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  • 101PODCASTS
  • 232EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 6, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about usa today network

Latest podcast episodes about usa today network

The Brian Lehrer Show
The State of New York State

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 21:05


Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC/Gothamist (formerly with the USA TODAY Network), offers excerpts and analysis of Gov. Hochul's first State of the State address.

SEC Football Unfiltered
Why expanding the College Football Playoff wouldn't hamper Alabama dominance

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 41:30


Throughout the eight years the College Football Playoff has been in place, 12 of the 16 semifinal games have been decided by more than 14 points. That included both semifinal games this season.  No. 1 Alabama defeated No. 4 Cincinnati 27-6 in the Cotton Bowl before No. 3 Georgia thumped No. 2 Michigan 34-11 in the Orange Bowl. Some pundits think expanding the playoff would create closer games and more varied outcomes. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams examine the case for an expanded playoff and whether it would generate more compelling games and create more parity within a sport that has become dominated by a handful of teams, led by Alabama. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.  

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 40 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 11:22


PROVIDENCE – As difficult as COVID-19 has made this December with omicron now the dominant variant, “we are looking toward a month of January when we're just going to see an extraordinary number of infections across all of the country,” Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, said on Tuesday.  “As it has been throughout, the pandemic is going to hit different parts of the country at different times,” jha said. “We're seeing pretty substantial increases in the Northeast. We're seeing Florida's numbers just skyrocket. We're seeing this really in Los Angeles. New York City has been one of the epicenters in the U.S. So we're really seeing this across the country.”  Jha said that while the number of reported new cases has hit record levels, the true numbers are likely even higher.  “I actually think we're way under-counting,” he said. “Because of the holidays, people are not testing. Lot of states are not reporting. So I would argue that right now, we have more people infected in America than at any moment during the entire pandemic, no question about it. In my mind, this is pretty staggering. And we are not anywhere near peak infection.”  According to The New York Times on Monday, 543,415 new cases were reported in the U.S. based on the latest data, with a daily average of 243,099. Rhode Island, according to The Times, had a daily average of 1,382 new cases with a positivity rate of 130 per 100,000, fifth highest in the nation, after Washington, D.C., New York, New Jersey and Puerto Rico.  https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/us/covid-cases.html In Rhode Island, as elsewhere in the nation, the strain on hospitals concerns Jha, who spoke during recording of the latest “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  “All of our major hospitals are incredibly stressed largely because of staffing shortages, because of nursing shortages,” Jha said. “So I am very worried about both the cases we saw just before Christmas and what will happen over the Christmas and New Year's holidays in terms of the number of new infections. Even if it turns out that Omicron is milder, which it probably is, there will still be enough new infections to really cause a serious problem.”  https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/coronavirus/2021/12/11/covid-fourth-wave-rhode-island-hospitals-short-staffed-omicron-ri/6461357001/    Jha and others on many occasions have urged people to get vaccinated and boosted when eligible. Experts also have repeatedly advised people to wear masks in many settings, particularly indoors; limit the size of gatherings; make provisions for proper ventilation, and continue hand-washing. These measures can also help prevent influenza and other diseases.  Isolation after testing positive has also been advised -- and on Monday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines. Among them is shortening the time that infected patients should isolate from ten to five days after a positive result.   https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2021/12/27/omicron-airlines-cancel-flights-covid-updates/9021308002/    Overall, Jha said he agrees with the new guidance.  “I'm in favor of the CDC changes, but I understand that not everybody loves them,” he said.   Looking deeper into 2022 and beyond, Jha said “there is no question in my mind that COVID-19 is going to be with us, probably forever but certainly for a very, very long time.”  The question then becomes, he said, “How do we manage our lives with the virus?”   Similar to “the way we manage our lives with lots of other respiratory viruses” such as flu, which has never disappeared, he said.  “We've got to figure out how to really lower the virulence, the way in which this virus gets people sick,” the scientist said.  Progress has already been made, according to Jha.  “Vaccines are going to be our primary tool,” Jha said. “We're also going to have therapies that will lower the severity of the disease, such as monoclonal [antibody therapy], oral pills like PAXLOVID from Pfizer. There will be hopefully others. It's going to become something that we manage and live with.”  https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/coronavirus/2021/12/12/monoclonal-antibodies-hasbro-childrens-hospital-treat-covid-at-risk-kids/6478053001/   Jha foresees seasonality, just as with flu.  “We'll see surges maybe even in the summer in the south, in the winter in the north, and that will become a feature of this virus,” he said.  But the bottom line, according to the scientist, is that COVID-19 “It will not continue to torture us the way it has so far.”    This is the 40th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, begun in October 2020 and available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK. It is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. 

SEC Football Unfiltered
Did LSU, Florida Gators, USC Trojans or Miami Hurricanes make the best hire?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 38:59


No shortage of quality college football jobs came open during this year's coaching carousel. LSU ranks among the top five jobs in the sport. It came open. So did another marquee SEC job: Florida. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams rank the hires for these six high-profile jobs. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

Scoops with Danny Mac
BILLIKEN BABBLE: Auburn Preview with Bennett Durando of The Montgomery Advertiser

Scoops with Danny Mac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 16:22


St Louis Native Bennett Durando of the USA Today Network and the Montgomery Advertiser joins Billiken Babble to get SLU nation prepared for their next top 25 matchups against the Auburn Tigers (War Eagle?). We talk about Jabari Smith and his NBA future, the Tigers Winning ways, their recent NCAA punishment, and what it means for Bennett to be covering the game with his Father, St Louis Post-Dispatch Beat Writer Stu Durando! If you can support the recovery effort in Kentucky due to the recent Tornados, please look to Travis Ford's recommended donation options. They can be found here: It's still heartbreaking to see so many impacted by last weekend's storms. If you are able to help, please do so. The @KyChamber & @KySportsRadio fund, as well as the @UnitedWaySTL fund, are a few still needing our support. pic.twitter.com/5mNd3bVAfE — Travis Ford (@CoachTFord5) December 15, 2021

SEC Football Unfiltered
Where should Bo Nix, Max Johnson, Zach Calzada transfer? Here are some SEC schools in need

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 35:56


College football coaches predicted that loosening transfer restrictions on athletes would yield a free agency-like system, and that's come to fruition after the NCAA changed the rules last spring to grant immediate eligibility to all first-time transfers. The transfer portal is bursting at the seams, and it's not just full of bums and project players. Already, former Oklahoma starting quarterback Spencer Rattler has transferred to South Carolina. Also in the portal are former SEC starting quarterbacks Bo Nix of Auburn, Max Johnson of LSU and Zach Calzada of Texas A&M. Each of those three players will be immediately eligible at his next school, whether that's a destination inside or outside the SEC. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams suggest SEC landing spots for these transferring quarterbacks.  Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The Volunteer State
Tennessee football can go from Music City Bowl to Sugar Bowl next season ... yes, really

