Podcasts about Health equity

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Study causes of differences in the quality of health and health care

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  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
Health equity

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Best podcasts about Health equity

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Latest podcast episodes about Health equity

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Monkeypox is ‘concerning,' spreading, and unwarranted stigmas against gay men are making the response more difficult

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:48


Since monkeypox first appeared in the headlines several weeks ago, the number of people infected has grown. Now, we're seeing a lot of stories that bring back memories of the early days of the COVID pandemic, like problems with testing, tests not getting where they are needed, vaccines being nearly impossible to find.  The virus is also showing up in higher numbers in men who have sex with other men -- why is this? We had a lot of questions and got a ton of really valuable information from Dr. Perry Halkitis, Dean & Hunterdon Professor of Public Health & Health Equity at Rutgers School of Public Health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Continuing the Conversation | Optimizing Care for Patients With Endometrial Cancer: A Focus on Pharmacist Interventions and Mitigation of Health Equity Issues | PTCE Pharmacy Connect

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 33:26


·      Recognize the role of biomarker expression in the selection of most appropriate treatment options for patients with endometrial cancer ·      Review strategies for identification and management of drug-related toxicities in patients receiving therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors, targeted agents, or combination therapy Faculty: Sarah Hayward, PharmD, BCOP Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Gynecologic Oncology Stephenson Cancer Center at OU Health University of Oklahoma Health Science Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Sarah Hayward, PharmD, BCOP, has the following relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose: Consultant (advisory board): GSK, Seagen/Genmab Pharmacy Times Continuing Education™ is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This activity is approved for 0.5 contact hour (0.05 CEU) under the ACPE universal activity number 0290-0000-22-322-H01-P. The activity is available for CE credit through June 30, 2023. This educational activity is supported by an educational grant from GlaxoSmithKline Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Am I Dying?!
Do you take my insurance?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 49:44


This should be a basic question with a yes or no answer but the American insurance system is so complicated and buries both patients and providers in paperwork. Dr. Mark Lewis and Dr. Jean Luc Neptune share their frustrations and insights along with tips and tricks. Plus, don't miss the debut of the Is It Serious Players!Tweet us your questions @marklewismd or @jeanlucneptune or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.SHOW NOTES: Check out , The Dabble Co. from OffScrip Healthhttps://offscrip.com/showsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

One Small Bite
How To Decolonize Your Plate with The Black Nutritionist Dr. Kéra Nyemb-Diop

One Small Bite

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 68:55


Decolonize Your Plate!Dr. Nyemb-Diop invites black people to decolonize their plate. The idea of a healthy plate consists of European centric foods. This systemic racism affects how nutrition services are provided to black people.  Black culture can create their plate their way by decolonizing it. Cultural foods are healthy and healing. Forget the whitewash of healthy food lists.Highlights of this episode:Dr. Nyemb-Diop's Decolonize Your Plate approachRacism within nutrition and dietetics practicesSystemic oppression in healthcareBody and food shame within black communitiesHealing through cultural foodsGuest Info: https://www.instagram.com/black.nutritionist/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/keranyembdiop/https://fierce-originator-7182.ck.page/73c6d6e0b1Resources: Get Your Copy of the book - One Small Bite: Anti-Diet Stories that Empower You To Build a Positive and Secure Relationship with FoodGet Unstuck Class Classes are on Zoom, so no travel necessary. Read about it here: https://orozconutrition.com/courses/Where do I go from here?If you like this episode, then download the show wherever you listen to your podcasts at Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Google, iHeartRadio, Castbox, etc!Hit that subscribe button so you won't miss another episode. Big Ask: Leave a Review! Please, take a few minutes and leave me a review on your podcast app. Each review helps other listeners find the podcast, which provides me with the ability to continue bring you unique content. So spread the love. Loss for words? Just write what you like about the show.Share the show with friends.If you want to work with us, schedule an appointment or a free 15 minute discovery call. Explore our website and click Schedule an Appointment. Or, reach us by email info@orozconutrition.com or phone 678-568-4717. Chop the diet mentality; Fuel Your Body; and Nourish Your Soul!

The Freshfields Podcast
MedTech and Health Equity for Women - A Conversation with Marissa Fayer

The Freshfields Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 23:04


In this episode of our MedTech podcast series, Freshfields Partner Vinita Kailasanath sits down with Marissa Fayer – CEO and Founder of HERhealthEQ – to discuss trends in the global women's healthcare market, including the women's health industry's growth beyond fertility solutions, efforts to increase clinical trial diversity, health equity, and more.

The Race to Value Podcast
Black Health Matters: Improving Population Health Equity within African American Communities, with Dr. Richard W. Walker

The Race to Value Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 64:19


It's no secret that the Black community tops the list of groups afflicted by hypertension, stroke, diabetes, heart disease, kidney failure, and cancer. What the statistics do not show is the pain, misery, and despair that these conditions create—not only for the individual, but also for family and friends. As an African-American doctor, Dr. Richard Walker has studied these conditions among his patients for many years. Now, in his new book, “Black Health Matters”, Dr. Walker offers a number of commonsense ways to prevent, manage, and possibly eliminate these killers, turning the tide of African-American health. And he not only provides us with a construct for thought leadership in population health equity, he practices this type of care at his home-based primary care practice TVP-Care in Houston, Texas. Dr. Walker has spent considerable time in researching the health and healthcare journey of African captives into slavery and understands what current African Americans now to need to do to survive nutritionally and culturally. He is truly on a mission to overcome the chronic ill health and early death that is so pervasive in Black communities. Most importantly, however, Dr. Walker is a leader in the value movement that believes traditional medicine should be merged with lifestyle medicine. He understands that African Americans can turn their health around by understanding and incorporating better nutrition, nutritional supplements, exercise, and regular healthcare checkups into their lives. In this important podcast discussion, we you will learn from a leading clinician and entrepreneur how we should go about improving Population Health Equity within African American communities in this Race to Value! Episode Bookmarks: 01:30 Introduction to “Black Health Matters” and the work of Dr. Richard Walker in the health value movement 03:30 What does the use of the word “value” mean when it comes to community health? 05:00 Dr. Walker discusses his upbringing in Spanish Harlem and how that experience led him to become a physician leader seeking to advance health equity 07:00 The “mystery” of excessive hospitalizations due to sugar consumption and how that led to an epidemic of Type 2 Diabetes in the African American community 09:00 The misperception in the African American community that most common chronic diseases are genetic (instead of caused by environmental of lifestyle factors) 10:00 Dismantling the informational disadvantage that leads to a misunderstanding of Social Determinants of Health 12:00 The impact of the murder of George Floyd and the BLM social justice movement and how that inspired Dr. Walker to write “Black Health Matters” 14:30 How the collective experience of African Americans over the last 400+ years has been based on “waiting” (e.g. slavery, citizenship, civil rights) 16:00 “Taking care of your own life is all about taking charge of the environment by understanding the root causes that lead to disease.” 16:30 How poor nutrition in the African American community stems from the slavery era and persists to this day 17:30 The inadequate training of the healthcare workforce further exacerbates preexisting issues of poor health among African Americans 18:30 “Black Health Matters” is all about understanding the progenitors of chronic disease that are not genetic, and how to mitigate them in African American communities. 19:00 Environmental hazards and chemical toxicities are more common in underserved, minoritized communities 20:30 Research that confirms the presence of systemic issues in the healthcare industry related to institutional racism 22:00 “The concept of value-based care is transformational because it has the potential of changing the course in healthcare by recognizing the true value of the individual.” 23:30 Will value-based care bring us to the “Quintuple Aim” that includes health equity? 24:30 How the founding vision of Dr. Walker's value-based,

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - In Conversation with Dr. Richard Pazdur (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 20:18


