymous caddie, Pat Mayo of DraftKings/Mayo Media Network; Rick Gehman of RickRunGood.com; Brandon Gdula of numberFire/FanDuel; and Lee Alldrick of FanShareSports.

The Water Skier Magazine’s Hit It Podcast
From the Granite State to the Sunshine State with Barefoot waterski legend Keith St. Onge

The Water Skier Magazine’s Hit It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 58:40


Class of 2023 USA Waterski and Wake Sports Hall of Fame inductee Keith St. Onge joins the Hit It podcast to talk about his legendary career. Having racked up 14 world championships and 19 U.S. national overall titles, Keith talks about his journey from the New Hampshire to Florida, lessons learned along the path of his career, and what it was like to win a gold medal as part of Team USA in the 2022 IWWF World Water Ski Show Tournament.

The Show UP Dad
Showing Our Kids to Build Wealth with the "Barefoot Millionaire

The Show UP Dad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 55:34


Todays Guest is Jude Mendonca aka "The Barefoot Millionaire He is an ex Homeless Drug addict turned author, public speaker, serial entrepreneur who owns recovermeusa.com.( supplement company) He also is the CEO of "Node Ranch" which is a software firm developer for crypto. But the most amazing thing I feel he has accomplished is being a Show UP Dad to 4 Boys and being married for 13 years. Time is the most precious asset we can have. In the Podcast we talk about,

Words and Nerds: Authors, books and literature.
555. Scott Pape and Dani Vee: Barefoot Kids

Words and Nerds: Authors, books and literature.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 30:30


Scott Pape and Dani Vee: Barefoot Kids

The Lutheran Hour
Barefoot Saints

The Lutheran Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022


Moses heard God speak to him from a burning bush. Where do we hear Him?

Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio 1:30-3pm EST/ 10:30am-noon PST

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 85:00


Barefoot Is Legal Radio is hosted by Audrey and Phoenix every Saturday.   Barefoot is Legal is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to sharing the health benefits, giving support, & providing information for living a completely barefoot lifestyle. Most people want the freedom to go barefoot, but think going barefoot is illegal. There are zero laws about driving a car, going to a store, or eating in public barefoot. No such laws have ever existed. We share the message and freedom of choice to your body without prejudice or discrimination.   Our website is http://www.barefootislegal.org. We are on all the social medias.

Daily Devotions from Lutheran Hour Ministries

November 4, 2022 Daily Devotion from Lutheran Hour Ministries

The Natural Running Network
If Kipchoge ran BAREFOOT?

The Natural Running Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 47:01


If Kipchoge ran BAREFOOT? Nike had invested a fortune to bring one of their Elite runners to the finish line of a marathon in under 2 hours. Elide Kipchoge did just that! Of course, Nike Monopolized on the event by creating a special racing shoe for him to wear which will pay them back 1000… Read more → The post If Kipchoge ran BAREFOOT? appeared first on The Natural Running Network.

Hey Shayla
034 - BEST type of play for DEVELOPMENT with Occupational Therapist and Author of Balanced and Barefoot

Hey Shayla

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 37:34


What type of outdoor play is most crucial for children? OT and Author of Balanced and BarefootHey Shayla Podcast | Ep: 034Guest:Author of Balanced and Barefoot Angela Hanscom OTThank you for listening to the Hey Shayla podcast!  Here, we love to learn new things and decide what works for us and our family.. We're the moms that support instead of judge and know there are many ways to do something right.  I'd love to connect on Instagram @heyshaylaI read (listened to) balanced and barefoot this summer and LOVED everything that it said. It encouraged us to get outside more, to let her take the lead and to make sure she was moving in all sorts of ways to learn and understand her body more!I asked the author of Angela Hanscom to be on my podcast and was even more blown away with the information she gives in this podcast.Give yourself some distance to let them play, don't direct all of their play let them practice using their imagination, and certain movements like spinning and being upside down are crucial for their development!Angela, is an OT who moved her “office” outside to give her patients the full sensory experience.  She then started an outdoor program Timbernook (that is now  all over the US and New Zealand) where kids get to be and learn outside! Xo ShayJoin the email list to be notified when episodes go live HERE!Join the email list to be notified when episodes go live HERE!Companies I love and am an affiliate for:*** DISCOUNT HEYSHAYLA for all unless specified :) *****Expecting and Empowered: Pregnancy and Postpartum workouts*LoveBug Probiotics: Pre and postnatal probiotics*My Little Eaters: Guide to Baby Led Weaning*Kindred Bravely: Maternity Sports Bra*Clearly Filtered: Filtered water bottle pitcher*TushBaby: Great “Up-Down” Baby carrier*Iksplor: Wool base layer Let's Connect!Instagram (@heyshayla),YouTube (Hey Shayla)Website (www.heyshayla.com)Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/shop/heyshayla)**Disclaimer: Please note that some of the links here are affiliate links. Which means at no cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. I only work with companies that I love, and that I think you will love.

Ruined Childhoods
Quiz Show (1994)

Ruined Childhoods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 82:00


Dan and Jon travel back in time for Robert Redford's look at the 1957 Quiz Show scandal that rocked NBC. And while they're at it, Jon recounts his experience on an unaired game show pilot back in 2007.Next episode: Barefoot in the Park (1967)Contact us, follow us on social media, or buy some merch at linktr.ee/RuinedChildhoods

Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio 1:30-3pm EST/ 10:30am-noon PST

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 89:00


Barefoot Is Legal Radio is hosted by Audrey and Phoenix every Saturday.   Barefoot is Legal is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to sharing the health benefits, giving support, & providing information for living a completely barefoot lifestyle. Most people want the freedom to go barefoot, but think going barefoot is illegal. There are zero laws about driving a car, going to a store, or eating in public barefoot. No such laws have ever existed. We share the message and freedom of choice to your body without prejudice or discrimination.   Our website is http://www.barefootislegal.org. We are on all the social medias.

Send Me To Sleep Podcast - World's Sleepiest Stories, Meditation & Hypnosis
The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood: Little John Turns Barefoot Friar

Send Me To Sleep Podcast - World's Sleepiest Stories, Meditation & Hypnosis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 52:05 Very Popular


Tonight, I'll be reading The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood: Little John Turns Barefoot Friar by Howard Pyle. Welcome to Send Me To Sleep, the World's sleepiest podcast, designed to help you fall asleep through relaxing stories and hypnotic meditation. If you find this podcast effective, please consider subscribing, so you can stay up-to-date with new weekly episodes and fall asleep consistently, each night. Enjoying the show? Leave us a rating and review: Apple Podcasts - Spotify Sign up for our newsletter to stay up-to-date on all of the sleepiest news: https://sendmetosleep.com/podcast/ Visit our website: Send Me To Sleep - World's Sleepiest Website Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sendmetosleepco/ Do not listen to this sleep story whilst driving or operating machinery. Please only listen to the Send Me To Sleep podcast in a safe place where you can relax and fall asleep.

Ricky's Ram Jam
Ep. 8: NFL trade deadline with Rams COO Kevin Demoff

Ricky's Ram Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 44:35


Ricky, fresh off of the bye week, gives advice on which Barefoot wine will surely impress a date (2:23) and then gets to sit down with Los Angeles Rams COO Kevin Demoff (4:04) ahead of the NFL trade deadline. What's a day in the life of a COO (7:26) and what are some of Kevin's favorite Rams moments(32:28)? Find out!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Let ‘em go Barefoot
Building Intentional Community with Julie Walter

Let ‘em go Barefoot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 64:11


Welcome to episode 17 of the Let ‘em go Barefoot podcast. My guest today is Julie Walter also known as @familyyields on Instagram. I invited Julie on to talk about creating intentional community and to share with us the purpose of the forest and farm school she created and runs with her husband on their 50-acre farm in Canada.   Community is something we all need and yet many of us struggle with finding a community (or keeping one). And when you chose to homeschool, sometimes you just have to go and create one to meet the needs of your kids and your family. In this episode we talk about things to consider when being in community, including the need for like-mindedness around a purpose, but ALSO diversity of ideas and perspectives. We discuss her experiences as a teacher for 16 years. Why she chose to homeschool. Social-emotional learning and why it is important. The need for buy in when kids are learning new things. The global competencies she is aiming to help children develop. How the principles of permaculture permeate through her life, and so much more. There's also a story she shares that illustrates the power of curiosity and interests that you don't want to miss. Julie is insightful, thoughtful, and I love how she is showing up with intention and purpose. I think you will too. Find more of Julie here: https://familyyields.com/about/   If you'd like to support the podcast or add a tip to the tip jar, you can do so here. Thank you! To find more of Missy's work go to www.letemgobarefoot.com Writing on Substack here: https://letemgobarefoot.substack.com/    

Send Me To Sleep Podcast - World's Sleepiest Stories, Meditation & Hypnosis
The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood: Little John Turns Barefoot Friar (Voice Only)

Send Me To Sleep Podcast - World's Sleepiest Stories, Meditation & Hypnosis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 52:05


Tonight, I'll be reading The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood: Little John Turns Barefoot Friar by Howard Pyle. Welcome to Send Me To Sleep, the World's sleepiest podcast, designed to help you fall asleep through relaxing stories and hypnotic meditation. If you find this podcast effective, please consider subscribing, so you can stay up-to-date with new weekly episodes and fall asleep consistently, each night. Enjoying the show? Leave us a rating and review: Apple Podcasts - Spotify Sign up for our newsletter to stay up-to-date on all of the sleepiest news: https://sendmetosleep.com/podcast/ Visit our website: Send Me To Sleep - World's Sleepiest Website Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sendmetosleepco/ Do not listen to this sleep story whilst driving or operating machinery. Please only listen to the Send Me To Sleep podcast in a safe place where you can relax and fall asleep.

Me & You, The Housewives, & Marvel Too
[SCRIPTED] Hot D & Barefoot! w/ Noor! THE REALITY IS! [House of the Dragon Season One]

Me & You, The Housewives, & Marvel Too

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 57:37


WELP! The first season of HBO's MEGA HIT SHOW “House of the Dragon” is now over, and I am aggressively anxious for season two! I need to know Rhaenyra's plan of action. I need to know how Alicent reacts when Aemond tells her… THE NEWS! I need to know if Larys prefers a fuzzy kitten heel or a sensible flat. I.. have.. questions! But for now, you'll have to settle for answers and antics as Noor (from “The Reality Is” podcast) and I break down season one of the show. We bounce back from serious to incredibly ignorant to lustful within a matter of minutes. Check it out!Noor's Podcast (Apple): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-reality-is/id1535296559Noor's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/therealityispod/?hl=enNoor's Porcast (Spotify): https://open.spotify.com/show/1xHoNqhlL0z4HpmiEXKqi7*** HEY! Some of you have asked how you can show your appreciation for all of the content provided by your mama's favorite Black geek. How about you buy me a beer/coffee? FOLLOW THE BELOW LINK: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/realitycomics2 ***Are you a Big Brother fan? Check out my other podcast called Big Brother Breakfast Club, where we've had great guests like The Cookout alliance's Hannah, Derek F. and Kyland of BB23.https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/big-brother-breakfast-club/id1581821551https://open.spotify.com/show/5hFyddPtwrtSFi5pEbdWaxDON'T FORGET TO SUBSCRIBE, RATE, AND REVIEW! I LOVE 5 STARS!EMAIL ME: realitycomicstoo@gmail.comFOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM: @realitycomicstoo / www.instagram.com/realitycomicstoo