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 35:31


Could Tennessee catapult from the Music City Bowl in 2021 to the Sugar Bowl next season? It's within the realm of reasonableness after quarterback Hendon Hooker announced Sunday that he'll return to UT for a sixth season of college eligibility in 2022. If you don't believe us, just look at Ole Miss' success this season. The Rebels laid groundwork in 2020 by going 5-5 in Lane Kiffin's first season. Quarterback Matt Corral's return offered promise for better times ahead in 2021. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks debate whether Hooker's return positions Tennessee to emulate the Rebels' second-year surge. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

The Volunteer State
Is Music City Bowl a lackluster reward for Tennessee football or a prime opportunity?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 24:02


Tennessee (7-5) will play Purdue (8-4) in the Music City Bowl on Dec. 30 (3 p.m. ET, ESPN). For Vols fans hoping to make a trip south for some winter sunshine and beach time, sorry. For those looking to travel to a nearby destination to watch UT play in the postseason, you're in luck. So, what's better – a Florida bowl, which historically carries more prestige, or an opportunity for first-year coach Josh Heupel to showcase his program at the instate NFL stadium? On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams discuss Tennessee's bowl selection and whether it was a fair reward for Tennessee's season. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

SEC Football Unfiltered
Why Georgia football's playoff fate isn't centered on Stetson Bennett ... or J.T. Daniels

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 41:31


If the Georgia football team is to win a national championship this season, it's not going to be through the arm of its quarterback. These Bulldogs were fashioned as a throwback. For 12 games, Georgia used a menacing defense and an offense built around its rushing attack to ascend to No. 1 in the nation. But those linchpins didn't hold in a 41-24 loss to No. 2 Alabama on Saturday in the SEC Championship Game in Atlanta. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams debate whether Georgia should change quarterbacks for the playoff. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 39 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 12:24


PROVIDENCE – The omicron variant has been detected in more than two dozen countries, including just this week in the U.S.   And this much is certain, says pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha: it will continue to spread.  Beyond that, Jha asserts, uncertainties at this early stage abound, just as they did when the last major variant, Delta, was first found in India about a year ago.  During recording of the latest “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, said he and other scientists are concerned with three major issues as they monitor developments.  -- Ease of transmissibility, which the Delta variant has abundantly demonstrated, is one.  “There's some data out of South Africa that suggests that it might be spreading very quickly in South Africa, but just because it does there does not mean it's going to spread more easily here,” Jha said. “The short answer is we don't know.”  But he added: “If Omicron is as contagious or more contagious than Delta, [most regions] will end up encountering this variant as well.”  -- A second issue is severity.  “Does it cause more severe disease?” Jha said. “We have no idea. You may have heard stories of somebody who had mild disease, but individual cases, anecdotes, don't tell you the story. We have to look at a lot more data. We don't know if it causes milder disease or more severe disease. Obviously, we all hope it causes more mild disease, but we don't know.”  -- A third is evasiveness, “the big issue,” as Jha described it.  “Does it break through our vaccines?” Jha said. “We don't have the data, but here's what concerns so many of us: the mutations we see with omicron are in parts of the virus where our vaccines usually work -- the parts of the spike protein where our vaccines work. That's where we're seeing the mutations and that's what's concerning many of us.”  Jha expects answers here relatively quickly.  “We will get more data in the next week to 10 days,” he said. “We don't have to wait months.”  Regarding the three current COVID vaccines – Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson – and their potential defense against omicron, Jha was asked: “Is it better to be vaccinated than to be unvaccinated?”  “Oh my goodness, not even a close call,” Jha said. “Let's say our vaccines work a little less well. Is there any chance vaccine effectiveness goes to zero, meaning the vaccines atop working completely against omicron? There's essentially no chance in my mind that vaccines will stop working altogether.   “So if you've been vaccinated, you'll still have some degree of protection. And most of us believe, [given] our understanding of how boosters work, that if you are fully boosted, you actually will probably have a pretty high degree of protection against Omicron.”  Jha's advice? If you are not vaccinated, do so. And if you are eligible for a booster shot but not yet gotten it, do so.  During the podcast, Jha also explained why unvaccinated people who become infected with coronavirus are much more likely than vaccinated people to serve as a sort of haven in which mutations are more likely to occur. The reason, he said, is the more frequently a virus replicates, the greater the chance that one or more replications will carry a mutation.   “Vaccinated people most times won't even get infected, so the virus is not going to be multiplying,” Jha said. “Even if you get infected, [the virus] will be there for a much shorter period of time and you're not going to give the virus as much chance to mutate.  “No question there's a lot more replication happening among unvaccinated people and replication is the heart of mutations that lead us to” variants such as omnicon.  This is the 39th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, begun in October 2020 and available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK. It is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. 

SEC Football Unfiltered
Did LSU football hit a home run with Brian Kelly or overspend in a panic buy?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:01


LSU opened the bank vault, stroked a big check, and got its man. Southern Cal's moment in the spotlight after hiring Lincoln Riley from Oklahoma didn't last long. LSU seized the attention by lifting veteran Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly away from one of the sport's most iconic jobs for the chance at a richer paycheck and fertile recruiting ground on the Bayou. Kelly received a 10-year contract worth $95 million, plus incentives. But did LSU make a home-run hire or overspend in a panic buy to wrap up a coaching search that had entered its seventh week? On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, host Blake Toppmeyer and guest cohost Nick Kelly of the Tuscaloosa News evaluate LSU's hire. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Nick Kelly (@_NickKelly) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The Volunteer State
Tennessee football bowl projections: Here's who Vols should (and shouldn't) want to play

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 29:14


A Big Ten or an ACC opponent is likely in Tennessee's future. The Vols (7-5) will learn their bowl destination on Sunday. Logical candidates include the Music City Bowl, Gator Bowl, Outback Bowl and Duke's Mayo Bowl. The Music City or Outback would pit Tennessee against a Big Ten opponent, while the Gator or Duke's Mayo would slate the Vols against a team from the ACC. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's Adam Sparks discuss possible bowl destinations and opponents for Tennessee. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

Mizzou Sports
Mizzou football heads into Battle Line Rivalry bowl eligble

Mizzou Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 55:18


Columbia Daily Tribune Mizzou athletics beat reporter Eric Blum and Tribune sports editor Chris Kwiecinski talk about Missouri's last two victories to become bowl eligible and preview the upcoming game against Arkansas. The USA Today Network's Christina Long is this week's special guest to give further insight into the Razorbacks. Also, both Eric and Chris' fathers, both named Bruce, join to celebrate Thanksgiving.