In part two this ASCO Education Podcast episode, hosts Dr. David Johnson and Dr. Patrick Loehrer continue their conversation with Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence, focusing on his leadership and vision for improving cancer care worldwide. The conversation includes reflection on drug toxicities, approval processes, and complexity of clinical trials. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.   TRANSCRIPT Dr. Pat Loehrer: Hi. I'm Pat Loehrer, the Director of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University. Dr. Dave Johnson: And hi. I'm Dave Johnson at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Pat Loehrer: This is the second half of our Oncology, Etc. conversation with Dr. Rick Pazdur, who's the director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. In Part 1, we chatted with Dr. Pazdur about his upbringing and his early career. Today, we're going to focus on his leadership and vision for improving cancer care worldwide. But first, we'll discuss how cancer has impacted his life personally.   I want to flash-forward. I had the pleasure of knowing Mary. And there was no question, if you had a problem in oncology, you would go to Mary and not Rick Pazdur when you were a house staff member. But moving forward a bit, I'm not sure if all the listeners know that Mary came down with ovarian cancer. Dave himself had cancer. My wife had breast cancer. It is incredibly hard to be an oncologist I think when your spouse or someone who's close to you has cancer, and particularly, being married to a medical oncology nurse. Maybe just share a little bit about that journey of being a husband of a- Dr. Richard Pazdur: Yeah. It is interesting because going back to the Rush story, the first patient that my wife and I had in common, and this is so ironic, was a patient with ovarian cancer. The last patient that we had in common was her, which is some ironic fate, so to speak. And the story began of her illness was right around Labor Day. We had gone to Chicago in February driving back from Chicago. I noticed that she kept on taking a whole bunch of Tums and then saying - Oh, I just got a lot of GI symptoms, and she went to see her gastroenterologist or GP and he said, ‘Oh, this is just, you know, indigestion.' And two weeks after that or not even that, she was in the hospital with a massive amount of ascites, needed an intensive care unit. It was readily apparent just on getting her CA 125 what she had and she wound up one day in debulking surgery and then IP chemotherapy, etc. I think something that I learned, and I think we knew from the very beginning that this was not going to be a curable illness, and how to deal with that on an emotional level. And I have to give my wife credit. She spared me a lot of the emotion because she was such a strong person. She made all of her own calls as far as what she wanted. She would ask me what I thought, but she would do her own research, she would go to her own doctors' appointments. She said, ‘You don't really need to come with me. I'm self-sufficient.' She was very much interested in helping other cancer patients, and after she died, I think one of the most cherished conversations I had was a group of women that came to me and said how much she helped them during their support group because she was a nurse. She knew she was dying. She had emotional maturity not to fall apart but to accept the inevitable in a very strong way. My wife was a very religious person, had gone to Catholic schools, really embraced religion during those terminal years basically. And I think that was a great sense of comfort to her. But it did teach me a lot of lessons when you take care of somebody that has cancer, and that is, what a bad job we do with drug toxicities. Drug toxicities to medical oncologists and especially the people at the FDA are numbered, Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 1. These toxicities are tolerable, tolerable to who, so to speak. And how to manage these toxicities and how they interrupt your life is one of the lasting experience I have, which I always will remember. And that has been one of my roles recently is forming several programs that we have in the OCE to look at dosing, to look at what is this definition if the drug is tolerable or well-tolerated or if the toxicities could be managed. I always say, yeah, every toxicity could be managed, even death. You call the undertaker to manage it. So what do you really mean by that statement. But I think the issue of toxicity is an important one. And then also going on clinical trials and having people considering what you want to go on, what risk you want to take, and what is actually in the informed consent and how meaningful that is. Dr. Dave Johnson: Really glad you brought that up, Rick. That matches my own experience with lymphoma and going through chemotherapy. And as an oncologist, one would think I would know what the side effects are. I'd recounted them dozens and dozens of times to people over the years, but until you've actually experienced them either personally or up close as you did with Mary, it's impossible to fully understand. I'll give you one example. Fatigue. Everybody thinks they know what fatigue is, but until you've had chemotherapy-induced fatigue, the fatigue that never abates, you just don't understand what it is. It's debilitating in ways that are unimaginable to most people. So I'm sure that experience certainly shaped your view and your role at the FDA. Dr. Richard Pazdur: Correct. Dr. Dave Johnson: I wonder, if you might share, you initiated a number of programs recently, including programs to try to improve coordination and co-operation amongst the pharmaceutical companies. Could you speak to some of those programs for us? Dr. Richard Pazdur: I think one of my favorite programs is Project Orbis. Project Orbis is an idea I had when I was walking down the street. It just hit me. When I came to the FDA, one of the things I rapidly noticed is how isolated the FDA was, even from the rest from the regulatory agencies throughout the world. There was very little cross-fertilization there. So one of the very first things that I did was set up a monthly tele-conference first with the EMA, the European Medicines Agency, and then we ended on Health Canada, Australia, Japan, Singapore, you name it. And one of the things that became really apparent to me, we at the FDA got applications always first—always. That's obvious. You know why they had given it to us first? The money. That's where the finances are going to be. So we got the application first, and it could be 2 years, 18 months, 12 months, that these other countries, Canada, Australia, Switzerland, and Brazil, Israel, would get these applications. And I said, well, this isn't right, really, because these people, they have cancer. They have every right to get these medications as soon as possible, and also we have such a large agency. We have 80 to 100 oncologists that work there, and most of these agencies have one or two oncologists. So our expertise in oncology at the FDA is so much greater than these other regulatory agencies. How can we leverage that to help these other countries? So we started Project Orbis, and what it was is that companies come in and they submit an application and they simultaneously submit the same application to the countries that want to participate in the program. They are all preselected and have confidentiality agreements with each other. And we worked together on the applications, basically reviewing the applications. So we had many meetings, tele-conversations, telephone conversations with countries. So that expedites these drugs. This has really had a lasting impact because from a worldwide perspective, it's really promoted more rapid development of drugs and rapid approval of drugs, and that's important because that establishes sooner new standards of care that will impact future trials. So in addition to the humanitarian issue of improving healthcare for patients in these countries, it has an impact on the global clinical trial system by having new standards approved much faster and accepted by world authorities. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Let me just jump on that for a second, just to make a comment. Back when we were growing up, there would be like three to five drugs approved- Dr. Richard Pazdur: Yeah. Dr. Pat Loehrer: And today, it's like once a week, there's a new indication for oncologists. Dr. Dave Johnson: Our listeners have another question that might be appropriate to ask at this time. What is the most common mistake that drug companies make in their applications to the FDA or in the process of trying to get their drug approved? Is there a frequent mistake that you can advise them? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Well, they don't come and talk to us. That's number one. They want, not necessarily what the best registration pathway is, but what the quickest registration pathway is. And sometimes the quickest registration pathway, especially single arm trials, are not the best registrations pathway. So my advice is rather than playing games with the FDA, to put it in the vernacular, just do the right thing and say, what is the optimal information that patients need when I develop this drug. We're seeing a lot of problems now with various drugs where people are developing in a refractory disease setting a drug, and they plan on getting accelerated approval on a response rate. So they push and push the dose. And with a single arm study, you can't really evaluate safety that well. Everything is attributed to the drug, and they want to get the highest response rate. And they get it, and there's a confirmatory study, and the arm of the confirmatory study, the control arm may not be as toxic as theirs, and we're seeing a wave of drugs that now have inferior survival compared to controls, which probably is predicated upon, they got the wrong dose. And I think that is one of the major programs that we have, that we need to address is dosing in oncology, this ‘More is better, more is better,' and ‘Let's push the dose as high as possible.' More isn't even probably good in cytotoxic days, but certainly, not a good idea in targeted therapies and certainly not a good idea in biological therapy. So we've really got to think about dosing more, penetration of targets, what's the optimal dose rather than what's the highest dose. You know as well as I do, pharmaceutical companies want to go with the highest dose because the major hurdle is the demonstration of efficacy, even in a randomized study. So nobody wants to be blamed by saying, well, you spent $100 million on a Phase 3 study and it's negative because you used too low of a dose. But then at the end of the day, we don't have a really good tolerable dose, and it's really hard to go backwards and look at dosing after a drug was already approved because the efficacy study has already been done. Dr. Pat Loehrer: The other aspect of drug companies is not only getting the dosage there, but also the duration. There is motivation for money, and so patients are going to and- Dr. Richard Pazdur: Oh, count on that. Dr. Pat Loehrer: So it begs a question, and I know the FDA can't do this, but in other countries, there is a monetary review together with the toxicity review. Can you reflect a little bit about that to the best of your ability? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Well, even within our simpler agencies, they may communicate more than we do with CMS, but all oncology drugs that when they're approved are then paid for by CMS, okay? In these other countries, that is not so. They may get approval and then they have to go to these health assessment agencies that will decide and argue with the companies what the pricing of the drug is. I think it's a mistake, honestly, for the FDA to get into pricing. We have a hard enough time with efficacy and safety, and pricing is a very ephemeral concept because it could change on a dialing. Somebody could promise you, you should approve their drug because it's much cheaper on Monday, and on Friday, they could say, 'Oops, we made a mistake. We really think that this dose has to be X number of dollars.' And you could see competition hasn't worked well in oncology with seven PD-1 drugs approved, pricing has not really been of any movement here. Dr. Pat Loehrer: I'm sorry. Dave may have another question, but let me ask you this. Going back to the clinical trials and what industry asked you- the complexity of clinical trials is going up logarithmically compared to the way they were in the ‘70s and ‘80s. In many of the trials where we have to get all this data in order to soothe the FDA, what are your thoughts about simplifying clinical trials? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Oh yeah. I'm for it. I am for it. If you really look at it, these are not FDA requirements for the most part. The companies want them, all of this data because it's controlled. They don't want to be blamed at the end of the day for not capturing this data or that data. They have developed complicated bureaucracies, going back in my sociology days there, complicated bureaucracies to gather all of this data, the whole CRO industry to go out and pester you guys in practice by doing site visits. It's a complicated situation and it's really predicated a lot on the history and bureaucracies that have been built up and not money to strip away those bureaucracies for fear of failure, so to speak, of not catching something. Dr. Dave Johnson: So Rick, we're coming to the end of our time that we've scheduled. I actually have two questions for you. We've asked all of our previous guests, the first of which would be if you could talk to your 21-year-old self today, what advice would you give yourself? After you've done that, we'd like to know what books have you been reading lately or is there some documentary that you've seen that you would recommend to us and our listeners? Dr. Richard Pazdur: I would tell myself, when I was 21 years old, relax and be less anxious. All things pass. I think we get so anxious when we're young about relatively small things. I remember my first ASCO presentation, I was petrified. My heart was beating out of my chest. I was sweating. And like relax. It's one of a thousand presentations at ASCO. We tend to magnify things, and I think age puts things in perspective. This in the reality of the world is a small thing, and people probably won't even remember it. Dr. Dave Johnson: Excellent advice. Dr. Richard Pazdur: My favorite author that I'm reading now for the last couple of months is a presidential historical author, Doris Kearns Goodwin. I think many of you know, she's written many books. I love her writing style. And I like non-fiction. I like biographies and I like history books, history stories rather than mysteries or things like that, fantasy books. The two books that I really enjoyed, the first one was No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II. I don't know if anybody's read that. It's an excellent book. Most of our attention in World War II is directed toward Europe and what was going on in Europe, the battlefields, etc., which I'm not a big fan of reading about battles and stuff, but this was what was going on in The White House and the relationships of all of the people that came there. It was like a hotel almost with the personalities that were flowing through including Churchill and various princes and queens, etc. But also the interesting relation, the fascinating relationship that Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt had, I don't know how to describe the relationship. It truly was an unconventional relationship based on some past history that they had of affairs etc., but it was just a fascinating one. The best book, though, again I'm reading now, is written also by Doris Kearns Goodwin, and it is Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream. Doris Kearns Johnson was his biographer and spent a great deal of time with him in The White House as well as when he left The White House. But it's an excellent book on management and reading people, success. One of the things that is most interesting about Lyndon Johnson, and especially when he was running the senate before he became president, was his ability to know what motivated people and how to use that to form a consensus. Does this person want to go on this trip. I'll give it to him and then he could help me with this. Does this person want to go to this party or get on this position in congress? So it was really a skillset that he had, which I think most leaders need to know. You have to motivate people. You can't lead by an autocratic masthead, but you've got to lead from what do people want and to make sure that they feel you have a personal relationship with them. As I say to my staff, everything in life is personal—everything. Dr. Dave Johnson: Well, it's been a great session, Rick. We so much appreciate your willingness to spend time with us. We wish we had twice as much time. I'm sure we could go on for hours. Thanks again, and we appreciate all you do at the FDA. You've been a fabulous leader, and we hope you continue on for many years to come. Dr. Richard Pazdur: Thank you so much, Dave, and thank you so much, Pat. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Great to see you. Dr. Dave Johnson: Pat, before we leave, any idea why our patients seem to get sick on Saturday and Sunday? Dr. Pat Loehrer: I have no clue. Do you know the answer, Dave? Dr. Dave Johnson: Yes. They have a weekend immunity. Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education Podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center at education.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