LightSaber Radio
LSR #115 - Andor Audit 1x8 - Barefoot Constantly

LightSaber Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 87:16


In today's episode, Andor Audit 1x8 - Barefoot Constantly, The LSR crew has an In-depth and fun discussion about the 8th episode of Andor, Narkina 5. While Mon Mothma throws some parties to troll for supporters of the cause. Cassian has been sent to Narkina 5 to serve his unjust sentence. Does this episode have enough depth as an episode to send it into the, or did it leave the crew disappointed? Did it give us enough info to make some predictions or did it just leave us hanging? Plus some news about what's going on in the star wars universe. This is one of those episodes you don't want to miss. We hope you enjoy today's show. If you liked the show, please give a five-star rating on whatever platform you use to consume your content. It really does help. If possible, share it with your friends and family. It would be greatly appreciated. And don't forget to subscribe to the show. That way you will be notified every time we release a new episode. As always, thank you for spending your time listening to this podcast. For anyone that would like to be a guest on the show, or has any questions about the show. Please do not hesitate to email us. We would love to hear from you. Follow us on our Social Media for more great content. LightSaber Radio Contact Info You can leave us a voicemail at (314) 877-8288 Email - light.saber.radio1@gmail.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6gyZJIz6OsbJ7ShnSgDAwQ/videos Twitter - https://twitter.com/LSR_Podcast Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Lightsaber-Radio-105935108382033 Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lightsaber.radio/ TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lightsaber_radio?lang=en The story, art, and characters therein are the property of whoever holds the copyright to this material. We do not claim ownership of the source material. This podcast was produced for noncommercial use, to be enjoyed by ourselves, fellow fans, and the original creators as a tribute to Star Wars. Please support the official release. #starwars #starwarspodcast #starwarsfan #themandalorian #maythe4thbewithyou #starwarscelebration #thebadbatch #starwarsday #starwarsvisions #lightsaber #starwarrebels #kenobiTrailer #starwarrebels #starwarsnews #andor --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lightsaber-radio/message

Singletracks Mountain Bike News
Bikepacking 20,000 Miles from Alaska to Tierra del Fugo... Barefoot

Singletracks Mountain Bike News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 97:56 Very Popular


In 2006 Goat and two friends set out to ride mountain bikes from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego, the southernmost tip of South America, and after three and a half years of travel, the trio completed the mother of all bikepacking trips. Riding the Spine is just one of many adventures Goat has experienced over the years, including living in a tree house and building and working on countless bikes. In this episode we ask: How did you upbringing influence your adventure-based lifestyle? How did you get into cycling, and particularly long-distance riding? What was it like living in a treehouse for 4 years during college? How did the idea of Riding the Spine come about? Who was in the group? What was your bike setup at the start, and how did it evolve during the ride? Why did you and the crew get arrested in Arizona? Which sections were your favorites to ride? Have you been on any bike adventures since the trip? Do you have any planned for the future? Get more stories from Riding the Spine at ridingthespine.com and keep up Goat's latest adventures at wandergoat.com. Cover photo by Melinda Thompson. This episode of the Singletracks podcast is sponsored by Explore Brevard. Professional mountain biker Adam Craig says it's one of the top three places in the universe he's ever ridden. Where is this magical mountain biking nirvana? It's none other than Brevard, North Carolina, home to Pisgah National Forest and DuPont Recreational Forest. The area boasts over 300 miles of peerless singletrack, not to mention hundreds of miles of gravel roads, creating a near endless array of routes, terrains, and challenges to explore. Four vibrant bike shops will get you sorted, whether you need gear, service, or a top notch rental. Top it off with an array of craft breweries, cafes and gathering spots that have earned Brevard the title as one of the best small towns in America in 2021. It all adds up to a premier mountain biking destination you'll want to experience for yourself. Find out more at ExploreBrevard.com. ✏️ A written transcript of this conversation is available at singletracks.com. --Keep up with the latest in mountain biking at Singletracks.com and on Instagram @singletracks --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/singletracks/support

Tony & Dwight
Big Bopper's Birthday. Leaving The Lottery. Bad Baby Names. The Barefoot Booter & Grease 2.

Tony & Dwight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 28:57


Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio 1:30-3pm EST/ 10:30am-noon PST

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 90:00


Barefoot Is Legal Radio is hosted by Audrey and Phoenix every Saturday.   Barefoot is Legal is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to sharing the health benefits, giving support, & providing information for living a completely barefoot lifestyle. Most people want the freedom to go barefoot, but think going barefoot is illegal. There are zero laws about driving a car, going to a store, or eating in public barefoot. No such laws have ever existed. We share the message and freedom of choice to your body without prejudice or discrimination.   Our website is http://www.barefootislegal.org. We are on all the social medias.

ESPN Daily
Sole and Valor: The Mystery of the NFL's Last Barefoot Kicker

ESPN Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 30:26


In the 1980s NFL, barefoot kickers were a fleeting and rare phenomenon, with little to no evidence to back up any claims of a strategic advantage. The last known barefoot kick in the league was recorded in 2002, and executed by St. Louis Rams kicker Jeff Wilkins…or so we thought. Sam Borden kicks off an investigation into a football mystery… and embarks on a quest for truth…and justice…and a heel turn for the ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

While You Were Talking
86 - I stepped on a crawdad barefoot and it bled green

While You Were Talking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 37:41


Take the dialect quiz! What were you thinking about while we were talking? Send us a voice message and let us know! Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Send us an email: whileyouweretalkingpod@gmail.com Thank you to Rob Henson for our theme music, and thank YOU for listening! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whileyouweretalkingpod/message

WIFI & WATER
E45 - Norman Gabula On Barefoot Networking At ETH Safari In Kenya

WIFI & WATER

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 46:17


Like any other industry, web3 and crypto has its fair share of conferences. You know the ones with panel discussions, keynote speakers, SWAG, company booths, sponsorship branding everywhere and well you get the picture. And while I have not admittedly attended a web3 or crypto specific conference yet, I've been told by fellow web3 and crypto community members, including even guests who've joined this podcast, that there are a lot less suits and a lot more experiences that you might not expect at "professional" gathering with high ticket attendance prices. And to build on this notion of unique and curated experiences, this episode's guest, Norman Gabula, will share all about his involvement in helping to create and then executing ETH Safari's inaugural web3 conference in Kenya. ETH Safari, as Norman shares, is a web3 conference held in Kenya that brings in attendees from more than 40 countries to discuss how web3, crypto, NFTs, blockchain and more will continue to shape not just Kenya or Eastern Africa as a region but the continent of Africa and beyond. Norman also shares his own story of choosing to work on ETH Safari as a Volunteer over a paid gig in his more traditional professional legal path as a lawyer. It's a story that will resonate with many who've decide to take the road less traveled and ended up in the global community of web3 and crypto. To reach Norman, please find him on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/norman-gabula-271b199a/ To check out ETH Safari, please check out the following links: Twitter - https://twitter.com/ETHSafari LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/ethsafari/ Website - https://ethsafari.xyz/ Please follow us on social media and check out our website: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/morethanblockchain/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/morethanblckchn YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC45qe8qj0rIcXdYqI_aiIXg Website - https://www.morethanblockchain.xyz/

The Jessica Haizman Podcast
47. What's so Important about Feet?

The Jessica Haizman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 38:01


In today's episode I sit down with Anya Jensen to talk all about FEET and what you can do to be supporting them (since they DO support your whole body). Whether this is a pain point  or you feet are problem free- there are still small manageable things you can implement to keep your body moving -the right way- for years to come!Find more information about Anya and barefoot shoes hereDon't forget to subscribe to the podcast!Please leave a rating if you enjoyed this episode & share it with your friends!Find more at Jessicahaizman.com

Welcome to Florida
Episode 122: The Barefoot Mailmen

Welcome to Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 35:37


When it comes to homeowners in Florida and hurricane damage, it's buyer beware.Our guest is Ralph Krugler, historian at the Hillsboro Lighthouse and Florida barefoot mailman historian. The Barefoot Mailmen operated in the late 19th century walking the mail to residents along the Florida frontier on the east and west coasts of the state. Here's a great Sunshine State "did you know:" the official seal of the city of Hypoluxo in Palm Beach County features an image of a barefoot mailman."Welcome to Florida" is presented by Windstorm Products, a family business in Florida which has grown to become the largest online retailer of hurricane hardware. When the next hurricane comes, and it will, have your home protected from wind and flood damage by using the products and expertise available at windstormproducts.com. 

Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio 1:30-3pm EST/ 10:30am-noon PST

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 89:00


Barefoot Is Legal Radio is hosted by Audrey and Phoenix every Saturday.   Barefoot is Legal is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to sharing the health benefits, giving support, & providing information for living a completely barefoot lifestyle. Most people want the freedom to go barefoot, but think going barefoot is illegal. There are zero laws about driving a car, going to a store, or eating in public barefoot. No such laws have ever existed. We share the message and freedom of choice to your body without prejudice or discrimination.   Our website is http://www.barefootislegal.org. We are on all the social medias.

Let ‘em go Barefoot
Barefoot Strong with Dr. Emily Splichal

Let ‘em go Barefoot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 50:35


In this episode, I talk with Dr. Emily Splichal, a functional podiatrist who calls herself “barefoot friendly”. This designation may seem odd for a foot doctor, but because of the fear-based medicine in our western society, she has witnessed the unreasonable fear of the natural (bare) foot amongst some of her colleagues. Her book, Barefoot Strong, aims to bring the importance of foot health back into the forefront. She wants to literally uncover our feet and help us learn how valuable foot health is for our nervous system and our brain development. We cover a lot of ground (no pun intended) in our conversation. We get into the science of bare feet, the benefits to overall health, considerations for kids with special needs, products you can use to stimulate the feet and nervous system, the amount of time you should aim to be without shoes, the different surfaces to go barefoot on and why, why shoes are so common, athletes and barefoot training, and so much more. https://www.dremilysplichal.com/ http://barefootstrong.com/barefoot-strong-the-book/ http://barefootstrong.com/foot-types-quiz/ https://www.naboso.com/ For more insights on mindful parenting, homeschooling, and educational freedom, follow along on Instagram @letemgobarefoot or at www.letemgbarefoot.com  

One Step Beyond
S2E2 - Barefoot Hiking, with Ken Posner

One Step Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 74:50


Ken Posner recently completed the 211-mile John Muir Trail in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains... barefoot from start to finish. On this episode, he takes host Tony Fletcher onto a trail in the more forgiving Shawangunk Mountains of the Hudson Valley to explain, and demonstrate, the benefits of hiking barefoot, on easy trails like this but also on the toughest parts of the John Muir Trail.Ken was previously the guest on Season 1, Episode 15 of One Step Beyond, when he took Tony on a 'bushwack' hike up one of the Catskills peaks, without navigation. Ken's list of achievements is impressive for a late starter and someone who still holds down a desk job. In 2013, he achieved what was then the Fastest Known Time (9 days) for Running The Long Path through New York, and wrote a book about the experience. The following year, he set a still-standing FKT for the Badwater Double, a 146-mile, near 15,000-ft climb from the lowest point in the Continental US to the highest point, at the top of Mount Whitney – and back again, covering the 292 miles in under 4 days. He has also gone barefoot in conducting the Grid - all 35 of the Catskills 3500ft peaks in all 12 months.Ken Posner's blog can be found at https://thelongbrownpath.com/He can be found on Twitter, Instagram and on YouTube.Also in this episode: Tony reports back on his Marathon March in aid of the Palace for Life foundation, taking on all 26.5 miles, all four 3500ft+ peaks, and all 6-7000ft elevation of the Cat's Tail Trail Marathon a week after the foundation's annual sponsored marathon walk around south London. Tony's aim was to complete it within the 10-hr cut-off time set for runners - without running. Did he succeed? Listen in to find out. You can support Tony's fundraising at https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/tonyfletcher64The Palace for Life foundation is at https://www.palaceforlife.org/Questions/comments/suggestions? Email Onestepbeyond@ijamming.net.Find One Step Beyond at:Instagram is OneStepBeyondPodcastFacebook is One Step Beyond with Tony FletcherTwitter is OneStepBeyondP1Theme song is 'Yes Men' by The Dear Boys. Listen in full here.Logo by Mark Lerner. Photo taken at Arte Sumepaz in Cundinimarca, Colombia. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/onestepbeyond. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

20/20
The Barefoot Witness

20/20

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 80:56 Very Popular


A workplace romance turns fatal for a Baton Rouge teacher-of-the-year mom. Could a three-year-old eyewitness help crack the case?   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 80:00


Barefoot Is Legal is a 501 c3 nonprofit dedicated to the rights and legalities of the barefoot lifestyle as well as for empowering and encouraging others in barefooting. People go barefoot for medical, health, religious, cultural and safety reasons. Join your hosts during our weekly internet broadcast to learn more about living the barefoot life and the fact that there are NO laws saying you must wear footwear in public. Learn your rights and the laws. Stand up for your rights. This is the place to share stories. We have amazing guests from all walks of life! Learn more about what is new in the barefoot community and even legal advice. If you have questions or stories to share or even looking for advice about the health benefits of being barefoot to share, please call into this live broadcast, 319-527-6208. We love to hear from our audience! Take your personal freedom back and go barefoot! Guess what? It is NOT illegal to drive and/or walk around in public without shoes. Many people are not aware of that! Help us spread the word!

