Podcasts about picasso

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20th-century Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer

  • 2,398PODCASTS
  • 3,510EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 6, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about picasso

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Latest podcast episodes about picasso

Billieve: a Buffalo Rumblings Podcast
Food for Thoughts: Food fight

Billieve: a Buffalo Rumblings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 44:21


On this episode of "Food for Thought", Bruce dives into foods that are worth fighting for, the Hall of Fame Game and the changes around the AFC East this offseason. #Bills #goBills #BillsMafia The Buffalo Rumblings vidcast network is sponsored by Picasso's Pizza. Picasso's: we are Buffalo pizza. Shipping local and nationwide. Order online at piccasospizza.net. Subscribe to the Buffalo Rumblings podcast channel featuring Billieve, Buffalo Rumblings Q&A, Breaking Buffalo Rumblings, Code of Conduct with J. Spence, The Bruce Exclusive, The Buff Hub, Jamie D. & Big Newt, The Overreaction Podcast, Food For Thought, The Chop Up, Hump Day Hotline, Off Tackle with John Fina, Bills Mafia Time 2 Shine, Intentional Grounding, Not Another Buffalo Podcast, Buffalo Nerd Sports Podcast and Circling the Wagons: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Google Play | Spotify | Podbean | iHeartRadio | TuneIn | Megaphone | YouTube Ask Alexa or Google Home to play the Buffalo Rumblings podcast! Editor's note: If you're viewing this in Apple News, you'll need to head to your podcast app or phone's web browser to hear the embedded audio file. #BUFFALOBILLS #BILLS #BILLSMAFIA #goBILLS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Artists for Joy
The Joy Toolkit

Artists for Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 24:45


This week's show was recorded live in Brooklyn, NY! Merideth shares an idea picked up at this year's Writer's Digest Conference, a practical step in cultivating joy.  Picasso's "Girl in the Mirror" https://mo.ma/3zVTEtE Erin Ellis, cellist https://spoti.fi/3d0YT2d  Leave a comment or submit a question https://bit.ly/38bKMSF Transcript of this episode https://bit.ly/3PJ4bNR (auto-generated, may contain errors)  

Alabama Freshwater Fishing Report
Coosa, Tennessee River, Eufaula and West Point Fishing Report for August 1-7, 2022

Alabama Freshwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:01


On this week's show, Brian Senn talks with some of the best freshwater anglers in Alabama. This week our contributors are Garrett Wade with the Tennessee River Report, the 2021 Bass Pro Shops U.S Open Champion Tucker Smith with the Coosa Report, and Steve Graziano with the Eufaula/West Point Report. Plus, Tucker discusses his new artificial bait product, the Picasso Speed Drop, and why you need to get one. Enjoy the show, stay hydrated, stay deep, and get out on the water this weekend! Get Tucker's Picasso Speed Drop >>> Show Sponsors: AFTCO L&M Marina Boaters List Southeastern Pond Management Photonis MB Ranch King Hilton's Real-Time Navigator Buck's Island Marina Fishbites Killerdock Outdoor Alabama YUDU National Land Realty Great Days Outdoors  

Visionaries Global Media
Dungeons & Junkiez Presents: Tales Of Ortorvia #40: The Master's Grand Plan

Visionaries Global Media

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 53:42


Join The GameJunkiez, as they embark on a journey into the world of Dungeons & Dragons, EXCLUSIVELY on Visionaries Global Media Join Alex, as he takes the helm as the DM, as he sits down with all of the members of “The Pirate Crew”, as they Sail into the ocean world of Ortorvia, which will be as always a totally unscripted, homebrew adventure!!! Starring! Matt, as Reed Tosscobble the Halfling Pirate Captain Rogue/Bard/Fighter Kerry, as Rran the Gnoll Barbarian/Fighter Caitlin, as Ahlai Salir the Human Monk/Warlock Chad, as Picasso the Tortle Barbarian/Monk and Alex as ‘The DM who bullies a bunch of pirates' ================================ Follow Matt: @TheMattAttackUK Follow Alex: @SpiderBreadUk Follow Kerry: @Shirobeans Follow Caitlin: @CaitlinRC Follow Chad: @Chads_Mind ============================= Follow the show: @DungeonJunkiez Follow our sister show, Chris Talks Games: @chrislewis37 Follow our main show: @GameJunkiezPod Follow Caitlin's Content: @OurMindGames Follow Chad's show: @Viewfromtoprope Follow the network: @VisGlobalMedia All Music in this episode from Tabletop Audio: https://tabletopaudio.com/ #WeWillGetThroughThis #DnD #DungeonsNJunkiez

All the Hacks
Hosting Cocktail Parties, Building Relationships, Museum Hacks and Friends Newsletters with Nick Gray

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 64:30 Very Popular


#68: Entrepreneur and author, Nick Gray joins Chris to discuss his mission to get people to host more parties, make connections, build friendships, and live a richer life. They delve into why Nick thinks name tags and icebreakers are non-negotiable for parties and get a complete run-through of everything you need to do to make your next cocktail party easy and effortless. Nick also shares all the museum tricks and tips he picked up while running Museum Hack, the multi-million dollar renegade museum tour company he founded and recently sold.Nick Gray (@nickgraynews) is an entrepreneur, investor, author, and founder of Museum Hack. His new book is “The 2-Hour Cocktail Party” How to Build Big Relationships with Small Gatherings.” Full show notes at: https://allthehacks.com/cocktail-parties-nick-grayView on YouTube: https://youtu.be/250NrAu7IEwPartner DealsMasterworks: VIP access to skip the waitlistVuori: 20% off the most comfortable performance apparel I've ever wornBlockFi: Exclusive bonus of up to $250 freeTrustworthy: 20% off The Family Operating System® Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Nick Gray: Website | Blog | TwitterNick's Resources:How to Host a Party WebsiteThe 2-Hour Cocktail Party: WebsiteThe 2-Hour Cocktail Party: AmazonHow to Host a Clothing SwapHow to Plan a Networking EventHow to Host a Happy HourIf I Had $10 Million Dollars, How Would I Live Differently?Music Playlist for Cocktail PartiesResources Mentioned: The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why It MattersMixilyPartifulChris' go-to lemon ricotta pancake recipeCapital One Cultivist Deal Academy of SciencesThe Apollo CircleMetropolitan Museum of Art's Young Patron's Program Bank of America Museum DealdeYoung MuseumAirBnb ExperiencesHow Nick Gray Sold Museum Hack PodcastNick's Favorite:MuseumsMetropolitan Museum of Art (Take the entrance on 81st St to skip the lines)Legion of Honor National Gallery of Art New York City RecommendationsNew York City's Central Park (Picnic at Sheep Meadow)Washington Square Park Scott's Pizza Tour Full Show NotesNick Gray, author of “The 2-Hour Cocktail Party” How to Build Big Relationships with Small Gatherings”  explains the benefits of regularly hosting events [2:02]Advice about the best day of the week to host your cocktail party, the ideal duration, and who to invite [3:02]How to get 80% of the benefit with only 20% of the work of a dinner party and ideal number of guests to invite [5:42]Nick gives step-by-step invitation information and tips about hosting a party with kids  [8:01]Information to put on your event page and two unique features Nick includes for all of his parties [18:55]What to serve at your cocktail party, the NICK party formula [20:47]How to get people to leave when the party is over [21:55]Choosing the perfect music streaming channel and types of cocktails to serve [23:11] The reason Nick doesn't serve beer [25:11] Three parts of an icebreaker, examples, and how to use them during your cocktail party [29:08]The schedule and formula to use when sending reminder messages to your guests [37:08]Asking for feedback after your cocktail party [36:56]Advanced level party planning: Organizing a book or clothing swap [39:34]How to run a good icebreaker [40:55]Leading a party with generous authority [42:33]What people come away with after a successful cocktail party [43:34]Nick's Museum Hack business [44:35]How to experience a museum for the first time and avoid gallery fatigue [46:42]Nick's museum recommendations [50:55]Tips for getting good deals at museums [51:42]How to find a tour when visiting new locations [1:00:42]Selling a business using seller financing [1:01:54]Writing a quarterly newsletter (Life Updates) to your friends [1:04:01]Nick's favorite New York City recommendations [1:06:04]Where to find Nick Gray online [1:07:44] SponsorsTrustworthyTrustworthy is a secure online service that helps modern families protect, organize, and optimize their important information — ID's, Money, Property, Passwords, Insurance, Taxes, Legal, Emergency Instructions and the Family Archive. Trustworthy gives you a system of record for all your family information and lets you share it with loved ones, collaborate with trusted professionals like your accountant or wealth advisor and helps you keep everything up to date and on track so you never have to pay a late fee or penalty again.So if you want to set up your Family Operating System and be prepared for all of life's moments you can get 20% off and a free 14-day trial at allthehacks.com/trustworthy MasterworksMasterworks is an alternative investing platform that gives you access to one of the most exclusive and overlooked investments in history: blue-chip art. Masterworks lets regular people invest in paintings by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol without spending millions. I've now used masterworks to invest 14 different paintings, including a 15 million dollar Picasso.Here's how it works: Masterworks will buy a painting they think will appreciate well over time, then they securitize that painting with the SEC, so you can invest in it instead of buying the whole thing. Once they sell the painting, later on, you get your share of the proceeds. It's that simple. They've offered over 100 paintings so far and the three that have sold realized a net annualized gain over 30% per work. They have over 280,000 users and demand is as high as ever. All the Hacks has partnered with them to give you all priority access by going to allthehacks.com/masterworks(see important disclosures at masterworks.io/cd) VuoriVuori is a new and fresh perspective on performance apparel. Perfect if you are sick and tired of traditional, old workout gear. Everything is designed to work out in, but doesn't look or feel like it. The product is incredibly versatile and can be used for just about any activity like running, training, swimming, yoga; but also great for lounging or weekend errands.To get the most comfortable and versatile clothing on the planet with 20% off your first purchase (plus free shipping on any US order over $75 and free returns) visit allthehacks.com/vuori BlockFiThis episode is brought to you by BlockFi. If you're interested in Crypto, BlockFi is one of the best ways to get started, letting you easily buy, sell and store your crypto assets. After signing up and linking your bank account, you can instantly trade a variety of cryptocurrencies and store them all in a secure wallet that lets you control and transfer your holdings however you want. You can also set up recurring transfers so you can dollar cost average your crypto investments over time.Or if you want another way to put your crypto investing on autopilot, there's the BlockFi Crypto Rewards Credit Card. While 1.5% cash back isn't the best in the market, that cash back is automatically invested into Bitcoin, Ethereum or whatever cryptocurrency you want. If you want to check out BlockFi, you can get an exclusive bonus of up to $250 free when you sign at allthehacks.com/blockfi Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

I've Been Meaning to Listen To That
Kanye West: The Life of Pablo (w/ Professor Skye & Stenley Phillippe)