The Volunteer State
Is Josh Heupel a better choice for SEC coach of the year than Kirby Smart or Lane Kiffin?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:14


Clemson coach Dabo Swinney on Monday suggested that South Carolina's first-year coach Shane Beamer should be considered for SEC coach of the year. If an ACC coach can nominate someone for an SEC award, then we can, too. And there's no shortage of options this year, including Josh Heupel, Tennessee's first-year coach who inherited a depleted roster and an ongoing NCAA investigation left by the previous coaching staff. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks consider Heupel's candidacy for SEC coach of the year, and they offer their picks as it stands today. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

SEC Football Unfiltered
A few candidates the Florida Gators should (and shouldn't) consider as next football coach

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:33


Florida became the third marquee college football job to open this season when the Gators fired Dan Mullen amid his fourth season on Sunday. The Gators join LSU and Southern Cal with openings considered to be among the top-15 jobs in college football. Other Power Five jobs available include Washington, Washington State, Virginia Tech and TCU. Suffice it to say that this year's coaching carousel will offer an even wilder ride than usual. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams each pitch three candidates for their cohost to evaluate for the Gators. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

Subscription Stories: True Tales from the Trenches
The Right Teams & Culture for Subscription Growth with Gannett-USA Today Network CMO Mayur Gupta

Subscription Stories: True Tales from the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:18


Mayur Gupta is the Chief Marketing and Strategy Officer at Gannett – USA Today Network. He is responsible for leading the transformation of Gannett into a subscription platform that is obsessed with user value and not just site traffic. Mayur is responsible to actualize Gannett’s mission to build trusted local communities where people thrive. This is not his first time driving growth among subscribers. Prior to Gannett, he was CMO of the subscription meal company Freshly and before that, Mayur was Global VP for Growth & Marketing at Spotify. Mayur was recently named to Forbes’ list of the World’s most influential CMOs of 2021. In this conversation, we talk about the kind of teams needed for sustainable long-term subscription success, the role of “growth” as an emerging discipline and his formula for creating a flywheel for growth that can work at any kind of company.

The Volunteer State
Tennessee football bowl projections: Music City, Duke's Mayo or Liberty for Vols?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:55


Bowl projections abound, and we're not going to miss out on the projection fun. Tennessee (5-5, 3-4 SEC) is positioned to play in a bowl for just the second time in a five-year stretch. The Vols will host South Alabama (5-5) on Saturday (7:30 p.m. ET, ESPNU) before concluding the regular season against Vanderbilt (2-8). They need to win at least one of those two games to secure bowl eligibility. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks forecast Tennessee's bowl prospects.  Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

BPR News Extended
Section 8 program in the South reinforcing segregation

BPR News Extended

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:21


A federal government housing voucher program is making the problems it was designed to alleviate only worse in the South. That's according to a six-month investigation done by the USA Today Network.

SEC Football Unfiltered
Who faced the toughest coaching job – Sam Pittman, Mike Leach or Lane Kiffin?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 43:33


Arkansas, Mississippi State and Ole Miss rank as the toughest jobs in the SEC West.  Second-year coaches Sam Pittman, Mike Leach and Lane Kiffin are making them look relatively easy. Each team secured an important victory on Saturday. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams evaluate the speedy program turnarounds being orchestrated by Kiffin, Pittman and Leach. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

New York NOW
Cuomo Probe Transcripts, State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, Qualified Immunity Debate

New York NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:57


On this week's edition of New York NOW: - Hundreds of pages of transcripts were released this week from the Attorney General's investigation into the multiple claims of sexual harassment made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo this year. - Jon Campbell from the USA Today Network and Kate Lisa from Johnson Newspapers join us to break down the highlights of those transcripts. - State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli join us to discuss the state's finances, access to broadband, and next year's elections. - The debate over qualified immunity for police officers heats up in New York. Darrell Camp has the details. Learn more: nynow.org

Mizzou Sports
Mizzou football returns home for critical matchup against South Carolina

Mizzou Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 52:11


Columbia Daily Tribune Mizzou athletics beat reporter Eric Blum and Tribune sports editor Chris Kwiecinski talk about Missouri's 43-6 loss to No. 1 Georgia and how it impacts the Tigers' game against South Carolina. The USA Today Network's Cory Diaz is this week's special guest to give further insight into the Gamecocks. 

The Volunteer State
Is Tennessee football or Florida a bigger long-term threat to Georgia?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 28:36


Tennessee fans celebrated two triumphs Saturday: the Vols' 45-42 victory over No. 17 Kentucky, and South Carolina's 40-17 thrashing of Florida. Florida (4-5, 2-5 SEC) has jumped the rails since beating Tennessee 38-14 on Sept. 25, while the Vols (5-4, 3-3) are on the upswing. Tennessee will face its greatest test to date against No. 1 Georgia (3:30 p.m. ET, CBS) on Saturday at Neyland Stadium. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks preview UT's clash against a defense that Vols coach Josh Heupel described as "statistically maybe as good as anybody that's ever played the game." Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

SEC Football Unfiltered
Here's the case for retaining embattled Florida Gators coach Dan Mullen

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 32:20


If Florida is going to fire embattled coach Dan Mullen, it must consider two questions: Who can the Gators legitimately expect to hire? And is Florida confident it will outrank LSU and Southern Cal on the vacancy pecking order? LSU and USC got a jumpstart on their coaching searches in October and September, respectively. Do the Gators really want to enter that brew now? On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams examine Mullen's hot-seat status and debate whether Gators athletics director Scott Stricklin should retain Mullen or reboot. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The Volunteer State
How Josh Heupel could dunk on Jeremy Pruitt during his first season

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 26:05


The pinnacle of the Jeremy Pruitt era came in 2019. Tennessee started 0-2 before rebounding and qualifying for the Gator Bowl, where the Vols rallied to defeat Indiana 23-22 to cap an 8-5 season. We later learned Tennessee's 2019 season was fool's gold. Pruitt flopped in 2020, and Tennessee fired him after the season amid an NCAA investigation into alleged recruiting violations by Pruitt's staff. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks preview UT's game against the Wildcats and how it has shifted toward a game Tennessee should expect to win after UK got thumped by Mississippi State on Saturday. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 38 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 14:46