Podcasts by Larry Lannan
Barefoot In The Park - A Review

Podcasts by Larry Lannan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 3:38


A local group, the Hyperion Players, have produced their version of Neil Simon's "Barefoot in the Park" - here is my review

The Voice of Retail
Wes Hall, the "King of Bay Street" and CBC Dragon, on his new book "No Bootstraps When You're Barefoot"

The Voice of Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 31:33


Welcome to The Voice of Retail. I'm your host Michael LeBlanc. This podcast is brought to you in conjunction with Retail Council of Canada.In an exclusive interview, the one and only Wes Hall join the podcast to talk about his new book "No Bootstraps When You're Barefoot: My rise from a Jamaican plantation shack to the boardrooms of Bay Street." Wes shares his story and advice for retailers on how they can genuinely help black entrepreneurs and adds hints for anyone who winds up in front of him on CBC's Dragon's DenThanks for tuning into this special episode of The Voice of Retail.  If you haven't already, be sure and click subscribe on your favourite podcast platform so new episodes will land automatically twice a week, and check out my other retail industry media properties; the Remarkable Retail podcast, the Conversations with CommerceNext podcast, and the Food Professor podcast.  Last but not least, if you are into BBQ, check out my all new YouTube barbecue show, Last Request Barbeque, with new episodes each and every week!I'm your host Michael LeBlanc, President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company & Maven Media, and if you're looking for more content, or want to chat  follow me on LinkedIn, or visit my website meleblanc.co!  Have a safe week everyone! About WesAs the executive chairman and founder of Kingsdale Advisors, Wes Hall is one of North America's most influential powerbrokers and Canada's preeminent leader in shareholder advisory services, playing pivotal roles on multi-million and billion-dollar transactions for Air Canada, Xstrata, Citigroup, Tim Horton's, PetroCanada and many others. Hall is also the owner of QM Environmental, a leading national environmental and industrial services provider with over 450 employees, among other businesses. An instructor at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, he teaches Black Entrepreneurship & Leadership, a first-of-its-kind course in North America; he is the founder of the anti-Black racism initiative, BlackNorth; and in October 2021 became one of the investors on the hit series Dragons' Den.  About MichaelMichael is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice. He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career. He has delivered keynotes, hosted fire-side discussions with C-level executives and participated on thought leadership panels worldwide.  Michael was recently added to ReThink Retail's prestigious Top 100 Global Retail Influencers for a second year in  2022. Michael is also the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts, including Canada's top retail industry podcast, The Voice of Retail, plus the Remarkable Retail with author Steve Dennis, Global E-Commerce Tech Talks and The Food Professor with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  Most recently, Michael launched Conversations with CommerceNext, a podcast focussed on retail eCommerce, digital marketing and retail careers - all available on Apple, Spotify, Amazon Music and all major podcast platforms.   Michael is also the producer and host of the “Last Request Barbeque” channel on YouTube where he cooks meals to die for and influencer riches.

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Would You Rather (Wet and Funky)

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 3:30


Nosy or noisy neighbors?  Week with no soap or no toothbrush?  Barefoot in a public restroom or food poisoning?  Blind or unable to speak for rest of life? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma
'Letting Go of the Victim Mindset and Embracing the Higher Perspective' with Leanne The Barefoot Medium

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 45:58


Leanne, The Barefoot Medium® from Brisbane, Australia is a gifted and highly sought after International Medium, Twin Flame Connector and Transformational Coach who is blessed to connect people from all over the world with their loved ones who have passed over. She brings her honest and compassionate personality to providing people with clarity, guidance and encouragement, to help them connect with Spirit and the Universe, come into union with their Twin Flame and manifest what their soul needs, wants and desires in life.In today's episode we will be discussing:• Letting go of the victim-mindset and embracing the higher perspective• Shifting from turmoil to triumph• Healing from heartache and trauma• Finding the light within• Transforming obstacles and challenges to step into your purpose and passion Website: https://www.thebarefootmedium.com.au/ Email: thebarefootmedium@hotmail.com.auFacebook: www.facebook.com/leannethebarefootmedium/Instagram: thebarefootmediumThanks For Listening! Follow us on: - Website: https://victim2victor.net/ - FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/victim2victor - TWITTER: https://twitter.com/V2V_healing - INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/victim_2_victor_podcast/- Victim 2 Victor Audio Book Audible: https://adbl.co/3akVNCu - Victim 2 Victor Book on Amazon: https://amzn.to/34MQQyu - Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3wHvUof - Spotify: https://spoti.fi/36D6ZYE 

FOX Sports Knoxville
The Blitz HR2: "Best Places to be Barefoot" 10/5/22

FOX Sports Knoxville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 45:54


-The Opening Drive -The AL Playoff Field -Tuesday Draft, but make it Wednesday -Best Bet

El podcast de Jana Fernández
Pies deformes, cuerpos deformes, vidas deformes, con Rubens García

El podcast de Jana Fernández

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 63:52


Una cuarta parte de los huesos de nuestro cuerpo se encuentran en los pies. El proceso biomecánico que hace que cada una de estas piezas trabaje de forma conjunta en sincronía es tan complejo como perfecto. Nuestros pies nos permiten caminar (se estima que caminamos una media de 160.000 km a lo largo de toda nuestra vida, 240 millones de pasos), correr, saltar, mantener el equilibrio, conducir… en fin, nos permiten hacer prácticamente todo lo que necesitamos hacer, pero siguen siendo los grandes olvidados cuando hablamos de salud y bienestar.Su relación con el resto de las estructuras corporales es más que directa, ya que están unidos al cuerpo a través de 72.000 vías nerviosas. Y precisamente por ser los cimientos de nuestra estructura corporal, las dolencias en los pies pueden tener repercusiones en otras partes del cuerpo como la espalda, los tobillos, las rodillas o la cadera, y ser determinantes en otro tipo de dolencias como la artritis, o problemas circulatorios.Para entender esta estructura tan compleja y, a la vez, esencial para nuestra salud y para aprender a cuidarlos más allá de modas estéticas y mensajes de marketing, hoy cuento en el podcast con Rubens García, exfutbolista profesional y terapeuta del movimiento, y fundador de R-Motion Education, una plataforma de servicios de readaptación y rehabilitación para aprender a movernos sin dolor y optimizar nuestro rendimiento físico.Notas del episodio

Let’s Toke About It
Ep 39. Barefoot shoes, Destoying America, Negative 1 effectiveness.

Let’s Toke About It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 53:40


Today's episode features topics such as: Question 4 on HB837, running in barefoot shoes, the intentional destruction of America, and negative punch effectiveness Here are the links to everything i was talking about : https://trackbill.com/bill/maryland-house-bill-837-cannabis-reform/2218214/ https://ballotpedia.org/Maryland_Question_4,_Marijuana_Legalization_Amendment_(2022)#Text_of_measure Check out: YouTube.com/lordbongtimore Instagram.com/lordbongtimore Instagram.com/elliotaces Facebook.com/groups/teamnevertap 1stphorm.com/elliotaces https://www.1stphorm.app/elliotaces

Freedomizer Radio Network
Barefoot Is Legal Radio 1:30-3pm EST/ 10:30am-noon PST

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 90:00


Barefoot Is Legal Radio is hosted by Audrey every Saturday.      Barefoot is Legal is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to sharing the health benefits, giving support, & providing information for living a completely barefoot lifestyle. Most people want the freedom to go barefoot, but think going barefoot is illegal. There are zero laws about driving a car, going to a store, or eating in public barefoot. No such laws have ever existed. We share the message and freedom of choice to your body without prejudice or discrimination.      Our website is http://www.barefootislegal.org. We are on all the social medias. 

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Suzanne LaRusch 10/01/2022

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 61:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/9ePwK9prXTc Suzanne LaRusch made her acting debut at the ripe old age of 18 months in a Kodak commercial. As a child actress she was featured in numerous television commercials and shows. After high school, Suzanne immediate began touring in dinner theater. Barefoot in the Park, Sweet Charity, Guys and Dolls and Born Yesterday just to name a few. Two years as dance captain for the Los Angeles Rams Cheerleaders launched several television acting appearances. Suzanne started in the world of impressions and LUCY in 1991 under special assignment to Universal Studios. She quickly came to the attention of Lucie and Desi Arnaz Jr., who authorized LaRusch to portray their mother's work in other venues. Desilu, too, Inc. and CBS Worldwide TV, Inc. (whom own the I LOVE LUCY property) have since recognized Suzanne as THE OFFICIAL LUCY PERFORMER. Over the years, she has entertained for former President George Bush, was a surprise guest for Roseanne at the 1997 Women in Film LUCY AWARDS, appeared on such national television programs as The Better Half with Dick Clark, The Rosie O'Donnell Show, hosted 5 appearances on HSN (Home Shopping Network) selling out of every I LOVE LUCY product offered. In 2007, Suzanne appeared for ABC on their number one rated hit reality show THE NEXT BEST THING. A national competition and Search for the Greatest Celebrity Impersonator. Suzanne wrote and performed all original material for the show. The Result? America voted her fourth runner up and Number One Female Celebrity impressionist in the country! 2009-2011 Suzanne toured in a woman show, AN EVENING WITH LUCILLE BALL which she co-authored with Lucille Ball's daughter Lucie Arnaz who also directed the piece.

Highlights from Moncrieff
The Barefoot Guy

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 7:34


George Woodville, has spent the past year living barefoot. After he decided to ditch shoes altogether, he has been spreading the good news of the so-called Grounding Movement. George Woodville, AKA the Barefoot Guy joined Sean on the show today...

The Hard 90 Podcast With Zach Sorensen

Guided meditation for grounding: 3 Wins... 3 Gratitudes... I Have... I Am... I Give... I Love...