Buffalo, What’s Next?
Buffalo, What's Next: Extremism and Examining Health Equity

Buffalo, What’s Next?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:59


WBFO's Tom Dinki synthesizes his four-part series on extremism in WNY with news director, Dave Debo. Kelly Marie Wofford, Director of Health Equity in Erie County talks with Brigid Jaipaul-Valenza about health outcomes and the challenges BIPOC communities face.

SHAPE America's Podcast - Professional Development for Health & Physical Education Teachers
Episode 157: SHAPE America Funded to Advance Health Equity in K-12 Education

SHAPE America's Podcast - Professional Development for Health & Physical Education Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 11:12


SHAPE America – Society of Health and Physical Educators has received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Healthy Schools Branch for the National Initiative to Advance Health Equity in K-12 Education. SHAPE America CEO Stephanie Morris chats with Health Resource in Action's (HRiA) Dr. Brittany Chen, Vice President of Health Equity, about working on this exciting project together to support school administrator capacity-building to advance health equity and promote healthy schools.More info: https://www.shapeamerica.org/pressroom/2022/shape-america-awarded-funding-for-national-initiative-to-advance-health-equity-in-k-12

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Advocating for Health Equity w/Dr. Stephanie Young Moss | Holistic Pharmacy Podcast

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 47:30


Today I want to highlight the work of another pharmacy and entrepreneur colleague, Dr. Stephanie Young Moss (aka “Yomo”). She caught my eye on Instagram, where she shines her light on wellness, family dynamics, pharmacy practice, and disparities in healthcare. A practical tip that she shared in the episode has stuck with me, about how learning goes both ways. For example, shadowing allows healthcare students to learn from professionals, but the mentors also get the opportunity to learn. A relationship with someone different than you helps you understand where they're coming from and how you can serve different populations. Dr. Stephanie received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy and a Masters of Health Services Administration with a concentration in Health Economics from The University of Wyoming. She has worked in various areas in pharmacy, Community, Regulatory Compliance, Managed Care, and Health Economics and Outcomes Research. Over the past 20 years Dr. Moss has advocated for decreasing disparities in health care through her volunteer work. She uses her platform to educate families across the U.S. on ways to decrease and eliminate health disparities by incorporating simple wellness and mental health techniques. Dr. Moss has shared her views on international and national podcasts and local television news stations. Dr. Stephanie is the creator of the website www.drstephanieyomo.com where you will find practical health and wellness tips, ways to reduce healthcare disparities and simple tips for health and wellness professionals to enhance their presence on social media so they can stand out in their niche, build a successful brand and advocate for important causes. She is also the owner of Integrative Pharmacy Outcomes and Consulting, which focuses on educating underserved communities on ways to reduce and prevent health disparities. For nearly 2 decades, Dr. Stephanie has served on various boards and volunteer organizations that focus on health equity, decreasing implicit bias, addressing social determinants of health and empowering communities to advocate for their health. She has served on the boards for The Minority Health Coalition of Marion County and Eskenazi Health Center where she has served as the Clinical Quality Committee Chair, Board Secretary and is currently the Board Treasurer. She resides in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can connect with Dr. Yomo on all social media (@Dr. Stephanie Yomo) and www.drstephanieyomo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Advocating for Health Equity w/Dr. Stephanie Young Moss | Holistic Pharmacy Podcast

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 47:30


Today I want to highlight the work of another pharmacy and entrepreneur colleague, Dr. Stephanie Young Moss (aka “Yomo”). She caught my eye on Instagram, where she shines her light on wellness, family dynamics, pharmacy practice, and disparities in healthcare. A practical tip that she shared in the episode has stuck with me, about how learning goes both ways. For example, shadowing allows healthcare students to learn from professionals, but the mentors also get the opportunity to learn. A relationship with someone different than you helps you understand where they're coming from and how you can serve different populations. Dr. Stephanie received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy and a Masters of Health Services Administration with a concentration in Health Economics from The University of Wyoming. She has worked in various areas in pharmacy, Community, Regulatory Compliance, Managed Care, and Health Economics and Outcomes Research. Over the past 20 years Dr. Moss has advocated for decreasing disparities in health care through her volunteer work. She uses her platform to educate families across the U.S. on ways to decrease and eliminate health disparities by incorporating simple wellness and mental health techniques. Dr. Moss has shared her views on international and national podcasts and local television news stations. Dr. Stephanie is the creator of the website www.drstephanieyomo.com where you will find practical health and wellness tips, ways to reduce healthcare disparities and simple tips for health and wellness professionals to enhance their presence on social media so they can stand out in their niche, build a successful brand and advocate for important causes. She is also the owner of Integrative Pharmacy Outcomes and Consulting, which focuses on educating underserved communities on ways to reduce and prevent health disparities. For nearly 2 decades, Dr. Stephanie has served on various boards and volunteer organizations that focus on health equity, decreasing implicit bias, addressing social determinants of health and empowering communities to advocate for their health. She has served on the boards for The Minority Health Coalition of Marion County and Eskenazi Health Center where she has served as the Clinical Quality Committee Chair, Board Secretary and is currently the Board Treasurer. She resides in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can connect with Dr. Yomo on all social media (@Dr. Stephanie Yomo) and www.drstephanieyomo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fairness First Podcast
Health Equity Voices: Deborah Harris

Fairness First Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 34:21


Listen to our conversation with Flagstaff's community advocate and leader, Deborah Harris. In our conversation with her, we dived into the history of the Southside Community Association in the city of Flagstaff and the connection between health equity and the Black lived experience in northern Arizona. Listen and learn more about the history behind the Southside neighborhood in Flagstaff, and the historical significance of the Black community in the economic and infrastructure formation and sustainability of this city.