PROVIDENCE – With the CDC expected this week to grant approval of the Pfizer vaccine for children age 5 to 11, polls show that some parents and guardians are hesitant about their youngsters getting the shots – and some have said they will refuse.  Dr. Ashish Jha's message to them?  “You can listen to what I have to say, but more importantly, look at what I'm doing.”  What he is doing, the Brown University School of Public Health dean revealed on Tuesday, is having his nine-year-old son get inoculated.  “The first possible day that the vaccine is available, he's getting the shot,” Jha said.   Needless to say, Jha and his wife are not subjecting their child to something untested. Science stands behind their decision.  “I have looked very, very carefully at the data and for my nine-year-old who's healthy, the benefits of the vaccines way outweigh any risks of the vaccines,” Jha said.  “The vaccine has been given to almost 4 billion people, including tens and tens of millions of kids around the world. The vaccines are exceedingly safe. And so between the global experience of vaccinations and the long-term effects of COVID, this is not a close call. This is a ‘gotta do this.' It's the right thing to do for your kids.”  Some 80,000 Rhode Island residents belong to this youngest group. The state Health Department has been preparing for weeks for the CDC's anticipated approval, which could come as soon as the end of the day Tuesday.  “We are working to ensure that vaccine is available to this population in Rhode Island very promptly after the CDC makes their announcement,” public information officer Joseph Wendelken told The Journal. After the CDC ruling, he said, “we will be making an announcement about when eligibility gets expanded in Rhode Island.”  https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/local/2021/10/12/covid-2021-outlook-halloween-thanksgiving-according-dr-ashish-jha/6100647001    On another issue during Tuesday's taping of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, Jha said that in Rhode Island and New England, “infection numbers are pretty stable, at a low-ish level -- not high, not tiny,” unlike last year at this time, when cooling autumn weather forced people indoors, where the coronavirus spreads easily, and the region experienced a surge.  The Health Department on Nov. 2, 2020, reported 214 Rhode Island residents hospitalized, with 26 in ICU; new cases totaled 429; and there were six deaths. Those numbers reported on this Tuesday, a year later, were 95, 11, 224, and two, respectively.  COVID-19 this year, Jha said, is “running up against a wall of vaccinated people, so we're not seeing those outbreaks… We're essentially at a stalemate, with the virus at a relatively low level.”  Still, he added, “I don't want to be too kind of ‘rosy-colored glasses' on this. Could I see outbreaks in New England over the next couple of months? Absolutely. Could we see hospitalizations rise? Yes, but I think we have so much vaccination here, so many people vaccinated, that I don't see large outbreaks in our future and I don't see anything like last winter.”  Not necessarily so for other parts of the U.S., however, Jha said.  “It's not just getting cold in New England, it's also getting cold in the Midwest and the Great Plains states, and those places I'm more worried about infection,” he said. “I some places like Montana, North Dakota, infection numbers are really quite high and that's because they just don't have the same level of vaccinations. And one has to be worried about those states for the next couple of months.”  During the taking, Jha also discussed the new Merck COVID medication, molnupiravir, saying “I am very optimistic this pill is going to end up becoming an important part of our tool set” in the fight against coronavirus disease. But he said it is no substitute for vaccination.  And Jha went into detail about the CDC's recent recommendation on booster shots.   On Oct. 21, the agency declared that “eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster dose. Some people may have a preference for the vaccine type that they originally received, and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC's recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots.”   Three vaccines are available in the U.S.: the two-shot Pfizer and Moderna products, and the one-shot Johnson & Johnson, or J&J.   Said Jha: “If you got the J&J, you need a second shot no matter who you are… Whether you call it a booster or you just call it a second shot in the series is up to you but you need a second shot and it doesn't matter which second shot. If you got a J&J, you can get a Moderna, a Pfizer or another J&J, and I think you're fine.   “If you had a Moderna or Pfizer and you're in any kind of a high-risk group -- if you're older, chronically ill, high exposure -- you should get that booster. And here again, it doesn't matter which booster you get.”  Also Tuesday, Jha stressed the importance of providing vaccines to people on all parts of the planet, not just more privileged nations. Variants have arisen in parts of the world where vaccination rates were low, Jha said, and those have spread globally. New variants could arise in similar fashion.  This is the 38th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK. It is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. 

SEC Football Unfiltered
Here are two options for how the College Football Playoff rankings should look

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 40:35


Georgia almost certainly will be ranked No. 1 when the first College Football Playoff rankings are unveiled on Tuesday night. Sorry to spoil the surprise. After that, it's going to get interesting.  On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams debate how they'd order the top seven teams in this week's rankings. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

SEC Football Unfiltered
SEC coach of the year: Can Lane Kiffin or Mark Stoops beat Kirby Smart?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:32


Kirby Smart is the man to beat for SEC coach of the year. But if Smart's Bulldogs (7-0, 5-0) stumble before the College Football Playoff, or if voters are just desperate for a plucky underdog story, other candidates would come into play. On this edition of “SEC Football Unfiltered,” a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams debate the top candidates who could threaten Smart for SEC coach of the year. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The Volunteer State
How many moral victories can the Vols claim in Josh Heupel's first season?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 28:01


Can a 28-point loss be a moral victory?  Depends how you look at it. Tennessee football's 52-24 loss to No. 4 Alabama on Saturday was closer for most of the game than the final score indicated. The Vols led 14-7 after one quarter and trailed just 31-24 early in the fourth quarter. On the flip side, Tennessee suffered its 15th straight losses to Alabama, and none of the last six results in this series have been closer to 22 points. On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks evaluate Tennessee's performance and debate whether it qualifies as a moral victory. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) Adam (@AdamSparks) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on Vols sports news by following @GoVolsXtra. Connect on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GoVolsXtra/ Subscribe to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

Home Plate Podcast
8: Season 2, ep. 8: Trouble brewing with Pruitt?

Home Plate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:20


Tennessee falls in a memorable night against Ole Miss. We look ahead to Alabama and are joined by Blake Toppmeyer of the USA Today Network to discuss the latest actions of former Vols coach Jeremy Pruitt and his legal team. 

SEC Football Unfiltered
Who's the top LSU football coaching candidate who would say yes to the Tigers?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:11


It's coaching search season for LSU football. The Tigers will have a new coach in 2022 after Sunday's announcement that coach Ed Orgeron will be dismissed at the conclusion of this season. This will mark the opening of one of college football's top jobs, and one of college athletics' most highly regarded athletics directors, Scott Woodward, is expected to swing for a big-name hire. On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams offer potential candidates who should be linked to the search. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe.

The Volunteer State
Where would Tennessee football be right now if Lane Kiffin hadn't left in January 2010?

