Podcasts about hemingway

American author and journalist

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The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 152 with Tommy Dean: Master Editor, Reflective Teacher, and Craftsman and Student of Powerful Flash Fiction

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 77:02


Episode 152 Notes and Links to Tommy Dean's Work       On Episode 152 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Tommy Dean, and the two discuss, among other topics, his reading trajectory which started with sports biographies and has branched out in many directions, his start writing in undergrad, his views of flash fiction vs. short shorts, the craft of writing flash fiction, Tommy's recurring themes and development as a writer, and inspiring works by Tobias Wolff and other titans of the trade.      Tommy Dean lives in Indiana with his wife and two children. He is the author of a flash fiction chapbook entitled Special Like the People on TV from Redbird Chapbooks. He is the Editor at Fractured Lit. He has been previously published in the BULL Magazine, The MacGuffin, The Lascaux Review, New World Writing, Pithead Chapel, and New Flash Fiction Review. His story “You've Stopped” was chosen by Dan Chaon to be included in Best Microfiction 2019. It will also be included in Best Small Fiction 2019. His interviews have been previously published in New Flash Fiction Review, The Rumpus, CRAFT Literary, and The Town Crier (The Puritan). Find him @TommyDeanWriter on Twitter.   Tommy Dean's Website   Buy Hollows    A.E. Weisberger Reviews Special Like the People on TV   “Past Lives” Story from Atlas and Alice Magazine-2020   “You've Stopped” from Pithead Chapel   2017 Mini-Interview with Megan Giddings   At about 7:30, Tommy discusses her early reading (a lot of sports and biographies and horror and “heavy genre”) and writing, with the writing mostly coming after undergrad    At about 10:00, the two discuss character as seen in these shared sports biographies   At about 11:30, Tommy describes his love for the library and its easy access to Sports Illustrated/SI for Kids   At about 12:30, Tommy and Pete discuss their shared loves for basketball and baseball, the former especially    At about 14:25, Tommy gives background on how he came to become interested in flash fiction/short shorts   At about 17:20, Tommy responds to Pete's questions about how he has honed his craft   At about 19:00, Tommy describes what it is about flash fiction that appeals to him   At about 19:50, Tommy differentiates between “flash fiction” and “short short”   At about 22:50, Tommy gives some of the formative texts, literary journals (like SmokeLong Quarterly and Vestal Review)  and writers that are classics of the flash fiction forms, like Stuart Dybek, Dan Chaon, Robin Black and “Pine,” and Elizabeth Tallent and her story, “No One's a Mystery”   At about 27:00, Pete recounts the connections between the podcast title and Tobias Wolff's “Bullet in the Brain”   At about 28:30, Tommy discusses the power of flash in its granularity   At about 29:30, The two discuss Hemingway and his “interludes” or works that could be classified as “flash”; they also discuss breaking convention   At about 34:20, Pete corrects himself on the pivotal line that inspired the podcast title   At about 35:10, Pete cites a powerful use of understatement from Elie Wiesel's Night   At about 36:30, Tommy talks about how teaching/editing inform his writing, and vice versa   At about 42:35, Pete quotes interviews with Tommy and Megan Giddings and talks about his “lifejackets” as character    At about 44:00, Pete references powerful opening lines from Tommy and asks about the connections between title and subject matter; Tommy talks about work that became awarded and his process   At about 45:35, Tommy talks about his philosophy of dialogue in flash fiction   At about 47:15, Tommy explains conscious choices in using quotation marks or not   At about 48:30, Pete and Tommy discuss the idea that dialogue to begin a story is fraught; Pete provides an example of a short he wrote that     At about 52:15, Pete highlights a stunning open line from “Past Lives”; Tommy gives real-life connections to the story before reading it   At about 55:45, Tommy describes an “in” for writers involving unique characters   At about 56:45, Tommy talks about his two chapbooks   At about 57:15, Pete reads a review from the first collection and talks about themes of childlessness and craft shared by Hemingway's “Hills Like White Elephants” and Tommy's early writing   At about 59:15, Tommy responds to Pete's questions about development as a writer between his first and most recent collections; he traces his development via “cuts” and themes used    At about 1:03:20, Pete shares a reader's review of Tommy's Hollows and Tommy discusses why he appreciates these particular sentiments   At about 1:05:25, Tommy reads “Baby Alone”   At about 1:14:30, Tommy gives out his social media and contact info, including Alternate Currents and ELJ Editions    You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.     Sign up now for The Chills at Will Podcast Patreon: it can be found at patreon.com/chillsatwillpodcastpeterriehl     Check out the page that describes the benefits of a Patreon membership, including cool swag and bonus episodes. Thanks in advance for supporting my one-man show, my DIY podcast and my extensive reading, research, editing, and promoting to keep this independent podcast pumping out high-quality content!    This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form.    The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 153 with Luivette Resto, a mother, teacher, poet, and Wonder Woman fanatic born in Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico, and proudly raised in the Bronx. A CantoMundo and Macondo Fellow, and Pushcart Prize nominee, she is on the Board of Directors for Women Who Submit.      The episode will air on November 22.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
499: Cody Keenan - Working With The Most Powerful Person In The World, Taking Big Risks, & The Art Of Speechwriting

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 54:43


Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." Receive a carefully curated email from me... Each Monday morning to help you start your week off right... Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Cody Keenan has written with President Barack Obama since 2007, working his way up to chief speechwriter. He's been named the “Springsteen” of the Obama White House, even though he can't play an instrument, and Obama calls him “Hemingway." His first book, Grace, became an instant New York Times Bestseller.  Notes: The use of productive paranoia. Cody said, “I was so afraid to fail that I would do anything to succeed.” – We can use fear as fuel… Storytelling – As a speaker, it is our job to help the people in the audience see themselves in the place of the hero in the story. When you're preparing for your next team meeting or town hall address, think about that and how you tell the stories that you do. Singing at the Eulogy in Charleston - If you want an A+ performance, you have to choose to go for it. You can get a B by playing it safe, but you won't perform with excellence unless you have the courage to go for it. In less than 10 years, Cody went from mailroom intern in Congress to chief speechwriter in the White House. My goal is to "write a speech that sings."  ‘In less than 10 years, I went from mailroom intern in Congress to chief speechwriter in the White House,' President Obama said he relied “on Cody not just to share my vision, but to help tell America's story.” “He's a brilliant writer. He's relentless.” The first speech Cody wrote was for Senator Ted Kennedy. Right after President Obama's 2004 Democratic convention speech that put him on the map. You write: “To see someone else speak words I'd written sent electricity right up my spine and out my hair.”

You Start Today with Dr. Lee Warren | Weekly Prescriptions to Become Healthier, Feel Better, and Be Happier.

Annie Grace's Book is Not About AlcoholOkay; Annie's book This Naked Mind: Control Alcohol, Find Freedom, Discover Happiness, and Change Your Life actually IS about alcohol. But in my opinion, it's about alcohol in the same sense that Hemingway's classic The Old Man and the Sea is about fishing. Sure, Hemingway wrapped his tale in the metaphors of fishing, but the story is about fighting a colossal battle against an almost impossible set of foes and difficult circumstances, believing in himself, and ultimately overcoming all those challenges and inspiring others with his story. Annie's story is one of overcoming an unhealthy relationship with alcohol (hint: there is actually no “healthy” relationship with alcohol). She decided to dive into researching it on her own, to try and understand her own behavior and take back control of her own life. It wasn't easy, but she's now eight years into her new, free life, and she's changing the world. I'm going to do a Self-Brain Surgery Saturday episode about alcohol sometime. But for today, let Annie show you how she found a path to freedom through research and a commitment to discovering the truth. Here's what she now believes, in her own words:* I believe (and the science says!) that a positive approach is far more effective than a negative approach. * Scare tactics & willpower don't work over the long term and true, lasting change comes from positive desire. * As a first step we must put down the weapons of shame and blame. Let ourselves off the hook and then understand our power. * We are not powerless. In fact, the more we know and understand, the more powerful we become. * There is no ‘right way', but I have found that the path to changing your thinking, and therefore your desire, can be the most fun and least painful way to change.Here's the “official” story from her great website:At 26, Annie Grace was the youngest Vice President in a multinational company's history, and her drinking career began in earnest; by 35, she was in a global C-level marketing role, responsible for 28 countries. Drinking close to two bottles of wine a night became a ritual. Annie Grace's professional success came at a personal price she no longer wanted to pay. She knew alcohol was no longer serving her. Yet, she didn't want to suffer through life in a daily battle for sobriety, feeling deprived and constantly trying to avoid temptation. Annie Grace revamped her own relationship with alcohol — she stripped it of its power and changed her beliefs about booze being a reward — and today she helps others across the globe do the same. Her approach helps people where rehabs have not. She's created a brand new way to look at the role of alcohol in our lives, establishing a safe space for those who question their drinking but haven't self-diagnosed as alcoholics stuck in denial of an incurable disease. Annie Grace preaches compassion, knowing its power over shame and blame is the best way to achieve lasting change. And, she offers a proven alternative to the largely ineffective recipe for so-called “success”—the one that says anything less than 100% abstinence is failure. Annie Grace doesn't teach people how to be sober; she helps them quash their desire to drink in the first place. Annie's 30-day Alcohol Experiment is, in her words, “An effortless way to interrupt your patterns, restore your health and get back in touch with the version of yourself that didn't need alcohol to relax or enjoy life.” She's helped millions of people around the world break free from the power of alcohol, nicotine, and other behaviors that limit lives and steal joy. You can try it for free here:Annie Grace's official photo This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit drleewarren.substack.com/subscribe

Rise Together Podcast
217: The Power of Connection - with Dr. Thomas Hemingway

Rise Together Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 62:46


Please welcome Dr. Thomas Hemingway to the Rise Together podcast! Thomas is a board-certified physician and a recent author of Preventable!: 5 Powerful Practices to Avoid Disease and Build Unshakable Health. He's a father of six, a surfer, and a host of a health podcast, Unspeakable Health. You can keep up with Dr. Hemingway by visiting his website or following him on Instagram! -------- Let's stay connected! Head to mrdavehollis.com and sign up for my newsletter today! -------- Dave and his daughter Noah have crafted a delightful children's picture book, based on their popular video series “Teatime with Noah,” that encourages children to be brave, believe in themselves, and DREAM BIG!! In Here's to Your Dreams!: A Teatime with Noah Book (available now!), readers will follow along with Daddy and Noah as one of their beloved father-daughter tea parties magically transforms into a fantastical adventure. As Noah pursues her dream of becoming a sea captain, it's not all smooth sailing: she realizes she doesn't know how to be a captain and doesn't even have a ship! With each challenge and difficulty, Daddy gently guides Noah to ride the waves of life with courage… and to chart her own path. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Those Old Radio Shows
The Adventures Of Maisie - The Efficiency Expert

Those Old Radio Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 28:50


The Adventures Of Maisie - The Efficiency Expert From-1951 Announcer-John Eastman Stars-Ann Sothern, Frank Nelson, Hans Conried, Lurene Tuttle, Sheldon Leonard, Earle Lee & Sidney Miller Maisie advises her boss Mr. Hemingway to hire an efficiency expert.