Midday
Special Coverage: The High Court Strikes Down Abortion Rights

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 81:04


Today, during the first half of the noon Midday hour, we continue WYPR's Special Live Coverage of the historic rulingending abortion rightshanded down Friday morning in a 6-3 decision by the conservative majority of the US Supreme Court. Ahead of President Joe Biden's scheduled remarks on the ruling at 12:33pm, Midday host Tom Hallspeaks with Prof. Margaret Johnson, co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism at the University of Baltimore School of Law, and director of the law school's Bronfein Family Law Clinic. Later in the half hour, Tom speaks with Maryland State Delegate Emily Shetty (Democrat, Dist.18) about the ruling's human and political impacts. Then, WYPR News reporter Rachel Baye joins us with excerpts from her interview Thursday with Karen Nelson, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, who notes that while abortion will remain legal in Maryland, she is expecting the large influx of residents from states that have banned abortions to put a significant strain on Maryland's reproductive health resources. ______________________________________ Our continuing live, local coverage of Friday's historic Supreme Court ruling resumes during the 3pm hour. Midday host Tom Hall returns for a full hour of live conversation and listener interaction. Tom's guests this hour include Stacey Lee, associate professor of the Practice at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School; Dr. Lisa Cooper, founding director of the Center for Health Equity, part ofthe Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and WYPR reporterJohn Lee, who joins us to share some of his interviews with Heather Mizeur, aformer Maryland State Delegate and currently a Democratic primary candidate for Maryland's 1st District US Congressional seat, and Dave Harden, a rival Democratic primary candidate for that 1st District seat. The incumbent 1st District congressman, Republican Andy Harris, declined John's request for an interview, but his office released a statement supporting the Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Stay tuned to WYPR this weekend for more of NPR's special coverage of the Supreme Court ruling striking down abortion rights. Midday's live coverage will continue during our regular noon-1pm broadcast on Monday, June 27. For a list of pro-choice events and demonstrations happening this weekend, go to the wewontgoback.com Website. For information on the anti-abortion movement, visit the March for Life site. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hartford HealthCare Podcast
Inner city struggle, recovery and celebration with Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin

Hartford HealthCare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 14:58


Hartford HealthCare's Steve Coates talks to Hartford, Connecticut Mayor Luke Bronin. They cover some critical challenges U.S. cities are all facing including violence, COVID recovery and how health equity plays an important part in each of these issues.Mayor Bronin, who recently recovered from COVID himself, shares some important lessons learned in being tasked with leading his city through the pandemic. He also talks about leveraging key partnerships with hospitals, health systems, community and faith organizations and the impact that can have on individuals and the city at large.DominGO! Hartford, which will temporarily transform a few miles of Hartford's city streets into car-free public spaces this summer, is one of the mayor's prime examples of how we are connecting our communities and creating new places for safe, neighborhood fun and healthy activities for all ages and abilities.Follow More Life to be notified each time a new episode drops. Just search “Hartford HealthCare” on your favorite podcast platform. Related links and episodesBackus Hospital Helps A City Park Rise From RubbleEquity in Healthcare Delivery ConferenceSupplier Diversity Summit Builds Partnerships with Minority and Women-Owned BusinessesListen: The Racial Divide: Acknowledging and addressing disparities in healthcare

NEJM Catalyst Leadership Podcast
Racial Equity Plan: Developing Specific Actions for Anti-Racist Health Care

NEJM Catalyst Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


The Senior Vice President and Senior Associate Dean for Health Equity and Inclusive Excellence for Vanderbilt Medical Center discusses the development of their Racial Equity Plan.

Am I Dying?!
Why is a colonoscopy so important?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 42:09


45 is the new 50! Colon cancer screenings are for everyone and yet, people still find it difficult to talk about. Dr. Mark Lewis and Dr. Jean Luc Neptune share their own colonoscopy experiences and talk candidly (and even with some humor) about what to expect from both the prep and the screening. The recommended age for screenings has been lowered to 45 so if you have been putting it off, listen in, get inspired and get screened!Tweet us your questions @jeanlucneptune or @marklewismd or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SAGE Otolaryngology
OTO: Health Equity and Diversity in Otolaryngology

SAGE Otolaryngology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 35:20


This podcast highlights original research published in the June official journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) Foundation. There has never been a time in our society when we have been as willing and open in our discussions around issues of racial and ethnic inequalities, discrimination, systemic racism, and socioeconomic disparities. Within this dialogue on health inequalities, one soon comes to realize the strong interplay of bioethics, social justice, and systemic racism on health care and outcomes. Ethical questions pertaining to the rights of individual participants in research, criteria for inclusion and recruitment into studies, and the development of trusting relationships among communities, health systems, and governmental agencies continue to challenge us in achieving our goals of reducing health disparities and improving health care outcomes for our patients.   Click here to read the full issue.

Meet The Leader
Pfizer CEO: What's next for health equity, vaccines and the COVID-19 pandemic

Meet The Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 35:11


After years of disruption, can the world return to normal? In a special one-on-one-conversation at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, founder Klaus Schwab talks to CEO Albert Bourla for his take on how the COVID-19 pandemic will evolve - and how technologies and vaccines will change with it. Bourla also shares the surprising factors that made the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine possible and what those difficult days taught him about collaboration, tackling big goals, and how to make life-saving medicines available to the world's most vulnerable. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Public Health Review Morning Edition
204: Smart Approaches to Brain Health

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 5:12


Dr. Jewell Mullen, Associate Dean for Health Equity in the Office of Health Equity at The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, offers her assessment of the work that still needs to be done to address Alzheimer's and related concerns; Dr. Stephen Flores, who leads the vaccine confidence and demand work within the Immunization Services Division of the National Center of Immunization and Respiratory Disease with the CDC, explains how to drive organizational and community change; a new ASTHO blog article explains how several states are using paid family and medical leave policies as tools to reduce disparities; and an ASTHO brief examines certification for community health workers as a way to encourage more people to enter the field. Alzheimer's Association Webpage: Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month ASTHO Blog Post: As Families Seek More Work / Life Balance, States Consider Leave Policies ASTHO Brief: State Approaches to Community Health Worker Certification

Payers, Providers, and Patients – Oh My!
Crowell Health Solutions Mini-Series Part 2 – A Health System's Perspective on Prioritizing Health Equity

Payers, Providers, and Patients – Oh My!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 34:05


This episode is the second part in a miniseries with Crowell Health Solutions, which is a strategic consulting firm that Crowell & Moring launched earlier this year to help healthcare organizations and technology companies transform health care by improving patient care and health outcomes, advancing health equity, and lowering health care costs through solutions like digital health innovations and value-based healthcare models. In this episode, Janet Walker and Roma Sharma interview three leaders working at Ascension, which is one of the nation's largest not-for-profit health systems with more than 2,600 sites of care, about how Ascension has prioritized health equity and population health initiatives, including its framework “ABIDE,” which is built upon the hallmarks of Appreciation – Belongingness – Inclusivity – Diversity – Equity.  The interviewees are Dr. Stacy Garrett-Ray (Senior Vice-President and Chief Community Impact Officer), Pamela Mitchell Boyd (Senior Director of ABIDE), and Nicole Commodore (Director, Community Impact and Advocacy).   Payers, Providers, and Patients – Oh My! is Crowell & Moring's health care podcast, discussing legal and regulatory issues that affect health care entities' in-house counsel, executives, and investors.   For more information, please see: Crowell & Moring Unveils Crowell Health Solutions

Radio Advisory
120: Open Mic: The latest IPPS proposal could be a game-changer for health equity

Radio Advisory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 4:51


In early May, CMS released the inpatient prospective payment system proposed rule for fiscal year 2023. In this year's proposal CMS introduced several policies aimed at addressing health equity. Among those is a data collection condition that would require a provider to attest that their organization is capturing SDOH measures. Eric Fontana, Vice President of Client Solutions at Optum Life Sciences, has spent much of his career helping health care leaders make sense of data and regulations. In this special Open Mic edition of Radio Advisory, Eric shares his thoughts about why this could be a game-changer for researchers. Interested in sharing your thoughts about health care on an Open Mic? Pitch us your idea by emailing podcasts@advisory.com. Links: The 2023 inpatient proposed rule: What you need to know IPPS Regulations and Notices [CMS website]

HFMA's Voices in Healthcare Finance
Using the systems thinking approach to tackle the complex issues of health equity and DEI

HFMA's Voices in Healthcare Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 19:23


Denese Neu discusses how the systems thinking approach can help healthcare organizations organize their health equity and DEI strategies.

The Hospice Chaplaincy Show with Saul Ebema
A Conversation with Dr. Shail Maingi On advancing health equity for Sexual and Gender Minorities in Hospice Care

The Hospice Chaplaincy Show with Saul Ebema

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 38:20


Dr. Maingi is the Dana-Farber Cancer Network Health Equity & Inclusion liaison at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at South Shore. Dr. Maingi is also co-chair of the ASCO SGM Task Force and a member of the Diversity and Inclusivity Task Force, Symptoms and Survivorship Task Force, and Practice Health Task Force. 