The Volunteer State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:50


On this edition of "The Volunteer State," Blake Toppmeyer of the USA TODAY Network and the News Sentinel's John Adams and Adam Sparks reflect on Kiffin's exit, discuss his return and examine what is an important game for each program. Tennessee has had a losing record in seven of the last 11 seasons, following Kiffin's exit. Toppmeyer asks Sparks and Adams to envision a world in which Kiffin didn't depart in January 2010. What would have happened to Tennessee football and Kiffin?

SEC Football Unfiltered
After Alabama football loss, how close is the SEC West from veering into chaos?

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:48


On this edition of "SEC Football Unfiltered," a podcast from the USA TODAY Network, hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams offer an SEC West reset and debate whether Saturday's upset in College Station, Texas, said more about Texas A&M and how it never should have lost to Arkansas and Mississippi State, or whether it revealed real concerns for Alabama.  

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 37 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 16:50


PROVIDENCE – Do not expect a repeat of the grim fall and winter holidays of last year, when the pandemic raged. Instead, people in many parts of the U.S. can look forward to more traditional celebrations, now that “the delta surge of the summer has clearly turned a corner.”  Such was the assessment on Tuesday by Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, during taping of the 37th taping of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  “The horrible surge of the South, I think, is over,” Jha said. During the summer, he said, “Florida was among the worst in the world and now it's well below national average.”  Jha cited data confirming that nationally, infections, hospitalizations' and deaths are in decline. But, the physician and scientist warned, “I think there are pockets of concern. Certainly in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains… In North Dakota, Montana, large parts of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan, you're seeing infection numbers still rising, and I'm worried.”  But for residents elsewhere, Jha said, the end of 2022 should be better than the last months of 2021, starting with Halloween.  “Is it safe to go trick-or-treating? Absolutely,” said Jha. “Halloween may not be 100% normal, but let's say, very, very, very close to normal.”  His one hesitation?  The fact that the federal government has yet to grant emergency use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children age five to 11. Approval is expected soon, but not in time for kids in that youngest age group to get the first and second shots required to reach full immunity.  And for that reason, Jha urged trick-or-treaters to wear masks if they enter a residence to get their candy. He also said “especially with young kids, I wouldn't do a house party.”  If all guests and members of a household – including the youngsters -- are fully vaccinated, Thanksgiving and the December holidays should be as they were in 2019 and previous years, Ashish said. Those willing to err on the side of caution, he added, should consider rapid testing, particularly if someone attending a gathering is not vaccinated.    “If you really want to be extra careful,” he said, “give everybody a rapid test before they come over for Thanksgiving dinner. It takes 15 minutes,” and the cost, now at about $10, is expected to drop, according to Jha said.  When everyone tests negative, Jha said, “I don't know what else you can do to make it safer. You're in an exquisitely safe situation.”  Jha said that once approval is given to the Pfizer vaccine for young children, he will arrange for his nine-year-old child to be inoculated as soon as possible.  And then he discussed an issue concerning many parents and guardians of children in the five-to-11 group: what factor does a child's weight play? Pfizer has recommended doses for the youngest children to be one-third of those now administered to people 12 and older – but some 11-year-olds weigh much more than their peers.   “I do wish that we could do this in more of a weight-based method,” Jha said.  Given that is not the case, he said, “this is a conversation with your pediatrician… It may be reasonable to go in a different direction, but really based on the guidance of your physician.”   Asked about recently enacted vaccine mandates for healthcare workers in Rhode Island and many parts of the country, Jha hailed them as a success, saying that nationally, only about one percent of such workers have declined.  “There is always going to be a small, noisy minority -- you know, the one nurse who so strongly refuses that he or she is willing to lose their job. Those are just extremely rare.”  Jha addressed the issue of flu season coinciding again with COVID.  “Last year, the flu basically didn't show up, he said. “And the reason is we did a lot of masking and hand-washing… and social-distancing. That made a big difference.  “What I suspect is going to happen this year with less masking, less social-distancing, is we're going to see a lot more flu. I'm hoping that some of the lessons of COVID will keep the flu level from getting horrible.” Hand-washing remains critical to prevent spread of influenza.  Jha urged all to get their flu shots if they haven't already.  The dean also answered an audience question from a man in New Jersey who wrote:   “We have a healthy 11-year-old son who turns 12 around Dec 1.  However, under the assumption that vaccines become eligible for kids 5-11 by the end of October, does Dr. Jha have any thoughts/data about kids that age getting the lower dose right away?  Or if there are any benefits/reasons to waiting the extra month to get the same dosage kids 12+ have been getting for a while?”  Here, too, Jha recommended a discussion with a pediatrician.    The “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, debuted in late October, 2020. Nearly nine hours have been recorded through this, the 37th episode. 

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast
Pregame Podcast: Ethan Sands talks NC State vs. LA Tech

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 21:45


Coming off the biggest win of the Dave Doeren era over Clemson, NC State faces yet another tough test in Louisiana Tech this weekend. Ethan Sands of the USA Today Network joins Cory Smith to break down the Bulldogs ahead of Saturday's matchup. What should Pack fans expect from QB Austin Kendall if he's cleared to play? Who are the playmakers on offense and defense for La Tech? What has led to the Bulldogs' 2-2 record with two losses by a combined 3 points? What is Ethan's prediction for Saturday?

Story in the Public Square
A Look Ahead at the COVID-19 Pandemic with Dr. Ashish Jha

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 28:10


When schools finished the academic year earlier this summer, they looked forward to the fall with the first cautious optimism anyone had felt in years.  But Dr. Ashish Jha has offered level-headed wisdom that the pandemic simply is not over. Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH, is a physician, health policy researcher, and the Dean of the Brown University School of Public Health.  Before joining Brown, he was the K.T. Li Professor of Global Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the Harvard Global Health Institute.  An internationally respected and consulted pandemic expert, Jha strongly believes that communication with the public is an essential part of public health, and never more important than during a public-health emergency like COVID-19.  He appears regularly on national news network shows, is active on social media, and is the authoritative voice on the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY Network.  In addition to his duties at Brown, maintains a clinical practice at the Providence VA Medical Center. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 36 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 15:40