La Vie Creative
EP 265: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (Petit and Grand Palais)

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 26:09


Arroe Collins
Cody Keenan Releases Grace

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 17:05


GRACE: PRESIDENT OBAMA AND TEN DAYS IN THE BATTLE FOR AMERICA (Mariner Books, October 4, 2022) is the riveting story of the most exhilarating and emotional stretch of the Obama presidency, told by the man Obama calls his "Hemingway," his longtime collaborator and chief speechwriter, Cody Keenan. GRACE is a spellbinding account of the ten most dramatic days of the Obama presidency, when a hate-fueled massacre and looming Supreme Court decisions (the right to health care for working families and the right for same-sex couples to marry) put the character of our country on the line. Cody Keenan takes the readers deep inside the White House to offer the most intimate glimpse into process, procrastination, and crafting speeches at the highest level with Barack Obama

Arroe Collins
Cody Keenan Releases Grace

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 17:05


GRACE: PRESIDENT OBAMA AND TEN DAYS IN THE BATTLE FOR AMERICA (Mariner Books, October 4, 2022) is the riveting story of the most exhilarating and emotional stretch of the Obama presidency, told by the man Obama calls his "Hemingway," his longtime collaborator and chief speechwriter, Cody Keenan. GRACE is a spellbinding account of the ten most dramatic days of the Obama presidency, when a hate-fueled massacre and looming Supreme Court decisions (the right to health care for working families and the right for same-sex couples to marry) put the character of our country on the line. Cody Keenan takes the readers deep inside the White House to offer the most intimate glimpse into process, procrastination, and crafting speeches at the highest level with Barack Obama

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience

#PodcastersForJustice "Writing, at its best, is a lonely life." – Ernest Hemingway Ernest Hemingway scholar and author, Professor Mark Cirino, spoke to me about the ethos of the late literary lion, how Hemingway outlived his myth, and his mission to uncover Hem's truest sentence. Dr. Cirino hosts the popular Hemingway Society-sponsored podcast, One True Podcast. He is also the author of eight books about American literature as a writer or editor. His most recent is One True Sentence: Writers & Readers on Hemingway's Art (2022), with Michael Von Cannon. Described as "A selection of the greatest sentences by the master, Ernest Hemingway..." selected and examined by contemporary authors. Publishers Weekly called it “A revelatory compendium ... a rewarding tapestry ... readers are likely to come away with a deepened understanding of—and even awe at—Hemingway's vast talent.” Mark Cirino serves as an editor for Kent State University Press's Reading Hemingway series, and served as a consultant on the film adaptation of Hemingway's "Across the River and into the Trees." He taught creative writing and literature at NYU, and now teaches literature at the University of Evansville. Stay calm and write on ... Get 'The Writer Files' Podcast Delivered Straight to Your Inbox If you're a fan of The Writer Files, please "Follow" us to automatically see new interviews. In this file Mark Cirino and I discussed:  Why "Writing, at its best, is a lonely life" The importance of finding your writing community How The Sun Also Rises made Hem a literary celebrity The only thing you have to do as a writer Why each writing project requires new discipline An open invitation to Bob Dylan And a lot more! Show Notes: Dr. Mark Cirino - Professor and Department Chair One True Sentence: Writers & Readers on Hemingway's Art by Mark Cirino and Michael Von Cannon (Amazon) Mark Cirino Author Page on Amazon One True Podcast: Hosted by Mark Cirino and produced by Michael Von Cannon Kelton Reid on Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SOMM TV
Episode 143: SOMM TV Podcast: Hemingway Cocktails

SOMM TV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 46:31


Ernest Hemmingway is rumored to have invented many drinks around the world, lets get to the bottom of the truth in today's podcast.  Join Amanda Sasser of Contiki bar and Jason Wise as they drink around the world seeking the truth about this mythic writer and drinker.

Historiepodden
Gratis-episode: Ernest Hemingway

Historiepodden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 57:55


Er man interessert i litteratur, er det en fare for at man har hørt navnet Ernest Hemingway. Som en av 1900-tallets mest berømte forfattere har han nemlig blitt både hyllet og mislikt. Men når han ikke skrev bøker levde Hemingway et liv som var mildt sagt innholdsrikt. I dagens episode skal vi derfor innom innom flere kriger, kjærlighetsaffærer og reiser gjennom forskjellige land. Vi skal også gjennom det som ble en særdeles lang liste med skader og sykehusopphold

La Vie Creative
EP 263: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (catacombs)

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 28:55


Fast Keto with Ketogenic Girl
The Leptin Lowdown with Dr. Thomas Hemingway

Fast Keto with Ketogenic Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:23


Hi friends! This episode is all about leptin! What is is, what leptin resistance is, how it is related to insulin resistance, how leptin controls our satiety regulates our metabolism and how to reset the body's sensitivity to leptin for effortless weight loss and energy! Check out Dr. Hemingway's website, book, podcast & MORE Here!! Test Your Ketones & Fat Burning with the TONE! SHIPPING Worldwide!! Order the TONE HERE Follow @optimalproteinpodcast on Instagram to see visuals and posts mentioned on this podcast. Link to join the facebook group for the podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2017506024952802/ Follow Vanessa on instagram to see her meals, recipes, informative posts and much more! Click here @ketogenicgirl Try the Higher Protein Keto Meal Plans & Coaching: https://www.ketogenicgirl.com Special thank you to our podcast sponsor: Magnesium Breakthrough by BiOptimizers Right now you can try BiOptimizers, magnesium breakthrough and any other BiOptimizers product for 10% off, just go to magbreakthrough.com/fastketo and use the code FAST KETO.  

Face in Hat
5.3 Eternal individuation and King Follett

Face in Hat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 88:04


We welcome William Morris aka Wm, founder of A Motley Vision, onto our show to talk about the BYU studies article, The King Follett Discourse: Pinnacle or Peripheral?, by James E. Faulconer and Susannah Morrison.  We talk about the nature of individuality, intelligence, and our own eternal destiny, as revealed by Joseph Smith and studied by prophets and scholars ever since.  We even may have come to a new conclusion on the discourse as a whole?  Join us! Link to our Face in Hat discord server! https://discord.gg/MnSMvKHvwh Dialogue Podcast Network https://www.dialoguejournal.com/podcasts/ Article for today: The King Follett Discourse: Pinnacle or Peripheral?, by James E. Faulconer and Susannah Morrison https://byustudies.byu.edu/article/the-king-follett-discourse-pinnacle-or-peripheral/ The full issue: Yet to be revealed, open questions in Latter-Day Saint theology. Edited by Eric A. Eliason and Terryl L. Givens https://byustudies.byu.edu/journal/60-3/ Motley Vision website https://motleyvision.org/ The Darkest Abyss: Strange Mormon Stories, by William Morris https://www.amazon.com/Darkest-Abyss-Strange-Mormon-Stories/dp/1948218682 Email subscription for Wm https://buttondown.email/motleyvision God has created “both things to act and things to be acted upon”, 2 Nephi 2:14 https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/scriptures/bofm/2-ne/2#p14 Science the Key to Theology: Volume One: Preliminaries, by Steven L. Peck https://www.amazon.com/Science-Key-Theology-One-Preliminaries/dp/0998605204 The Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media, by John Durham Peters https://www.amazon.com/Marvelous-Clouds-Toward-Philosophy-Elemental/dp/022625383X Dark Watch and other Mormon-American stories, by William Morris  https://www.amazon.com/Dark-Watch-other-Mormon-American-stories-ebook/dp/B00WQHCCFG Talking to Dante in the Spirit World,by Daniel Cooper https://irreantum.associationmormonletters.org/talking-to-dante-in-the-spirit-world-by-daniel-cooper/ Hemingway in Paradise and Other Mormon Poems, by Scott Hales https://www.amazon.com/Hemingway-Paradise-Other-Mormon-Poems/dp/B09WQBHBQG Thanks to our sponsor!  Check out Beyond the Witch's Woods: Book One of the Kingdom of Adair, by Nathan K Caulder  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0BF2Q4TJX/