Dementia Researcher
Writing the BEST Fellowship Application

Dementia Researcher

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 44:30


In this podcast, Dr Stefania Forner, Director of Medical & Scientific Relations at Alzheimer's Association guest hosts a discussion with current and past awardees of the Association's Fellowships and international grant programs. They recap on the take-aways from a recent grant writing master glass and explore how grants are evaluated, what makes a successful application. Visit our YouTube Channel to watch the video version of this podcast - just look for dementia researcher. Meet our guests: Dr DeAnnah R. Byrd, Assistant Professor at Arizona State University. Studying the effects of chronic conditions & stressors in older Blacks and reducing dementia among minority populations. Dr Joe Abisambra, Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Associate Dean of Diversity and Health Equity at University of Florida. Focussing on tau biology in the context of Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury. Dr Eduardo R. Zimmer, Assistant Professor at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Researching Glial Cells, neuroimaging and neurodegeneration at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The next Alzheimer's Association International funding round will open later this summer, keep an eye on the Dementia Researcher and Alzheimer's Association websites: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/funding-calls https://www.alz.org/research/for_researchers/grants/types-of-grants -- You can find out more about our panellists, and their work on our website. There you will also find a full transcript: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk -- Like what you hear? Please review, like, and share our podcast - and don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode. This podcast is brought to you in association with Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's Research UK and Alzheimer's Society, who we thank for their ongoing support.

Advancing Health
Equity Through Precision Heart Care with Cleerly, Inc. and Lee Health System

Advancing Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 17:43


Dr. Leon D. Caldwell, Senior Director, Health Equity Strategies and Innovation, in the Institute of Diversity and Health Equity at the AHA, sits down with Dr. James Min, CEO and Co-founder of AHA Associate, Cleerly, as well as Dr. Richard Chazal, Senior Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heart & Vascular Institute at Lee Health System. Dr. Min and Dr. Chazal are at the forefront of a new population-based, precision heart care approach that is transforming the historical approach to cardiovascular care by treating the actual disease instead of symptoms. Together, they discuss how this new standard of care ultimately impacts health equity. For more information on the journey to health equity please visit https://equity.aha.org/

Public Health Review Morning Edition
202: Equity on Juneteenth

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 3:32


Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, ASTHO's Senior Vice President of Health Equity and Diversity Initiatives, and Dr. Arthur James, a retired OB/GYN and pediatrician, examine the steps required to achieve health equity in a webinar to recognize this weekend's Juneteenth holiday. ASTHO Webpage: Health Equity & Social Determinants of Health Resources

Humanity Chats with Marjy
Cardiovascular Health Equity - Cam Srivastava

Humanity Chats with Marjy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 29:06


Cam Srivastava on Cardiovascular Health Equity.Humanity Chats - a conversation about everyday issues that impact humans. Join us. Together, we can go far. Thank you for listening. Share with a friend. We are humans. From all around the world. One kind only. And that is humankind. Your friend, Marjy Marj

Inside Angle
How value-based care does (and doesn't) improve health equity

Inside Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:21


Let's face it: Value-based payment models are still a work in progress. How can we create value-based programs so that historically underserved populations, both rural and urban, can experience improved care outcomes? Dive into the topics of health equity, advanced payment model design and more with guest Dr. Amol Navathe, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Public Health Review Morning Edition
201: LGBTQI+ Health Equity

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 5:45


Dr. Jan Malcom, Minnesota's Health Commissioner, discusses steps to ensure health equity for people in the nation's LGBTQI+ community; Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, ASTHO's Senior Vice President of Health Equity and Diversity Initiatives, welcomes the possibility of a COVID-19 vaccine for kids under five years old; ASTHO's Juneteenth webinar about the impact of racism on health equity is today; and ASTHO plans a webinar about the role of transport services in the work to improve risk appropriate care. ASTHO Juneteenth Webinar: Commemorating Juneteenth A Journey to Equity ASTHO Webinar: The Role of Transport in Strengthening Risk Appropriate Care  

Am I Dying?!
How do doctors approach dying?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 47:27


Dr. Mark Lewis and Dr. Jean Luc Neptune talk about how one of their most sacred responsibilities as doctors is to be brutally honest with their patients about what they can do and what they can't. They also share what we all can do to be as prepared as possible. They discuss the importance of living wills, health care proxies and normalizing death. When you welcome death as the natural endpoint, it makes it an approachable conversation.Tweet us your questions @marklewismd or @jeanlucneptune or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.SHOW NOTES: Book recommendations: When Breath Becomes Air by Paul KalanithiBeing Mortal by Atul GawandeCheck out The Heart of Healthcare, from OffScrip Healthhttps://offscrip.com/showsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
How Federal and State Healthcare Policy Can Advance Health Equity with Jennifer Sisto Gall, MPH, Director of Policy and Clinical Programs at Phreesia

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 15:53


In this episode, we are joined by Jennifer Sisto Gall, MPH, Director of Policy and Clinical Programs at Phreesia, to discuss the effect that healthcare policy has on health equity. Tune in to learn how changes at the federal and state level are influencing how payers and providers address health disparities, and gain strategies for how your healthcare organization should be investing resources.This episode is sponsored by Phreesia.

Public Health Review Morning Edition
199: Juneteenth Webinar Examines Racism, Health Equity Link

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 5:10


Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, ASTHO's Senior Vice President of Health Equity and Diversity Initiatives, will host a discussion featuring comments from Miss Opal Lee known as the grandmother of Juneteenth, as part of a Juneteenth webinar on Thursday; Genny Grilli, Epidemiologist Supervisor at the Minnesota Department of Health, discusses food-related hepatitis outbreaks amidst reports that some strawberries are contaminated with hepatitis; and ASTHO examines legislative and legal actions focused on religious exemptions to vaccination laws as well as Congressional efforts to address the disturbing rise in child suicide cases in a pair of new blog articles. ASTHO Juneteenth Webinar: Commemorating Juneteenth A Journey to Equity ASTHO Blog Article: Youth Suicides and the Mental Health Crisis: What Congress Is Doing ASTHO Blog Article: Courts Consider Whether State Vaccination Laws Must Include a Religious Exemption

A Health Podyssey
Krista Harrison Peers Into the Intersection of Hospice, Dementia & Care Quality

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 26:57


The concepts that underlie hospice were introduced a few centuries ago but, the modern hospice movement began in London in 1967.In 1982 hospice was added as a Medicare benefit. Today, half of all Medicare decedents enroll in hospice, at a total cost of $20.9 billion to Medicare in 2019.Hospice has a strong evidence base for improving end-of-life experiences for the recipient and the recipient's family. But there's limited evidence regarding the effects of hospice for people with dementia.This is a critical knowledge gap given that one in three adults aged 85 and older has dementia.Krista Harrison from University of California San Francisco joins A Health Podyssey to discuss how well hospice works for people with dementia.Harrison and coauthors published a paper in the June 2022 issue of Health Affairs assessing the relationship between hospice enrollment and last month of life care quality for Medicare enrollees living with dementia.They found that hospice-enrolled people living with dementia had higher quality last month of life care than people who are not enrolled in hospice, with quality levels similar to people without dementia.Order the June 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on costs, care delivery, COVID-19, and more.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. – In Conversation with Dr. Richard Pazdur (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 25:33