PROVIDENCE – The microbe that causes coronavirus disease may never disappear entirely, but there is an “end game” in sight for the pandemic, which means “we're going to get through this and we will get back to a normal that people will value and appreciate and love.”  And that could be as soon as the year 2022.  That was the prognosis Tuesday from Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, speaking during a recording of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  “We still have a lot of work to do, but the bottom line is if you think about the tools necessary to bring this pandemic to an end, we have them all,” starting with safe and effective vaccines, Jha said.  “Thinking about what the long-term looks like,” the scientist continued, “we are going to live with this virus. We're not going to eradicate it, but hopefully we can suppress it to very, very low levels. The 1918 flu pandemic was caused by this H1N1 influenza. That virus is still around, but it just doesn't cause much illness anymore.   “So I would not be a bit surprised if the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 is around forever. My hope is at very, very low levels. My hope is that most of us have immunity either from vaccines or from infections and that the infection levels are very low and then we do some things for a while to keep infection levels low, like have regular widespread testing and improve indoor air quality and occasionally, if there's an outbreak, put on masks…  “The other thing that will help speed up this end game is if we get better treatments, which will also make it less serious.”  Bottom line?  “I think 2022 is going to be a much, much better year for all of this,” Jha said.  During taping of this 36th episode of the podcast, available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, Jha also said he suspects that the autumn months for the nation as a whole will be better than some who have been following the spread of the delta variant are predicting.  “There's an old line by Yogi Berra that predictions are hard, particularly about the future,” Jha joked, “but I'm going to make one which is: I think we as a country have peaked in our infection numbers. We had this very dramatic rise in cases all through the summer and I think in the last couple of weeks, it really looks like we've peaked.”  Regional differences remain.  “The infection numbers in the South really have started coming down,” Jha said. “When I look out to California, it's stabilized and coming down. New York is coming down. The Midwest and the Great Plains I still worry about; I can see infection numbers rising. Here in New England, infection numbers seem to have pretty much flattened over the last week to 10 days.”  Nonetheless, Jha said, nationally “we still have enormous numbers of people getting infected: 140,000 and 150,000 a day, down from 175,000, but still high.”   Deaths and hospitalizations remain unacceptable, the scientist said, “so I don't mean to paint a rosy picture of ‘sunny days are here again' and everything is great. We have lots of challenges especially as we look to the fall, but I think the peak of this wave has crested and now we've got to figure out how to get it down quickly.”  Jha responded to questions The Journal has received regarding the safety of large indoor gatherings, asserting that “we have the tools to do indoor concerts and conferences, but they're complicated… You've got to work harder to make those events safe.”  He gave the example of a two-day indoor academic conference, saying “the first thing I would do is do a vaccine mandate: ‘Sorry, you can't come and spend two days indoors with a lot of people if you're not vaccinated,' Second, I would add some rapid testing on top of antigen testing. They're cheap. They're relatively easy and I would get everybody tested upon arrival. I don't think once you've done that that you would need indoor masking.”  Proper ventilation also is key, Jha said.  The Brown dean said he approves of President Biden's decision last week to use the federal Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration to implement a vaccine mandate or require regular testing for companies that employ 100 or more people.  “I think that's a very reasonable set of regulations,” Jha said, “one certainly backed by the science. It makes sense to me that the federal government can require that as a safety measure.”  On the topic of booster shots, Jha said it is likely that an advisory panel to the FDA in the next week or so will recommend third shots of the Pfizer and Moderna products for “high-risk people -- people who are over 65, people who have chronic diseases, certainly frail elders. My guess is, they're not going to recommend boosters for young healthy people, largely because it's really not clear that they are needed at all.”  As for the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine, Jha said he hopes the FDA will provide guidance on it, too, and not just “say ‘you're on your own' and not give any sense of a timeline for when they'll have answers… My hope is that when the FDA advisory committee meets in the next week, they address the J&J issue. If not, I'm happy to tell you what. I think the data [indicates] people are going to need an extra shot.” 

SEC Football Unfiltered
Why some SEC football teams should embrace a COVID forfeit rather than play Alabama

SEC Football Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 36:10


The SEC has provided its members with the perfect cop-out to suffering a beatdown at the hands of No. 1 Alabama. Claim a COVID-19 forfeit. On Wednesday, the SEC announced that teams will be assessed a forfeit loss if they are unable to compete in a game this season because of roster limitations brought on by positive COVID-19 tests or quarantines. Perfect. USA TODAY Network hosts Blake Toppmeyer and John Adams embrace using the COVID forfeit as a strategic move. Stay connected on Twitter with Blake (@btoppmeyer) and John (@JohnAdamsKNS) and stay up to date on SEC football news by subscribing to KnoxNews: knoxnews.com/subscribe

Shock Your Potential
Embracing Artistic Journalism to Drive Social Change - Dayvee Sutton