1001 Greatest Love Stories
THE SUN ALSO RISES (CHAPS 1-3) by ERNEST HEMINGWAY

1001 Greatest Love Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 45:31


The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's first novel and many say his best. It is recognized as one of the top classics of the 20th century and it deals with the young American generation of expatriates who frequented Paris after WWI- the generation aptly named "The Lost Generation" by Gertrude Stein. The protagonist is Jack Barnes, a young American who has suffered a war injury that makes sex impossible- and his love interest, Brett, who is a beautiful and promiscuous young lady who also finds Paris and its nightclubs a fun way to live. Jake, throughout the novel, will find himself to be the only one of the crowd who believes in working hard and trying to be moral- he is also proud of his home country. ANDROID USERS- 1001 Radio Days right here at Google Podcasts FREE: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20radio%20days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales at Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5tZWdhcGhvbmUuZm0vQURMNzU3MzM0Mjg0NQ== 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries at Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20heroes 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories (& Tales from Arthur Conan Doyle) https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20sherlock%20holmes 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre on Spotify: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20ghost%20stories 1001 Stories for the Road on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20stories%20for%20the%20road Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20greatest%20love%20stories 1001 History's Best Storytellers: (author interviews) on Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/1001-historys-best-storytellers APPLE USERS Catch 1001 Heroes on any Apple Device here (Free): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2  Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at Apple Podcast App Now: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at Apple Podcast now:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901 NEW Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-greatest-love-stories/id1485751552 Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 NEW 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre is now playing at Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-ghost-stories-tales-of-the-macabre/id1516332327 NEW Enjoy 1001 History's Best Storytellers (Interviews) on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-historys-best-storytellers/id1483649026 NEW Enjoy 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories and The Best of Arthur Conan Doyle https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-sherlock-holmes-stories-best-sir-arthur-conan/id1534427618 Get all of our shows at one website: https://.1001storiespodcast.com REVIEWS NEEDED . My email works as well for comments: 1001storiespodcast@gmail.com SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY BECOMING A PATRON! https://.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork. Its time I started asking for support! Thank you. Its a few dollars a month OR a one time. (Any amount is appreciated). YOUR REVIEWS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS AT APPLE/ITUNES AND ALL ANDROID HOSTS ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED! LINKS BELOW.. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sloppy Boys
106. Death in the Afternoon

The Sloppy Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 60:18


The guys make one of Hemingway's more questionable concoctions, combining absinthe and champagne.DEATH IN THE AFTERNOON RECIPE1.5oz/45ml Absinthe4oz/120ml ChampagnePour one jigger of absinthe into a champagne glass. Add iced champagne until it attains the proper opalescent milkiness. Drink three to five of these slowly.Recipe via Ernest Hemingway Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Collaborist
Old Dogs, New Tricks. Discoveries about Point of View and Weather! And We Answer the Question -- Who Designs Book Covers?

Collaborist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 37:15


Jason and Ben discuss who designs a book's cover and why the process is the way it is. We also discuss a FIFTH! POV that nobody ever knew about (except maybe Hemingway). Jason tells us about recent magic in nature with bioluminescence and not kayaking in shark infested waters on windy nights. Also, reminder, if you're participating in NaNoWriMo 2022, we're here to talk to you about your project ahead of time to make sure you feel prepared to do your best fast drafting.

One True Podcast
Hariclea Zengos on "On the Quai at Smyrna"

One True Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 52:14


One hundred years ago, in September 1922, Turkish forces torched the port city of Smyrna in a hellish episode towards the end of the Greco-Turkish War. The ensuing evacuation, with its chaos and grisly violence, inspired Hemingway's journalism as well as his short fiction. Hemingway's most enduring effort to capture this atrocity is "On the Quai at Smyrna," which would become the first story in his collection In Our Time. This masterpiece of irony with its memorable narrative voice has intrigued readers, even as its historical basis has been less discussed, especially by American readers. To help us penetrate this puzzling narrative, we are joined by Hariclea Zengos, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English at the American University of Ras Al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates. Prof. Zengos guides us through the tragic historical roots of “On the Quai at Smyrna” as well as the story's structure, voice, its unforgettable imagery, and its devastating opening and closing lines.

Behind Bars: Cocked Tales and Wasted Nights
Episode 48- The Night I Interviewed Matt Part One

Behind Bars: Cocked Tales and Wasted Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 34:12


La Vie Creative
EP 261: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (Saint Augustin)

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 23:34


Love Your Work
290. Leonardo Mind, Raphael World

Love Your Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 15:11


The world expects us to be Raphaels, but some of us are Leonardos. Don't hold your Leonardo mind to Raphael standards, because this Raphael world would be nothing without Leonardo minds. There's an inscription in the Pantheon in Rome that says, “Here lies that famous Raphael by whom Nature feared to be conquered while he lived.” In other words, Raphael was such an amazing painter, Nature was supposedly shaking in her boots, afraid he would learn all her tricks. (Ironically, Raphael's remains are sealed away in a sarcophagus, where Nature can't get to them. Who's afraid of who?) But Nature had nothing to fear. Raphael could not outdo her. As Raphael was being buried, the painter Nature should have feared lay hundreds of miles to the north, in a little church on the grounds of the King of France's chateau. Raphael the young phenom, Leonardo, the old has-been Several years before Raphael's early death, he was getting paid thousands of ducats to paint one fresco after another in the Vatican. Meanwhile, the aging Leonardo da Vinci was nearby, living off a meager 33 ducat-a-month stipend, not doing much of importance. The pope had tried hiring him to paint something, but ended up frustrated, saying, “This man will never get anything done!” When the prolific art patron, Elizabeth d'Este, who had hounded Leonardo for a portrait for decades, came to visit Rome, she didn't bother getting in touch with Leonardo. He was a has-been, who couldn't be counted on to follow through. Who was she there to see? The young phenom, Raphael. Raphael was very similar to Leonardo, but also very different. His most important difference was that he was a master executor. If you hired Raphael, he got the job done. He also had been raised in the workshop of his father, a court painter for a Duke, so Raphael was refined and well-mannered. He knew how to schmooze with nobility. He had the connections that came along with that background, and could get a letter of recommendation from one powerful person to another with ease. Leonardo, on the other hand, was born out of wedlock – which made him “illegitimate” at the time – and didn't get much education. While he had gained a reputation as a brilliant engineer and architect, he had also gained a reputation as an unreliable painter. Raphael: A reliable Leonardo As Raphael continued his career as the pope's wunderkind, Leonardo worked his way north. He left yet another project unfinished in Milan, then impressed King Francis I enough to be invited to join him at the Chateau d'Amboise, as the official painter, architect, and court pageantry designer. While a gig with the King of France wasn't the worst thing in the world, it was a step down from what Leonardo could have been doing if he hadn't been reputed as someone who couldn't get things done. The pope and all the nobles in all the principalities of Italy just watched him go. He'd never return again. While Raphael had some clear advantages that helped his career advance, he couldn't have done it without the ways he and Leonardo were similar. The frescoes being painted by the young Raphael – such as his most-famous School of Athens – were exactly the kinds of projects Leonardo would have been great for, if only he could have been counted on to finish them. In fact, there was no person in the world to whom Raphael owed his own painting style more than Leonardo. When it came to painting, Raphael was mostly a reliable Leonardo. Raphael's “Leonardo period” Art historians call the years during which Raphael spent a lot of time in Florence his “Florence period.” But they might as well call them his “Leonardo period.” That's the four years during which Raphael's work started looking less like that of his mentor, Perugino, and more like that of his idol, Leonardo. During Raphael's Florence period, Leonardo was in a public face-off with another young phenom, Michelangelo. Leonardo had been commissioned to paint a battle scene in the Florence Council Hall. As usual, the first deadline came and went. Meanwhile, Michelangelo had done such a great job with his David statue, the council decided it would be a great idea to have him paint a battle scene, too. It was a pretty awkward situation for Leonardo. He was already struggling to finish, and a committee of which he had been a part had gone against his recommendation for a less-conspicuous location and put the David right outside the entrance of the council hall. Michelangelo was an arrogant prick who openly taunted Leonardo for his past failures, and now Leonardo had to walk through the shadow of Michelangelo's latest triumph to get to his mural. Oh, and Michelangelo's battle scene mural was directly across the room from his. By all accounts at the time, this was a painting competition – a battle of battle scenes. Leonardo wasn't competitive by nature, but this was supposedly going to motivate him to finish his mural. Today, we might say putting Leonardo in this position was pretty machiavellian. Which is ironic, because it was arranged with the help of none other than the inventor of machiavellianism, the council's secretary, Niccolò Machiavelli. Once word of this painting battle traveled outside Florence, young artists traveled to Florence to witness it. One of those artists: Raphael – armed with a letter of recommendation from the mother of the future Duke of Urbino to the leader of the Florentine Republic, stating that the twenty-one year-old was “greatly gifted…sensible and well-mannered.” It's during this “Florence period” that Raphael's work changed dramatically. It started to look as if he might know a thing or two about anatomy, he started aping Leonardo's smokey sfumato technique, and drawing contorted, muscular men in the heat of battle. He learned a bit watching Michelangelo, but he learned a lot watching Leonardo. As it turned out, neither Leonardo nor Michelangelo finished his mural. For Michelangelo, it wasn't a big deal. He got summoned to Rome, where he eventually painted the Sistine Chapel ceiling. Leonardo, however, had more of his career behind him than ahead of him. Yet another public failure meant he never got another public commission. So while Leonardo, in his sixties, was wandering around Europe, chasing what work he could, Raphael, in his early thirties, was getting showered with high-paying papal commissions, as a more-reliable Leonardo. The rise and fall of Raphael These days, we admire Leonardo more than we do Raphael, but that wasn't always the case. That Raphael is one of the few people entombed in the palace of the gods, alongside kings, is testament to his popularity when he died. Heck, at his funeral, the pope kissed his hand. Around 1800, the church in which Leonardo was buried was destroyed in the French Revolution. Nobody bothered to try to recover Leonardo's remains. They were mixed in with everyone else's and forgotten. Meanwhile, Raphael was as popular as ever. If you take a peek at Google Ngram, you see a sharp increase in mentions of Raphael around that time. For hundreds of years after Raphael's death, he was considered the quintessential painter of the High Renaissance. The art academies around Europe, who controlled the opinion of what was or wasn't good art, built their curricula around studying the work of Raphael. But as the influence of art academies crumbled in the late 1800s with the rise of Impressionism, so too did crumble the reverence for Raphael. Meanwhile, Leonardo has risen in popularity over the centuries. Today, if you want to find a good book on Leonardo, you have lots of choices. Raphael, not so much. The probable cause of this rise in popularity and the probable cause of Leonardo's struggles with follow-through are one in the same: Nature had more reason to fear Leonardo than Raphael. Leonardo's massive iceberg Through the centuries after Leonardo's death, his notes began to resurface. They had been inherited by someone who was supposed to compile and publish them, but were so numerous and disorganized, that was a nearly impossible task. His notes ended up collated and bound into individual notebooks, scattered amongst collectors around Europe. One notebook was found as recently as the 1960s, hiding in plain sight in Madrid, in the collection of the library. These notebooks have revealed that for Leonardo, painting a picture was about much more than painting a picture. When Raphael did an anatomy study, it was all about knowing how the skin on the surface of the body was shaped by the muscles underneath. The only purpose was to mimic Nature, on a superficial level. For Leonardo, an anatomy study was about much more. He didn't just want to know what muscles were under the skin. He wanted to also know which muscles were engaged by which movements, or which nerves activated by which emotions. As a painter, there was no reason for Leonardo to know what the human heart looked like, or how it worked. Yet Leonardo made observations about the heart that would have advanced science by centuries, had they been published. Leonardo searched, Raphael found As I talked about on episodes 105 and 288, economist David Galenson would say Raphael was a conceptual innovator, while Leonardo was an experimental one. To Leonardo, there was no such thing as irrelevant information. In the course of researching how to paint something, he might make a new discovery about anatomy, metallurgy, geology, or some other field, that would set him down a different path. The art historian Eugene Garin thought, based upon Leonardo's many thousands of pages of notes, that he was trying to compile a treatise of all human knowledge. Leonardo wasn't studying Nature just so he could paint it convincingly – he was trying to understand all of Nature. Raphael didn't have to explore all aspects of the world. He merely had to copy the result of Leonardo's thinking. Galenson told me, “It's what conceptual innovators do, it turns out.” Conceptual innovators take an idea, and make it their own. It's what Picasso did with the work of Cézanne, what Warhol did with the work of Pollack, what Hemingway did with the work of Stein and Twain. The projects Leonardo pursued were impossible to finish Leonardo's experimental approach meant his paintings were never finished. He was always discovering something new, so he was constantly revising. For example, after one of his anatomy studies, he realized he had painted some neck muscles wrong, so he went back and repainted them thirty years after the fact. He did the bulk of his work on the Mona Lisa during four years, but moved it around for fifteen, making finishing touches until a paralyzed hand rendered him unable. The patron never got their painting, Leonardo never collected payment, and the Mona Lisa was still collecting dust in his studio when he died. This experimental, iterative approach extended to Leonardo's materials and methods, and made it even more difficult for him to follow through. The best-practice method of painting murals in fresco required laying down plaster and painting on it before it dried and literally set itself in stone. It wasn't great for Leonardo's blurry-edged painting style, and it made iteration impossible. He couldn't lay down dozens of layers of paint over the course of years, as he did with the Mona Lisa. By the time Leonardo was painting his battle scene in the Florence Council Hall, his famous Last Supper was already fading and flaking, thanks to his resistance to painting in the reliable fresco technique. Not satisfied with adapting his style to this technique, Leonardo instead experimented once again on his battle-scene mural. He was almost finished, before the fire he was using to set colors got too close, destroying his work. This Raphael world is nothing without Leonardos Historically, the world rewards Raphaels. It rewards the ability to formulate a plan, follow through, collect payment and prestige, and move on. So, the world trains us to be Raphaels. Why do we follow a curriculum and fill out bubbles on standardized tests with #2 pencils? Because our teacher already knows the answer. They know the answer so well, they've programmed a computer to grade the test, and it'll get confused if you use a #3 pencil. But for the curriculum to be designed to make Raphaels, we first need Leonardos. We need people who explore and experiment. We need them to ask questions that might not have answers, and to come up with new questions nobody ever thought of. That's not a straightforward process. It's messy and disorganized, and it would cause any Raphael to pull their hair out. When you don't always find answers, and the answers you do find lead to new questions, you don't always finish. The days of the Raphaels of the world are numbered. If somebody already knows the process, already knows the answer, we don't need Raphael. A computer or machine can follow a process. Raphael knew this. Once his fame was established, he milked it for all it was worth. His later frescoes were painted by his staff of assistants in the largest workshop of the High Renaissance. He licensed his drawings to a printmaker, who sold copies of his work. As it becomes harder to make it as a Raphael, it's becoming easier to make it as a Leonardo. I think Leonardo would have been a great blogger. He wouldn't have to collect and document all knowledge, then rely on an heir to collate, typeset, and publish his life's work on expensive parchment. He could instead write and publish one note at a time, gradually building his treatise of human knowledge. He wouldn't have to wander around Europe looking for patrons – he could get them without leaving his home. If you're a Leonardo, don't bother being a Raphael If you're a Leonardo mind, don't fall into the trap of evaluating yourself by the standards of the Raphael world. There's a reason why the Raphaels are so good at getting it done: Their task is simpler. Don't beat yourself up by your inability to plan and carry out a vision no one could reasonably execute on their first attempt. Instead, find a way to explore in public, one little project at a time, building up into your grand masterpiece. Leonardo's remains were forgotten for sixty years. Some scientist, perhaps motivated by the gradual resurfacing of the notes revealing Leonardo's genius, gathered together some bones he figured were those of the master. They're in a tomb in a chapel on the grounds of the chateau, and it's one of the top attractions in Amboise. Are they actually Leonardo's bones? Probably not. His remains are probably where they should be – not sealed away in some sarcophagus, but one with Nature. Thank you for having me on your podcasts! Thank you to Costa Michailidis for having me on the InnovationBound podcast. As always, you can find interviews of me on my interviews page. About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is author of Mind Management, Not Time Management, The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative. Follow David on: Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher YouTube RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »     Show notes: https://kadavy.net/blog/posts/leonard-mind-raphael-world/