I've Been Meaning to Listen To That

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 139:10


This week on "I've Been Meaning To Listen To That", we listen to THE LIFE OF PABLO by KANYE WEST with special guest PROFESSOR SKYE & STENLEY PHILLIPE! Plus, Andrew, Stenley, & Professor Skye discuss how George Lucas and Picasso are actually apt parallels to Kanye West, take emotional inventory of the Donda 2 Rollout/ Pete Davidson drama, and debate whether the bleached asshole line in "Father Stretch My Hand Pt. 1" is the most important/impactful line in Kanye's discography! Follow Professor Skye on Youtube (Professor Skye's Record Review, From the Desk of Professor Skye), Twitter (@skyepaine @sweatyrecordre1), & Instagram (@professor_skye) Follow Stenley Phillipe on Instagram (@snapasten) Follow Andrew Ambrose Lee on Twitter (@AundrewALee) & Instagram (@aundrewalee) Follow Michael Limentato on Twitter (@limentaco) & Instagram (@limentaco) Follow Sean Wilkinson on Instagram (@diabetictwink) Follow Stefanie Senior on Instagram (@stefmsenior) & Twitter (@stefmsenior) Theme Song by Emily Blue (Twitter: @emilybluemusic Instagram: @emilybluelovesyou) Cover Art by Olivia Jensen (Twitter: @oliviaaj22, Instagram: @oliviajensen_art) Listen to our I've Been Meaning To Listen to That (And I Did!) Playlist Follow us at (@ibmtltt) on Facebook, Tiktok & Instagram, and email us at ivebeenmeaningtolistentothat@gmail.com Have a good daaay! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ibmtltt/message

The New Wave Entrepreneur
EP193: A Powerful Lesson In Entrepreneurship From Tupac Shakur, Pablo Picasso, Stephen King and More

The New Wave Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 11:10


The New Wave Podcast: Daily Conversations On Web3.0, Business, Psychology, Psychedelics & More. A Show For People Seeking Spiritual, Psychological And Financial Sovereignty. Hosted By Best-Selling Author, Speaker and Entrepreneur Daniel DiPiazza. Tupac Shakur, Picasso, Stephen King and many other greats ALL have THIS trait in common. Unlock the power of prolific creation! ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ⌛Timestamps⌛(02:05) What can Tupac teach us about business?(03:48) You simply need to produce more work. A LOT more! (09:11) Devote yourself completely ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Warfare of Art & Law Podcast
Glance at Culture - Dr. Jennnifer Mass, President of Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, On Cultural Heritage Science, Modigliani's Palette, Creating Scientific Literacy and More

Warfare of Art & Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 49:34


To learn more, please visit the website for Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, LLC.Show Notes:0:01 use of scientific methods in London and Berlin to understand and preserve cultural heritage since 19th Century 2:30 history of cultural heritage science 4:00 founding Scientific Analysis of Fine Art LLC (SAFA) 5:40 Yves Tanguy's Fraud in the Garden5:50 catalogue raisonné prepared by art historians Charles Stuckey and Stephen Mack6:10 fascist attack during screening of Luis Bunuel's satiric “L'Age d'Oro” 7:00 use of multi-spectral imaging on Fraud in the Garden included ultraviolet light and infrared radiation, and x-rays to view slash pattern on painting7:45 multiple restorations on Fraud in the Garden dated through the pigments and paint binders9:00 value of artwork as historical documents versus restoration of the artwork 9:45 cultural heritage as historical documents example of Victoria & Albert Museum10:45 display of the Rothko Murals at Harvard by projecting original color on faded paintings11:45 analysis for attribution questions varies between antiquities, paintings, decorative art objects13:20 non-destructive drive for protocols for elemental and molecular analysis14:00 changes to work by Van Gogh and Met's Irises and Roses exhibit on this14:30 geranium lake known as Eosin red15:00 paints like cadmium yellows and chromium yellows created during the Industrial Revolution are also very sensitive to light and relative humidity15:15 changes in Matisse's 4 versions of Joy of Life – yellows fading to ivory white15:30 mechanism of degradation 16:20 Picasso's 1901 The Blue Room 17:30 Cezanne18:15 analysis of over 900 tubes of paint from Munch19:30 paints standardized in 1920s 21:00 flaking of zinc white: reaction of zinc oxide with oil creates crystalized molecules - zinc soaps21:25 titanium white 23:00 heavy metal pigment paints that strongly absorb x-rays like lead white or vermillion (a mercury sulfide red) prevent seeing under-painting24:45 head of the scientific vetting committee for TEFAF New York 27:15 Court of Arbitration for Art 28:35 trusting science to conduct due diligence 30:30 stigma  attached to use of science 33:00 Bard Graduate Center34:00 wooden polychrome sculpture analysis: dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating36:00  dirty dozen paint list36:45 mixing drying oil paints (linseed) with non-drying oil paints (sunflower)37:50 Eosin red, emerald green, cadmium yellow, chromium yellow, vermillion, copper blues  38:50 favorite paintings 39:10 Modigliani Collection at the Barnes 39:45 Modigliani's palette 40:35 The Burlington Magazine 41:10  Klimt's Faculty Paintings 42:30 computational technologies to bring lost work back to life43:00 facilitating justice43:45 invention of photography enabled Jacob Riis to document New York slums 44:00 20th Century photographer and sociologist Lewis Hine44:20 BLM movement44:30 environmental justice issues 45:40 recommendations to pursue cultural heritage science 46:55 legacy to create scientific literacy for art conservators and historiansTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast, please call 1.929.260.4942 or email Stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]

The Ben Maller Show
The Fifth Hour: A Maze of Inflation

The Ben Maller Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 32:36


Ben Maller and his 5th Hour home-slice Danny G. have a fun Saturday in the can for you! They talk rat in a maze, Picasso of goats, burn this summer down, tub-tragic, back scratcher and more!  ...Subscribe, rate & review "The Fifth Hour!" https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-fifth-hour-with-ben-maller/id1478163837 Engage with the podcast by emailing us at RealFifthHour@gmail.com ... Follow Ben on Twitter @BenMaller and on Instagram @BenMallerOnFOX ... Danny is on Twitter @DannyGRadio and on Instagram @DannyGRadio ...  #BenMallerSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fifth Hour with Ben Maller
The Fifth Hour: A Maze of Inflation

The Fifth Hour with Ben Maller

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 32:36


Ben Maller and his 5th Hour home-slice Danny G. have a fun Saturday in the can for you! They talk rat in a maze, Picasso of goats, burn this summer down, tub-tragic, back scratcher and more!  ...Subscribe, rate & review "The Fifth Hour!" https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-fifth-hour-with-ben-maller/id1478163837 Engage with the podcast by emailing us at RealFifthHour@gmail.com ... Follow Ben on Twitter @BenMaller and on Instagram @BenMallerOnFOX ... Danny is on Twitter @DannyGRadio and on Instagram @DannyGRadio ...  #BenMallerSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness
Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness - Ep 97

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 48:04


All you guys in the Teen Canteen are simply the best! We have surpassed 10k views on YT before our 100th Episode! Thank you, thank you, thank you just so darn much. Our offering today takes place over two shows. One from July 23rd, 1995 and then July 27th, 1996. Titled: Butter Than Nothing. You will understand why, shortly. The first quarter has various talk with some choppy edits. We take calls from: Norma who has a funny epitaph and then a poem to her boyfriend. Judy in PA with some chat about restaurants. Norm wants to open ‘Picasso’s.’ And the hiring qualifications are very interesting. Our dear friend Joan in Tewksbury talking about stamps, the Talking Information Centers for the Blind and being buried in newspapers. We the move to July 27th, 1996 for the entire second part of the episode. Our guest was Norma Duffy Lyon – The Butter Lady. She sculptures in butter! Stuff like a full-size Clydesdale horse, a brahman bull, Garth Brooks and oh, so much more. She was currently ‘churning’ out American Gothic for the Iowa State Fair. This is one fascinating woman. Not only her talents but her family as well. Just a super interesting lady and a great interview by Norm. Before we end Norm teases an upcoming guest, Chuck Mitchell, owner of Dove Glove in VT. He rents doves out for all types of events. And Norm is blessed with my presence. Episode 97, Butter Than Nothing, melts into your ears…now.

Pindrop
Barcelona: streetwear with a political twist

Pindrop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 29:22 Very Popular


Barcelona is a city that can't be separated from its art–you might picture Gaudí architecture, Picasso paintings, or flamenco and jazz spilling onto the streets and into the night. But there's another art scene that's breaking into the mainstream from the margins–led by the city's street vendors, known as manteros. Listen to how this group of people, often immigrants without legal protections or rights to work in Spain, fought to form a union to gain the voice they needed, and ended up creating a global and people-centered fashion-label that highlights human rights in the process.

Advanced French
Advanced French 293 - World News, Opinion and Analysis in French

Advanced French

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 6:12 Very Popular


La « grande démission » gagne la France  Héritage de l'État islamique : épouses et enfants languissent dans des camps syriens La France face au tourisme de masse Guerre du pain Trois œuvres de Picasso retrouvées

Bob Sirott
This Week in Chicago History: Second City, Rose's Records, and Ferrara Pan Candy Co.

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


Anna Davlantes, WGN Radio's investigative correspondent, joins Bob Sirott to share what happened this week in Chicago history. Stories include the opening of Second City, the arrival of Picasso’s sculpture, founding of the Leo Burnett Ad Agency, and more Sponsored by UChicago Medicine

The Shit Show
Culture Vulture: Can You Separate The Art From The Artist?

The Shit Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 16:10


Listen to the full Culture Vulture episode on Apple Podcasts here. Or on Spotify here. This weeks episode has been a long time coming (and had to be recorded twice to get it perfect) and it's all about when/ how/ and IF you can separate the art from the artist. Spoiler - there's no right or wrong answer here - it's an incredibly personal and introspective topic, but we give you so many tools to add to your toolkit when it comes to unpacking and reconciling your love for someone/something when the artist has done something Very Bad.Picasso piece, Vox piece.This episode of Culture Vulture was brought to you by our mates at Part Time Rangers - our fave alcoholic bevvy brand - coz why wouldn't you want to save wildlife while you sip?Become a SYSCA supporter here!! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Audio Poem of the Day
If I Told Him, A Completed Portrait of Picasso

Audio Poem of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 3:42


By Gertrude Stein

Culture Vulture
Can You Separate The Art From The Artist?

Culture Vulture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 50:10


This weeks episode has been a long time coming (and had to be recorded twice to get it perfect) and it's all about when/ how/ and IF you can separate the art from the artist. Spoiler - there's no right or wrong answer here - it's an incredibly personal and introspective topic, but we give you so many tools to add to your toolkit when it comes to unpacking and reconciling your love for someone/something when the artist has done something Very Bad.Picasso piece, Vox piece.This episode of Culture Vulture was brought to you by our mates at Part Time Rangers - our fave alcoholic bevvy brand - coz why wouldn't you want to save wildlife while you sip?Become a SYSCA supporter here!! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Laissez-vous Tenter
Dans la bibliothèque de l'été de Bernard Lehut, "Regardez-nous danser" de Leïla Slimani

Laissez-vous Tenter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 14:45


- Dans la bibliothèque de l'été de Bernard Lehut, "Regardez-nous danser" de Leïla Slimani. Il s'agit du 2e volet de sa trilogie familiale, "Le pays des autres", inaugurée il y a 2 ans. - Les programmes télé de ce mardi soir, avec Isabelle Morini Bosc. - Une idée de sortie ; la Cité du vin à Bordeaux accueille l'exposition "Picasso, effervescence des formes". Plus de 80 œuvres illustrent la place du vin, des alcools et de la boisson dans l'œuvre et la carrière du peintre. Visite guidée avec Monique Younès. Coups de coeur, coups de gueule, reportages, interviews, et des invités prestigieux : "Laissez-Vous Tenter" dresse un panorama de l'actualité Musique, Cinéma, Littérature, Médias, People. Ecoutez Laissez-vous tenter avec Le Service Culture du 26 juillet 2022

The Book Pile
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

The Book Pile

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 22:31 Very Popular


There are two ways to make it as a children's author: tell kids the world is magical (Rowling, E.B. White), or tell kids the world is horrifying (Roald Dahl, The Brothers Grimm). Shel Silverstein tells kids the world is both magical and horrifying. Plus, Kellen wants people to stop copying Picasso and Dave gets philosophical about chaos.*TheBookPilePodcast@gmail.com*Kellen Erskine has appeared on Conan, Comedy Central, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, NBC's America's Got Talent, and the Amazon Original Series Inside Jokes. He has garnered over 50 million views with his clips on Dry Bar Comedy. In 2018 he was selected to perform on the “New Faces” showcase at the Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal, Quebec. Kellen was named one of TBS's Top Ten Comics to Watch in 2017. He currently tours the country www.KellenErskine.com*David Vance's videos have garnered over 1 billion views. He has written viral ads for companies like Squatty Potty, Chatbooks, and Lumē, and sketches for the comedy show Studio C. His work has received two Webby Awards, and appeared on Conan. He currently works as a writer on the sitcom Freelancers.