I Survived Theatre School
Cullen Douglas

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 75:37


Intro: Even our lungs need a sense of purpose. Let Me Run This By You: Boz is buying a house!Interview: We talk to actor and documentary filmmaker Cullen Douglas about AMDA, Florida School of the Arts, Southeastern Theatre Conference, Tyne Daly, character actors, Jason Priestly, Patricia Crotty, Our Town, Lenny Bruce, Dick Van Dyke, investigative journalism, reusing caskets, David Carr,  Deadwood, playing Bilbo Baggins, being pen pals with Andrea McCardle, singing If I Were A Rich Man,  The Pirates of Penzance, Bye Bye Birdie, Robert Sean Leonard,  Billy Flanigan: The Happiest Man on Earth, Shonda Rhimes, Twin Peaks,  Grey's Anatomy ,  Barry, Bill Hader,  documentary filmmaking, The Humanitas Prize,  Private Practice.FULL TRANSCRIPT (Unedited): 1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth Ruez.2 (10s):And I'm Gina Paci.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.2 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of1 (20s):It all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?3 (33s):TikTok and I started looking at the videos and I was like, Ooh, I don't know about this. I think I need to start wearing wake up. So thank you. You1 (43s):Look gorgeous. How are3 (43s):You doing?1 (44s):Yeah, hi. I'm finally, Many things are happening. Many things are happening. So I finally, even though I'm coughing still little, I finally feel like I am, I like kicked the pneumonia bronchitis situation and little mostly thank you. I, yeah, I, we went away and then to Ventura and I slash Ojai and I really rested and I really, there was one day I worked, but I really mostly rested and I just really was like, okay, I need actual ass downtime. And yeah.1 (1m 25s):And then I started to heal and I was also on praise God for antibiotics. And then the thing that really helped me really kick it was I hadn't exercised my lungs in a really long time at all because I was so sick that I just was like, Who wants to like walk or, and, and it was 107 degrees, so it's like, who wants to exercise in that? So my cousin, my sister came in town, I, that's like a big eyebrow raise for, to drop my niece off to college. And we went on a hike to Griffith, but like a sloping hike, not a crazy hike. And I was like, I don't think I'm gonna be able to do it.1 (2m 5s):And it actually helped my lungs to like feel like they were contributing to fucking something and me like Forgot I3 (2m 16s):Like a sense of purpose. Right,1 (2m 17s):Right. And also like to, yeah, to have a job. And they were like, like to be exercised and I was like, Oh, I forgot that. Like the lungs. And, and it's interesting in this whole covid situation, like the lungs need to work too. And I never understood in hospitals, cuz I spent quite a long time in them, why they have those breathing like tube things that you blow the ball and the ball floats up. You have to, I thought that was so dumb until I had bronchitis and pneumonia and I was like, Oh, they have to work. Like they have to be expanded. If you don't use them and work them, they get, it's not good when,3 (2m 58s):When my dad, you know, my dad had this really bad car accident when I was like nine years old and yeah, he rolled 40 times and he wasn't wearing a seatbelt, which saved his life because he was in a convertible. But of course the reason he got into the accident was because he was drinking anyway. He broke everything. Like he broke six ribs and he had one of, he had to spend one year lying on an egg crate mattress on the floor one year. And for the rest of his life, every time he sneezed or coughed it hurt his ribs. But he,1 (3m 34s):Oh, and he3 (3m 36s):Had one of of those things like you're talking about. And as a child I could not get it to the height that I was supposed to go. I shuder to think what it would be like right now. Yes. So you're, that was a good reminder to exercise our lungs. I make sure my breathing capacity is good1 (3m 54s):And, and, and even wait and, and it's like, I always literally thought, oh, you exercise to be skinny. That is the only, only reason no other, like, if you had asked me, I'd say, Oh, there's no other reason. What are you talking about? But now I'm like, oh, these parts of us need actual exercising. Literally lie. I just, it blew my mind.3 (4m 19s):I was lies1 (4m 21s):The lies.3 (4m 22s):It's endless. Yes.1 (4m 27s):Hey, let me run this by you. Oh, I think we're buying a house. What? This is the craziest Oh my not in, Yeah. Okay. This is what went down. So this is so crazy. Miles' job stuff has evened out in terms of like, there's just so much going on that I can't talk about, but which is makes for terrible radio, but podcasting. But anyway, the point is we're we're a little stable, so we went to Ventura and I was like, I fucking love this town. I love Ventura. It's an hour away. It's a weird like, think lost boys, right? Like Lost Boys. The movie is, is really Santa Cruzi, but like, that's what this town reminded of.1 (5m 9s):It's not, so it's Adventurer county, so it's like an hour northwest. It's on the beach. And I was like, I love this town. I I I love it here. There's so many brown folk. It's heavily, heavily you Latina. And it's like, so anyway, I was like, I love it, but I bet I can't afford it like anywhere in California. Well it turns out that Ventura is about 500,000 less on a house than la. So I was like, wait, what? So we saw this darling house that was, that is was small but like beautiful craftsman and you know, I'll just say I'll be totally transparent with $729,000, which is still a shit ton of money.1 (5m 49s):But I looked at the same exact property almost in, in, in Pasadena for 1.3 million for two bedroom, one bath. Yeah. Two bedroom, one bath got preapproved. I've never been preapproved for anything in my goddamn light. We got preapproved for a mortgage. I couldn't, Gina, I couldn't. But when we got the preapproval letter, like I literally, speaking of lies, I was like, okay, well just expect him to come back and say we can't do anything for you.3 (6m 17s):Yeah, right.1 (6m 19s):Just really know it's not gonna work. And he wrote back and was like, Here's what we can do on this house the mortgage wise and it's comparable. It's in the ballpark of what we're paying in rent. And I was like, I don't wanna be going into my middle aged and later years in no space.3 (6m 39s):It really takes a toll. It really takes a toll on your psyche in a way that you can't really account for until you go from no space to having space. And then you go, oh my gosh, there's these three specific muscles in my shoulders that have been tense for the entire time I've been living in a city, you know, decades in some1 (6m 56s):Cases. So it's a whole different, I could build a little studio, like all the things. So yeah. So I'm grateful. Never would occur to me, never would have occurred to me. Never.3 (7m 6s):Do you care to say anything about your sister's visit?1 (7m 10s):Well, you know what is yes. And what is so comforting to me again, you know, if you listen to this podcast you're like, Oh my god, Jen, shut up. But about the truth. Okay. The truth is the fucking truth of, and even, even if it changes from person to person, that person's truth is the truth. And my truth is, I feel, So she came and she stayed not with me because I just, that what we were outta town. And then she stayed in my house while we were gone, which was fine with her, with my niece for one night. And then I saw her one day and that was, that was fine. And then she stayed with my cousin and it was, let's just say it was very, the, for me, my experience was, oh, someone else besides me sees the challenges.1 (7m 60s):And that's what I will say about that. There is something about being witnessed and having someone else go. I see, I feel what you're talking about.3 (8m 11s):Yes. Oh, I, I relate very deeply to that because people who are good at1 (8m 19s):Image image management,3 (8m 22s):At image management, a term I like is apparent competent.1 (8m 26s):Oh yes. Oh yes. I love that. I've never heard that. Apparent, competent. That is it.3 (8m 30s):Yes. Many, many people in life are apparently competent because all of their energy and effort goes into projecting very much just that idea and to be at home with them is a completely different thing. And I'm not saying like, Oh, you should always be competent in all areas of life or that I'm competent in all areas of life. I'm just saying like, yeah, there, there are some, some forms of personality disorders and just like, not even that, but just interpersonal problems are so kind of covert. And they're so, because I feel like people say, I feel like people are always trying to look for like the most broad, you know, big actions to determine whether somebody is1 (9m 13s):Whatever, nurse, whatever. They haven't been hospitalized, they've never been in rehab, they still have a house. You're like,3 (9m 20s):What? It's the same kind of mentality that says if you're not like in the gutter with a, with a mad dog in a paper bag that you're not an alcoholic, you know, it completely ignores probably what 85% of alcoholic for, which is highly functioning Correct. People who don't miss work and Correct. You know, maybe even people in their lives would never, ever know that they had a drinking problem. So yeah. So that is validating. I'm happy that for you, that you had that experience and sometimes it takes like 20, 30 years to get that validation. But the truth always, I mean, you know, it's true. That's the thing. It comes to the surface eventually.1 (9m 56s):Well, and the other thing is, I now as where I used to be so afraid of the truth and I still am, look, I I don't like getting, we know this about me, my feedback is hard for me. I'm scared of all the things, but I used to run from the truth like nobody's business in my own ways. Now I sort of clinging to it as, wait a second, wait a second, what is the truth of the matter? Like what are the facts here? Because I feel like that is the only way for me to not get kaka go, go crazy. And it is comforting. I am comforted in knowing that. Like, it was interesting. So I also am taking a solo show, writing class, I'm writing a new solo show, my third one.1 (10m 41s):And I'm just started and I thought, let me take a class with the woman who I taught. I did the first one in oh four in LA with, anyway, but I was saying on Facebook, like I, I, I'm taking this class with Terry and she's magic and I'm so glad I'm doing it and da da da. And she was like, Hey, I have a question for you. Can I quote you? And I was like, Yes. Because in her, in her like, for a and I said, of course it's all true. Like I didn't have to worry that my quote was somehow dirty or misleading or like, not really what I felt like I've done that so much in my life in the past where I've been like, oh shit, I told them I loved them or I loved their stuff, or I loved and I feel inside totally incongruent with that kind of thing.1 (11m 30s):No, I was like, no, these are what, these are my words now. I try to, it doesn't always work, but I try to just be like, okay, like what is the truth? And if someone had to quote me, would I be okay? And I, and I am a lot of the time I was like, of course you can. It's what I, I'm thanking for asking, but also it's what I feel in my bones about that, that you, that you have a magic when it comes to solo show teaching. That's it, it that is the truth. That my,3 (11m 55s):That is so cool. It's cool that you're doing that and I'll, that it, that gave me a reminder I had wanted to say on this podcast because you know, we had Jeremy Owens on the podcast. Yes. And he recently put on his social that he, he was doing it kind of as a joke, but I think he's actually doing it now, which is doing another solo show. And I had messaged him to say, you know, I meant what I said when I told you that you should do this and that I would help you and that goes for anybody cuz I said, I've said that to a lot of people on this podcast. Like, if you need help, you know, if this conversation has reinspired in you, a desire to go and do this other creative thing, please, I'm not saying like, I'm gonna co-write it with you.3 (12m 37s):I'm saying like, let me know if there's something I can do, if I can read it or, or, or bounce it off of you so that that stands for any of our previous guests. But tell us more about what, what's it gonna be about, what are you gonna be talking about? Well,1 (12m 51s):I don't entirely know, but where I'm leading is, it was interesting in this, See the thing I forgot means is that I like writing exercises. I never do them on my own. I never do. So this, she does writing exercises and a meditation before and I really longed and craved that because I spend so much of my hustle these days. How can I bring in income? How can I advance my career in Hollywood? And that is really shuts down the play aspect of all things. And I'm not saying, you know, I'm not saying that you, that I I'm not saying it's bad. All I'm saying is it totally eliminates for me the create like the really raw fun play creativity.1 (13m 37s):Okay? So in this, in this class, I just took it like, I just took the class. I was like, I'll do it. It's a masterclass in solo work, I'll do it. I like her. She called me, I was on the freeway and I was like, I'll do it. So right now the working title is, and also a solo show more or less. And I don't know if that's gonna change, but it is. Like I, and, and then in the exercise we did, we had our first class Sunday, it was all about, I realized that this solo show needs to be for me more of a call to action that that we, the, and it really comes from something you said, which is, I'm paraphrasing, but it's like we are our only hope, which is the good news and the bad news.1 (14m 25s):So like you said, we are the problem, I am the problem. Which is great. And also the, you know, terrible. So that is sort of this solo show is more gonna be about, it's like more activism based, but in a like creative arts activism way and, and not just a funny antidotes about my wacky family. And I mean, I would argue we could argue that like that my last solo show did have that underneath. But I think there needs to be a more like call to action for artists and people like us to start doing the things in the arts world that are gonna like help save the planet. And I don't know what that means yet, but she was like, oh this is like more of an activism piece based on what you're like it has that component to it.1 (15m 11s):And I was like, yeah. And then she said, if there was a banner, we did these cool exercise, she said, there's a banner all over town, whatever town you're in advertising your show, what would it say? And what came to mind in the meditation was it would be a red banner and it would just say, and it would say hope. And then in parentheses it would say sort of, So what I realized is I'm obsessed with the parentheses, like that's where I live. So I live in the world of I love my life parentheses, it's a fucking nightmare. So I love that kind of thing in my writing. And so I was like, okay, I'm really gonna embrace that. So it's like, it's like that, that stuff, I don't know where it's gonna go. I don't know what it's gonna happen.3 (15m 52s):Well two things. One is you have actually thrown out quite a few excellent titles for show, for solo shows. You'll periodically be like, that's the title of my new book or that's the title of my next, my next solo show. Yeah. So you might have to give a little re-listen to some episodes. I wish I could tell you which1 (16m 11s):I will.3 (16m 12s):Okay. The other thing is something that just came up for me when you said about the parenthesis, which I know exactly what you're talking about. I was saying like, oh yeah, she wants to show the good, the bad and the ugly. Oh. And something that occurred to me was like this concept of underbelly. Like you're showing yes, your soft underbelly. We are, I mean when I think when a person is maturing into themselves, that's what, that's the goal is to get to first accepting your own soft underbelly and then also contending with it and then representing it to the world. Because the thing that I've