Les Nuits de France Culture
Selon Hemingway : "Avant Mark Twain, il n'y avait rien. Depuis, on n'a rien fait d'aussi bien"

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 25:59


durée : 00:25:59 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Dans "Panorama - Radio Jeunes" en décembre 19909, à l'occasion de la parution dans la collection "Bouquins" d'un volume consacré à l'écrivain américain Mark Twain (1935-1910), Michel Bydlowski, réunissait quelques aficionados du père de Tom Sawyer pour évoquer sa vie et son oeuvre. A l'occasion de la parution dans la collection Bouquins d'un volume consacré à l'écrivain américain Mark Twain (1835-1910), Michel Bydlowski réunissait quelques aficionados du père de Tom Sawyer pour évoquer sa vie et son oeuvre. L'oeuvre de Mark Twain comprend, bien sûr, les deux célèbres romans Les Aventures de Tom Sawyer et Les Aventures de Huckleberry Finn, mais aussi des récits, des biographies, et des nouvelles, généralement humoristiques. Pour introduite cette table ronde, rappelons que Mark Twain est l'un des auteurs les plus importants de la littérature américaine, il est l'un des premiers à avoir introduit notamment le langage parlé dans l'écrit, avec une finesse inégalée. Comme l'a dit Ernest Hemingway à son propos : "Avant, il n'y avait rien. Depuis, on n'a rien fait d'aussi bien". Les Aventures de Huckleberry Finn (1885) qui fait suite à Tom Sawyer fait date pour plusieurs raisons, dont l'éveil de la conscience antiraciste américaine, c'est un roman archétypal, dont Hemingway (à nouveau) disait : "_Toute la littérature moderne américaine en est issue, c'est le moment du seuil de l'adolescence". _ Par Michel Bydlowski Réalisation : Annie Woychekovska Panorama - Radio Jeunes : Mark Twain (1ère diffusion : 26/12/1990) Indexation web : Documentation sonore de Radio France Archive Ina-Radio France

One True Podcast
Kirk Curnutt on "After the Storm"

One True Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 58:35


We are asking the entire One True Podcast community to contribute to the Hurricane Ian relief effort. Our production studios are in Fort Myers, Florida, which took the brunt of the storm, so we want to do anything we can to lend a hand. This episode honors the recovery effort by urging our listeners to go to www.communitycooperative.com and give generously to provide direct help to those who suffered from the hurricane. Fittingly, we will devote this One True Fundraiser to a lively discussion of Hemingway's hardboiled short story, “After the Storm,” set in the aftermath of the devastating hurricane of 1919. A man is choked and another guy gets his arm muscle slashed in just the first paragraph! To sort out all the action, we are joined by our friend and first-ever guest, Kirk Curnutt, who lends his expertise on Hemingway and Key West history and culture.We hope you'll enjoy the three-way discussion and we also hope you'll donate to www.communitycooperative.com to help the recovery! Thank you!