The Winter Growers Podcast
Patty Gentry of Early Girl Farm

The Winter Growers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 82:38


Patty Gentry of Early Girl Farm grows in Brookhaven on Long Island, NY. She has been described as "the Picasso of vegetables" and is featured in a documentary film, The Soul of a Farmer, that follows her farming journey and takes a raw and honest look at the challenges facing small-scale farmers today. As a former chef, Patty loves and understands vegetables, and she is passionate about quality and taste and supplying her customers with beautiful produce year-round. Growing on 2 acres, she sells to seven restaurantes, and a 150 member CSA. She dreams of one day opening a little market garden cafe and book store and gathering space dedicated to all things growing. I loved speaking with Patty, she is a passionate a curious learner who offers so much warmth, humor, and thoughtfullness to our conversation. Also mentioned in the show... The New Organic Grower by Eliot Coleman The Living Soil Handbook by Jesse Frost The Lean Farm by Ben Hartman Winter Growers is made possible by... Tunnel Vision Hoops, for your Winter infrastructure needs. Growing for Market Magazine, enter code "winter" at checkout to get 25% off a new subscription. Rimol Greenhouses, for high-tunnels and greenhouses. Johnny's Selected Seeds, check out their seriously amazing Growers Library. And you, our Patreons and supporters. You can support our creators for as little as $2/month on Patreon or Notillgrowers.com/support. Y'all are the best!

Visionaries Global Media
Dungeons & Junkiez Presents: Tales Of Ortorvia #39: The Wrath Of Storm - Shield

Visionaries Global Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 85:22


Join The GameJunkiez, as they embark on a journey into the world of Dungeons & Dragons, EXCLUSIVELY on Visionaries Global Media Join Alex, as he takes the helm as the DM, as he sits down with all of the members of “The Pirate Crew”, as they Sail into the ocean world of Ortorvia, which will be as always a totally unscripted, homebrew adventure!!! Starring! Matt, as Reed Tosscobble the Halfling Pirate Captain Rogue/Bard/Fighter Kerry, as Rran the Gnoll Barbarian/Fighter Caitlin, as Ahlai Salir the Human Monk/Warlock Chad, as Picasso the Tortle Barbarian/Monk and Alex as ‘The DM who bullies a bunch of pirates' ================================ Follow Matt: @TheMattAttackUK Follow Alex: @SpiderBreadUk Follow Kerry: @Shirobeans Follow Caitlin: @CaitlinRC Follow Chad: @Chads_Mind ============================= Follow the show: @DungeonJunkiez Follow our sister show, Chris Talks Games: @chrislewis37 Follow our main show: @GameJunkiezPod Follow Caitlin's Content: @OurMindGames Follow Chad's show: @Viewfromtoprope Follow the network: @VisGlobalMedia All Music in this episode from Tabletop Audio: https://tabletopaudio.com/ #WeWillGetThroughThis #DnD #DungeonsNJunkiez

Rien ne s'oppose à midi - Matthieu Noël
On peut les voir en peinture !

Rien ne s'oppose à midi - Matthieu Noël

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 73:39


Historiquement Vôtre réunit 3 dames que l'on peut voir en peinture : la “garçonne” du Paris des années folles Suzy Solidor (1900-1983) qui fut, avec plus de 200 portraits, l'artiste la plus portraiturée au monde, par Picabia, Marie Laurencin, ou encore Francis Bacon ! Puis Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) une collectionneuse américaine avisée dont un seul portrait d'elle aura permis à celui qui l'a peint de se faire un nom. Et quel nom : Picasso ! Et une star célèbre dans le monde entier qu'on peut voir en peinture, mais qui ne peut plus voir en peinture un peintre de Saint-Tropez qui continue à vendre ses portraits : Brigitte Bardot !

Debout les copains !
On peut les voir en peinture !

Debout les copains !

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 73:39


Historiquement Vôtre réunit 3 dames que l'on peut voir en peinture : la “garçonne” du Paris des années folles Suzy Solidor (1900-1983) qui fut, avec plus de 200 portraits, l'artiste la plus portraiturée au monde, par Picabia, Marie Laurencin, ou encore Francis Bacon ! Puis Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) une collectionneuse américaine avisée dont un seul portrait d'elle aura permis à celui qui l'a peint de se faire un nom. Et quel nom : Picasso ! Et une star célèbre dans le monde entier qu'on peut voir en peinture, mais qui ne peut plus voir en peinture un peintre de Saint-Tropez qui continue à vendre ses portraits : Brigitte Bardot !

Beyond the Book
The Picasso of Publishing

Beyond the Book

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 16:07


New frontiers. Challenging the status quo. These are lifelong career ambitions for Vitek Tracz.

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1858: How to Build Muscle With Kettlebells, Using Strength Training to Reduce Arthritis Pain, the Ideal Order to Complete MAPS Fitness Programs & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 85:45 Very Popular


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin answer four Pump Head questions drawn from last Sunday's Quah post on the @mindpumpmedia Instagram page. Mind Pump Fit Tip: Contrary to popular media propaganda, meat, eggs, and milk are the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet! (3:11) Sal has stamped his seal of approval on Seed. (13:35) Adam's Organifi “Peanut” Brittle desert. (16:52) Sal recommends UnXplained with William Shatner. (21:13) Justin recommends Westworld on HBO. (33:57) Another brilliant move by Apple. (35:45) That one-time Disney gave Robin Williams a Picasso for being the Genie. (40:35) Is your favorite Hollywood star on anabolics? (44:25) #Quah question #1 - What order should your programs be completed? (57:17) #Quah question #2 - Can kettlebells build muscle? (1:06:44) #Quah question #3 - How would you describe training to technical failure to someone who doesn't push themselves hard enough? (1:14:20) #Quah question #4 - What are the benefits of strength training with arthritis? (1:19:10) Related Links/Products Mentioned Visit Seed for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code MINDPUMP at checkout for 15% off your first month's supply of Seed's DS-01 Daily Synbiotic** Visit Organifi for the exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code MINDPUMP at checkout** July Promotion: RGB Bundle or MAPS Suspension 50% off! **Promo code JULY50 at checkout** Bill Gates just won legal approval to buy 2,100 acres of North Dakota farmland worth $13.5M — and people are ‘livid' about it all across the state Watch Alone Full Episodes, Video & More | HISTORY Channel Watch The UnXplained with William Shatner | Netflix How Traumatic Brain Injuries Can Unleash Extraordinary Hidden Talents Elon Musk confirms he welcomed twins with Neuralink exec Shivon Zilis Infant brains develop years faster than we thought - ScienceDaily Westworld | Official Website for the HBO Series | HBO.com WWDC 2022: Next-Gen Apple CarPlay Can Make Any Car Instantly Cooler Than Ever Don't blame gas station owners over sky-high prices, drivers tell Biden Robin Williams Given Picasso After Disney Beef Over Aladdin Does Chris Hemsworth Use Steroids? Chris Hemsworth's Steroid Cycle - More Plates More Dates New Thor 4 Photo Shows Natalie Portman & Tessa Thompson's Heroes Together How Celebrities Get Ripped So Fast (5 Actors That Got Huge For Movie Roles) Visit MASSZYMES by biOptimizers for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code MINDPUMP10 at checkout** The Ultimate Mind Pump Programming MAPS Fitness Prime MAPS Symmetry MAPS Fitness Products – Build Your Avatar How to Choose the PERFECT Kettlebell For YOU?? | MIND PUMP How To Overhead Press with Kettlebells | Mind Pump How to do a Proper Kettlebell Swing (Don't Make THIS Mistake!!) How To Do The Perfect Kettlebell Press Bottoms Up Kettlebell Press Tutorial for SVKO Wild Card Event 3 Turkish Get-Up Variations - Tutorial with Kettlebell Master of Sport Efficacy of an 8-Week Resistance Training Program in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned More Plates More Dates (@moreplatesmoredates)  Instagram

Just the Gist
The Picasso that was kidnapped from the NGV with Stuart Semple

Just the Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 83:07


On August 4th, 1986, it was discovered that the most expensive painting in Australia, 'The Weeping Woman' by Pablo Picasso, was missing from the National Gallery of Victoria's collection. Turned out it had been abducted by a cheeky new organisation no-one had ever heard of: the "Australian Cultural Terrorists” (the A.C.T) who were holding the painting ransom. Their demands? Increase funding to the arts, or the painting would be incinerated.  Was this really a crime? Or was it more of an act of protest? Or a piece of performance art? Whatever the ACT intended it to be viewed as, it's hilariously funny.  Jacob shares the story with long time friend of the podcast and guest host Stuart Semple. Follow Stuart on Instagram @stuartsemple Skip straight to the story: approx 13:21 We give you Just The Gist, but if you want more, there's this: Watch the fantastic documentary “Framed”  https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/program/framed Read this article from the day after the painting was found to be missing  https://www.theage.com.au/culture/art-and-design/from-the-archives-1986-victoria-refuses-stolen-picasso-ransom-demand-20210730-p58ei5.html Check out these articles, written 30 years after the painting went missing, featuring a few theories about who the Australian Cultural Terrorists were…  https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/art-and-design/thomas-dixon-first-person-weeping-woman-20160623-gpqixc.html https://www.crikey.com.au/2016/08/31/who-stole-picassos-weeping-woman-2/ To enjoy the Google reviews some folks have left for the Ann Freedman's new gallery, just google Freedman Art and scroll through reviews like this one:  “On the way out, a thin, curly, gray haired lady whispered that she could get me a Picasso for $500. I talked her down to $325!  Paint was barely dry!  It looks great, hanging over the cat litter box!” If you haven't heard Jacob's episode about the fued between Stuart Semple & Anish Kapoor, scroll back in your feed to episode #35 'Stuart Semple vs Anish Kapoor' Jacob caught up with Stuart last year too, scroll back to episode #99 'CHATTING WITH STUART SEMPLE' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Hugh Eakin, Jordan Weber