In part one of this ASCO Education Podcast episode, director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence Dr. Richard Pazdur talks with hosts Dr. David Johnson and Dr. Patrick Loehrer about his upbringing in Indiana, his family, and his circuitous route to oncology. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.   TRANSCRIPT Dr. Pat Loehrer: Hi, I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm the director of the Center of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University. Dr. David Johnson: I'm Dave Johnson at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. Pat, great to be back with another episode of Oncology, Etc, an ASCO educational podcast. We have a very special guest today, Dr. Richard Pazdur, from the FDA Oncology Center of Excellence. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Dr. Pat Loehrer: This will be terrific. Dr. David Johnson: Yeah. You were telling me before we got started about a little event that occurred this week, maybe you want to elaborate on that for us. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Yeah, we always start out this by talking about books, and one of the books I'm drawn to today is a book called, The Emperor of All Maladies, which was written by Dr. Mukherjee several years ago. I want to read a little bit from this because it has pertinence. This is about a guy named John Cleveland. Dr. Mukherjee writes, he goes, ‘In 1973 Cleveland was a 22-year-old veterinary student in Indiana. In August that year, two months after his marriage, he discovered a rapidly enlarging lump in his right testis. He was whisked off to the operating room for surgery and returned with a scar and he was diagnosed with metastatic testis cancer. This was right around the time that Larry Einhorn came to Indiana University where he was treated with a three-drug cocktail of actinomycin-D, bleomycin, and oncovin ABO. And then he had a brief remission progressing and was treated with mithramycin mithrymicin. And then in October of 1974, he once again developed progressive disease, and Larry approached him about a new cocktail with the drug cisplatin, that had never been used before in combination, and Larry's thought was to put it together with another couple of drugs.” So, I'll just finish reading this. “In October 7, 1974, Cleveland took the gamble, he enrolled as patient zero for BVP, an acronym for the new regimen containing Bleomycin, Vinblastine and cisplatin. 10 days later, he returned for routine scans and the tumors in his lungs had vanished. He was ecstatic and mystified. He called his wife from the hospital phone. I can't remember what he said, but I told her the results. So, John was the first one cured of testis cancer. Back then it was a 5% cure rate. Today, it's 95%. He is really the hero of heroes. Last week, at this time, John had asked me to come to his hospital room because he was diagnosed with metastatic cancer of a different type. He knew that this was basically the final hours of it. And so he wanted to say goodbye to me, and it was the most touching reunion I had. Two days ago, John passed away. So, my thoughts are with him, especially his family. But also, when we think about heroes, John was one of them, and if it wasn't for him, and his first treatment, Larry might not have gone on and treated other patients with this regimen. This drug cisplatin was experimental back then it caused a lot of nausea and vomiting and didn't work in many tumors, but this was a drug that was really highlighted and approved for the treatment of bladder cancer so Hubert Humphrey could get treated, and then in testis cancer, and it's really one the really success stories of all success stories in terms of oncology, and it started out with this experimental drug from the NCI that was approved by the FDA.” So, this leads us to our guest today, Rick Pazdur who I've known for many years. He grew up in Calumet City, Illinois, which is famous as the home of the Blues Brothers and Rick Pazdur. He got his bachelor's degree from Northwestern, his medical degree from Loyola Stritch Medicine, and then did his hematology-oncology fellowship, initially his oncology fellowship at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's, where I first met Rick, and then later finished his Heme-Onc fellowship at the University of Chicago. From there, he went to Wayne State, served on the faculty there for about five or six years, and then joined the faculty at MD Anderson. He was there from 1988 to 1999. Then, we'd like to hear about this, but for some reason, it got in his head that he wanted to go to the FDA and so he moved to the FDA where he was Director of the Division of Oncology Drug Products, from 1999 to 2005, when they created the Office of Hematology Oncology Products, and he became the Director of this. More recently, he's been made the director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. He still serves as the acting director for this OHOP. Rick is an extraordinary individual. He's been awarded a number of awards. From ASCO, he got the Service Recognition Award and the Public Service Award in 2013. And the AACR also awarded him the Public Service Award in 2015. He's received numerous awards and he is probably one of the most respected oncologists that I know in this society. It's such a great pleasure to have you here today, Rick. Dr. Richard Pazdur: My pleasure, Pat. My pleasure entirely. I look forward to the conversation. Dr. David Johnson: Pat, you left out one award. He got so many awards that you can't list them all, but I was impressed that he got this award for the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center's – The 100 list. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Yeah, we made the cut-off. Dr. David Johnson: I have no idea what that is. Dr. Pat Loehrer: We were on the 1001 list. We made that one. The only thing I want to throw into is that when I first met Rick, when I was a resident or an intern, I think, he was on the service with Phil Bonomi, who is very important for me for my thymoma research, but there was an oncology nurse on the service, Mary Lind, who was a terrific oncology nurse as they all are. But it turned out there was more chemistry that went on. So, Rick ended up marrying Mary, and I'm sure he'll tell some stories. We'll come back to that in a little bit, too. Dr. David Johnson: Yeah, this is really exciting. So, let's get started. Rick, maybe you could tell us a little bit about your background and what got you into medicine in the early part of your career. Dr. Richard Pazdur: I had an interesting story. Pat had mentioned Calumet City home as a Blues Brothers. That was the orphanage in the movie. It was located in Calumet City. But what you don't know about Calumet City is that the real kind of nickname for Calumet City in the 50s 60s 40s was 'Sin City'. It has the honor of having the greatest number of liquor licenses in the United States. And in Calumet City, which was on the border of Hammond, Indiana, and Calumet City, they're kind of Sister Cities. They're one in Illinois, Calumet City. And Hammond is in Indiana, obviously, there was this strip, and it was called ‘The Strip' and it had all of these bars and floor shows with Sally Rand and gambling. If you walk down there, which I never did as a kid, but drove down there with my father some time just traversing the city, those lights were so bright, it was just like Las Vegas, basically. So, you had that Strip and that went on for maybe three, four, or five blocks. And then you have the rest of the city that I grew up in, which was primarily a Polish Catholic city, which I am kind of a representative of being 100% polish. There were scattered bars throughout the city. In fact, my fondest memory is sleeping in bed at 3 o'clock in the morning or 2 o'clock in the morning, awakening to people running out of a bar, which was 50 feet or 100 feet from my bedroom window. They were screaming and yelling and cursing and everything and throwing beer bottles at each other. And in those days, obviously, as you remember, in the 60s, there was no air conditioning. So, the bar was called The Tropical Inn. Let me tell you this, there was nothing tropical about it and there was nothing 'in' about it. Dr. David Johnson: That background might have driven…. Dr. Richard Pazdur: That was not what I would call a highbrow area, but I enjoyed it. It was a fabulous childhood that I had. Most people don't know this. So, I will share this with you because it really had an indelible mark on my life and something that really transformed my childhood and my high school years and my college years, and my medical school years. When I was about in seventh or eighth grade, my father who was basically a blue-collar factory worker, developed glaucoma, and he went blind at a very early age. And that threw the family into not only emotional turmoil but also economic turmoil. I survived basically by getting Social Security dependent income and had to work at a very early age. I started as a dishwasher. My mother lied about my age so I could start working at a crummy restaurant in Calumet City as a dishwasher and I worked throughout school, but that experience really made me grow up really fast if I could say so. You didn't have a childhood, you had to be responsible because there was really no security blanket to fall back on. Although my parents didn't have a lot of money, they really had very good emotional support for me and both my father and my mother came from very large, Polish families. My mother had nine children in her family. She was right in the middle. And so, I had many cousins and many aunts and uncles and my father had seven children in his family and he was the oldest boy. So, there was a lot of support there, but obviously not a lot of financial support. So, it really made me grow up relatively quickly and really come to some of life's lessons, relatively fast like discrimination against disabled people, which I will always remember. When I was a boy, I remember going with my father walking and obviously he had a white cane, but walking down the street, people would actually cross the street to avoid us. They just didn't want to confront that anxiety. I don't know if it was discrimination or if they just felt uncomfortable dealing with it. When you go to a restaurant, people raise their voices, like the man was mentally impaired and that wasn't the case. Dr. Pat Loehrer: I'm sorry to interrupt you just for a second because I read this somewhere and I think it's important to throw in. So, you graduated from high school in three years? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Yes, that's what I was gonna say. I graduated and I worked during that time also. These jobs were not like jobs that kids have now as consultants or internships, these were like real jobs as a janitor, a gardener, or a packer in a grocery store. You had to do it and you had to compartmentalize your life to get things done, basically. But you were driven to do things and I'm thankful for that experience really. I even use it now when I'm facing turmoil in my life. I look back at that time and say to myself, Rick, if you did it then as a 12-year-old kid, a 14-year-old kid, you could do anything. So, it really fostered a sense of responsibility, self-awareness, and the need to do things for yourself and get going on yourself. because nobody's going to help you in a sense. I'm very grateful for that. Dr. David Johnson: Rick, at what point did you decide to become a physician? How did that experience really drive you into that field? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Well, I spent a great deal of time in the lobby of the University of Chicago hospital with my father. I was the primary caregiver and went with him to his doctor's appointments. I can't tell you the number of hours I spent in the lobby of that hospital. I was very interested in science. I was very interested in really helping people because of that background. I really had a great deal of clarity, though. I remember, when I was maybe a freshman or sophomore in high school, I wrote for the Northwestern Medical School catalog, because I thought I would be going to Northwestern undergraduate, I already decided in my own mind that that's where I wanted to go. I just got their medical school catalog and I was thumbing through it, and I remember this vividly sitting on my bedroom floor next to the window that was 50 feet away from the bar, basically, and was looking through the medical school catalog and seeing all these names of this doctor, head of neurology, assistant professor, associate professor. I said, “Hell, if I'm going to be a doctor, I want to be one of these people. I want to be the best doctor. I want to be teaching the physician here and doing research.” So, unlike most kids today that have to find themselves, like, ‘I'm going to take 8 years to complete college or something like that and take a year off to find myself.' I had to be very, very focused on what I wanted to do. So, I really worked very hard during it through time. I don't regret it, as I say. I went to Northwestern undergraduate and had a fantastic experience there. I graduated in three years as I mentioned. I had a special interest there that most people don't know about. The people at the FDA know about it. I did these pre-med courses but I had a really special interest in the field of sociology, and actually was toying with the idea if I didn't get into medical school to pursue a Ph.D. in Sociology and become an academic sociologist. If you remember and both of you are of this age. Dr. Pat Loehrer: David is, not me. Dr. Richard Pazdur: Okay. David might know of the Vietnam War. This was right around the time of Kent State and closing down the schools, I'm sure you remember that, for the colleges, etc. Nobody went into business or anything like that. It was a sociology, psychology, and anthropology type of things people were interested in. My love was this field, and I did a lot of research on it. I remember one of the professors that probably had the most influence on me, a woman called Zena Smith Blau, who was a sociologist, and I did multiple research projects and independent studies. The first thing when I took her first course, she assigned us a paper and she said, write about yourself, ‘What makes you unique? I went to see her and I said, ‘I really don't know exactly what you mean by this.' She said, ‘Well, how different are you?' And I said, ‘Well, my parents are children of Polish immigrants, and I really know the Polish community in Chicago fairly well.' She said, ‘That's it Rick, that's what your specialty will be.' I did multiple research projects on this area with her. Some of them were like the assimilation of Polish immigrants with regard to urban-rural origin. Another one was working-class youth in Chicago, and mobility based on education and high school part-time employment. So, that was a fantastic experience that is totally outside of what I did in my future. Dr. David Johnson: We asked our listeners to submit questions because we knew you were coming on. We did get a question that perhaps is appropriate to ask at this time. It comes from a younger trainee, who wants to know what advice you would give to a trainee aspiring to have a clinical investigative career in oncology? What sort of preparation should they have? Obviously, you've got to learn all of the techniques of clinical trial designs, statistics, etc. But what other advice would you give a trainee hoping to pursue a career in clinical investigation? Dr. Richard Pazdur: I think one's career always has to go back to the basics and have a patient focus. So, what is your interest in the patient, so to speak? And that is what advice I would give them. Are you interested in a supportive care issue? Are you interested in a specific disease? I think you have to follow a passion and that is what is most important to me. What is your passion in life? Because as physicians, we spend a great deal of time preparing for our careers and then subsequently afterward, in our designated careers, and you really can't approach this as a job. It has to be a passion. So, if you do have this, what are the questions that you really want to answer? What is the field that you want to go into and make an indelible mark in? So, that's what I come from, and that's something that I tell our staff is: what do you really want to do? What makes you happy? What would make you a success in your mind? Not defining yourself by somebody else. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Finish the story a little bit. Was it a patient then that turned you on to oncology? What brought you into oncology? Dr. Richard Pazdur: I had a very circuitous circular route to oncology. Oh my God! I don't know if you have enough time to hear this story, but let me start though. I originally went to medical school because of my background in sociology. I wanted to become a psychiatrist because here again, I thought psychiatry, sociology, and psychology, these are kinds of things I was interested in until I took my first rotation in psychiatry. It was nothing like I thought it was going to be. I saw my first patient that got ECT (Electroconvulsive Therapy) and I said, 'I ain't doing this.' So, I was then interested in cardiology. Loyola at that time where I was going to medical school and where I did my internship and residency, had a huge cardiology program that was like CAST city, USA. Everybody was just coming into the hospital getting CAST and going out of the hospital. Dr. Pat Loehrer: [Unintelligible 18:13] was there, right? Dr. Richard Puzdar: Yes. Mary Kate [Unintelligible 18:18]'s father was the head of medicine there. And it had a huge cardiology program and an excellent cardiology program. I really did like Clinical Oncology, and I was all signed up for a cardiology fellowship, the Ts were crossed, the dots were placed, the contract signed, and everything. And somebody said, ‘Rick, why don't you take a rotation while you're a resident in the cath lab? We have an opening and this would be a great time and opportunity for you to jumpstart your fellowship. So, you can come and work for us in the middle of your third year of residency for about two or three months.' So, I did that and I hated it. I just dreaded it. I couldn't stand it. It was the most boring thing. I would think of every opportunity to escape the Cath lab. It was the same thing over and over and over again, inject the dye, turn on the [Unintelligible19:16] machine, and follow the coronary arteries. So, I happened to go to a community hospital, St. Francis in Evanston, Illinois, and I met an oncologist there that had just finished her fellowship. I really was very impressed by her clinical skills. She had finished her fellowship at the University of Chicago and worked with her there and was just amazed by really the quality of care that the oncologist gave patients with cancer. Previous to that, I had an interest also in oncology. At Loyola at that time, we had an oncologist his name was Ketty Badrinath, and he was an excellent clinical teacher. Now that I decided that I'm not going into cardiology, the first problem I have is to find a job and to find a fellowship in oncology. So, I started investigating oncology programs at St. Francis Hospital there. I went down to the gift shop and I said, I want $10 worth of quarters. I went to a payphone, closed the door of the payphone, dialed information, and got every oncology program that I could think of from Mayo Clinic to all of the programs in Chicago. One of my last phone calls was to Rush Presbyterian. I found that program director, Jules Harris, I don't know if you remember him, and he said, “We have an opening.” So, I accepted the position. At the end of June, whatever it was, June 27, 1979. I started my oncology fellowship program. Now Oncology at that time in Chicago, to give you a picture of it, the largest program in oncology was at Rush. It had a total of 12 people. And the therapy started at Rush around solid tumors really in the endocrine therapies of prostate cancer and breast cancer. So, it was a different program than most programs throughout the United States that were offshoots of Hematology programs and the treatment of acute leukemia and lymphomas. So, it had a really kind of different orientation. So, I started my fellowship. And on the first day, I met Phil Bonomi, who had a tremendous influence and still has an influence over me. I know no doctor that I respect most more than Phil. I think the greatest compliment that one could give a doctor is to refer your own family to him. And I've done it on numerous occasions with various cousins and aunts and uncles, etc. But as you mentioned, Pat, I also had the opportunity to meet my wife. And I met her and at first, we were very good friends and there was no romantic relationship. And then, as time proceeded, we knew that there was something special there. My wife was just a wonderful person. Like myself, my wife was pretty much a self-made person. She was one of eight children, the oldest daughter. As the oldest daughter, she had to assume a lot of childcare responsibilities, cooking, etc, for all of her brothers and sisters and took care of the younger children. But she was an excellent student. She graduated first in her class. She was a national merit finalist. I often asked my wife, ‘Mary, you're a nurse, are you interested in going into medicine? I'll be happy to work with you to get you into medical school.' And she said, ‘No, you want to go into medicine, I want to go into nursing.' That was her orientation toward other people. It wasn't about the buck. It wasn't about the title. It was about the work of helping other people. I really have to honor her mother and father who gave her that orientation. Of interest, all of her sisters are nurses. Her mother was actually a school nurse, and an original graduate of Rush. She went to Rush Nursing School in the 50s but had to leave because at that time in the 1950s, if you got married, you can't be in nursing school, they kicked you out. So, it shows you how times have changed.   Dr. Pat Loehrer: Well, this concludes part one of our interview with Dr. Richard Pazdur who is the director of the US Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence. Stay tuned for part two of this conversation where we'll hear how cancer has touched his life personally and will explore the initiatives and programs, he started to improve patient care globally.   Thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO education podcast where we'll talk about just about everything and anything. If you have an idea for a topic or guests you'd like to see on the show, please email us at education@asco.org. Have a good week.   Unknown Speaker: Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes. Please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive education center at education.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