been on recently is like I have done myself and nobody else any favors for the amount of time I've spent misrepresenting myself because my misrepresenting myself has all been based on the lie that I thought there is a person that you are supposed to be, and your job is to be that person and you know, instead of like figure out the person that you are.3 (17m 10s):So, you know, coming into your own power is, is is a lot what we spend, what I spent my thirties about, like coming into your own power and not say that I arrived at it, but that No,1 (17m 23s):But3 (17m 24s):You about that. And then I think my forties are more about coming into my own vulnerability and that both of those things are really two sides of the same coin. Your power and your vulnerability, right? Because you can't have any power unless you're being honest about, you know, what the situation is. Today we are talking to Colin Douglas. Colin Douglas is an actor, writer, director, and documentary filmmaker who has been on absolutely everything. Most recently you've seen him on Barry and I love that for you.3 (18m 4s):But he's been, I joke in the, in our interview that he's been an absolutely every television show ever made. And that's only a slight exaggeration. He's been on Grey's Anatomy and Private Practice and the 2017 revival of Twin Peaks Agents of Shield, Pure genius. He's just been on everything Deadwood. So he's very experienced, he's very wise and he's very warm. So I hope you enjoy our conversation with Colin Douglas.0 (18m 34s):Great.3 (18m 36s):So congratulations Colin Douglas, you survived theater school. You survived4 (18m 42s):Two3 (18m 42s):Theater schools as a matter of fact.4 (18m 45s):I did. I was a glut for punishment actually. Yes. I I couldn't get enough of it.3 (18m 50s):So it was a BFA and MFA both in acting?4 (18m 54s):No, you know what, it was a zero degree. I, I am still just kind of riding by the seat of my pants. I actually, when I attended amda, it was not a degree program yet. Now it is. But back in the day it was basically they just kind of said, okay, go audition. And then when I went to Florida School, the arts, it only had an AA degree and I literally am still to this day two credit shy of my degree because I had booked a job out of Sctc and it was gonna be starting and I was like, I'm not sitting around and getting my degree just so that I can go get a job.4 (19m 42s):So I went, I took the job and I never looked back.1 (19m 45s):I mean that is, here's, I was just talking to someone who went to the theater school last night, my friend Lindsay. And we were talking about how conservatory I wish, I wish that I had done things differently, but it is what it is. But what you are reminding me of just go and audition is like the most valuable piece of advice anyone could have given us, which we never got. Which was now you, the piece of paper that says you have a BFA is not for not, but it's also not, it doesn't directly correlate to getting jobs. Like, it just doesn't. So you, you got a job while you were in school and said, I'm going, you didn't even think about staying or how did that work in your brain?4 (20m 30s):Well it was, it was because I was literally just the two credit shy kind of thing. And actually the class was, it was sort of a lab where I, you know, I had to help strike sets, but I was so busy with doing shows that I never had time to go help out with strike. So it was one of those things, oh okay, I'll, I'll require, I'll get that when I can get it when I have the time. And I never did. And then the tour was starting before the fall session started and I was like, you know what? My only regret honestly was the fact that I felt like, and, and again, it's not, you know, if somebody were to ask me today, you know, should you go to theater school?4 (21m 16s):I would say yes, if that's what really where you wanna hone your craft if you wanna, you know, build your community, but don't, if you're gonna do something like that, go to a program that has an established alumni because that's where your connections are being made when you get out of school is that support network that you have at amda at the time, there really wasn't, you know, when I was there, the biggest sort of claim to fame at the time was Time Daily. She was a graduate of, of Amda. And so it was, it wasn't as if I could reach out to Time Daily all of a sudden.4 (21m 59s):And then Florida School, the arts was, and still is such a small arts school that there really wasn't anybody for me to reach out to. Had I gone to Northwestern, had I gone to Juilliard or Yale or, or or Tish, that I would've had a built-in network of working professionals on the outside. So that was my only regret in that, that if I had perhaps gone to a different theater school, maybe I would've had those connections. But I certainly got the education I felt I needed.3 (22m 34s):Well and also you got the connections while getting paid instead of having to pay, which is was just definitely preferable. And by and speak about, you know, work experience and getting connections. You have been on every television show that has ever existed and tons of films too. So was your experience that as soon as you started working, you were just off to the races? I mean, I'm not suggesting that it's easy because no life of an actor is easy, but have, has it been pretty consistent for you would you say for your career?4 (23m 10s):It's been consistently inconsistent in that,1 (23m 16s):Wait, I just have to say that has to be the name of your book. Okay. I, we were talking about earlier before you got on about titles of shows and books, your book could be consistently inconsistent. The Culin Douglas story, I'm just, I'm just putting it out there. Thank you. Please send me 10% check to my office.4 (23m 32s):Yeah, thanks. No, it really, it was one of those things that I, I had a very dear professor at Florida School of the the Arts, Patricia Kadi, she was the acting instructor there and I was doing all of the plays, I was in all of the productions there and I had kind of become the top dog in the school, so to speak. And she pulled me aside one day and she said, you know, the one thing you're gonna have to realize is you're probably not gonna start working professionally until you're in your thirties.4 (24m 13s):And I, and I didn't really understand what she was saying there. What she was basically commenting on was that I was a young character actor and I didn't look like Jason Priestly, I didn't look and yet I hadn't grown into my framer look either. So I was gonna be in this really sort of, where do we cast him? He's talented but we don't know where to put him. And so I did a lot of theater for a lot of years and then in my thirties is when I was able to transfer into television and film. So what, cause I finally had kind of caught up to my look.1 (24m 45s):Yeah. So what I appreciative aid about that is it sounds like she said it so she said it in a way that wasn't like being a jerk, right? Like my experience was feeling that way except having it told like there is something deficient in you so that you cannot be an ingenue cuz you're too fat, you're too this. So instead of, hey, go do some theater, do all the things and then you'll grow into your look, do not fret. This is like part of the technical side of the business of how a camera sees you and not about your talent. It would've been so much different. Instead it comes down to, I think a lot of people we've talked to from the DePauls, from the Northwestern say, nobody told me that in a way which was, I could make a plan about it.1 (25m 35s):It was always just, well you're never gonna be cast. So by, and instead of hey maybe you could do theater, maybe you could write, maybe you could do something else until Hollywood catches up to the character of you.4 (25m 50s):Exactly.1 (25m 51s):It good, Patricia. Good. Is Patricia still around?4 (25m 54s):She is. And she literally just announced today that she's retiring from teaching. Well1 (25m 60s):Patricia, you did good work and you she did fantastic. You made it so call in part of it sounds like she encouraged you cuz you started with that story of her encouraged you to know that maybe later it would be your time to be on every single television show ever written. But for the twenties and the, you know, you were gonna do some theater and, and get your training right man, and,4 (26m 23s):And I honestly, I didn't completely understand everything she was saying in that little sound bite because, you know, I was, I was sort of standing there saying, Patty, look at all these job offers. I just got out of CTCs, you know, I'm gonna be working like crazy. And she said, No, no, no, don't get me wrong that the work is going to be there. But as far as what you're seeing in your mind's eye of, you know, Helen Douglas tonight on The Tonight Show, that's not gonna happen until you can kind of get into that other stream as it were. How3 (27m 0s):So did that match up? I mean, was that a surprise to you or did that match up with what you already thought about yourself? I don't think any 17 year old, 18 year old necessarily thinks of themselves as a character actor. Although it may just be because it never gets put to you that that's an option when you're a teenager. You know, the option is like, as Bos mentioned, Ingenu or not Ingenu, but they never really say like, Well, but you, you know, you're gonna fit into this different mold. So how did that butt up against what you already thought about yourself?4 (27m 32s):It actually kind of lined up okay with me in, in a weird way because at Florida School, the arts in particular, they were so gracious in the fact that when they picked their seasons, they picked shows that it made sense for me to be the lead in, in that I, I'm giving you an example, we did a production of Our Town and I was the stage manager and, you know, as opposed to being cast as the one of the young, you know, lead ingenue kind of a things. And then we did Bye by Birdie and I was cast in the Dick Van Dyke role.4 (28m 12s):And so they did it in such a way that, you know, or when we did Barefoot in the Park, I was Victor Velasco the old man who lived upstairs. So I was already sort of being primed that I was this character actor and would be gonna be doing that kind of stuff. And then quite honestly, as that look started to emerge, I mean in college I had sort of a flock of seagulls kind of hairdo thing going on, you know, and then it quickly all went away. And I had been playing about 20 years older in film and television and in theater than I've actually always been, you know, I was playing guys in my, when I was in my, you know, thirties, I was playing guys in my fifties.4 (28m 59s):Now I'm in my fifties and I'm playing guys in my in1 (29m 1s):In seventies. And I think that calling, the thing that I'm noticing too is like maybe for men it's a little different too, right? Like there's something about being, like, there's just, and it's a societal thing where like women who are play, like, it's, it's a insult for women when they're like, Oh, we're sending you in for a 50 year old and you're 30. But, and I think maybe if you have a certain kind of ego for a man as well, and we all have egos, I mean, it says, but, and I, I love the fact that you didn't, it doesn't sound like anyway, and you can tell me if I'm wrong, you took it as an insult that they were, that you were going out for roles that were for like the Victor Velasco of the world. You were able to embrace it as you were working.1 (29m 43s):Like that's, so I say this all to say, because I remember in our last class with Jim Ooff, who people call hostile prof and he said to me, You know who you are. And I was like, dying to hear you are Michelle Pfeiffer. That was never gonna happen. But I was dying to hear, he was like, That's who you, he's like, you are the next. And I'm waiting and, and I'm waiting. He goes, Lenny Bruce. And I was like, what the actual fuck is going on? What are you telling me?3 (30m 13s):No idea. What a great compliment that was.1 (30m 15s):I was devastated, devastated. I wanted to quit. I was suicide. Like it was just, But anyway, so what I'm saying is you didn't take that and run with it in a way that was like, I am not Jason Priestly and therefore my life is over. You were able to work and, and embrace the roles. It sounds like4 (30m 34s):I was able to embrace the roles and, and I was getting, okay, you are a young dick fan dyke, you're a young, this kind of a guy. So I was able to kind of make that connection. I honestly were being completely honest here. I think, how do I put this, that it does not sound completely like an asshole. It1 (30m 54s):Doesn't matter. We always sound like assholes here. Go ahead.4 (30m 57s):But at Florida school, the arts, I was one of, I was one of the only straight men at school and therefore undated a lot. So I was not, the fact that I wasn't looking like the young hot stud,1 (31m 22s):You were still getting it4 (31m 23s):Right? I was still getting it. So that didn't it, had it not been like that situation, I think I probably would've started to hyperventilate thinking, well hold it, I'm in my twenties, why are they making me play these old men? And this is affecting, you know, cus group. But that wasn't the case. And so I, I had sort of a, a false sense of ego I guess a little bit. But it was supporting the work that I was doing.3 (31m 50s):Yeah, absolutely. So did you grow up always knowing that you wanted to be an actor? Did you think, did you try any other paths first? Or were you, were you dead set on this?4 (32m 2s):I was dead set when the story goes, that when I was four I asked Santa for a tuxedo to wear to the Emmys and Santa delivered gave me a, a white dinner jacket and spats and stuff like that. So I was, I was ready to go.1 (32m 18s):Oh my god, do you have that picture? Can you please send us that?4 (32m 22s):Oh no, we have moved so many times. When I was growing up, my dad, when I was growing up was an undercover investigative reporter. And so wherever he was basically undercover was where we were living. Wait1 (32m 36s):A minute, wait a minute. Wait a minute, wait. Okay. This is fantastic because I do a lot of crime writing and so does Gina writes and undercover crime reporter father now, right there is sort of burying the lead. What in the hell? He was an undercover, What does that even mean? An undercover, He's not a police officer, but he's an undercover reporter.4 (32m 57s):He was an undercover investigative reporter. Well, what that for a period of time, So I'll give you an ex, there was a senator at one time back in the early seventies who was receiving kickbacks from his employees or hiring people on the books. And those people weren't actually having jobs. And so they would then send him the money. He was getting all of the money.1 (33m 24s):Sure. Like Chicago was like living in Chicago all time.4 (33m 28s):So the, somebody tipped my father off that this was happening. And so he went undercover and, and worked as sort of like an aid and things like that. Or there was a time where he, he worked at a meat packing place or he worked at a funeral parlor that was selling caskets with fake bottoms. And so people would buy these incredibly expensive things and then they would drop them and then they'd open up the hatch and the body would just drop into a pine box and then they would reuse the, the casket.1 (34m 8s):So this is the single greatest thing I've ever heard in my life, and I'm gonna write a pilot about it immediately called Fake Bottom. And it's4 (34m 14s):Gonna see, I've already wrote that was, I actually wrote a spec pilot. That's how I landed my lid agent. Oh, it was because what ended up happening is my dad, much to my mom's chagrin, used me in two of his undercover stings when I was a kid. One time, there was a situation where firemen had been hired and they weren't actually properly trained. It was another one of those kind of kickback situations. So it was a training session and they, I was supposedly, it was a staged event where they were gonna try to test the skills of the firemen or whatever.4 (34m 55s):And so I was gonna, I I practiced with a real fireman being fireman carried up and down a ladder from a second story