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 68:07 Very Popular


Episode No. 558 features author Hugh Eakin and artist Jordan Weber.  Eakin is the author of "Picasso's War: How Modern Art Came to America," which tells a story of how New York City slowly, eventually, came to embrace both European modernism and the art of Pablo Picasso. Eakin's history begins with John Quinn, a white-shoe attorney with a yen for progressive literature and art, and follow's Quinn's involvement and influence across New York and Europe, through the Armory Show, Alfred Barr, and more. The book is full of original research, new angles that give life to once-ossified narratives, and bright, well-paced prose. Indiebound and Amazon offer it for about $33.  Jordan Weber discusses "All Our Liberations," an art installation and space for community learning, reflection and healing organized by the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in Saint Louis. The project, which runs from July 16-24, takes place at the Spring Church near the Pulitzer in Saint Louis's Grand Center Arts District. The project includes a three-tiered sculpture Weber made with black obsidian stones and participation from collaborators Weber met during a 2021 residency. During the week-long program Weber will host programs for both formerly incarcerated individuals and members of the public. Urban farmers, healers, and organizers from Close the Workhouse -- a Saint Louis-area campaign working to end mass incarceration -- are Weber's programming co-host. In April 2023, Weber will expand "All Our Liberation" as part of Counterpublic, a city-wide triennial.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Entretiens avec Alain Cuny (2/5) : Alain Cuny : "Comédien… ce n'était pas là où je voulais aller"

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 24:59


durée : 00:24:59 - Les Nuits de France Culture - Entretiens avec Alain Cuny 2/5. Dans ce deuxième entretien mené par Fernande Schulmann, le comédien évoque ses études aux Beaux-Arts, son amitié avec Pierre Reverdy, sa rencontre avec Artaud, sa difficulté de vivre, (1ère diffusion : 06/01/1976). * "Une certaine articulation de l'entreprise de vivre s'est tout à coup révélée". voilà comment s'exprimait, de sa voix incomparable, Alain Cuny dans la magnifique série de cinq entretiens qu'il accordait en 1975 sur France Culture. Par ces mots il décrivait ce qu'avait représenté pour lui, alors qu'il n'avait pas vingt-ans, les rencontres de Braque, Picasso, Chanel, que lui avait présenté Pierre Reverdy, avec lequel il avait lié une amitié profonde.  * Dans le deuxième volet de cette série, Alain Cuny parlait également de sa rencontre avec Artaud et on découvrait comment, à quinze ans à peine, un don pour le dessin lui avait permis de gagner sa vie en réalisant des affiches de cinéma, notamment pour des films de Feyder, Renoir ou Pabst.  "Comédien. ce n'était pas là où je voulais aller" disait-il, en martelant qu'il n'avait pour autant jamais exercé cet art qu'en lui donnant toujours tout de ses ressources physiques et spirituelles. Il faut absolument entendre Alain Cuny, dans toute sa riche complexité, au micro de son amie Fernande Schulmann ; à mille lieues de la statue du commandeur qu'il a pu représenter, l'entendre dire encore, après quarante d'années d'une carrière flamboyante, "Je vis en clandestin", avouant qu'il avait été longtemps, et était resté peut-être toujours, "en permanent danger de rompre", "de prendre congé" d'une existence à jamais marquée par son douloureux commencement. Par Fernande Schulmann - Avec Alain Cuny Entretiens avec Alain Cuny 2/5 (1ère diffusion : 06/01/1976) Indexation web : Sandrine England, Documentation sonore de Radio France Archive Ina-Radio France

Adam and Andy
AnA #81: Creationism

Adam and Andy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022


Here's a weird one. Think we're just over here chatting about Picasso reacting to boring people? A guy chugging Mountain Dew and tomato juice? Well, there's also some time to give certain CREATIONS their time to air grievances about their creators. This is a safe space. Well, really only safe for the Suds. 0:00 Cold Open 3:53 Intro 15:18 A Bone to Picasso 23:48 Badlands Chugging 30:01 School for Furries 44:31 Alphabet Souper Record 50:54 Close Send us emails! adamalsoandy@gmail.com Tik Tok: @adamalsoandy Facebook: @adamalsoandy Twitter: @adamalsoandy Instragram: @adamalsoandy Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0wWImCkh76lpYmGdmXzrQZ iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/adam-and-andy/id1529984241 adam-andy.com

Life on Planet Earth
MISSIONARY OF WALL STREET: STEPHEN AUTH, CIO at one of Wall Street's top money managers, on how his group brings New Yorkers back to God; his near death experience & new book, PILGRIMAGE TO THE MUSEUM

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 59:36


Have you ever visited a museum and found the narrations in the self-guided-tour headsets a bit tedious? Slightly too clinical, perhaps? And have you ever noticed that God is rarely mentioned in art museums these days, unless in a cold, archaeological, “scientific” way? All of that is about to change. In Pilgrimage to the Museum, author-curator Stephen Auth takes you on a provocative and colorful journey through the history of Western art, interpreted through a lens of profound Christian faith — appropriately so since, in Auth's view, much of Western art expresses humanity's search for God, the Divine Artist-Creator. In this beautifully illustrated voyage, drawn largely from works on display at New York's popular Metropolitan Museum of Art, you will experience the ups and downs of humanity's determined quest. Leaving all the art-history jargon at the front door, Auth will transport you in his spiritual time machine from Egypt's Old Kingdom, through Greece and Rome, to medieval Europe; from the age of the Renaissance, through the Ages of Exploration and Enlightenment; and from the rise of atheism in the late 1800s to the seeds of a spiritual rebirth in the modern era. Along the way, you will experience anew the masterpieces of many artists, from Polykleitos to Raphael, Duccio to Rembrandt, Monet to Picasso. Through the works of these great artists, you will encounter the profound truths that lead many to God and cause many others to wonder. You will discover how various themes and motifs of man's struggle to find God occur, morph, fade, and then reoccur centuries later. As you laugh, cry, and pray your way through this illuminating voyage, you will emerge refreshed and renewed in your own journey to God— and you will never look at a work of art the same way again. Source: SOPHIA INSTITUTE PRESS Website: www.sophiainstitute.com/products/item/pilgrimage-to-the-museum --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

Visionaries Global Media
Dungeons & Junkiez Presents: Tales Of Ortorvia #38: Betrayal

Visionaries Global Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 78:42


Join The GameJunkiez, as they embark on a journey into the world of Dungeons & Dragons, EXCLUSIVELY on Visionaries Global Media Join Alex, as he takes the helm as the DM, as he sits down with all of the members of “The Pirate Crew”, as they Sail into the ocean world of Ortorvia, which will be as always a totally unscripted, homebrew adventure!!! Starring! Matt, as Reed Tosscobble the Halfling Pirate Captain Rogue/Bard/Fighter Kerry, as Rran the Gnoll Barbarian/Fighter Caitlin, as Ahlai Salir the Human Monk/Warlock Chad, as Picasso the Tortle Barbarian/Monk and Alex as ‘The DM who bullies a bunch of pirates' ================================ Follow Matt: @TheMattAttackUK Follow Alex: @SpiderBreadUk Follow Kerry: @Shirobeans Follow Caitlin: @CaitlinRC Follow Chad: @Chads_Mind ============================= Follow the show: @DungeonJunkiez Follow our sister show, Chris Talks Games: @chrislewis37 Follow our main show: @GameJunkiezPod Follow Caitlin's Content: @OurMindGames Follow Chad's show: @Viewfromtoprope Follow the network: @VisGlobalMedia Music from Tabletop Audio: https://tabletopaudio.com/ #WeWillGetThroughThis #DnD #DungeonsNJunkiez

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 161 Part 2: Modern Marvels: Why Collectors Are Connecting with Modernist Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 23:08