North GA Blue: Getting into Good Trouble
Nakita Hemingway, Democratic Nominee for GA Agriculture Commissioner

North GA Blue: Getting into Good Trouble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 35:51


The North GA Blue: Getting into Good Trouble podcast covers democratic politics in North GA, the 9th Congressional District, and across the state of Georgia. The podcast is in Q&A/Interview format with various democratic politicos including county chairs, democratic operatives, politicians, and more. It is our mission to deliver crucial information to our listeners in a timely manner as we fight for community values and principles in the 3rd most Conservative district in the state. Our website is: https://www.fcdpga.com/podcastsOur guests highlight democratic activities and actions to work toward a Blue Georgia. The 9th Congressional District spans 20 counties across the region and covers a good deal of northern GA including Blue Ridge, Morganton, Fannin, Union, Banks, Athens/Clarke, Dawson, Elbert, Forsyth, Franklin, Gilmer, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Jackson, Lumpkin, Madison, Pickens, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, and White counties. Our democratic party podcast also disseminates information and interviews powerful Democrats across the state of GA working to overthrow the suppression tactics of the GOP and ensure democracy and our values, grassroots efforts, and goals remain intact. #podcasts #politicalpodcasts #democraticpolitics #democraticparty #stateofga #democraticactivism, #democraticgrassroots #community #gademocraticparty #georgiademocrats #democraticpodcasts #bestdemocraticpodcasts #GAPOL #ClimateChange #freedemocraticpodcasts #deepdemocracypodcasts #gademocrats #democracy #republic #democraticpodcastslisten #fightthegop #votersuppression #voterrights #bluestates #redstates #podcastsdemocraticpolitics #grassrootsactivism #climatechange #environment #9thCongressionalDistrict #9thcongressionaldistrictchairs #ruraldemocrats #racialequity #racism #RacialEquity #POC #politicalactivist  #racialjustice #equity #RaisingtheWage #GAMinimumWage #MinimumWage #education #diversity #inclusion #workingtorestoredemocracy #voterrights #democraticoperative #localpolitics #countypolitics #statepolitics #politicalraces #voterturnout #redistricting #gerrymandering #votersuppression #voterrights #politicalhistory #gapol #ruralrevival #ruraloutreach #DemocraticPartyofGA  #DPG #EconomicJustice #democraticgoals #democraticcharacter #democraticvalues #democraticintegrity  #TurnGABlue #Transparancy #GADems  #gapol #BestDemocratPodcast #Ethics #Integrity #ElectingDemocrats #LocalElections #CountyElections #StatewideElectionsGA #NationalElections #Healthcare #SocialJustice #EconomicJustice #EnvironmentalJustice #UnderservedPopulations #BlackCommunities #HispanicCommunities #LatinoCommunities #BlackandBrownPeople #RacialEquity #RacialJustice #LGBTQ+  #GayRights #CivilRights #Advocacy #PoliticalAdvocacy #Activist #ProChoice #Immigration #MedicaidforAll #ACA #GunReform #ObamaCare  #Education #VoterRights #ProChoice #WomensRights #DemocraticCandidates #AtlantaGA #GALTGovernor #ProgressivePolicies #ElectProgessiveWomen #Healthcare #EconomicSecurity #CriminalJusticeReform #Equity #Equality #Education #VotingRights #GASB202 #ProgressiveWomen #Unions #JohnLewisVotingRightsAdvancementAct #FreedomToVoteAct #VoterSupressionGA #VoterSuppression #VotingRestrictions #CivilRightsViolations #VotingAttacks #VoterSupression #CommunityOrganizer #Diversity #Inclusion #Policy #Action #BlackWomen #BlackandBrownPeople #POC #UnderservedPopulations #PoliticalActivist #ElectProgressiveWomen #ProChoiceWomen #ProChoice #WomenSupportingWomen #ERA #ReproductiveJustice #Education #GunLaws #ProChoiceDemocrats  #ProgressivePublicPolicy #NakitaHeminway #DemocraticCandidate #GADemocrat #GAAgriculture #GAFarmers #GAAgricultureCommissioner #Farmer #FamilyFarms #MigrantProtection #MigrantLaws #MigrantReform #FarmWorkers #Hemp #HempProduction #MarijuanaLegalization #MarijuanaReform #GAAgriBusiness #GAFamilies #NoChildHungry #LocallyGrown #LocalProduce #FarmRecoverySupport the show

That Said With Michael Zeldin
A Conversation with Cody Keenan, Author, ‘Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America’

That Said With Michael Zeldin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 45:10


  Join Michael in his discussion with Cody Keenan as they discuss his book, Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America.  The book recounts the most remarkable eulogy delivered by President Obama in Charleston, South Carolina after the hate crime murders of Reverend Pickney and eight parishioners in the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Guest Cody Keenan Cody Keenan rose from a campaign intern in Chicago and deputy pirate to become chief speechwriter at the White House and Barack Obama's post-presidential collaborator. He's been named the “Springsteen” of the Obama White House, even though he can't play an instrument, and Obama calls him “Hemingway” for reasons that have little to do with his talent or seasonal beard (ask him sometime). Even British GQ once named Cody one of the “35 Coolest Men under 38 (and a Half),” ahead of Ryan Gosling, but behind Tom Hardy. n truth, Cody is more comfortable behind the scenes, helping to shape the stories of our time. He got his start as a young aide to the legendary senator Edward M. Kennedy before earning a master's degree in public policy from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A sought-after expert on politics, messaging, and current affairs, he is now a partner at leading speechwriting firm Fenway Strategies and teaches a popular course on political speechwriting to undergraduates at his alma mater Northwestern University.  Born in Wrigleyville, Cody finally got to write his dream speech just four days before Obama left office—one welcoming the World Champion Chicago Cubs to the White House. To his wife Kristen's enduring embarrassment, their White House courtship was documented on CNN. Today, they live in New York City with their daughter, Grace. Host Michael Zeldin Michael Zeldin is a well-known and highly-regarded TV and radio analyst/commentator. He has covered many high-profile matters, including the Clinton impeachment proceedings, the Gore v. Bush court challenges, Special Counsel Robert Muller's investigation of interference in the 2016 presidential election, and the Trump impeachment proceedings. In 2019, Michael was a Resident Fellow at the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he taught a study group on Independent Investigations of Presidents. Previously, Michael was a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. He also served as Deputy Independent/ Independent Counsel, investigating allegations of tampering with presidential candidate Bill Clinton's passport files, and as Deputy Chief Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives, Foreign Affairs Committee, October Surprise Task Force, investigating the handling of the American hostage situation in Iran. Michael is a prolific writer and has published Op-ed pieces for CNN.com, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Hill, The Washington Times, and The Washington Post. Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelzeldin Subscribe to the Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/that-said-with-michael-zeldin/id1548483720

Vidas prestadas
"Cuando uno ya no sea capaz de decir algo nuevo, lo mejor es quedarse callado"

Vidas prestadas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 49:36


Leonardo Padura es uno de los nombres más celebrados y prestigiosos de la literatura escrita en español. Narrador, periodista y guionista, Padura estudió literatura latinoamericana en la Universidad de La Habana y es autor de una obra potente y premiada por la crítica y también por los lectores, un cóctel soñado por los autores de todos los tiempos. Fue ganador del Princesa de Asturias de las Letras en 2015 por la totalidad de su obra aunque sus novelas policiales ya habían recibido galardones como el Dashiell Hammett. Títulos como Pasado perfecto, Vientos de cuaresma, Máscaras, Paisaje de otoño (estas cuatro dieron origen a la serie de TV también premiada con el premio Platino Cuatro estaciones de La Habana), Adiós, Hemingway, La neblina del ayer, La cola de la serpiente y La transparencia del tiempo tienen como protagonista al cínico y desesperanzado Mario Conde, nacido en tiempos de la revolución, ex policía, aspirante a escritor, vendedor de libros de viejo y -en la última novela- encargado de la seguridad de un restaurante y bar de la zona de La Habana elegida por turistas y cubanos con recursos. Padura es también autor de La novela de mi vida, Como polvo en el viento y la exitosa El hombre que amaba a los perros, que además de hablar de la Cuba contemporánea reconstruye la vida de Ramón Mercader, el asesino de Trotsky. En Personas decentes, Mario Conde es convocado a ayudar a la policía a resolver un crimen -al que muy pronto se sumará otro-, el de Reynaldo Quevedo, ex funcionario de Cultura y abanderado de la pureza ideológica en los 70, que de alguna manera mató en vida a varios artistas y escritores. Esto ocurre en 2016, el año del deshielo de las relaciones entre Cuba y Estados Unidos, con la llegada de Barack Obama a la isla y también de los Rolling Stones y un famoso desfile de Chanel. Una primavera que terminó muy pronto, con el triunfo de Donald Trump. En paralelo a esta historia principal, una historia del pasado, primeras décadas del siglo XX, cuando Cuba era la Niza del Caribe y cuyo protagonista es Alberto Yarini, proxeneta cubano, hijo de familia rica e ilustrada y con grandes ambiciones políticas. En esta historia las muertas son dos prostitutas. En todos los crímenes hay más que muertos: hay perversión y truculencia. Junto a esto, la historia de Cuba y el presente complejo y precario en el que se salvan los menos y para los más se hace difícil mantenerse decente, en donde muchos sólo encuentran la salida abandonando la isla y en donde el pasado insiste en reaparecer. En la sección En Voz alta la actriz Ingrid Pellicori leyó un fragmento de “Si esto es un hombre” de Primo Levi y en Libros que sí Hinde recomendó “Contra toda esperanza”, de Nadiezhda Mandelstam (Acantilado) y “El tiempo de las moscas”, de Claudia Piñeiro (Alfaguara)

La Vie Creative
EP 259: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (Palais Garnier)