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 31:00


"Embrace your journey, and it will take you to where you are supposed to be." Dayvee Sutton When we reflect on our journeys to where we are, we see how different events and experiences led to our current positions. Therefore, we must embrace our journey to find meaning and fulfillment in life. This is according to our guest today, Dayvee Sutton, who believes that her present is largely explained by everything she has experienced in her previous experiences.  Dayvee Sutton is an investigative storyteller who travels the world uncovering the unseen in the most picturesque places. From hunting for pink dolphins and black caiman in the heart of the Amazon Rainforest to riding a motorbike through the streets of Hanoi, Vietnam, and gritty reporting in the infamous La Perla neighborhood in San Juan, Puerto Rico, after Hurricanes Irma and Maria. She uses travel adventures as the gateway to draw in audiences. Her reporting range covers everything from fun holiday travel tips to breaking news stories like navigating trips in the pandemic and important issues like the climate crisis. Dayvee's unique perspective as a black woman in this space allows her to explore how the climate crisis affects the lives of women, indigenous people, people of color, and others whose needs and welfare tend to come last around the world. Her storytelling approach is relatable and tangible for audiences from her years as a journalist and not a scientist. Dayvee's work can be seen on NBC News and TODAY Show, CNN, Dr. Oz, and The Weather Channel. She produced and hosted two seasons of an adventure travel show for Amazon Prime Video called "Beyond the Usual'', the series "Extraordinary Experiences" for USA TODAY Network, and is a Pathfinder host for "Lonely Planet." Dayvee also is one of the producers for "Health Minute" and "Consumer Watch'' for CNN New source. In today's episode, our guest will discuss her travel experiences and how her journey has led her to discover her art, which is entrepreneurial journalism. Listen in! Social Media https://twitter.com/dayveesutton   https://facebook.com/dayveesutton   https://twitter.com/dayveesutton   https://www.DayveeSutton.com So my background is as a traditional local news journalist, and most of my career was spent in sports, which I did for about 12 years. [4:01] I then co-hosted a lifestyle and entertainment show locally, and that is where I really kind of found what I like to do. [4:13] Everything in my background is like a full circle to making sense to right now, starting from where I was born and raised. [4:24] I grew up in south of the suburbs of Los Angeles, where I was exposed to all kinds of cultures just being in a diverse friend group, and I was always so curious. [4:30] Come to curving a whole journey of 15 years in news media, making a career pivot about six years ago to start my production company and go full-on in and tell travel stories. [5:28] My background and even my college education help me take a deeper dive because what I learned as having a degree in world religions are empathy and perspective. [5:48] One of my kind of taglines is that my job is to inspire you to go, and the audience consists of people who want to be inspired to try and go, but most of the audience are just interested in learning. [7:54] Another underlying mission in my work is to dismantle colonialism in travel, and I know that can be triggering, but the whole industry is based on that. [8:20] That means everything is set up to accommodate your comfort and your standards instead of allowing you to immerse yourself into how they do things. [8:50] In my stories, whether they are the short, fun ones or on video, or if they're a longer, deeper dive one, I kind of try to unpack the impact and how to do it better. [9:11] Being humble is a better approach than demanding that somebody tend your way just because you are who you are. [12:45] You stand out and probably will get treated more favorably if you are humble in your approach because they aren't used to it. [13:18] Basic manners and kindness does go a long way. [14:20] Commercial Break. [17:15] Travel is the best education, I think, and so whenever I touched the ground into a new place, I have my ears and eyes wide open, and I try to just soak it all up. [19:34] I recently unearthed and digitized these VHS tapes of when my dad took us to different places, and it was a bit surreal seeing little me and doing what I do now. [20:04] Talk about a full circle is just learning about this child me, and what I do now has just been amazing. [21:30] I love the world and learning about how people live, and it is those human bits anywhere around the world that inspire me to encourage people to travel. [21:45] Whatever little box we have grown up in, when we start to see that people are all the same, it breaks down all stigma, stereotypes, and bigotry that they might have grown up with. [22:38] I was working in a traditional newsroom when I became inspired by another journalist who is a celebrity journalist, Soledad O'Brien. [23:50] I started to investigate the idea of entrepreneurial journalists, which is different than a freelance journalist. [ 54:51] In my company, we create ideas like programs segments, and we produce particular content for different networks and outlets, and my approach is a little deeper. [25:12] One of the things that I do pretty regularly is I am on-air contributor to several national programs. People are curious about how to do that, so I'm coming up with an e-course to show people that any expertise is fit for TV. [25:38] Your dream is your dream, and there are lots of obstacles along the way, but if it were easy, everyone would do it. So keep going. [29:40] …………………………………………………………………………………… Thank You to our August Sponsor! Tired of the time and expense to get a manicure or pedicure? Try Color Street today! Base, color, and top coats of high-quality liquid nail polish in each strip results in a brilliant, salon-quality manicure in just minutes. No dry time, smudges, or streaks, and your mani/pedi lasts up to 10 days. Color Street is 100% real nail polish, not stickers. Learn More: https://www.colorstreet.com/bhroberts/party/2095611    

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 35 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 16:33


PROVIDENCE – As children including his own begin to return to the classroom, pandemic expert Dr. Ashish Jha expresses confidence that they and their teachers and support staff can be safe – provided school districts follow what he outlined Thursday as four requirements.   They are:   ◘ Vaccinations for all who are eligible   ◘ Proper ventilation and related mitigation measures in buildings   ◘ Regular testing   ◘ Mask-wearing   “For me this is personal,” said Jha, a resident of Newton, Mass., whose children attend public schools there. Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, serves on the Newton Public School District's Medical Advisory Group, whose recommendations have been adopted by the district.   “The bottom line here is we can get all kids back to school safely this fall,” Jha said, provided school districts anywhere in the U.S. embrace the four requirements, which are in line with guidance from many other public-health leaders and the CDC and FDA.   But the scientist cautioned: “If we ignore the science and the data and just say, ‘let's get them back,' it will go badly.”   During taping of this 35th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, available from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK, Jha elaborated on the four requirements.   “Kids 12 and over should be getting vaccinated and adults should have mandatory vaccinations,” Jha said. “To me, this is a no-brainer.” Currently, only individuals age 12 and older are eligible for coronavirus disease vaccinations.   Ventilation and related mitigation measures, Jha said, are also a “no brainer.” The federal government has allocated “billions and billions of dollars” for these, Jha said, based on the science of transmission, which is unambiguous.   “This is an airborne disease,” Jha said. “I think school leaders should be losing their jobs if they have not improved ventilation because it's unconscionable 15, 16 months into a pandemic, when you have the money and the science and the data's clear for you not to do that. So ventilation improvements are a no-brainer -- including just being able to open windows.”   Third, Jha said, “is testing. We have very good data that if you do weekly testing in schools of everybody, you pick up so many infections before they've had a chance to spread that you actually dramatically lower spread in schools.” Masking, Jha said, “is last but not least. Indoor masking especially right now where there's a surge of infections happening makes a lot of sense. Imagine we get to a point where infection numbers get really low -- I think masking could come off.   “So I really believe that masking is one part of a broader solution and [the fact that] we have somehow turned this into a political football makes no sense. We all agree: We've got to protect kids. No one says masking alone is going to do it, but it's part of a broader portfolio of activities that we absolutely need to have.” On this podcast episode, Jha also discusses the growing number of corporations including CVS Health, Walgreens, Bank of America, Delta and United Airlines, Facebook, Goldman Sachs, Microsoft, UPS, Walmart and Walt Disney that have instituted vaccine mandates for all or some of their employees.   He singled out Goldman Sachs, the investment bank and financial services firm that is headquartered in New York City.   “If you want to go visit them in their offices in New York, you have to show proof of vaccination,” Jha said. “Goldman Sachs is not your classic kind of ‘liberal public health entity…' They want to protect their employees. They really value their employees… Their employees are their business and they want to make sure their employees are not getting sick.''   Jha also discussed the rising numbers of teenagers becoming sick with coronavirus disease, saying “when you live in an unvaccinated community teens, definitely spread to each other and this is not just in schools. It's mostly out of schools, hanging out and having sleepovers…”   As for younger children, Jha said “the evidence is overwhelmingly clear that they get their infections from their parents, caregivers and older siblings.”   The dean also weighed on the Rhode Island Department of Health's COVID modeling that indicates hospitalizations in Rhode Island will peak in October. “In the next two months, we should expect hospitalization numbers to continue to climb and that worries me immensely for Rhode Island because when I look at what's happening in Rhode Island -- and in many other places [of the U.S.], even New England -- I worry about hospital capacity and hospitals really getting full.”   Jha also answered an audience question regarding a woman in California who contracted coronavirus disease and continues to experience pulmonary symptoms which her doctor could not explain. Jha does not give specific medical advice on the podcast, but in general, he recommends long-COVID patients reach out to leading universities with hospital affiliations.