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the best modernist pieces are fetching record prices at auction today How “Messengers of Modernism” helped legitimize modernist jewelry as an art form The difference between modern jewelry and modernist jewelry Who the most influential modernist jewelers were and where they drew their inspiration from Why modernist jewelry was a source of empowerment for women About Toni Greenbaum Toni Greenbaum is a New York-based art historian specializing in twentieth and twenty-first century jewelry and metalwork. She wrote Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry 1940-1960 (Montréal: Musée des Arts Décoratifs and Flammarion, 1996), Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge (Stuttgart: Arnoldsche Art Publishers, 2019) and “Jewelers in Wonderland,” an essay on Sam Kramer and Karl Fritsch for Jewelry Stories: Highlights from the Collection 1947-2019 (New York: Museum of Arts and Design and Arnoldsche, 2021), along with numerous book chapters, exhibition catalogues, and essays for arts publications. Greenbaum has lectured internationally at institutions such as the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven; Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum and Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah. She has worked on exhibitions for several museums, including the Victoria and Albert in London, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, and Bard Graduate Center Gallery, New York. Additional Resources: Link to Purchase Books Toni's Instagram The Jewelry Library  Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: Once misunderstood as an illegitimate art form, modernist jewelry has come into its own, now fetching five and six-figure prices at auction. Modernist jewelry likely wouldn't have come this far without the work of Toni Greenbaum, an art historian, professor and author of “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the history of modernist jewelry; why it sets the women who wear it apart; and where collectors should start if they want to add modernist pieces to their collections. Read the episode transcript here.     Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. If you haven't heard part one, please go to TheJewelryJourney.com. Today my guest is art historian, professor and author Toni Greenbaum. She is the author of the iconic tome, “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960,” which analyzes the output of America's modernist jewelers. Welcome back.    Do you think that if you had looked up and seen Sam Kramer's shop, would you have been attracted?   Toni: Oh, my god, I would have been up in a shot. Are you kidding? I would have tumbled up those stairs had I known it was there. I never even knew what it was, but I was always seeking out that aesthetic, that kind of thing. Like I said, my mother would buy handmade jewelry, silver jewelry, and I loved what she bought. I would go to galleries with her. When I say gallery, they were more like shops; they were like shop-galleries, multimedia boutiques, not specifically jewelry, that would carry handmade jewelry. I loved it. Had I seen Sam Kramer's shop, I would have been up like a shot. The same thing with Art Smith. I would have been down those steps like a shot, but I didn't know they were there, and I was too busy running after boys and going to the coffee shops in Greenwich Village to look carefully.   Sharon: Out here, I don't know if you would have had those influences.   Toni: You had a few shops. You're in the Los Angeles area?   Sharon: Yeah.   Toni: There were a few shops in L.A., not so much in Northern California. There was Nanny's in San Francisco, which was a craft gallery that carried a lot of jewelers. In Southern California there were a few studio shops, but I don't know how prominent they were. I don't know how obvious they were. I don't think that they were as much on people's radar as the ones in New York.   Sharon: When you say studio jewelers, was everything one-off, handmade?   Toni: Yes—well, not necessarily one-off. Generally, what these jewelers would do—this is the best generalization—for the larger, more expensive, more involved pieces, they would make one. When they sold it, they'd make another one, and when they sold that, they'd make another one. If the style was popular, they would also have what they would think of as production lines—earrings, cuff links, tie bars that they would replicate, but they were not cast usually. At that time, very little of it was cast. It was hand-wrought, so there were minor differences in each of the examples. But unless we get into the business records of these jewelers, we don't really know exactly how many they made of each design.   Sharon: Why is it, do you think, that modernist jewelry has been so popular today?   Toni: Oh, that's a good question. That's a very good question. I think a lot has to do with Fifty/50 Gallery's promotion. Fifty/50 was on Broadway at 12th Street, and it was a multimedia gallery that specialized in mid-20th century material. There were three very smart, very savvy, very charismatic owners who truly loved the material like I love it, and when you love something so much, when you have a passion, it's very easy to make other people love it also. I think a lot of the answer to that question is Fifty/50's promotion. They were also a very educative gallery. They were smart, and they knew how to give people the information they needed to know they were buying something special. I think it appeals to a certain kind of person.    Blanche Brown was an art historian in the midcentury who was married to Arthur Danto, who was a philosopher who taught art history at Columbia. His wife, Blanche Brown, was also an art historian. She did a lot of writing, and she would talk about the modernist jewelry, which she loved. It was a badge that she and her cohort would wear with pride because it showed them to be aesthetically aware, politically progressive. It made them stand apart from women who were wearing diamonds and precious jewelry just to show how wealthy their husbands were, which was in the 1940s and 1950s, the women who would wear this jewelry. So, for women like Blanche Brown and women through the 1960s, 70s, 80s and even now—well, now it's different because we have all the contemporary jewelers—but I think it set these women apart. It made them special in a way. It set them apart from the women who were wearing the Cartier and the Van Cleef and Arpels.    You dress for your peers. You dress to make your peers admire you, if not be envious. Within the Bohemian subculture of the 1950s, within the Beat Generation of the 1950s and through the 1960s and the hippies in the 1970s, it set apart that kind of woman. Remember, also, feminism was starting to become a very important aspect of lifestyle. I think when “The Feminine Mystique” came out around 1963—I would have to check it—women were starting to feel empowered. They wanted to show themselves to be intelligent and secure and powerful, and I think modernist jewelry imparted that message when one wore it. It's not that different than people who wear the contemporary jewelry we love so much now. Art Jewelry Forum says it's jewelry that makes you think, and that is what I think a lot of us relate to in that jewelry. It's jewelry with a real concept behind it.   Sharon: That leads me to the next question. I know the biographies repeat themselves. When I was looking up information about you, they said you're an expert in modernist and contemporary jewelry. Contemporary can mean anything. Would you agree with the contemporary aspect?   Toni: I don't view myself as an expert in contemporary. I think I know more than a lot of people about it only because I study it. It's very hard to keep up because there are so many new jewelers popping up all the time. The name of my course that I teach at Pratt is Theory and Criticism of Contemporary Jewelry. Because of that, I do have to keep up to the day because it's a required course for the juniors majoring in jewelry studies, and I feel a responsibility to make them aware of what's happening right at that point I'm teaching it. Things are changing so much in our field, but I don't view myself as an expert. I just think I know a lot about it. It's not my field of expertise, and there's so much. You've got German jewelers, and you've got Chinese jewelers, and you've got Australian and New Zealand jewelers, and you've got Swedish jewelers. All over the world. You've got Estonia, a little, small country, as these major jewelers. They are each individual disciplines in and of themselves.   Sharon: How is it that you wrote the catalogue that became “Messengers of Modernism”? Were you asked to write the catalogue?    Toni: Yeah, I was hired by David Hanks and Associates, which was and still is the curatorial firm. They're American, but they work for the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. At that time, there was a separate Montreal Museum of Decorative Arts, and that's really where Messengers of Modernism—it came under the Montreal Museum of Decorative Arts. Now, it has been absorbed into the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. It's just one building. It was a separate building. Basically I was hired by the museum to write the catalogue.   Sharon: And how did it become a book?    Toni: It is a book.    Sharon: Yes, but how did it become—it was a catalogue.   Toni: It's a book, but it functions as the catalogue in the next edition.   Sharon: Right, but I was saying that you wrote the catalogue, and then you said it was published by Flammarion in Paris. Did they say, “Oh, let's take it and make it a book?” How did it transform?   Toni: It was always a book, but it functioned as the catalogue for a particular collection, which is their collection of modernist jewelry. Many exhibitions, even painting exhibitions, when you go to a museum and view a painting exhibition and you buy the accompanying text, it's the catalogue of the exhibition.   Sharon: Yes, but a lot of those don't become books per se. That's why I was wondering, did somebody at the publishers see your catalogue and say, “This would make a great book?” I have never seen the exhibition, but I have the book.   Toni: I think this is a semantic conversation more than anything else. It has become, as I said, the standard text, mostly because nothing else really exists, except I believe Marbeth Schon wrote a book on the modernist jewelers which is more encyclopedic. This book, “Messengers of Modernism,” first of all, it puts the collection in the context of studio craft from the turn of the century up until then, which was then the present. The book was published in 1996. I think what you're saying is it's more important than what we think of as a museum catalogue and it's become a standard text.   Sharon: Yeah.   Toni: It was always conceived as a book about modernist jewelry; it was just focusing on this one collection. What I'm saying is people would say, “Well, why isn't this one in the book? Why did you leave this one out?” and I said, “Well, I didn't leave this one out. This is a book about a finite collection that's in the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.” If I were writing a book about modernist jewelry, of course I would have included Claire Falkenstein, but she wasn't in their collection, so it's not in that book. That was basically what I meant.   Sharon: Is there a volume two that's going to be coming out with the ones that weren't in the collection that you think should be in the book?   Toni: That book was published in 1996. We're already in 2022. People are always asking me, but one never knows.    Sharon: I guess you don't need an exhibition to write a catalogue.    Toni: No, to write a book, of course you don't.   Sharon: To write a book. What's on your radar? What do you think you have next? Is it in the realm of modernism that you would be writing about?   Toni: That's really what I write about. I lecture about contemporary jewelry to my students and occasionally to the public, but my area of expertise is modernism. There are cardiologists that have a part of their practice in general medicine, but if somebody has a gastrointestinal problem, they're going to send them to a gastroenterologist. I can deal with the broad strokes, which I do, but unless it's one specific jeweler that I would write about, I would not attempt a book about contemporary jewelry. I would stick with modernism, what I feel very confident and comfortable with.   Sharon: If somebody who's passionate about jewelry but not wealthy said they want to start building a modernist collection, where would they start?   Toni: That is another good question. First of all, they would really have to comb the auctions. If they were very serious about collecting important works, I would send them to Mark McDonald, who's the premier dealer in this material. He was one of the partners of Fifty/50.   Sharon: Right, does he still work in that area? Didn't they close the store? Yeah, they closed the store.   Toni: Yeah, two of the partners tragically died. Mark had Gansevoort Gallery after. That was on Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District here in New York, which was a wonderful gallery also specializing in modernist material, multimedia. Then he had a shop up in Hudson, New York, for many years, right opposite Ornamentum Gallery. That closed, but he still deals privately. He is the most knowledgeable dealer in the period that I know of. If anybody was really serious about starting to collect modernist jewelry, he would be the person I recommend they go to.   Sharon: It sounds like somebody to collaborate with if you're writing your next book.   Toni: We always collaborate. We're good friends and we always collaborate.   Sharon: Where do you see the market for modernist jewelry? Do you see it continuing to grow? Is it flat? Is it growing?   Toni: Yes, the best of it will continue to grow. There was an auction right before the pandemic hit. I think it was February of 2020, right before we got slammed. It was an auction that was organized by David Rago Auction in New Hope, Pennsylvania, and Wright, which is also an auction gallery specializing in modern and modernism from Chicago. Mark McDonald curated the collection, and the idea behind that exhibition was it was going to go from modernist jewelry from the mid-20th century up to the present and show the lineage and the inheritance from the modernist jewelers. It also included Europeans, and there was some wonderful modernist jewelry in that exhibition that sold very well—the move star pieces, the big pieces.    Then there was—I guess a year ago, no more than that—there was an auction at Bonhams auction house which was one couple's collection of modernist jewelry, artist jewelry—and by artists, I mean Picasso and Max Ernst, modernist artists. They collected a lot of Mexican jewelry and two of Art Smith's most major bracelets, his modern cuff and his lava cuff. I always forget which sold for what, but these were copper and brass cuffs. One sold for $18,000 and one sold for $13,000. I think the modern cuff was $18,000 and the lava cuff was $13,000. If anybody comes to my lecture tomorrow for GemEx, I talk about both of them in detail. This is big money. Five figures is very big money for these items, but these are the best of the best, the majors of the major by Art Smith. Art Smith is currently very, very coveted.   Sharon: Who's your favorite of the modernist jewelers? Who would you say?   Toni: Well, I have two favorites. There are three that are the most important, so let's say three favorites. One is Art Smith, and the reason is because the designs are just brilliant. They really take the body into consideration, negative space into consideration, and they're just spectacularly designed and beautiful to wear. Sam Kramer, the best of his work, the really weird, crazy, surrealist pieces like the one that's on the cover and the back of the Sam Kramer book. Margaret de Patta, who was from the San Francisco Bay area, and she was diametrically opposite to these two because her work was based upon constructivism. She had studied under Moholy-Nagy, the Hungarian constructivist painter, sculptor, photographer. Her work is architectural based upon these eccentrically cut stones. She would be inspired by the rutilations, which are the inclusions within quartz, and she would design her structures around them. I would say those are my three favorites.   Sharon: That's interesting. I wouldn't have thought of Margaret de Patta. I guess I think of her in a different category. I don't know why.   Toni: She's one of the most important modernist jewelers. She founded that whole San Francisco Bay Area MAG, the Metal Arts Guild. She was their guru.    Sharon: When I think of San Francisco at that time, I think of all the jewelry I bought when I was 16 and then I said, “What did I want this for?” Now I see it in the flea markets for 14 times the price I paid for it.   Toni: Right.   Sharon: But who knew. Anyway, Toni, thank you so much. It's been so great to have you. We really learned a lot. It's a real treat. Thank you.   Toni: I had a great time also. Thank you for inviting me. Thank you.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Relay Chain
Composable Finance Part 2: Envisioning the Valhalla of Cross-Chain DeFi

Relay Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 36:11


This week we have the second half of the conversation between Jorrin Bruns (Support Engineer, Parity Technologies) and 0xbrainjar, founder and CEO of the Polkadot parachain Composable Finance. Composable and sister parachain Picasso on Kusama allow smart contracts built on different languages and different chains to connect, enabling cross-chain DeFi applications and more. If you missed part 1, have a listen here (https://relaychain.fm/44-composable-finance-part-1-unlocking-cross-chain-cross-layer-defi-on-polkadot). In part 2, they talk more about Mosaic, Composable's transfer availability layer, and XCVM, their cross-consensus virtual machine. They look at how Composable approaches cross-chain bridging and communication, interoperability with ecosystems outside of Polkadot, and thinking outside the box for cross-chain applications beyond what's already been done before. Links Composable Finance (https://www.composable.finance/) Picasso Network (https://www.picasso.xyz/) Angular Finance (https://twitter.com/AngularFinance) Whirlpool Cash (https://twitter.com/Whirlpool_Cash) Highlights 01:35 - Mosaic, XCVM and liquidity fragmentation 03:45 - Transaction fees w/ multiple blockchains 04:50 - Intro to XCVM (cross-consensus virtual machine) 07:15 - Interoperability with Cosmos and other ecosystems 11:32 - XCVM and bridging deep dive 16:30 - Cross-chain developer and user experience 24:30 - Angular, Substrate's first money market 26:45 - Whirlpool Cash (zk mixing) Special Guest: 0xbrainjar.