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 33:41


Sermons from Grace Cathedral
The Very Rev. Dr. Malcolm Clemens Young

Sermons from Grace Cathedral

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 15:09


“I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts; and I will be their God” (Jer. 31).                                                                    Jeremiah 31:27-34 Psalm 119:97-104 2 Timothy 3:14-4:5 Luke 18:1-8 “When the Son of humanity comes will he find faith on earth” (Lk. 18)? These words from two thousand years ago are the defining question of our time. This week the House Committee on the January 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol concluded its hearings. We have seen indisputable evidence that politicians continue to use false claims of electoral fraud to secure their own power.[1] Last month the governors of Florida and Texas falsely promised jobs and resettlement help to asylum seekers who they sent to Washington, D.C. and Martha's Vineyard. They used immigrants, including children, as part of a political stunt.[2] This action echoes the way that black southerners were bused out of the south by segregationist White Citizens' Councils to cities with prominent integrationist leaders in 1962.[3] This week in Ukraine and Iran ordinary people were slaughtered because of a distant political agenda, because of an ideology. Here at home we see terrible poverty and neglect on our own streets. “When the Son of humanity comes, will he find faith on earth?” In the face of the heartbreaking cruelty and dishonesty of his own time Jesus tells his friends, “a parable about their need to pray always and not to lose heart” (Lk. 18). Jesus tells this story near the end of his own journey to Jerusalem, as he talks about the end of time when God's realm of justice, peace and love will come. The Hebrew Bible frequently demands that the powerful have a special responsibility to widows, strangers and orphans. These groups are vulnerable because they have no male relatives to defend them. Although widows in the Bible (like in the stories of Ruth or Elijah and the widow of Zarephath) often model tenacity, resourcefulness and initiative, they represent vulnerability just as the judge symbolizes power. In several sections of Luke's Gospel he uses a “how much more” argument. “If you then, who are evil know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him” (Lk. 11:13).[4] This parable uses this same logic. A widow comes to a judge seeking justice. He does not believe in God. Nor does he respect people. He refuses to help her until he reasons that, “because this widow keeps bothering me, I will grant her justice, so that she may not wear me out” (Lk. 18). Let me point out two ways in which the Greek version differs from the English translation. When the judge says that he does not want the widow to “wear him out” the Greek word for this is hupopiazē. It is an expression from boxing. It means to literally give someone a black eye. The judge doesn't want the widow to embarrass him or injure his reputation. Second, the Greek more strongly conveys urgency, impatience and conviction. Greek uses double negatives to add emphasis. It's almost as if Jesus raises his voice to underline what he means. A more literal version might be, “And will not God give vengeance to his chosen ones who are crying day and night? And be impatient to help them!”[5] The point is not that God resembles the unjust judge. In almost every respect Jesus describes God as the opposite. The judge is self-centered. He only uses people. But God is full of love, impatient for his children to thrive. Jesus is unafraid to be humiliated for our sake. The purpose of this “how much more” story is for us to trust God and to persist in prayer.[6] Today I want to give you one picture of a faithless world and then to consider how faith humanizes us. In college I knew a woman whose favorite story was Ernest Hemmingway's "The Short and Happy Life of Francis Macomber." This always worried me about her partly because of the story's misogyny but mostly because of its position with regard to faith. We meet Francis Macomber as a thirty-five year old American business tycoon on safari in East Africa. As the story unfolds we gradually come to realize that he has committed the cardinal sin in the universe of Hemingway fiction. The day before he betrayed his manliness and ran in fear from a wounded lion who had been concealed in the tall grass. Margot, his wife, does not try to comfort him in his humiliation. Instead, she despises this act of cowardice and as a consequence she sleeps with the safari leader that night. Hemmingway also seems to hate his own fictitious character, because he wouldn't leave his wife, because "he would take anything" from her.[7] The next day the group goes in pursuit of a dangerous buffalo. Then, suddenly, in an almost religious conversion, Macomber changes. Hemmingway writes, that “[f]or the first time in his life he felt wholly without fear. Instead of fear he had a feeling of definite elation.” The safari leader admires this new courage. His wife fears it because she no longer has the power to make him ashamed of being afraid. Why is it called a "Short Happy Life"? Only moments later as Macomber tries to flush the buffalo out of the long grass, “he [feels] a sudden white-hot, blinding flash explode inside his head and that was all he ever felt.” Although his wife claimed she was aiming at the buffalo, she shot him in the back of the head. When the son of man comes will he find faith on earth? In Hemmingway's universe there is no faith. Men can never depend on women, or on other men. Every person is either a conquest or an adversary. The individual can only rely on an elusive courage that comes miraculously from within, an irrational bravery which completely isolates each soul from all else. The theologian H. Richard Niebuhr emphasizes that faith means more than merely faith in God. Faith concerns all the ways that we are connected to and support and depend on each other. “We see this possibility – that human history will come to its end… in the gangrenous corruption of a social life in which every promise, contract, treaty and “word of honor” is given and received in deception and distrust. If [human beings] can no longer have faith in each other, can they exist as [human beings]?”[8] What shall we do in this time before the second coming of Christ? We need to pray and not lose hope. We also need to strive to be people of honesty and integrity, to listen and care for others. To use the language of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) we need to treat people as ends rather than as means to our own goals. The heartbreaking sin of this judge was his inability to see the widow as a person. I have a friend named Sue Everson who is a world authority on hopelessness. As a medical researcher she studies the effect that hopelessness has on our health. One of her more startling statistics is that people who feel hopeless are twenty percent more likely to die in the next four years from a stroke. Hopelessness increases your chance of a stroke to the same degree that smoking a pack of cigarettes a day does.  Sue scientifically studies how religion seems to make people less hopeless.[9] Today with churches around the world we celebrate the Children's Sabbath. A central part of what we do together involves our care for children and families. We teach children how to listen spiritually, how to pray and not lose heart. Professor Lisa Miller has been our guest on the forum twice. She argues that denying our spirituality is not just untrue but unhealthy for us and especially for children. Using new techniques ranging from twin studies to neuroimaging, scientists are coming to a new appreciation for just how important spirituality is for human flourishing. Miller claims that all children possess a kind of “natural spirituality.” This interest in the Holy, this, “direct sense of… the heartbeat of the living universe… precedes and transcends language, culture and religion.”[10] This spirituality protects us, but not completely, from depression, anxiety and the tendency to misuse alcohol and drugs. So what is the most important thing that we can do as adults for children? We can support their Sunday School teachers and the families who gather here. We can take their questions seriously. We can listen to them.[11] And so the conversation continues every week here. In life we are forever asking and being asked a simple question, “do you believe me?”[12] Do you? Seeing what is happening in the world, it is easy to struggle with a crisis of trust right now. I trust God but I don't know if the Son will find faith on earth. And yet at the same time I feel remarkably supported by the life I find at Grace Cathedral. C.S. Lewis writes that, “Faith… is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted, in spite of changing moods….” Because of this he says we need to pray and hold some of the Christian ideals in our mind for a period of time every day. We need to worship because, “We have to be continually reminded of what we believe… Belief has to be fed…” People do not cease to be Christian because of a good argument but because they simply drift away. Kathleen Norris writes, “prayer is not asking for what you think you want but asking to be changed in ways you can't imagine. To be made more grateful, more able to see the good in what you have been given instead of always grieving for what might have been.”[13] My friends pray always and do not lose heart. Be trustworthy and care for the children. When the Son of humanity comes may he find faith on earth. [1] Alan Feuer, Luke Broadwater, Maggie Haberman, Katie Benner and Michael S. Schmidt, “Jan. 6: The Story So Far,” The New York Times, 14 October 2022. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2022/us/politics/jan-6-timeline.html?name=styln-capitol-mob®ion=TOP_BANNER&block=storyline_menu_recirc&action=click&pgtype=Article&variant=show&is_new=false [2] Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Eileen Sullivan, “Is That Legal: How Scores of Migrants Came to be Shipped North,” The New York Times, 16 September 2022. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/16/us/politics/migrants-marthas-vineyard-desantis.html?name=styln-marthas-vineyard-immigrants®ion=TOP_BANNER&block=storyline_menu_recirc&action=click&pgtype=Article&variant=show&is_new=false and https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/02/us/migrants-marthas-vineyard-desantis-texas.html [3] Jacey Fortin, “When Segregationists Offered One-Way Tickets to Black Southerners,” The New York Times, 14 October 2022. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/02/us/migrants-marthas-vineyard-desantis-texas.html [4] See also, “But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, how much more will he clothe you – you of little faith!” (Lk. 12:28). [5] 22 Pent (10-16-16) 24C. [6] Ibid. [7]  Hemingway cynically writes, "They had a sound basis of union. Margot was too beautiful for Macomber to divorce her and Macomber had too much money for Margot ever to leave him now." Ernest Hemingway, “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” The Short Stories of Ernest Hemmingway (NY: Scribners/Macmillan, 1987) 18. See also, 20 Pent (10-21-01) 24C. [8] “We see this possibility – that human history will come to its end neither in a brotherhood of [humanity] nor in universal death under the blows of natural or man-made catastrophe, but in the gangrenous corruption of a social life in which every promise, contract, treaty and “word of honor” is given and received in deception and distrust. If [human beings] can no longer have faith in each other, can they exist as [human beings]?” H. Richard Niebuhr, Faith on Earth: An Inquiry into the Structure of Human Faith ed. Richard R. Niebuhr (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989) 1. [9] 20 Pent (10-17-04) 24C. [10] Lisa Miller, The Spiritual Child: The New Science on Parenting for Health and Lifelong Thriving (NY: Picador, 2015) 25. [11] Miller quotes a parent who says, “I didn't realize for a long time that when my child asks a question and I say, “I don't know,” and just leave it at that, I'm actually stopping the conversation.” Ibid., 47. [12] H. Richard Niebuhr, Faith on Earth: An Inquiry into the Structure of Human Faith ed. Richard R. Niebuhr (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989) 22. [13] Kathleen Norris, Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith (NY: Riverhead Books, 1998) 60-1.

Keen On Democracy
Jerry Stahl on Which Nazi Concentration Camp Had the Best Cafeteria

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 30:19


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Jerry Stahl, author of Nein, Nein, Nein!: One Man's Tale of Depression, Psychic Torment, and a Bus Tour of the Holocaust. JERRY STAHL has written ten books, including the best-selling memoir Permanent Midnight, made into a movie with Ben Stiller; the essay collection OG Dad; and the novels Pain Killers; I, Fatty; Perv; Plainclothes Naked; Happy Mutant Baby Pills; and Bad Sex on Speed. A Pushcart Prize-winning author, Stahl's work has appeared in Esquire, Vice, the Believer, Tin House, Los Angeles Review of Books, and the New York Times, among other places. He has written extensively for film and television, including HBO's Hemingway & Gellhorn, which earned a Writers Guild Award nomination; Bad Boys II; and the cult classic Dr. Caligari; series credits include Maron, CSI, and Escape at Dannemora, for which he received an Emmy nomination. Stahl's writing has been widely translated, and he has taught with the InsideOUT Writers program for incarcerated youth, edited The Heroin Chronicles for Akashic Books, and participated in the documentary series, San Quentin Film School. He has two daughters, and lives with artist Zoe Hansen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Northern Miner Podcast
Episode 312: Mining industry communication ‘has to shift', ft Stratalis' George Hemingway