kind of a thing. But once the word was out that it was an internal sting, they put me into one of those crane baskets. And so I was sort of floating over midtown in, in the basket kind of a thing. And then another time actually, there was a talent agent who was running a kitty porn ring. And so I was sort of used to expose, so to speak, this this person that was actually trying to take advantage of, of kids and parents.3 (35m 38s):Oh my God. Well, two things occur to me about that. One is your family was already full of drama before you came along. I mean, anybody who wants to, right, who wants to do this investigative journalism, Like that's, that's a dramatic person. I love David Carr. I love that kind of personality of per, you know, the person who wants to like really get in there, investigate and just as an aside, like, I'm sorry for the families who paid for those coffins, but at the same time, you know, good, good on them because it's such a waste. So much, many people spent putting mahogany boxes into the ground to to, to, to decompose over time. Okay. So did your parents like that you wanted to be an actor or did they have a different idea for plan for you?4 (36m 19s):Oh, they, they were 100% supportive. The very, very much so from day one, I think, because it was my mom who really sort of stepped in and said, Hey, let's figure out how we can get this new kid who's always the new kid to find his people. And so she took me when I was 11 years old to a local community theater, children's community theater. And they were doing a production, a musical version of The Hobbit. And you know, the intention was that I was just gonna audition and be, you know, number 40 in the background kind of a thing.4 (37m 0s):Third,3 (37m 1s):Third habit from the left,4 (37m 3s):Third habit from the, And so they auditioned and I remember you had to sing a song and God, I have not told this story, you had to sing a song. And I decided to sing tomorrow from Annie because I was me madly, deeply in love with Andrea Ricardo. And we were actually pen pals. And so I went in there and I sang tomorrow and jump cut to that weekend. And my mom came in Saturday morning smiling as I was watching cartoons and she said, You've been cast in the lead as Bill Bos. And that was sort of like, okay, I I I found my people.3 (37m 47s):That's amazing. Please tell us more about your penal with,4 (37m 54s):So I, I just, I, you know, I I had gotten the album when it came out and I listened to it and I memorized it. And even then I was casting myself as either Rooster or Daddy Warbuck, you know. And so somehow I found her address and sent her, you know, a, a letter as we used to write, you know, before texting. And she wrote back and then I wrote back, and then the thing that was really exciting was 20,3 (38m 28s):Wait a minute, are you married to Annie?4 (38m 31s):No, I am not married to Annie. Okay. But 20 some odd years later I was doing a national tour and staying in a hotel in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Andrea was on tour doing a national tour and was staying in the same hotel, kind of bumped into one another and was like, you know, you don't know who I am, but this. And it ended up, it was wonderful because I went to see her show on my dark night and she and her family came to see me on, on the other night. So.1 (39m 7s):Beautiful. Okay, so here we go. Your family's on board and why didn't you just go and strike it out either in New York or anywhere? Why did you end up going to school? Were you like, I wanna learn more, or how did that transition into schooling go?4 (39m 24s):It did, I did wanna learn more. It, it really was because up at that point, the only influences as far as acting I was going was from, you know, the, either the community theater directors or the high school drama teacher who had, you know, aspirations for theater, but was really just doing it because he didn't wanna coach the football team. So I felt like I needed a stronger foundation for myself. And, but always it was sort of like I was going to the theater school because I didn't feel like, Oh, I don't wanna go to a school where I'm gonna have to learn all of these other things that I'm not gonna ever use.4 (40m 7s):Now I look back and go, you know, I wish I had done some of that other stuff because I did not create any kind of a fallback plan for me. It would, this is either gonna work or it's not gonna work and you're gonna be screwed. I1 (40m 21s):Mean, here's the thing, here's the thing. I don't know what you, you two think, but like, there is this two schools of, well there's probably a bajillion schools of thought, but one of them is like, if you have a fallback plan, you will fall back. The other one is not everyone is gonna be a Colin Douglas or a John C. Riley that's gonna work, work, work, work, work, work, work. So a fallback plan for some of us might have been like another avenue to get into the industry, right? But a fallback plan can also literally have people go and not live their dreams and become, you know, actuary scientists because they're afraid. So it's like, it's so individual, which is why I think theater school training is so tricky is because you're taking young individuals who don't know shit and some know what they wanna do, some don't, some are good, some are talented, but not, it's so individual.1 (41m 10s):So it's like when people ask me, should I go to theater school? I'm like, I fucking don't know who, I'm like, who are you and what do you wanna do on the planet? But nobody ever asked me that as a 17 year old. So here we are. Gina, you were gonna say something? Oh,3 (41m 23s):I was just going, if you remember your audition,4 (41m 30s):My audition into theater school. Okay. So I do, I remember my audition into anda a, and again, I already recognizing I was a character actor. I sang if I were a rich man from Fiddler on the Roof, you know, you know, a skinny ass, you know, kid from, you know, suburbia singing that song. And then I did a monologue from a play that I had done in high school. And which1 (42m 9s):One do you remember? Or No,4 (42m 10s):It's okay. It was it, yes. No, actually it was weird because I look back on it now kind of thinking how the soul sometimes prepares. I think sometimes it was a, from a show called Juvie, and I played a young gentleman who was mentally challenged and I got a lot of incredible feedback from, from the role because I had researched, I had, I had gone to the library and this is, there was a thing called Microfish when you would go to the library and you'd have to look up stories on kind of like a big machine. And I did all of these kind of things and research the roles, and I saw images of babies and young people with different kind of cognitive delays.4 (42m 60s):And so I did that. I got into Amda, whatever, again, sort of jumping forward in life. In 1996, my oldest son was born and he happened to be born with Down syndrome. And when I met him for the first time at the bassinet, I immediately went back to that Microfish machine in high school and remembered seeing babies and images of people with Down syndrome. And so I made that kind of connection. So it was sort of like, all right, this is where life was going as far as Florida School, the arts went, I actually didn't audition for that.4 (43m 43s):What had happened is I was at, and I broke my foot during one of the dance classes. They would bring in dance captains from various Broadway shows and teachers routines. And we were doing a routine from cats and I jumped off of a piling and I came down flat for,1 (44m 5s):Let me tell you something. This is what, this is just one of the many reasons I don't care for that musical is that also what are you having people jumping around for that? Aren't I just, anyway, I'm glad they brought, I'm sure it was a great experience in some ways, but like, I just don't care for, that was my first musical I saw. And I even as a kid, I was like, I don't buy this at all. I don't know what's going on here, but I don't like it. But anyway, so you busted your foot. Oh, and can I just say about microfiche? I'm sorry to be an asshole, but like, I could never figure out how to slow the fucking shit down and I never could see a goddamn story, so I gave up on the microphone, so you made it further than me. I was like, why is it going too fast? That was my, that's like, like, that's like so indicative of my life. But anyway, so okay, so you, you broke your foot and so what happened?1 (44m 49s):You had to, why did you4 (44m 50s):So I, I, I broke my foot, I went home to my parents' place who were now living in Florida and kind of rehabbed for a while. I then auditioned for a play for Pirates of Penza, excuse me, that was up, up performances up near St. Augustine, Florida. And I went up there and I was playing Samuel the the second pirate. And the gentleman who was playing the modern major general in the show was actually the dean and artistic director of Florida School of the Arts. And he said to me, If you'd like to come to school, we'll offer you a full scholarship and you can start at the, as soon as the show closes.4 (45m 38s):And so that's what I did. It was like, I just went straight to Flos Bureau Arts and I did not go back up to Amda after my footed here. Helen,1 (45m 45s):It's really interesting, like, and I was talking about, this was someone else yesterday about how one, obviously one thing leads to the next, Oh it was a showrunner actually, that was that I was listening to a lecture and she just said that what I've done is I have walked through doors that have opened to me without a lot of second guessing. I followed my heart in terms of who took interest in me and who opened doors for me. I walked through them. I didn't say no, but, or no, I just did it. And so it sounds like that's what you did. You were like, Oh, full ride, I'm in Florida now. You could have been like, No, no, no, I'm gonna go back to Amda because whatever.1 (46m 26s):But you were like, I'm gonna do this. And it sounds like it worked in your favor, but what was your experience like at Florida? Did you, I mean obviously we know you left early, but did you get stuff out of it? Did you love it? What was the deal?4 (46m 41s):I did love it in the sense that because it was such a small school and because where the school is located, it's in Plac of Florida, which is sort of geographically in the middle of sort of Jacksonville and Gainesville. And so on a Friday night there really wasn't any partying going on. It was all of us getting together and doing monologues for one another, you know, because there wasn't any place to really go. And then as far as the classes went, because it was such a small institution, so many of my classes were literally just myself and professor in their office.4 (47m 26s):And we would do, you know, that's how I learned dialects was literally just, you know, we were working on the Italian dialect or whatever and I would go in and the professor would speak to me in that Italian dialect and then I would have to answer him and that would be the entire class. And then the next week we would do the brooklynese. And so I had all of that and they were very, very gracious to me because when I came in as quote a freshman, I was taking all of the freshman courses, but then they also had me taking all of the second year acting courses as well, sort of accelerating me through the program and then allowing that by doing that I was able to be cast in all of their different productions.3 (48m 15s):So when you did school and enter the workforce, what surprised about sort of the business that maybe you weren't expecting or hadn't been prepared for? For in terms of your training or, you know, and it could have been a happy surprise or, or, or not such a happy surprise, but like what was some I always just feel like there's, people have their list of things. Oh, I never thought the one that people always bring up as coverage, I never thought, when I watched TV shows that they had to do the same thing 50 times.4 (48m 58s):I, I think for, for me, the biggest sort of, even though Patty Crotty, Patricia Crotty had said, you know, Hey, it's gonna be a while before you're gonna start to work. You know, although I did work immediately when I got outta school, it was, it was one of those things where I quickly realized that they really didn't care that I had played Albert and by by Birdie they didn't care that I was in all of the productions. It was basically, no, you've earned the right to stand in the back of a line and you're gonna have to, you know, get up at an ungodly hour, go to equity, sign in at 6:00 AM and then come back at two in the afternoon for your audition.4 (49m 47s):But by the time you come back, if you pick up backstage, you're gonna read that Robert Strong Leonard has already been offered the role that you're auditioning for at two o'clock. So those were sort of some of the realities of, oh, okay, this is not necessarily gonna be the projecting thing that's gonna get me into the room. It's just, it's gonna be more for me that, okay, I feel like I deserve to be here and I'm competent enough in my abilities. But I, I think that was as far as just working in general. But Gina, to answer the question as far as like the thing that I was most surprised by within the industry, I'm, I'm trying to think if there was anything that I really was sort of taken aback by,1 (50m 31s):Well I guess I can ask like, did you, what was your like, like in terms of getting an agent and all that, did anything there go like, Oh my gosh, I didn't understand that I would have to, How did your representation come about? Was that a surprise or did you just get an agent? Cause a lot of our listeners, some of them we talk, you know, we talk about like a showcase or, but you left early and just started working, so what was that transition like in terms of getting representation and going on, on auditions for film and TV or theater? And if you think of anything that surprises you along the way, just let us know. But sure,4 (51m 4s):I didn't have theatrical, I didn't have legit theater representation for a lot of years. I was literally very lucky in that, you know, just using relationships, you know, to help propel me into the next situation that one show would be closing and I would hear about the fact that they were looking for something else. Or I would go to the Southeastern Theater conference and audition and be able to pick up my next year or year and a half worth of work. And I was able to kind of keep it at that point. I finally did get an agent who was gonna cover me theatrically as well as, you know, commercially.4 (51m 46s):And I remember her telling me, she was basically saying the same thing that Patty Crotty had said is that, you know, you know, you're a good actor, I'll put you out there, but it's, it's probably gonna be a while before you're gonna book a commercial or any kind of television cuz you're just really hard to place. She was good to her words. She put me out there and a week later I booked a Budweiser commercial. So I was like, Oh, okay, I think I got this. I, I think the hardest lesson that I had to learn was that because it sometimes came easy, it felt like, like, oh, okay, this is what it was, is I would get say to that chunk of change.4 (52m 29s):And I, it took me a while to figure out that I had to make that chunk of change, stretch as far as I possibly could because I didn't know exactly when the next job was coming from and, and that it was hard when I met and fell in love with my wife who was coming. She had been a model, but she had also worked in the corporate world. And so she was very accustomed to, well no, you make this amount of money every month and this is what you can expect with your expenses. It was hard when we started to realize, oh no, CU just got a great windfall of money, but if you break it down and spread it out over a year, he's not making minimum wage.4 (53m 10s):So, you know, it was a really, that was a hard kind of thing to adjust with.3 (53m 15s):Yes. I mean that's, yes, that's a common story and that's something that they don't teach you about in theater school. They don't teach you money management and how you have to withhold taxes and all kinda stuff. Yeah. So