All the Hacks
Inflation and All Things Money with Jacob Goldstein

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 64:38 Very Popular


#64: Podcasting legend Jacob Goldstein joins Chris to discuss what's going on with inflation and what you can do about it. They also delve into everything money – how it originated, what its future might look like, how crypto fits in and some of Jacob's favorite money hacks.Jacob Goldstein is a journalist, writer, and podcast host. He's written for the Wall Street Journal, co-hosted NPR's “Planet Money” for a decade, authored “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing” and recently launched a new podcast, “What's Your Problem?”Full show notes at: https://www.allthehacks.com/money-jacob-goldstein Partner DealsVuori: 20% off the most comfortable performance apparel I've ever wornMasterworks: VIP access to skip the waitlistDaffy: Free $25 to give to the charity of your choiceFabric: Affordable term life insurance for you and your family Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Jacob Goldstein: Twitter | Podcast: What's Your Problem? | Podcast: Planet MoneyJacob's Book: Money: The True Story of a Made-Up ThingWhat's Your Problem? Podcasts: Squeezing the Entire Internet Into a ShoeboxJacob's San Diego Recommendations:Roberto's Taco Shop - Del MarTorrey Pines State Natural ReserveOther Resources Mentioned: Tesla Auto Loan SpreadsheetCME FedWatch ToolSeries I Savings BondsThe Potential of Blockchain Technology with Chris DixonRyan Holiday AutoSlash - Cheap Car Rentals WorldwideKayak - Search Flights, Hotels & Rental CarsTripadvisorCapital One Eno - Google Chrome ExtensionTruebill - Find & Cancel SubscriptionsAll The Hacks Traveling Podcasts: Pro Travel Hacks for Every Aspect of Your Next Trip with Leigh RowanHacking Credit Card Points and Miles with Alex MillerFinding Cheap Flights to Anywhere in the World with Scott KeyesRedeeming Points for Max Value and Listener Q&AUpgrade Your Travel with The Points GuyOptimizing Points, Miles, and More Listener Q&ATravel, Hotel, and Credit Card Points Strategies for 2022 with Richard KerrTravel Hacking Bora Bora on Miles and PointsTravel Hacking the Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous with Leigh RowanTravel Hacks for Planning Your Best Trip Ever with Brandon PressorMaximize Your Points: Stacking, Buyers Clubs, Redemption Hacks, and More with Julia MenezListener Q&A Live Show + Big Anniversary Giveaway Full Show Notes:The current state of inflation [01:44]Where inflation is making the largest impact [04:55]Jacob explains when inflation can be a good thing [09:39]You do not need to finance your vehicle through the purchaser, and Chris shares how he financed his most recent Tesla purchase [12:01]How to prepare for inflation and I Bonds [15:39]Jacob explains what money is [20:58]The genesis story of money [23:04]NFTs, Crypto, and the difference between all the various forms of money in the 1800s as opposed to today [29:09]Chris & Jacob's stories of Bitcoin at the beginning [36:14]Jacobs three possibilities for the future  of money and what happened in  Italy when it started to include the black market in its GDP [37:57]Money lessons Jacob is passing on to his children [41:52]Status and dealing with the urge to keep up with the Jones's [44:46]Jacob's travel site filter and annualizing monthly payments hacks and Chris's Tesla delivery hack [49:01] Managing your subscriptions and getting better deals on plane tickets [55:00]Jacob discusses his new podcast, What's the Problem? [59:56]Jacob's San Diego Recommendations [01:02:18]Find Jacob online [01:03:47] SponsorsMasterworksMasterworks is an alternative investing platform that gives you access to one of the most exclusive and overlooked investments in history: blue-chip art. Masterworks lets regular people invest in paintings by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol without spending millions. I've now used masterworks to invest 14 different paintings, including a 15 million dollar Picasso.Here's how it works: Masterworks will buy a painting they think will appreciate well over time, then they securitize that painting with the SEC, so you can invest in it instead of buying the whole thing. Once they sell the painting, later on, you get your share of the proceeds. It's that simple. They've offered over 100 paintings so far and the three that have sold realized a net annualized gain over 30% per work. They have over 280,000 users and demand is as high as ever. All the Hacks has partnered with them to give you all priority access by going to allthehacks.com/masterworks(see important disclosures at masterworks.io/cd) DaffyDaffy is a not-for-profit community built around a new modern way to give, with a mission to help people be more generous, more often. Daffy makes it so much easier to put money aside for charity. You can make your tax deductible contributions all at once. Or you can set aside a little each week or month. Then anytime in the future, you can give to more than one and a half million charities, schools, and faith-based organizations in a matter of seconds. So you can separate the decision to give (and get your tax deduction) from deciding exactly which organization you want to support and when. My favorite part is that you can invest your contributions to your Daffy account so they can grow tax-free to let you have even more impact in the future. To start giving today and get your free $25 to give to the charity of your choice, go to allthehacks.com/daffy VuoriVuori is a new and fresh perspective on performance apparel. Perfect if you are sick and tired of traditional, old workout gear. Everything is designed to work out in, but doesn't look or feel like it. The product is incredibly versatile and can be used for just about any activity like running, training, swimming, yoga; but also great for lounging or weekend errands.To get the most comfortable and versatile clothing on the planet with 20% off your first purchase (plus free shipping on any US order over $75 and free returns) visit allthehacks.com/vuori FabricFabric is where parents come to start their families' financial lives. They make life insurance easy with new lower prices that mean significant savings over other providers, like a million dollars in coverage for less than a dollar a day. With everything online, it takes less than 10 minutes to apply, and you could be offered coverage instantly, with no health exam required. Fabric is fully-backed by Vantis Life, one of the most trusted names in life insurance. To start protecting your family today with a 30-day money-back guarantee visit meetfabric.com/allthehacks Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 161 Part 2: Modern Marvels: Why Collectors Are Connecting with Modernist Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 26:42