Landry Football's Conference Call
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 8-24 TUESDAY HOUR 2

Landry Football's Conference Call

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 39:58


Chuck opens with ‘CFB 365' and a look at the headlines of college football. We talk North Carolina Tar Heels with head coach Mack Brown. Chuck then talks LSU Tigers with Glenn Guilbeau of the USA Today Network.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 8-24 TUESDAY HOUR 2

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 39:58


Chuck opens with ‘CFB 365' and a look at the headlines of college football. We talk North Carolina Tar Heels with head coach Mack Brown. Chuck then talks LSU Tigers with Glenn Guilbeau of the USA Today Network.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Paul Finebaum Show
Hour 1: JP Shadrick & Blake Toppmeyer

The Paul Finebaum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 40:09


Paul talks to Jaguars.com Sr. Reporter JP Shadrick about Tim Tebow's short-lived tenure in Jacksonville. Blake Toppmeyer of the USA Today Network then stops by to talk to Paul about the upcoming CFB season. Plus, calls! People are upset with Legend from yesterday's show.

Inside New Orleans with Eric Asher
Inside New Orleans with Eric Asher : Aug 13 2021

Inside New Orleans with Eric Asher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 112:23


Podcast of Inside New Orleans William Grant Distillers Friday Extravaganza on tap! 4-6pm on 106.1FM WRKN Listen live @ www.ericasher.com The I-Heart Radio or TuneIn Radio App or www.nashfm1061.com Podcast is available on Anchor, Apple, I-Heart, Spotify, Tunein, Spreaker & all other major podcasting platforms Topics: Saints LSU Tulane Pelicans & Mayor's Vaccination Mandate My guests are Michael Fazende of Hot off the Bench Podcast, Glenn Guilbeau of USA Today Network

The Paul Finebaum Show
Hour 4: Glenn Guilbeau

The Paul Finebaum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 35:26


Paul talks with USA Today Network's Glenn Guilbeau, who is celebrating his birthday today.

Inside New Orleans with Eric Asher
Inside New Orleans with Eric Asher : Aug 5 2021

Inside New Orleans with Eric Asher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 111:41


Podcast of Inside New Orleans presented by Oceana Grill, Bobby Hebert's Cajun Cannon Restaurant, Mambo's & Olde New Orleans Cookery 4-6pm on 106.1FM WRKN Listen live @ www.ericasher.com The I-Heart Radio or TuneIn Radio App or www.nashfm106.1.com Podcast of the show is available on Anchor. Apple, I-Heart, Spreaker, Spotify Google & all major podcasting platforms Topics: Saints, LSU, Pelicans & Tulane My guests are Jeff Duncan of nola.com & Fox 8 Sports, Glenn Guilbeau of USA Today Network, Mike Triplett of ESPN & Oleh Kosel of The Bird Writes

Meet Us On Main Street
Shannon Rae Green, USA Today | Without Borders Ep 2

Meet Us On Main Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 63:08


These comedy geniuses are back! Tia shows off her BOSS ukulele skills. Stacy is flying solo on this interview today with her long time friend Shannon “Shenanigans” Green. Shannon is an award-winning video journalist and Senior Multimedia Producer at USA TODAY. She's been doing podcasting since to beginning. So you will get to learn the history of podcasting. Starting all the way back in 2005. And guess who coined the term? You will have to listen to find out! Have you heard about Clubhouse yet? Shannon explains more about this growing app that great during the pandemic. She's had the chance to meet all types of famous people like President Obama. And Stacy joins in with her story trying to compare Kevin Costner to him…. Get a behind the scenes look at politic journalism at the source. Did you know they break into song? Its Disney musicals up in the White House! Shannon Rae Green is an award-winning video journalist and Senior Multimedia Producer at USA TODAY. She reports on-camera in daily news videos. She is the producer of political newsmaker video series, Capital Download, This Week with Susan Page. Shannon is a Gannett Innovation Grant recipient for app idea currently in development. She is pursuing a Master's degree in Graphic Information Technology at Arizona State University, completely online. I lead the editorial audio strategy at USA TODAY, overseeing the production and promotion of audio shows and podcasts across multiple distribution channels. I've covered national political conventions, the Olympics, USA TODAY investigations and daily news stories, among others. Audio is my passion, as is journalism. Twitter: @ShannonRaeGreen 5 Things USA Today Podcast The news you need to know to start your day. Five top news stories and why they matter. Seven days a week, with deep-dive Sunday episodes. Powered by the USA TODAY Network and hosted by Taylor Wilson and Claire Thornton. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/5-things/id975311694 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/meetusonmainstreet/support

The Paul Finebaum Show
Hour 2: Glenn Guilbeau & Dan Mullen

The Paul Finebaum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 41:06


Paul is live at SEC Media Day & is joined by Glenn Guilbeau of USA Today Network to talk all things said at Media Day. Paul is also joined by Florida HC Dan Mullen to talk the upcoming 2021 College Football season.

The Capitol Pressroom
State denies nearly $1 billion in Mario Cuomo bridge construction costs

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 12:29


July 13, 2021 - Jon Campbell, the state editor for the USA Today Network in New York, breaks down the state Thruway Authority's battle over nearly a billion dollars in additional construction costs on the Mario Cuomo bridge and identifies the restaurants coming to the service plazas along the state Thruway.

Steve Somers
07-05 Steve Somers with Pete Caldera

Steve Somers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 20:46


"We keep drawing lines in the sand... we're running out of sand." Pete Caldera from The Bergen Record & USA Today Network describes the current crisis in the Bronx, as the Yankees season has entered full panic mode after another losing weekend. This time, it was losing two of three to the Mets in the Subway Series at Yankee Stadium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Will To Change: Uncovering True Stories of Diversity & Inclusion
E174: The Great Resignation: Addressing a Broken Workplace with Journalist Joanne Lipman

The Will To Change: Uncovering True Stories of Diversity & Inclusion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 57:27


Joanne Lipman joins the program to discuss the ways in which the workplace is broken, and how we might reinvent the workplace that so that it works for everyone. Discover some of the challenges that come along with managing a remote workforce and what leaders will need to be mindful of in the new world of work. Joanne also shares her thoughts about the impact that the pandemic has had on women in the workplace.  About Joanne: Joanne Lipman served as Editor-in-Chief at USA Today, USA Today Network,  Nast, and The Wall Street Journal's Weekend Journal, leading those organizations to six Pulitzer Prizes. She is an on-air CNBC contributor and Yale University journalism lecturer. She is also author of the bestseller, THAT'S WHAT SHE SAID: What Men and Women Need to Know About Working Together.