that, that's that, that's, that's a whole education in and of itself. But you were also a writer and director. When did the writing and directing and producing come into your career?4 (53m 40s):The writing actually started in college in that we would have to have monologues for class and I had an affinity to writing the monologues and so I started writing monologues for my classmates for beer money or they would need an audition piece for something in particular. And so I would tailor it to sort of echo whatever play that they were auditioning for kind of a thing. And so it really just sort of came easy for me. And then whenever I was auditioning, my biggest thing was I don't wanna go in there with something that they have seen 3000 times.4 (54m 23s):And so I was like, Okay, you know what? I'm just gonna write my own thing. And it worked, it worked to a degree. And so that's where I sort of started to do it. And then personally after my oldest son Gabe was born, I had a lot of demons to be dealing with. I didn't understand why I had been chosen or whatever, or, or given a child with a disability and, and it took me kind of having to get outta my own way to realize that was the least interesting thing about him. And, but in doing so, I, I started to write in journals and then I ended up writing a one man play that I in turn tour the country with for a handful of years.4 (55m 11s):And it was that play that I then attracted some other attention and then got hired on to do some other writing in script doctoring or whatever. And then as I shared earlier, I wrote a spec script about that time of my life when we were kind of moving into hotels and things like that. And then that kind of just started to snowball. And then I was very fortunate back in 2010, I had the Humanitas Organization, Humanitas Prize. They tapped me as the first recipient of their New Voices fellowship program, which pairs you with showrunners to sort of mentor you in creating a television series.4 (56m 0s):And so I was shared with, paired with Shonda rhymes over at Shondaland and was able to develop a show, which was actually an adaptation of my one man play, about a family, you know, coming to terms and dealing with a child with a disability. But I had already actually had a relationship with Shawnda prior to that because I had gotten cast in an episode of Grey's Anatomy and she and her producing partner, Betsy Beers, put me up for an Emmy for that role. And then when I didn't get the nomination, Shawnda turned around and created a role for me over on private practice.1 (56m 46s):Okay. So you know, all these people, and I guess I'm mindful of time and I wanna know what the hell are you, are you doing now you have this documentary, What is your jam right this second? Colin Douglas. And if you could do anything, what would it be? And tell us about this documentary, because what I don't wanna happen is it's like 10 minutes go by and we haven't heard about the documentary and we haven't heard about like, what is your jam and your juice right this second.4 (57m 13s):Okay. So I, I made the documentary, I started working on it when we got locked out, you know, the world was hurting, the industry was shut down. I couldn't stand in front of a camera, I couldn't direct a bunch of actors in a narrative, but I knew I could still tell stories. And so I, at one point in my career, I detoured and I was an associate show director and a performer at Walt Disney World. I was there for about three years. And the level of talent in those theme parks is just incredible. You know, there are a lot of people who come outta theater schools and they get their job, you know, at Dollywood or at Bush Gardens or at Disney World or Disneyland, and they spend the summer there and then they go off and do whatever else with their life.4 (58m 5s):There are other individuals like the subject of my film, Billy Flanigan, who, he started right after theater school. He went to Boston Conservatory. He then opened up Epcot in 1982 as a kid at the Kingdom and has been working for 40 years straight as a performer out at Disney. When the Disney Park shut down because of the pandemic, Billy was without a stage for the first time in his 40 year career. So what he did is he took it upon himself to start doing singing and dancing telegrams for other performers who were out of work. And then he started to literally take it on the road because he's a cyclist and he started crisscrossing the entire country, delivering these sing in dancing telegrams called Planograms.4 (58m 55s):And my Facebook page was blowing up with, I got Planogrammed, I got Planogrammed and I, so I reached out to some old friends from Disney and I said, I've heard about this name Billy Flanigan for years. He's a, he's a legend. He was a legend 20 years ago when I was working, You know, can you put me in touch with him? And so I spoke with Billy. I reached out to my producing partner and I said, There's a documentary here, because Billy has just been so incredibly selfless. He's always a pay it forward kind of a guy. He's a performers performer, you know, even though he jokes about the fact that he'll get a nosebleed if he's not on center.4 (59m 36s):But it's one of those things where he just really is about making the other people on stage look good. So he's been the face of Disney. But then what ended up happening is he was so busy working and raising an entire family that a handful of years ago, Billy finally slowed down and realized that he had been living a different life than he perhaps should have been. And he came out and it really destroyed his family and, and brought things down. And so you had this guy who day in and day out was still having to give that Disney, you know, RAAs, but behind the scenes, as we all know, his performers, the show's gotta go on.4 (1h 0m 20s):And so his heart was breaking. And so I said to Billy, Look, if we tell your story, we're gonna have to tell all of it, because I feel like you sharing your humanity and your pain is gonna help other people out there within the L G B T community who are feeling bullied or feeling like they don't have their place. So if we can do this, this is, this is sort of our mandate. And he said yes. And his family said yes. And, and thankfully not as a direct link to the film, but I shared the final cut with Billy and his family, because obviously I had to have their final approval. And Billy called me and said, This film is helping heal my family now, because it had given them that creative distance that it was no longer them, it was these other people up on a screen talking about a period of their life.4 (1h 1m 13s):So right now, the film, it premieres digitally on October 7th, and then is available on D V D November 15th. And then after the first of the year, it'll be looking like landing on one of the major streamers.3 (1h 1m 29s):Oh, that's fantastic. I'm so excited to see it because I watched the trailer and that thing that you were describing about, you know, he's, he's, he's gotta always have a stage that comes through from the first frame. You see him, you think, Wow, this guy is like a consummate performer in a way that I could never imagine. I mean, yes, I, I love to be on stage. It's fantastic, but I, I don't have this thing where like, you know, I've gotta be performing every second. And that was really clear. And I didn't know, I didn't glean from the trailer that he was doing that for fun for other performers. I thought he was just starting his business with the singing telegram. So that is even more interesting. Okay, that's really cool.3 (1h 2m 9s):So after the first of the year, it'll come out on a streamer. And actually when you know which one it is, you'll let us know and we'll, we'll promote it on our socials. And I4 (1h 2m 17s):Wanted, but you can preorder now the DVD and the digital.1 (1h 2m 22s):Yeah. I didn't mean to like cut us off from Shonda land, but I really wanted to make sure that we talk about this documentary because I think that it is taking your career and your life in, it's like it's made it bigger and about other things other than, I mean, it's like there's a service component to documentary work that like, I think is not always there in other kinds of media. That documentary work is like at once, for me anyway, really personal, but also universal and also has a great capacity for healing. And so, or at least the truth, right? Like what is the truth?1 (1h 3m 2s):So that's why I wanted to make sure we covered that. But if there's other things you wanna say about your career and like what you're doing now and where you wanna go or anything else, I wanna give you the opportunity, but I wanted to make sure, So I didn't mean to cut off your Shonda land story because I know people are probably like, Oh my God, tell more about Sean Rhymes. But I wanted to talk about the, the Billy documentary.4 (1h 3m 24s):I appreciate that so much. No, I, I, you know, just to sort of bookend the, the documentary, I never felt like it was one of those things that I knew I could tell stories, but I didn't feel like I had any business telling the documentary. I don't necessarily even gravitate towards documentaries, but I just felt like, hold it. This truly is a story that that needs to be told and can maybe bring about a little bit of healing. And that's what I think good films and television do that you, we, we see ourselves mirrored back in many ways and we feel less alone.4 (1h 4m 5s):And so I felt like if I could do that with a narrative, maybe I can do it with a, a documentary. That's not to say that I wanna become a documentarian, because it's not that I wouldn't if the opportunity ever presented itself, but it's the same way in which, you know, writing a narrative feature, it's like, well, I've gotta be compelled to wanna tell this story kind of a thing. And this just happened to be the medium in which to tell it as opposed to making a, you know, a, a film about a guy named Billy who wants to start out being a performer.1 (1h 4m 40s):And I think that you've said a really good word that we talk about sometimes in other ways on this show and in my life I talk about is being compelled. So when someone is compelled to do something, I know that the art created from that feeling of being compelled is usually authentic, true necessary, and, and, and, and, and sometimes healing. So I love the word what doing projects that were compelled. So anything else that you're compelled to do right now?4 (1h 5m 14s):Work great, really, you know, I I, I really, I I still even after, you know, making this, this film, I, I am still very much an actor at heart and I love being on camera. I love the collaborative experience working with other actors. You know, I was very, very fortunate this past season to to work on Barry with Bill Hater and Bill, I guess if I, it was like, what's next? What's my next jam? I would love to be able to emulate what Bill is doing. You know, Bill is the lead. He's also writing, he's also directing all of the episodes.4 (1h 5m 58s):You know, I joked with him that he also ran craft services because it was literally doing all those things and just watching him effortlessly move from being Barry back to Bill, giving me a note and then giving a note to the DP and then stepping back into Barry was just a really wonderful thing. And it's like, you know what, if I can do that, and I have other friends and, and mentors like Tom Verica, Tom actually directed me in that first episode of Grey's Anatomy. And he and I have since become dear friends. He's now the executive producer and resident director on Bridger.4 (1h 6m 39s):He also was the resident director and producer on inventing Anna. And he and I have developed a narrative film that we're looking to produce as well. And, and, and so again, and yet, you know, Tom as sort of an aspiration or an inspiration for me. And he started out as an actor himself. And then, you know, he directed a lot of Grey's Anatomy and then the next thing you know, he's playing Vila, Viola Davis' husband on how to Get Away with Murder. And then he was also the lead producer on Scandal. So it's like, you know, not being defined by what this industry wants to put you in.4 (1h 7m 20s):I feel like I'm finally at the point in my career where Colin can direct a documentary and he could write something for somebody else and he could act. And, and again, you know, from day one when I, when I left Flow Arts early to go out and do the job, it's just because I wanna keep working. Yeah.3 (1h 7m 38s):And that's, that's, everybody says that. Everybody says, I just wish I could be working constantly. Cuz it's where it's where all the fun of, of the work is, you know, not auditioning and getting head shots and whatever. It's, it's, it's doing the work. By the way, Barry is how I came to ask you to be on this podcast, because I didn't watch it when it first came out. I, I kind of came to it late and of course binge the whole thing and it's fantastic. And, and I immediately went and looked up every single actor to see who went to theater school because I, I would love to have them all. What a fantastic show and what an interesting kind of nice little parallel somehow with your documentary and, and also your own story.3 (1h 8m 18s):There's a lot about actors like figuring out what they're doing on screen and, and kind of reconciling that with their offscreen life or, or even just with their career. Do I wanna be this type of actor? Do I wanna be this type of person? You know, Ha and Bill Hater has seamlessly gone, I mean, once upon a time you would not have really thought of a Saturday Night Live person making quite this kind of crossover. And the humor in that show about actors is so perfect. I've ne I've seen things that have come close to that, but I've never seen something that you're just dying laughing if you know anything about the acting profession, Right?3 (1h 8m 58s):Yeah. Or were you gonna say that?1 (1h 8m 59s):I was gonna say that. And also that like, his account, So I have suffered, you know, from panic attacks and anxiety disorder and his journey through that and with that has given me so much hope as a artist because he was one of the first people I knew, especially from snl, especially from comedy, to say, I was struggling with this and this is how I dealt with it. So it didn't totally destroy my life. And he could have chosen to be like, I'm having panic attacks on set at Saturday Live. I'm done, I'm done. But he worked through it and now is doing all of this. So it gives me a lot of hope. So if you talk to him, tell him there's a late, an anxious lady that really feels like I can, I can really reclaim myself as an artist and even maybe thrive through the anxiety.4 (1h 9m 50s):No, I, I, I so appreciate that, Jen. I really do. You know, I have dealt with panic attacks over the years, you know, again, being that new kid, I was kind of predisposed to, Oh my gosh, you know, and luckily I've never had it within my art. It's always been on the other side. But the way in which Bill has navigated all of that is really truly just, you know, motivating and inspiring on so many different levels. And I think the thing that I also recognize is the fact that Bill never had aspirations to be on snl. He wanted to be a filmmaker, you know, he was editing, he was doing all these types of things and he sort of fell in backwards to groundings and, and all that kind of stuff.4 (1h 10m 38s):And somebody saw him and said, Hey, let's do it. It's sort of like he had to kind of take that detour to be able to get back to doing the kind of things that he really wanted to be doing, you know, Which is great for me because I look at like, my time at Disney, okay? I never would've imagined that that brief time at Disney would've been able to fuel me in that it brought back into my life to allow me to direct a film about one of their performers 20 years later.1 (1h 11m 6s):It's a, your story. I'm so glad you came on because your story is a story about the, the consistent inconsistencies and the detours that aren't really detours. And for me, like just being like, I'm just knowing now going into into meetings, being a former therapist for felons. Like that is the thing that people are really interested in. And I