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the best modernist pieces are fetching record prices at auction today How “Messengers of Modernism” helped legitimize modernist jewelry as an art form The difference between modern jewelry and modernist jewelry Who the most influential modernist jewelers were and where they drew their inspiration from Why modernist jewelry was a source of empowerment for women About Toni Greenbaum Toni Greenbaum is a New York-based art historian specializing in twentieth and twenty-first century jewelry and metalwork. She wrote Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry 1940-1960 (Montréal: Musée des Arts Décoratifs and Flammarion, 1996), Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge (Stuttgart: Arnoldsche Art Publishers, 2019) and “Jewelers in Wonderland,” an essay on Sam Kramer and Karl Fritsch for Jewelry Stories: Highlights from the Collection 1947-2019 (New York: Museum of Arts and Design and Arnoldsche, 2021), along with numerous book chapters, exhibition catalogues, and essays for arts publications. Greenbaum has lectured internationally at institutions such as the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven; Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum and Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah. She has worked on exhibitions for several museums, including the Victoria and Albert in London, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, and Bard Graduate Center Gallery, New York. Additional Resources: Link to Purchase Books Toni's Instagram The Jewelry Library  Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: Once misunderstood as an illegitimate art form, modernist jewelry has come into its own, now fetching five and six-figure prices at auction. Modernist jewelry likely wouldn't have come this far without the work of Toni Greenbaum, an art historian, professor and author of “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the history of modernist jewelry; why it sets the women who wear it apart; and where collectors should start if they want to add modernist pieces to their collections. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week.    Today my guest is art historian, professor and author Toni Greenbaum. She is the author of the iconic tome, “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960,” which analyzes the output of America's modernist jewelers. Most recently, she authored “Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge,” a biography of the jeweler Sam Kramer. Every time I say jeweler I think I'm using the world a little loosely, but we're so glad to have you here today. Thank you so much.   Toni: I am so glad to be here, Sharon. Thank you so much for inviting me. It's been many years coming.   Sharon: I'm glad we connected. Tell me about your jewelry journey. It sounds very interesting.   Toni: Well, there's a lot you don't know about my jewelry journey. My jewelry journey began when I was a preteen. I just became fascinated with Native American, particularly Navajo, jewelry that I would see in museum gift shops. I started to buy it when I was a teenager, what I could afford. In those days, I have to say museum gift shops were fabulous, particularly the Museum of Natural History gift shop, the Brooklyn Museum gift shop. They had a lot of ethnographic material of very high quality. So, I continued to buy Native American jewelry. My mother used to love handcrafted jewelry, and she would buy it in whatever craft shops or galleries she could find.    Then eventually in my 20s and 30s, I got outpriced. Native American jewelry was becoming very, very fashionable, particularly in the late 60s, 1970s. I started to see something that looked, to me, very much like Native American jewelry, but it was signed. It had names on it, and some of them sounded kind of Mexican—in fact, they were Mexican. So, I started to buy Mexican jewelry because I could afford it. Then that became very popular when names like William Spratling and Los Castillo and Hector Aguilar became known. I saw something that looked like Mexican jewelry and Navajo jewelry, but it wasn't; it was made by Americans. In fact, it would come to be known as modernist jewelry. Then I got outpriced with that, but that's the start of my jewelry journey.   Sharon: So, you liked jewelry from when you were a youth.    Toni: Oh, from when I was a child. I was one of these little three, four-year-olds that was all decked out. My mother loved jewelry. I was an only child, and I was, at that time, the only grandchild. My grandparents spoiled me, and my parents spoiled me, and I loved jewelry, so I got a lot of jewelry. That and Frankie Avalon records.   Sharon: Do you still collect modernist? You said you were getting outpriced. You write about it. Do you still collect it?   Toni: Not really. The best of the modernist jewelry is extraordinarily expensive, and unfortunately, I want the best. If I see something when my husband and I are antiquing or at a flea market or at a show that has style and that's affordable, occasionally I'll buy it, but I would not say that I can buy the kind of jewelry I want in the modernist category any longer. I did buy several pieces in the early 1980s from Fifty/50 Gallery, when they were first putting modernist jewelry on the map in the commercial aspect. I was writing about it; they were selling it. They were always and still are. Mark McDonald still is so generous with me as far as getting images and aiding my research immeasurably. Back then, the modernist jewelry was affordable, and luckily I did buy some major pieces for a tenth of what they would get today.   Sharon: Wow! When you say the best of modernist jewelry today, Calder was just astronomical. We'll put that aside.   Toni: Even more astronomical: there's a Harry Bertoia necklace that somebody called my attention to that is coming up at an auction at Christie's. If they don't put that in their jewelry auctions, they'll put it in their design auctions. I think it's coming up at the end of June; I forget the exact day. The estimate on the Harry Bertoia necklace is $200,000 to $300,000—and this is a Harry Bertoia necklace. I'm just chomping at the bit to find out what it, in fact, is going to bring, but that's the estimate they put, at $200,000 to $300,000.   Sharon: That's a lot of money. What holds your interest in modernist jewelry?   Toni: The incredible but very subtle design aspect of it. Actually, tomorrow I'm going to be giving a talk on Art Smith for GemEx. Because my background is art history, one of the things I always do when I talk about these objects is to show how they were inspired by the modern art movements. This is, I think, what sets modernist jewelry apart from other categories of modern and contemporary jewelry. There are many inspirations, but it is that they are very much inspired by Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Biomorphism, etc., depending on the artist. Some are influenced by all of the above, and I think I saw that. I saw it implicitly before I began to analyze it in the jewelry.    This jewelry is extraordinarily well-conceived. A lot of the craftsmanship is not pristine, but I have never been one for pristine craftsmanship. I love rough surfaces, and I love the process to show in the jewelry. Much of the modernist jewelry is irreverent—I use the word irreverent instead of sloppy—as far as the process is concerned. It was that hands-on, very direct approach, in addition to this wonderful design sense, which, again, came from the modern art movements. Most of the jewelers—not all of them, but most of them—lived either in New York or in Northern or Southern California and had access to museums, and these people were aesthetes. They would go to museums. They would see Miro's work; they would see Picasso's work, and they would definitely infuse their designs with that sensibility.   Sharon: Do you think that jumped out at you, the fact that they were inspired by different art movements, because you studied art history? You teach it, or you did teach it at one time?    Toni: No, just history of jewelry. I majored in art history, but I've never taught art history. I've taught history of jewelry. We can argue about whether jewelry is art or not, but history of jewelry is what I've taught.   Sharon: I've taken basic art history, but I couldn't tell you some of the movements you're talking about. I can't identify the different movements. Do you think it jumped out at you because you're knowledgeable?   Toni: Yes, definitely, because I would look at Art Smith and I would say, “That's Biomorphism.” I would see it. It was obvious. I would look at Sam Kramer and I would say, “This is Surrealism.” He was called a surrealist jeweler back in his day, when he was practicing and when he had his shop on 8th Street. I would look at Rebajes and I would see Cubism. Of course, it was because I was well-versed in those movements, because what I was always most interested in when I was studying art history were the more modern movements.   Sharon: Did you think you would segue to jewelry in general? Was that something on your radar?   Toni: That's a very interesting question because when I was in college, I had a nucleus of professors who happened to have come from Cranbrook.   Sharon: I'm sorry, from where?   Toni: Cranbrook School of Art.   Sharon: O.K., Cranbrook.   Toni: I actually took a metalsmithing class as an elective, just to see what it was because I was so interested in jewelry, although I was studying what I call legitimate art history. I was so interested in jewelry that I wanted to see what the process was. I probably was the worst jeweler that ever tried to make jewelry, but I learned what it is to make. I will tell you something else, Sharon, it is what has given me such respect for the jewelers, because when you try to do it yourself and you see how challenging it is, you really respect the people who do it miraculously even more.    So, I took this class just to see what it was, and the teacher—I still remember his name. His name was Cunningham; I don't remember his first name. He was from Cranbrook, and he sent the class to a retail store in New York on 53rd Street, right opposite MOMA, called America House.   Sharon: Called American House?   Toni: America House. America House was the retail enterprise of the American Craft Council. They had the museum, which was then called the Museum of Contemporary Crafts; now it's called MAD, Museum of Arts and Design. They had the museum, and they had a magazine, Craft Horizons, which then became American Craft, and then they had this retail store. I went into America House—and this was the late 1960s—and I knew I had found my calling. I looked at this jewelry, which was really fine studio jewelry. It was done by Ronald Pearson; it was done by Jack Kripp. These were the people that America House carried. I couldn't afford to buy it. I did buy some of the jewelry when they went out of business and had a big sale in the early 1970s. At that time I couldn't, but I looked at the jewelry and the holloware, and I had never seen anything like it. Yes, I had seen Native American that I loved, and I had seen Mexican that I loved. I hadn't yet seen modernist; that wasn't going to come until the early 1980s. But here I saw this second generation of studio jewelers, and I said, “I don't know what I'm going to do with this professionally, but I know I've got to do something with it because this is who I am. This is what I love.”    Back in the late 1960s, it was called applied arts. Anything that was not painting and sculpture was applied art. Ceramics was applied art; furniture was applied art; textiles, jewelry, any kind of metalwork was applied art. Nobody took it seriously as an academic discipline in America, here in this country. Then I went on to graduate school, still in art history. I was specializing in what was then contemporary art, particularly color field painting, but I just loved what was called the crafts, particularly the metalwork. I started to go to the library and research books on jewelry. I found books on jewelry, but they were all published in Europe, mostly England. There were things in other languages other than French, which I could read with a dictionary. There were books on jewelry history, but they were not written in America; everything was in Europe. So, I started to read voraciously about the history of jewelry, mostly the books that came out of the Victoria & Albert Museum. I read all about ancient jewelry and medieval jewelry and Renaissance jewelry. Graham Hughes, who was then the director of the V&A, had written a book, “Modern Jewelry,” and it had jewelry by artists, designed by Picasso and Max Ernst and Brach, including things that were handmade in England and all over Europe. I think even some of the early jewelers in our discipline were in that book. If I remember correctly, I think Friedrich Becker, for example, might have been in Graham Hughes' “Modern Jewelry,” because that was published, I believe, in the late 1960s.    So, I saw there was a literature in studio jewelry; it just wasn't in America. Then I found a book on William Spratling, this Mexican jeweler whose work I had collected. It was not a book about his jewelry; it was an autobiography about himself that obviously he had written, but it was so rich in talking about the metalsmithing community in Taxco, Mexico, which is where he, as an American, went to study the colonial architecture. He wound up staying and renovating the silver mines that had been dormant since the 18th century. It was such a great story, and I said, “There's something here,” but no graduate advisor at that time, in the early 70s, was going to support you in wanting to do a thesis on applied art, no matter what the medium. But in the back of my mind, I always said, “I'm going to do something with this at some point.”    Honestly, Sharon, I never thought I would live to see the day that this discipline is as rich as it is, with so much literature, with our publishers publishing all of these fantastic jewelry books, and other publishers, like Flammarion in Paris, which published “Messengers of Modernism.” Then there's the interest in Montreal at the Museum of Fine Arts, which is the museum that has the “Messengers of Modernism” collection. It has filtered into the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, obviously MAD. So many museums are welcoming. I never thought I would live to see the day. It really is so heartening. I don't have words to express how important this is, but I just started to do it. In the early 1970s or mid-1970s—I don't think my daughter was born yet. My son was a toddler. I would sit in my free moments and write an article about William Spratling, because he was American. He went to Mexico, but he was American. He was the only American I knew of that I could write about. Not that that article was published at that time, but I was doing the research and I was writing it.   Sharon: That's interesting. If there had been a discipline of jewelry history or something in the applied arts, if an advisor had said, “Yes, I'll support you,” or “Why don't you go ahead and get your doctorate or your master's,” that's something you would have done?   Toni: Totally, without even a thought, yes. Because when I was studying art history, I would look at Hans Holbein's paintings of Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More, and all I would do was look at the jewelry they were wearing, the chains and the badges on their berets. I said, “Oh my god, that is so spectacular.” Then I learned that Holbein actually designed the jewelry, which a lot of people don't know. I said, “There is something to this.” I would look at 18th century paintings with women, with their pearls and rings and bracelets, and all I would do was look at the jewelry. I would have in a heartbeat. If I could have had a graduate advisor, I would have definitely pursued that.   Sharon: When you say you never thought you'd live to see the day when modernist jewelry is so popular—not that it's so surprising, but you are one of the leaders of the movement. When I mentioned to somebody, “Oh, I like modernist jewelry,” the first thing they said was, “Well, have you read ‘Messengers of Modernism?'” As soon as I came home—I was on a trip—I got it. So, you are one of the leaders.   Toni: Well, it is interesting. It is sort of the standard text, but people will say, “Well, why isn't Claire Falkenstein in the book? She's so important,” and I say, “It's looked upon as a standard text, but the fact is it's a catalogue to an exhibition. That was the collection.” Fifty/50 Gallery had a private collection. As I said before, they were at the forefront of promoting and selling modernist jewelry, but they did have a private collection. That collection went to Montreal in the 1990s because at that time, there wasn't an American museum that was interested in taking that collection. That book is the catalogue of that finite collection. So, there are people who are major modernist jewelers—Claire Falkenstein is one that comes to mind—that are not in that collection, so they're not in the book. There's a lot more to be said and written about that movement.   Sharon: I'm sure you've been asked this a million times: What's the difference between modern and modernist jewelry?   Toni: Modern is something that's up to date at a point in time, but modernist jewelry is—this is a word we adopted. The word existed, but we adopted it to define the mid-20th century studio jewelry, the post-war jewelry. It really goes from 1940 to the 1960s. That's it; that's the time limit of modernist jewelry. Again, it's a word we appropriated. We took that word and said, “We're going to call this category modernist jewelry because we have to call it something, so that's the term.” Modern means up to date. That's just a general word.   Sharon: When you go to a show and see things that are in the modernist style, it's not truly modernist if it was done today, it wasn't done before 1960.   Toni: Right, no. Modernist jewelry is work that's done in that particular timeframe and that also subscribes to what I was saying, this appropriation of motifs from the modern art movement. There was plenty of costume jewelry and fine jewelry being done post-war, and that is jewelry that is mid-20th century. You can call it mid-20th century modern, which confuses the issue even more, but it's not modernist jewelry. Modernist jewelry is jewelry that was done in the studio by a silversmith and was inspired by the great movements in modern art and some other inspirations. Art Smith was extremely motivated by African motifs, but also by Calder and by Biomorphism. It's not religious. There are certainly gray areas, but in general, that's modernist jewelry.    Sharon: I feel envious when you talk about everything that was going in on New York. I have a passion, but there's no place on the West Coast that I would go to look at some of this stuff.   Toni: I'll tell you one of the ironies, Sharon. Post-war, definitely through the 1950s and early 1960s, there must have been 13 to 15 studio shops by modernist jewelers. You had Sam Kramer on 8th Street and Art Smith on 4th Street and Polo Bell, who was on 4th Street and then he was on 8th Street, and Bill Tendler, and you had Jules Brenner, and Henry Steig was Uptown. Ed Wiener was all over the place. There were so many jewelers in New York, and I never knew about them. I never went to any of their shops. I used to hang out in the Village when I was a young teenager, walked on 4th Street; never saw Art Smith's shop. He was there from 1949 until 1977. I used to walk on 8th Street, and Sam Kramer was on the second floor. I never looked up, and I didn't know this kind of jewelry existed. In those days, like I said, I was still collecting Navajo.

Eyewitness History
The Radio Station Was "Bombed Off The Air Twice By The Klan"; Founder Of Underground Press Gives His Account

Eyewitness History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 35:56


Thorne Dreyer, a political activist and progressive journalist most of his life, was a pioneer of the ‘60s-70s underground press. He was a founding editor of The Rag in Austin and Space City! in Houston, two of the most influential of the era's underground newspapers. Dreyer is a director of the New Journalism Project, is editor of The Rag Blog, and has hosted Rag Radio on KOOP 91.7-FM in Austin for the last 13 years. He is the author of Making Waves: The Rag Radio Interviews, published in 2022 by the Briscoe Center for American History and distributed by the University of Texas Press, and an editor of Celebrating The Rag: Austin's Iconic Underground. Newspaper (2016), and Exploring Space City!: Houston's Historic Underground Newspaper (2021). In Austin, Dreyer joined the Students for a Democratic Society where he was active in civil rights and the movement against the War in Vietnam. Dreyer grew up in Houston where his mother was a prominent artist and his father was a writer and editor at the Houston Chronicle. Their Dreyer Galleries was the center of a large community of artists, intellectuals, and political activists, and was often under fire from the Ku Klux Klan because of the family's support for human rights. He worked as a political consultant in Houston, as a correspondent for Texas Monthly, managed KPFT, the Pacifica radio station, ran a public relations business, and worked as an actor and music producer. He currently lives in Austin with his dog Picasso.