MPR News Update
Minnesota Leaders meet to discuss racial health equity

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 5:47


Leaders of Minnesota's community health clinics and the state's department of human services are meeting Monday to discuss racial health equity. This is a morning update from MPR News, hosted by Cathy Wurzer. Music by Gary Meister.

Management Matters Podcast
Scaling Social Equity Solutions with Gail Christopher

Management Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 29:57


On this episode, we welcome Gail Christopher, Executive Director at the National Collaborative for Health Equity and Academy Fellow, to discuss her framework for social equity, how the US can scale successful social equity solutions, and her reflections on winning the Philip J. Rutledge Award. View the 2022 Social Equity Leadership ConferenceMusic Credits: Sea Breeze by Vlad Gluschenko | https://soundcloud.com/vgl9Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

HIMSSCast
The connection between health equity and value-based care is accelerating

HIMSSCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 12:35


There is a need to bring non-traditional organizations into value-based efforts, says Lynn Carroll, COO HSBlox

Am I Dying?!
How can I be my own health advocate?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 29:58


Do you feel like you don't have a voice in your own healthcare? Dr. Mark Lewis and Dr. Jean Luc Neptune talk about ways to take a stand for yourself. No one knows you and what you want for yourself better than YOU! Communicating your health concerns and goals clearly to your doctor helps your doctor help you. Tweet us your questions @marklewismd or @jeanlucneptune or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

St. Peter's by-the-Sea
PUBLIC HEALTH: Taking Care of Everybody: Dr. Patricia Markham Risica, DrPH

St. Peter's by-the-Sea

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 60:36


Dr. Patricia Markham Risica, DrPH Associate Professor of Behavioral & Social Sciences Associate Professor of Epidemiology Center for Health Promotion and Health Equity, Brown School of Public HealthOn June 7th, Dr. Patricia Markham Risica, DrPH, will discuss how we can collectively and cooperatively contribute to improving the health of the overall population. She will discuss some of the history of how public health interventions have been used to improve health for the entire population, and how these apply to current health issues

RawFork Podcast
S05E06 - Advocating for Health Equity w/ Dr. Stephanie Young Moss