FOX Sports Knoxville
The Blitz HR2: "The Worst Places to be Barefoot" 9/27/22

FOX Sports Knoxville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 43:32


-The Opening Drive -What's Real in the NFL? -Draft Day -Best Bet

The Todd L. Levitt Law Show
ISLE ROYALE NATIONAL PARK, Dank, Dank, Strain of the week, Driving Barefoot, HUGE SHOW!!!!

The Todd L. Levitt Law Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 51:31


Todd returns to the mainland after spending a week in the back country on Isle Royale. Todd provides details about his over the top adventure being stranded on the island. Grant returns for the strain of the week. Is it illegal to operate a motor vehicle while barefoot?  Enjoy the epsiode and please share Todd

Bad On Paper
All Things Fall (The Sequel)

Bad On Paper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 60:47 Very Popular


This week we're releasing our inner foliage sluts and soup fiends to talk about all things FALL! We discuss our favorite things about fall, and our favorite fall activities from weekends away to cozying up at home.   We also had to share a robust list of candle recommendations. Olivia recommends Bath & Body Works candles in the scents Hometown Sugar Cookies Autumn Chai, White Pumpkin, Flannel, Lakeside Morning, and Leaves. Becca recommends Brooklyn Candle Studio's Apple Cider and Montana Forest, Le Labo's Santal 26, Maison Louis Marie No. 4 Balincourt,  Hotel Lobby's Signature Candle (they have a fall candle coming out at the end of September!), and Yankee Candle's Sandal Balsam and Cedar.    We also highly recommend Chappy Wrap and Barefoot dreams Blankets     Favorite Fall Movies include Halloweentown, Hocus Pocus, Practical Magic, You've Got Mail, Gilmore Girls, Mermaids, and Autumn in New York if you're having a sad girl fall.    Our Favorite Fall Reading includes City of the Lost by Kelly Armstrong, The Ex Hex by Erin Sterling, A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness, The Magicians Series by Lev Grossman, and A Special Place for Women by Laura Hankin.    Fall Foods: Olivia's Soup Recipe and Chrissy Teigan's Stuffed Shells   Click here to join this haunted boat tour.    Share hyped products you want us to review in a future episode via DMing @badonpaperpodcast or emailing us at badonpaperpodcast@gmail.com.    Obsessions  Becca: Look Both Ways on Netflix, Breakfast by Dove Cameron Olivia: Birkenstock Bostons    What we read this week! Becca: People Person by Candice Carty-Williams Olivia: When We Were Bright and Beautiful by Jillian Medoff, Jackal by Erin E. Adams (check content warnings before picking these up!)   This Month's Book Club Pick: Killers of A Certain Age by Deanna Raybourn   Sponsors: ZocDoc - Go to Zocdoc.com/BOP and download the ZocDoc app for free. Then start your search for a top-rated doctor today. Tell Me Lies - Check out Tell Me Lies on Hulu and let us know what you think!   Join our Facebook group for amazing book recs & more!  Like and subscribe to RomComPods. Available wherever you listen to podcasts.  Follow us on Instagram @badonpaperpodcast. Follow Olivia on Instagram @oliviamuenter and Becca @beccamfreeman.

Optimal Health Daily
1873: Is Running Barefoot Better For Your Health & Fitness? By Emma Hogan

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 11:38 Very Popular


Emma Hogan with Les Mills talks about the effects of running barefoot Episode 1873: Is Running Barefoot Better For Your Health & Fitness? By Emma Hogan On a mission to create a fitter planet, Les Mills is the global group fitness leader serving up science-backed workouts and evidence-based education. You can experience LES MILLS™ workouts in 20,000 fitness clubs around the world, or access 1000+ world-leading workouts anytime, anywhere using LES MILLS™ On Demand. To discover the latest fitness insights and advice visit lesmills.com/fit-planet. The original post is located here: https://www.lesmills.com/fit-planet/fitness/barefoot-yay-or-nay/  Indeed, the number one source of hires in the U.S., delivers 1.5x more hires than even internal referrals, according to TalentNest. Get started now at Indeed.com/HEALTH.  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mark Bell's Power Project
Power Bite || Tips For Running Barefoot ft. Anya Jensen

Mark Bell's Power Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 9:01 Very Popular


In this Power Bite, Mark Bell, Nsima Inyang, Anya Jensen from Anya's Reviews and Andrew Zaragoza talk about running barefoot, why Anya does it, and some tips for people who are interested. Check out the full episode: https://youtu.be/W-e5g_eO9GA Join The Power Project Discord: https://discord.gg/yYzthQX5qN Subscribe to the new Power Project Clips Channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UC5Df31rlDXm0EJAcKsq1SUw Special perks for our listeners below! ➢https://boncharge.com/pages/POWERPROJECT Code POWERPROJECT for 20% off!! ➢https://thecoldplunge.com/ Code POWERPROJECT to save $150!! ➢Enlarging Pumps (This really does work): https://bit.ly/powerproject1 ➢https://www.vivobarefoot.com/us/powerproject Code POWERPROJECT20 for 20% off Vivo Barefoot shoes! ➢https://markbellslingshot.com/ Code POWERPROJECT10 for 10% off site wide including Within You supplements! ➢https://mindbullet.com/ Code POWERPROJECT for 20% off! ➢https://eatlegendary.com Use Code POWERPROJECT for 20% off! ➢https://bubsnaturals.com Use code POWERPROJECT for 20% of your next order! ➢https://vuoriclothing.com/powerproject to automatically save 20% off your first order at Vuori! ➢https://www.eightsleep.com/powerproject to automatically save $150 off the Pod Pro at 8 Sleep! ➢https://marekhealth.com Use code POWERPROJECT10 for 10% off ALL LABS at Marek Health! Also check out the Power Project Panel: https://marekhealth.com/powerproject Use code POWERPROJECT for $101 off! ➢Piedmontese Beef: https://www.piedmontese.com/ Use Code POWER at checkout for 25% off your order plus FREE 2-Day Shipping on orders of $150 Follow Mark Bell's Power Project Podcast ➢ https://lnk.to/PowerProjectPodcast ➢ Insta: https://www.instagram.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ https://www.facebook.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mbpowerproject  ➢ LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/powerproject/ ➢ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/markbellspowerproject ➢TikTok: http://bit.ly/pptiktok  FOLLOW Mark Bell ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marksmellybell ➢https://www.tiktok.com/@marksmellybell ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarkBellSuperTraining ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marksmellybell Follow Nsima Inyang ➢ https://www.breakthebar.com/learn-more ➢YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NsimaInyang ➢Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsimainyang/?hl=en ➢TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@nsimayinyang?lang=en  Follow Andrew Zaragoza on all platforms ➢ https://direct.me/iamandrewz #PowerProject #Podcast #MarkBell #FitnessPodcast #running #footstrength #barefootrunning