The Insider Travel Report Podcast
How Barcelona is Made Accessible by Made for Spain & Portugal

The Insider Travel Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 22:11


Virginia Irurita, founder and executive partner of Made for Spain & Portugal, a luxury destination management company specializing in custom private journeys in Spain and Portugal, talks with Alan Fine of Insider Travel Report about how a tour of Barcelona is possible for someone with impaired mobility. Irurita's company has safely put a wheelchair on a hot air balloon, so it was comparatively easy for them to assemble a wheelchair, a chauffeured Mercedes, and an art historian to guide us on a visit to Barcelona's Gothic quarter, Picasso's museum, Gaudi's apartments and La Sagrada Familia. Irurita also talks about what's new and hot in Spain and Portugal. For more information, visit www.madeforspainandportugal.com. If interested, the original video of this podcast -- with supplemental pictures and video -- can be found on the Insider Travel Report Youtube channel  or by searching for the podcast's title on Youtube. 

Perfect English Podcast
The Art of Horace Pippin | Word Power

Perfect English Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 28:22


There are many things in this life that we call art, and art does not take our understanding of any of the intricacies of color, light and shade, or the many different techniques there are in art, and that's why art is truly for everyone. You might have heard of Da Vinci, Picasso, Monet and other great and famous painters, but in today's Word Power episode, we will talk about one of the less talked about great painters of the twentieth century — we will talk about the art of Horace Pippin, and we will learn ten new words in the context of our story for today.Practice what you learn on the website https://englishpluspodcast.com/the-art-of-horace-pippin-word-power/Become a patron on Patreon and enjoy all the amazing patron-only benefitshttps://www.patreon.com/dannyballanEnjoy great stories and learn from English Plus Video Serieshttps://youtube.com/c/englishpluspodcastBuild Your Vocabulary with English Plus Vocabulary Building Book Series:Crossword Puzzle Vocabulary Building Book SeriesBuy on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09N2QGQS4Learn More: https://englishpluspodcast.com/crossword-puzzle-vocabulary-building-book-series/Word Search Games and Activities Book SeriesBuy on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09N2PVK1GLearn More: https://englishpluspodcast.com/word-search-games-and-activities-book-series/FedBiz'5 is Your Definitive Resource to Accelerating Government SalesSeries of 5-minute podcasts designed to help federal contractors find and win businessListen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifyEnglish Plus Vocabulary Building Series:Preview Crossword Puzzle Vocabulary Building Book SeriesPreview Word Search Games and Activities Book SeriesBuy Crossword Puzzle Vocabulary Building Book Series

The Insider Travel Report Podcast
Why Serras Hotel Barcelona Is the Perfect Pre- and Post-Cruise Hotel

The Insider Travel Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 19:47


Antonio Bignone, managing director and co-founder of Serras Hotel Barcelona and the Serras Hotel Collection, talks with Alan Fine of Insider Travel Report about his five-star luxury boutique property, which is just a five-minute taxi ride from the cruise port and was the location of Picasso's first art studio. Bignone gives us a complete tour, showcasing the views of Barcelona Harbor from the rooftop bar and restaurant. For more information, visit www.serrashotel.com. If interested, the original video of this podcast -- with supplemental pictures and video -- can be found on the Insider Travel Report Youtube channel  or by searching for the podcast's title on Youtube. 

STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye
Episode 39: R. O. Blechman

STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 45:14


The first drawing I saw by R. O. Blechman showed a boardroom table full of people trying to brainstorm.In 6 stages, it showed different people having an idea, the ideas were represented by various forms of lighting, from tiny lightbulb to lamp with shade to a massive chandelier.In the last frame the boss at the end of the table comes up with an idea, it's represented by a miniscule lightbulb.Brilliant observation, very funny.I also loved the naive style of the drawing.It looked like a note one naughty child would pass to another secretly in class.Drawn in a hurry because they were excited.The apparent lack of craft means it feels personal, human.A master draftsman like Leonardo daVinci couldn't improve it.He'd kill it.Over the years I became more familiar with Blechman's lines.Often referred to as a nervous line.Countless ad folk have copied it - Alan Parker, John Hegarty, Gray Jolliffe and dozens more, including me.It just looks so easy (try it).You'll find you can draw squiggley lines in the shape of a person, but they feel like those chalk outlines the police draw around bodies; dead.Bob's not only feel alive, they conjure up multiple personalities with endless emotions.Often with a couple of dots and two or three lines.It's like some kind of magic trick.And whereas most artists get smoother, slicker and more polished over the years, Bob chose to move in the opposite direction - his line becoming more broken and juddery with each year. (Come to think of it, didn't Picasso take a similar route?)This distinctive style meant you could spot a Blechman from the next county.But more important than his lines are his ideas.They cover the map, from the big, weighty issues, like politics and death, to the kind of every day minutiae Seinfeld would go on to cover.His observations are as relevant today as they were decades ago.They're about being human.And whereas the styles of many of his contemporaries timestamp their work, Bob's human, anxious lines don't date.Now 91, Bob still sends a cartoon to the New York Times every week.We had a great chat, hope you enjoy it.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Dialogues - Picasso, l'homme aux cent mille visages (1ère diffusion : 11/11/1980)

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 75:00


durée : 01:15:00 - Les Nuits de France Culture - Par Roger Pillaudin - Avec Hélène Parmelin et Jean Bazaine - Réalisation Alain Pollet

TalkErie.com - The Joel Natalie Show - Erie Pennsylvania Daily Podcast
Ten Years of Picasso's: Ray Stolz, Donny Wisniewski - Jun. 30, 2022

TalkErie.com - The Joel Natalie Show - Erie Pennsylvania Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 60:27


On Thursday, we shined the spotlight on a local small business, as they celebrate ten years in business. Picasso's Erie opened in July of 2012, and we talked to the sandwich wizards themselves, owners Ray Stolz and Donny Wisniewski about the joys and challenges of running their shop for the past decade, and what the future might hold.

Off Stage and On The Air

  Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsJarrott Productions Pet DickCity Theatre Picasso at the Lapin Agile What We Talked About Chicago 10K performance Corsicana Back to the Future Musical coming to B'way Shubert foundation Grants 38M to 600 orgs Andre and Antonio Team Up Leopoldstadt The Jimmy's   Thank you to Dean Johanesen, lead singer of "The Human Condition" who gave us permission to use "Step Right Up" as our theme song, so please visit their website.. they're good! (that's an order)  

LadyKflo
Les Demoiselles d'Avignon

LadyKflo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 9:04


Picasso shifted his point of view while working on Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. This perspective change shows in the painting. In fact, he fragmented the figures into ambiguous planes. This gives viewers a sense of looking at them from several angles. We get a combination of views within a single scene. For instance, the woman at the bottom right squats. Her legs face away from us. But this same woman's head looks straight at us. This serves as the most extreme example of ambiguity. Read LadyKflo's collected works and learn about more masterpieces with a click through to LadyKflo's site. https://www.ladykflo.com/category/masterpieces/ Checkout her socials too: https://www.instagram.com/ladykflo/ https://twitter.com/ladykflo

CIA: Contagious Influencers of America
# 163: ERWIN McMANUS examines the genius of Mozart, Picasso, Einstein, Michael Jordan and Jesus

CIA: Contagious Influencers of America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 45:41


What does it take to be a genius? Erwin McManus says if it's breaking the status quo and changing the ways we view the world, Jesus must be the greatest genius of all-time. Nine-time Emmy winner, David Sams, sits down with the author to discuss his latest book “The Genius of Jesus” and how we can all discover our own personal genius. Erwin also shares how his church, Mosaic, based in Hollywood, is impacting lives around the globe. #ErwinMcManus #TheGeniusOf #Mosaic  

This Day in History Class
Pablo Picasso's first major exhibition opens in Paris - June 24th, 1901

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 7:24


On this day in 1901, Spanish painter Pablo Picasso held the first major exhibition of his artwork at a gallery in Paris. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
Hondelatte raconte - L'année 1966 - 5/5

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 35:15


Christophe Hondelatte raconte l'année 1966 en puisant dans les archives d'Europe 1. Cette année-là… le phénomène Antoine énerve Johnny Hallyday, De Gaulle s'oppose à la guerre américaine au Vietnam, l'invention des caisses automatiques dans les magasins et le carton de l'exposition Picasso à Paris !

You Got Us F****d Up
83: Picasso with It

You Got Us F****d Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 87:33


Welcome back to episode 83! On 6/8/22 we talked about the monster hidden behind Pablo Picasso's artwork, spotting narcissists, GETTING TESTED FOR STI's, some car trouble, and more.  Have questions or want advice? Let us know! Visit our website: Yougotuspodcast.com  Movies we talked about:  A Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia (2013)  The Lobster (2015) The Favourite (2018) Brain on Fire (2016) Check us out on Instagram:  @yougotuspodcast @taylorrena_murphy  Smoke Cannabis and live in SoCal? Enjoy 30% off your Grassdoor order.  Grassdoor 30% off link  https://delvrd.me?branch=dJLXweuCNab

Visionaries Global Media
Dungeons & Junkiez Presents: Tales Of Ortorvia #37: Ballroom Wreckfest

Visionaries Global Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 98:11


Join The GameJunkiez, as they embark on a journey into the world of Dungeons & Dragons, EXCLUSIVELY on Visionaries Global Media Join Alex, as he takes the helm as the DM, as he sits down with all of the members of “The Pirate Crew”, as they Sail into the ocean world of Ortorvia, which will be as always a totally unscripted, homebrew adventure!!! Starring! Matt, as Reed Tosscobble the Halfling Pirate Captain Rogue/Bard/Fighter Kerry, as Rran the Gnoll Barbarian/Fighter Caitlin, as Ahlai Salir the Human Monk/Warlock Chad, as Picasso the Tortle Barbarian/Monk and Alex as ‘The DM who bullies a bunch of pirates' ================================ Follow Matt: @TheMattAttackUK Follow Alex: @SpiderBreadUk Follow Kerry: @Shirobeans Follow Caitlin: @CaitlinRC Follow Chad: @Chads_Mind ============================= Follow the show: @DungeonJunkiez Follow our sister show, Chris Talks Games: @chrislewis37 Follow our main show: @GameJunkiezPod Follow Caitlin's Content: @OurMindGames Follow Chad's show: @Viewfromtoprope Follow the network: @VisGlobalMedia Music from Tabletop Audio: https://tabletopaudio.com/ #WeWillGetThroughThis #DnD #DungeonsNJunkiez

Art2Life
Finding Your Style - Nicholas Wilton - Ep 34

Art2Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 39:59 Very Popular


https://Art2Life.com - One of the most common questions I get about the art-making journey is centered around style. How do you find your unique style? The challenge with art-making is that it's so personal, yet we can only look at other people to try and understand where we haven't been. We see the individual creative flare of artists like Picasso and Van Gogh, but it's often difficult to see it in ourselves. Join me for a deep-dive into how we find our style as artists and its role in our art practice. ================================ LISTEN IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN… What is style? [2:50] Finding what makes you feel alive [4:23] Why you can't plan for an art career [8:01] Diving into the process of art-making and why style comes second to the journey [12:05] Reflecting on the early stages of the art journey [20:50] The benefits of not knowing what you're doing [23:16] What part of you is under construction? [27:23] The role of playing in style [31:00]  The art that everyone wants to buy [35:24] ============================= CONNECT WITH NICHOLAS WILTON AND ART2LIFE: Get the Free COLOR TIPS PDF: https://workshop.art2life.com/color-tips-pdf-podcasts/  Follow the Sunday Art2Life Vlog: https://art2life.lpages.co/sign-up-for-the-a2l-vlog/  Follow Nicholas Wilton's Art on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nicholaswilton/  Follow Art2Life on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/art2life_world/?hl=en  Like on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/art2lifeworld  Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe8dJWKgPKkW4W3fsb1vLeg