RawFork Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 45:35


Today I want to highlight the work of another pharmacy and entrepreneur colleague, Dr. Stephanie Young Moss (aka “Yomo”). She caught my eye on Instagram, where she shines her light on wellness, family dynamics, pharmacy practice, and disparities in healthcare. A practical tip that she shared in the episode has stuck with me, about how learning goes both ways. For example, shadowing allows healthcare students to learn from professionals, but the mentors also get the opportunity to learn. A relationship with someone different than you helps you understand where they're coming from and how you can serve different populations. Dr. Stephanie received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy and a Masters of Health Services Administration with a concentration in Health Economics from The University of Wyoming. She has worked in various areas in pharmacy, Community, Regulatory Compliance, Managed Care, and Health Economics and Outcomes Research. Over the past 20 years Dr. Moss has advocated for decreasing disparities in health care through her volunteer work. She uses her platform to educate families across the U.S. on ways to decrease and eliminate health disparities by incorporating simple wellness and mental health techniques. Dr. Moss has shared her views on international and national podcasts and local television news stations. Dr. Stephanie is the creator of the website www.drstephanieyomo.com where you will find practical health and wellness tips, ways to reduce healthcare disparities and simple tips for health and wellness professionals to enhance their presence on social media so they can stand out in their niche, build a successful brand and advocate for important causes. She is also the owner of Integrative Pharmacy Outcomes and Consulting, which focuses on educating underserved communities on ways to reduce and prevent health disparities. For nearly 2 decades, Dr. Stephanie has served on various boards and volunteer organizations that focus on health equity, decreasing implicit bias, addressing social determinants of health and empowering communities to advocate for their health. She has served on the boards for The Minority Health Coalition of Marion County and Eskenazi Health Center where she has served as the Clinical Quality Committee Chair, Board Secretary and is currently the Board Treasurer. She resides in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can connect with Dr. Yomo on all social media (@Dr. Stephanie Yomo) and www.drstephanieyomo.com. Quote: “Creating exposure and building professional relationships with someone different than you helps you understand them and their needs.” For more amazing content, visit us at https://drmarinabuksov.com. Music: https://www.purple-planet.com.

Gathering Ground
Episode 32: Dr. Diana N. Derige

Gathering Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 60:00


This time on “Gathering Ground,” Mary meets with Dr. Diana N. Derige, Vice President of Health Equity Strategy & Development at the American Medical Association's Center for Health Equity, to discuss her role and the health disparities that are impacting Latinx and intersecting identities. Recently, alongside two of her colleagues, Diana edited and contributed to April's volume of the AMA Journal of Ethics titled Health Equity in US Latinx Communities. This issue of the Journal includes articles like "Should Clinicians be Activists?" "Latino Invisibility in the Pandemic," and "Language and Health (In)Equity in US Latinx Communities."

Doctors Who Create
#47 Creating the right FIT: Health Equity 2

Doctors Who Create

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 27:44


Dr. Evan Ashkin is the director and founder of the North Carolina Formerly Incarcerated Transition (NC FIT) program, which helps connect chronically ill formerly incarcerated individuals to primary care medical services. He currently serves as a professor of family medicine at the UNC School of Medicine, teaching in the underserved track of the residency program, and sees patients at Piedmont Health Services, which serves vulnerable populations. You can reach Dr. Ashkin with questions or comments at ashkin@med.unc.edu. If you're interested in hearing more about the program, please visit their website at ncfitprogram.org. To hear more about the Transitions Clinic Network upon which the NC FIT program was based, please visit their website at https://transitionsclinic.org/. If you're interested in an overview of post-release healthcare and re-entry programming, you can read more about it in an article co-authored by Dr. Ashkin, called “Prison And Jail Reentry And Health”: https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hpb20210928.343531/. References of interest: • The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander (https://newjimcrow.com/) • 13th by Ava Duvernay (a documentary viewable on Netflix: https://www.netflix.com/title/80091741) This episode was hosted and produced by Margaret Wang. Check out https://www.doctorswhocreate.com/about for the full podcast team. Music for this episode is credited to the band, Nightfloat. As always, please tweet us (@doctorscreate) with any questions, comments, or feedback!

Moving Medicine
Trans health care & gender-diverse patient considerations with Kameryn J. Lee, MD

Moving Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 15:12


AMA CXO Todd Unger and Kameryn Lee, MD, discuss how to approach—and provide—equitable health care for gender-diverse patients and the transgender community. Dr. Lee is a fellowship-trained minimally invasive gynecologic surgeon and founder of a new consultancy called Radically Inclusive Consulting Collective. She is also a member of the inaugural cohort of the Medical Justice in Advocacy 2021-2022 fellowship—a joint venture of the AMA and the Satcher Health Leadership Institute. For more information and resources, visit the AMA Center for Health Equity: https://www.ama-assn.org/about/ama-center-health-equity

Am I Dying?!
What is personalized medicine?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 31:16


Not to be confused with concierge medicine, personalized medicine uses genetic or biomarker information to determine treatment. In oncology, this leads to more precise care. Emerging in other medical specialties as well, personalized or precision medicine is providing more in-depth care and unique treatment options. JL and Mark are here to help us understand how it could benefit individuals.Tweet us your questions @jeanlucneptune or @marklewismd or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Impacting Health Equity in Cancer Care

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 16:37


In this episode, we are joined by Dr. James Hamrick, Vice President, Clinical Oncology, Flatiron Health. Tune in to hear this important discussion focused on health equity in cancer care, social determinants of health, catalysts for change, and more.This podcast is sponsored by Flatiron Health.

Analytics Exchange: Podcasts from SAS
The Health Pulse S3E1: The (Not So) Secret to Making Cancer Care More Equitable and Effective

Analytics Exchange: Podcasts from SAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 29:58


Dr. Sean Khozin is on a mission to break down silos and improve access to quality cancer care for all. Khozin is a board-certified oncologist, physician scientist, data scientist and the CEO of ASCO's CancerLinQ, a nonprofit health technology company focused on improving health outcomes for all patients with cancer. On this episode of The Health Pulse, Khozin joins host Alex Maiersperger to discuss how his organization is democratizing access to the best cancer care by bringing real-world evidence based tools to the point of care. As Khozin explains, only about 5% of cancer patients can access clinical trials. This means in oncology, clinical trial data often lacks external validity because it represents highly selective patient populations. CancerLinQ helps close the gap using real-world data to develop algorithmic support tools to inform personalized, multi-modal patient care in near-real time. Khozin also discusses precision medicine and reflects on how far we've come and opportunities to improve, particularly in the area of health care delivery. He also shares his perspective on regulatory science as translational science. From deriving insight from complex data to tackling treatment artifacts we need to unlearn, Khozin shares his vision for improving precision and why data convergence at the point of care leaves him optimistic about a major inflection point for cancer treatment in the next 10 years.Transcript available here.

A Health Podyssey
Rachael Bedard Explains Health Care in Jails

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 30:53


Join Health Affairs Insider.The United States has the highest rate of incarceration of any country in the world.Health care for people in jails and prisons is rarely part of mainstream health care and health policy conversations. But people who are incarcerated have significant health needs and a legal right to medical treatment.In addition, with 10 million people released from jail every year, needs that aren't met while people are incarcerated re-emerge in the community.While the number of incarcerated people in the United States has started to decline, the share of the incarcerated population that's older has grown, placing additional strain on health system's that are already under a great deal of pressure.Dr. Rachael Bedard joins A Health Podyssey to discuss the health needs of older people in jail. Bedard and coauthors published a paper in the May 2022 issue of Health Affairs assessing the health and health needs of incarcerated older adults in New York City. They found that older incarcerated had greater health vulnerabilities than their younger counterparts. They are also more likely to suffer from serious mental and physical illnesses.Order the May 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on telemedicine, disparities, pharmaceuticals, and more.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

The Clinical Problem Solvers
Episode 240: Anti-Racism in Medicine Series – Episode 17 – ‘Just' Births: Reproductive Justice & Black/Indigenous Maternal Health Equity

The Clinical Problem Solvers

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 57:21


  CPSolvers: Anti-Racism in Medicine Series Episode 17 – ‘Just' Births: Reproductive Justice & Black/Indigenous Maternal Health Equity Show Notes by Ayana Watkins May 31, 2022 Summary: This episode centers the roles of reproductive justice and anti-racist action in rectifying inequities faced by Black and Indigenous birthing persons. This discussion is hosted by Naomi Fields,… Read More »Episode 240: Anti-Racism in Medicine Series – Episode 17 – ‘Just' Births: Reproductive Justice & Black/Indigenous Maternal Health Equity

Am I Dying?!
Why? A response to the shooting in Uvalde, Texas

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 14:10


Recording our weekly episode was overshadowed by the emotion that we all felt in response to the senseless shooting in Uvalde, Texas. As parents and citizens, Dr. Mark Lewis and Dr. J.L. Neptune grapple with the impossible feelings of loss and grief over these young children and their teachers. As physicians, they see this as a public health crisis that must be addressed.Tweet us your questions @marklewismd or @jeanlucneptune or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Am I Dying?!
How much Ambien is too much Ambien?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 29:50


Getting to the root of sleep struggles might take longer than popping a pill, but good sleep hygiene and bedtime habits are a healthier solution. Relying on Ambien or other sleep medicines for an extended period of time can have long-term side effects. JL and Mark talk about sleep and sleep aids; when to use them and when to try an alternative method.Tweet us your questions @jeanlucneptune or @marklewismd or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.SHOW NOTES: CDC Sleep guidelines - https://www.cdc.gov/sleep/about_sleep/how_much_sleep.htmlSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.