The Northern Miner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 73:17


This week's episode features George Hemingway, Managing Partner Head of Innovation Practice, Stratalis, in conversation with Northern Miner production editor Blair McBride at the Q3 Global Mining Symposium. George discusses how the mining industry needs to take a more personal approach to persuade younger people to have a more positive view of it. All this and more with host Adrian Pocobelli. “Rattlesnake Railroad”, “Big Western Sky”, “Western Adventure” and “Battle on the Western Frontier” by Brett Van Donsel (www.incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Just Ingredients
79 - Is Your Metabolism Slow Or Is It Just Damaged? with Dr. Thomas Hemingway

Just Ingredients

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 59:30 Very Popular


Thomas Hemingway MD is a holistic and integrative Medical Doctor whom lives and shares his philosophy of PREVENTION over PRESCRIPTION. He is passionate about Natural Health and Healing through Simple, yet Powerful Daily Practices which can be LIFE SAVING. His upcoming book, “PREVENTABLE! 5 Powerful Practices to Avoid Disease and Build Unshakeable Health” describes the foundational principles of creating solid lifelong health. He also loves sharing this message in his top rated health podcast “Modern Medicine Movement” where he is known for distilling down the latest medical knowledge and science into easily digestible and actionable steps which can change our lives in the present AND the future. He is also a husband, and proud father to 6 wonderful humans with whom he enjoys spending time in the outdoors surfing, snowboarding, skiing, hiking, skateboarding, mountaineering and playing tennis. In today's episode, Dr. Hemingway and I discuss how to optimize the body for weight loss. We discuss the common myth of “slow metabolisms” and why that oftentimes isn't the case. Dr. Hemingway gives tips and tricks to lose weight that aren't all about diet. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drthomashemingway/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100012549966214 Twitter: https://twitter.com/doc_hemingway LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomashemingway/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/drthomashemingway/ Parler: https://parler.com/drthomashemingway Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/drthomashemingway Truth Social: https://truthsocial.com/@drthomashemingway Get 20% off 4 NEW Just Ingredients beauty products from Oct 13-15 at https://justingredients.us/

KPBS Midday Edition
Reflections on Indigenous People's Day

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 45:19


Monday is Indigenous People's Day, a commemoration of the perseverance that Indigenous people embody in the face of past and present injustice. Then, the pork industry is challenging California animal welfare law before the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday. We'll hear more about what the case is about. And, October is fire prevention month, a critical time for fire danger and preparedness. Cal Fire officials describe what they're facing in fire-prone areas of San Diego county and what you should know to stay safe. Next, San Diego city planners want to rename and restructure the plan to pack more housing into areas of the city near transit. But the change from “transit priority area” to “sustainable development area” could be more than just fiddling with terminology. And writer Caroline Hatano brings us an ode to the Japanese American community that once farmed all over Southern California. Finally, The Comic-Con Museum in Balboa Park recently opened “Hemingway in Comics.” It's an exhibit that explores what it means to be an icon and how that image can change over time.

La Vie Creative
EP 257: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (Palais Garnier to Madeline)

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 33:41


I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Former Obama speechwriter Cody Keenan, author of Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 8:09


ABOUT CODY KEENAN AND GRACEGRACE: PRESIDENT OBAMA AND TEN DAYS IN THE BATTLE FOR AMERICA (Mariner Books, October 4, 2022) is the riveting story of the most exhilarating and emotional stretch of the Obama presidency, told by the man Obama calls his "Hemingway," his longtime collaborator and chief speechwriter, Cody Keenan.GRACE is a spellbinding account of the ten most dramatic days of the Obama presidency, when a hate-fueled massacre and looming Supreme Court decisions (the right to health care for working families and the right for same-sex couples to marry) put the character of our country on the line. Cody Keenan takes the readers deep inside the White House to offer the most intimate glimpse into process, procrastination, and crafting speeches at the highest level with Barack Obama, including:· What happens inside the West Wing after a mass shooting, from someone who's written more eulogies after such tragedies than anyone else on the planet· Heated Oval Office debates over how and whether to speak that week at all· A late-night writing session in the First Family's private residence· Obama's innermost thoughts on race and his use that week of the one word you can't say· And the moment on Marine One when Obama decided to take a leap of faith in a soaring sermon and surprise everybody by leading the country in a chorus of "Amazing Grace."In the rarest of White House memoirs, Keenan masterfully narrates the propulsive story of those ten days and offers an intimate look at where we've been and where we can go on our American journey toward progress and hope.ABOUT CODY KEENANCody Keenan rose from a campaign intern in Chicago to become chief speechwriter at the White House and Barack Obama's post-presidential collaborator. A sought-after expert on politics, messaging, and current affairs, he is a partner at leading speechwriting firm Fenway Strategies and teaches a popular course on political speechwriting at his alma mater Northwestern University. He lives in New York City with his wife Kristen and their daughter Gracie.Available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Grace-President-Obama-Battle-America/dp/0358651891

QueIssoAssim
Livros em Cartaz 018 – A morte do sonho americano

QueIssoAssim

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 136:20


Segurem suas taças de champagne (coupe ou flute) e venham para a festa com Andreia D'Oliveira e Gabi Idealli que neste Livros em Cartaz tentam entender, entre os super ricos - e sua moral flexível - por que "O Grande Gatsby" é considerado o grande romance estadunidense do século XX. Comentados no episódio Paris é uma Festa, livro de Ernest HemingwayPulp, livro de Charles BukowskiO Poderoso Chefão (1972 ‧ Crime/Drama ‧ 2h 55m)Prohibithion (2011 ‧ Romance/Drama ‧ 5h 30m)A Divorciada (1930 ‧ Romance/Drama ‧ 1h 24m)A Era do Rádio (1987 ‧ Comédia/Comédia dramática ‧ 1h 28m)Elvis - O Rei do Rock & Rol (2022 ‧ Musical/Drama ‧ 2h 39m)

Writing Break
Hemingway, NaNoWrimo, and Writing Act 3

Writing Break

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 13:46 Transcription Available


We begin our discussion of Act 3 of a three-act book, and I share my professional opinion of NaNoWriMo. I also share a rare recording from Ernest Hemingway, which offers his opinion on writer organizations. https://www.amazon.com/Hurricane-Season-Fernanda-Melchor/dp/0811230732 (Fernanda Melchor, Hurricane Season) - Featured Author https://curiousfoxbooks.com/index.php (Curious Fox, Berlin, Germany) - Featured Bookstore https://mjhnyc.org/new-york-jewish-book-festival/ (New York Jewish Book Festival : Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust) https://www.endlessinkbooks.com/blogs/news/short-story-contest-2022-horror-comedy (Short Story Contest 2022 Horror Comedy!!!) https://publishers.org/news/aap-statshot-annual-report-for-2021-book-publishing-revenues-up-12-3-for-the-year-reaching-all-time-high-of-29-33-billion/ (AAP StatShot Annual Report For 2021: Book Publishing Revenues Up 12.3% For the Year, Reaching All-Time High of $29.33 Billion - AAP) https://nanowrimo.org/ (NaNoWriMo) https://forms.aweber.com/form/64/1857023764.htm (Free Style Sheet Templates) https://medium.com/@rosemi (Free Writing Tips) Music licensed from Storyblocks: “More Jam Please” by Raighes Factory "A Cafe In Monaco" by Scorehouse Media "A Dreamy Slumber" by Tencher Music "Bay Area Bop" by Q-Rock "Happy Walk" by Simon Jomphe Lepine "Vintage Funky Intro" by Jon Presstone

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 695 President Obama Former Chief Speechwriter Cody Keenan

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 43:01


Hello Show Noter ! Thank you for reading this ! I wont take up much of your time because the show today is my interview with a really cool guy who has had a really cool job for the past 14 years.  I think you will love it!  Stand Up is a daily podcast that I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Cody has written with President Barack Obama since 2007, working his way up from deputy pirate to chief speechwriter. He's been named the “Springsteen” of the Obama White House, even though he can't play an instrument, and Obama calls him “Hemingway” for reasons that have little to do with his talent or seasonal beard (ask him sometime). Even British GQ got in on the action, naming Cody one of the “35 Coolest Men under 38 (and a Half),” ahead of Ryan Gosling, but behind Tom Hardy.  In truth, Cody is more comfortable behind the scenes, shaping the stories of our time—whether moments of national tragedy or expansions of civil rights. He served as a young aide to the legendary senator Edward M. Kennedy. Cody holds a master's degree from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and a B.A. from Northwestern University, where he now teaches a popular course on speechwriting. His own commencement addresses at NYU in 2015 and Northwestern in 2018 were highlighted as some of the year's best. Born in Wrigleyville, Cody finally got to write his dream speech just four days before Obama left office—one welcoming the World Champion Chicago Cubs to the White House. To his wife Kristen's enduring embarrassment, their White House courtship was documented on CNN. Today, they live in New York's West Village, where they just had their first child.  Cody's first book, Grace, will be published by HarperCollins in October 2022. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Jason & Alexis
10/3 MON HOUR 3: AITA part 2, our favorite drops and Hemingway's cats

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 41:19 Very Popular


Am I The Asshat for refusing to support my boyfriend's social media career? What are our favorite show audio bits we play? Ernest Hemingway's cats in Key West are okay after Hurricane Ian.

La Vie Creative
EP 255: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (Marais and Arsenal )

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 28:23


1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales
BIG TWO-HEARTED RIVER (PT 2) by ERNEST HEMINGWAY

1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 41:03 Very Popular


In Part 2 we offer some history on the town of Seney, Michigan, when it served as home for three thousand loggers, becoming a North Central version of a wild west town, in the days before Hemingway stopped there on his fishing trip. In part two Nick Adams manages to pull in some nice trout and loses one big one, the whole process described extremely well by young Hemingway who was on his way to a career in writing. ANDROID USERS- 1001 Stories From The Old West at Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0c2fc0cGwJBcPfyC8NWNTw 1001 Radio Days right here at Google Podcasts FREE: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20radio%20days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales at Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5tZWdhcGhvbmUuZm0vQURMNzU3MzM0Mjg0NQ== 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries at Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20heroes 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories (& Tales from Arthur Conan Doyle) https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20sherlock%20holmes 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre on Spotify: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20ghost%20stories 1001 Stories for the Road on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20stories%20for%20the%20road Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20greatest%20love%20stories 1001 History's Best Storytellers: (author interviews) on Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/1001-historys-best-storytellers APPLE USERS 1001 Stories from The Old West at Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-from-the-old-west/id1613213865 Catch 1001 Heroes on any Apple Device here (Free): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2  Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at Apple Podcast App Now: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at Apple Podcast now:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901 NEW Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-greatest-love-stories/id1485751552 Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 NEW 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre is now playing at Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-ghost-stories-tales-of-the-macabre/id1516332327 NEW Enjoy 1001 History's Best Storytellers (Interviews) on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-historys-best-storytellers/id1483649026 NEW Enjoy 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories and The Best of Arthur Conan Doyle https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-sherlock-holmes-stories-best-sir-arthur-conan/id1534427618 Get all of our shows at one website: https://.1001storiespodcast.com REVIEWS NEEDED . My email works as well for comments: 1001storiespodcast@gmail.com SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY BECOMING A PATRON! https://.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork. Its time I started asking for support! Thank you. Its a few dollars a month OR a one time. (Any amount is appreciated). YOUR REVIEWS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS AT APPLE/ITUNES AND ALL ANDROID HOSTS ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED! LINKS BELOW.. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Thursday 9/29 - Carole Baskin, 6-Toed Cats and Coolio

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 34:01


Trending Topics at 5 o'clock. "That Bitch, Carole Baskin" stayed with the big cats during Hurricane Ian. Hemingway's 59 6-toed cats survived. Coolio has died. Netflix's "Blonde" is "unwatchable." The return of the Friday Movie Topic. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Little Left of Center Podcast
EP156: Mariel Hemingway MH stands for Mental Health

Little Left of Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 60:39


Mariel Hemingway, legendary actress from an iconic family takes a stand for mental health reform, suicide prevention, and accessible ways for YOU to feel better now. To listen ad-free and early, go to patreon.com/culturechangers. Topics discussed: Hemingway family dynasty, mental illness Lifestyle transitions Taking responsibility in your own health Running from Crazy Can mental illness be helped if its hereditary? Mariel's experience becoming obsessive over getting healthy The astounding benefits of Earthing How to begin when you're so busy Mental health reform Mariel Hemingway Foundation How to help others who won't help themselves Shame and trauma release MARIEL HEMINGWAY'S LINKS: Website Follow Mariel on Instagram Mariel Hemingway Foundation - Donate here ALLISON'S LINKS: Patreon for Culture Changers - Support Culture Changers Podcast by becoming a valued patron and getting all episodes ad-free plus bonus content and community! AllisonHare.com - Culture Changers Podcast, personal journal and blog, dance Instagram - Steps to heal yourself, move society forward, and slinging memes and dancing (seriously, Allison is also a dance fitness instructor) Blog - quick, way more personal, deeper topics - make sure to subscribe Reb3l Dance Fitness - Try it at home! Free month with code: ahare under Instructor Referral Feedback and Contact:: allison@allisonhare.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Midnight Train Podcast
Our History of Swear Words. (Sorry, Mom)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 124:37


Sign up for our Patreon for bonuses and more! www.themidnightrainpodcast.com    Do you happen to swear? Is it something you happen to do when you stub your pinky toe on the coffee table? What about when you've just finished dinner and you pull that glorious lasagna out of the oven, burn yourself and then drop your Italian masterpiece on the floor, in turn burning yourself once again? Odds are that if you're listening to this show, you have a rather colorful vernacular and aren't offended by those that share in your “darker” linguistic abilities. Those dramatic and often harsh, yet exceedingly hilarious words, have a pretty amazing history. Were they written in manuscripts by monks? Or, did we find them used by regular people and found in prose like the names of places, personal names, and animal names? Well, could they tell us more about our medieval past other than just that sex, torture, plagues and incest was all the rage? Let's find out!   Fuck   Let's start with our favorite word. Let's all say it together, kids. “Fuck!” This most versatile yet often considered one of the worst of the “bad words” doesn't seem to have been around in the English language prior to the fifteenth century and may have arrived later from the German or th Dutch. Leave it to those beautiful Germans to introduce us to such a colorful word. In fact, the Oxford English Dictionary says it wasn't actually used until 1500. However, the name of a specific place may have been used even earlier.   Many early instances of fuck were said to actually have been used to mean “to strike” rather than being anything to do with fornicating. The more common Middle English word for sex was ”swive”, which has developed into the Modern English word swivel, as in: go swivel on it. Some of the earliest instances of fuck, seen to mean “hitting” or “striking,” such as Simon Fuckebotere (from in 1290), who was more than likely in the milk industry, hitting butter, or Henry Fuckebeggar (1286/7) who may have, hit the poor.   The earliest examples of the word fuck in the English language appeared in the names of places. The first of these is said to be found near Sherwood in 1287: Ric Wyndfuk and Ric Wyndfuck de Wodehous. These both feature a kestrel known as the Windfucker which, we must assume, went in the wind. The next definite example comes from Bristol 1373 in Fockynggroue, which may have been named for a grove where couples went for “some quiet alone time.”   However, Somewhere among the indictment rolls of the county court of Chester (1310/11), studied by Dr. Paul Booth of Keele University (Staffordshire), a man whose Christian name was Roger is mentioned three times. His less Christian last name is also recorded. The name being mentioned repetitively pretty much means it did not result from a spelling mistake but rather it's the real thing. Meaning, the man's full name was Roger Fuckebythenavele. Not only does his second name move back the earliest use of fuck in its modern sense by quite a few decades; it also verifies that it is, in fact, a Middle English word. But of course, there are those fuckers that will undoubtedly debate it's fucking origin.   The stem *fukkō-, with its characteristic double consonant, is easy to explain as a Germanic iterative verb – one of a large family of similar forms. They originated as combinations of various Indo-European roots with *-nah₂-, a suffix indicating repeated action. The formation is not, strictly speaking, Proto-Indo-European; the suffix owes its existence to the reanalysis of an older morphological structure (reanalysis happens when people fail to analyze an inherited structure in the same way as their predecessors). Still, verbs of this kind are older than Proto-Germanic.   *fukkō- apparently meant to ‘strike repeatedly, beat' (like, say, “dashing” the cream with a plunger in a traditional butter churn). Note also windfucker and fuckwind – old, obsolete words for ‘kestrel'.   A number of words in other Germanic languages may also be related to fuck. One of them is Old Icelandic fjúka ‘to be tossed or driven by the wind' < *feuka-; cf. also fjúk ‘drifting snowstorm' (or, as one might put it in present-day English, a fucking blizzard). These words fit a recurrent morphological pattern observed by Kroonen (2012): Germanic iteratives with a voiceless geminate produced by Kluge's Law often give rise to “de-iterativised” verbs in which the double stop is simplified if the full vocalism or the root (here, *eu rather than *u) is restored. Kluge's law had a noticeable effect on Proto-Germanic morphology. Because of its dependence on ablaut and accent, it operated in some parts of declension and conjugation, but not in others, giving rise to alternations of short and long consonants in both nominal and verbal paradigms.   If the verb is really native (“Anglo-Saxon”), one would expect Old English *fuccian (3sg. *fuccaþ, pl. *fucciaþ, 1/3sg. preterite *fuccode, etc.). If these forms already had “impolite” connotations in Old English, their absence from the Old English literary corpus is understandable. We may be absolutely sure that *feortan (1/3 sg. pret. *feart, pret. pl. *furton, p.p. *forten) existed in Old English, since fart exists today (attested since about 1300, just like the word fuck) and has an impeccable Indo-European etymology, with cognates in several branches. Still, not a single one of these reconstructed Old English verb forms is actually documented (all we have is the scantily attested verbal noun feorting ‘fart(ing)').   One has to remember that written records give us a strongly distorted picture of how people really spoke in the past. If you look at the frequency of fuck, fucking and fucker in written English over the last 200 years, you may get the impression that these words disappeared from English completely ca. 1820 and magically reappeared 140 years later. Even the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary pretended they didn't exist. The volume that should have contained FUCK was published in 1900, and Queen Victoria was still alive.   According to the Oxford English Dictionary: Forms:  α. 1500s fucke, 1500s– fuck; also Scottish pre-1700 fuk.   Frequency (in current use):  Show frequency band information Origin: Probably a word inherited from Germanic. Etymology: Probably cognate with Dutch fokken …   In coarse slang. In these senses typically, esp. in early use, with a man as the subject of the verb. Thesaurus » Categories » intransitive. To have sexual intercourse. ▸ ?a1513   W. Dunbar Poems (1998) I. 106   Be his feirris he wald haue fukkit.   transitive. To have sexual intercourse with (a person). In quot. a1500   in Latin-English macaronic verse; the last four words are enciphered by replacing each letter with the following letter of the alphabet, and fuccant has a Latin third-person plural ending. The passage translates as ‘They [sc. monks] are not in heaven because they fuck the wives of Ely.' [a1500   Flen, Flyys (Harl. 3362) f. 47, in T. Wright & J. O. Halliwell Reliquiæ Antiquæ (1841) I. 91   Non sunt in cœli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk [= fuccant uuiuys of heli].]   transitive. With an orifice, part of the body, or something inanimate as an object. Also occasionally intransitive with prepositional objects of this type. [1680   School of Venus ii. 99   An hour after, he Ferked my Arse again in the same manner.]   transitive. To damage, ruin, spoil, botch; to destroy, put an end to; = to fuck up 1a at Phrasal verbs 1. Also (chiefly in passive): to put into a difficult or hopeless situation; to ‘do for'. Cf. also mind-fuck v. 1776   Frisky Songster (new ed.) 36   O, says the breeches, I shall be duck'd, Aye, says the petticoat, I shall be f—d.   transitive. U.S. To cheat; to deceive, betray. Frequently without. 1866   G. Washington Affidavit 20 Oct. in I. Berlin et al. Black Mil. Experience in Civil War (1982) v. xviii. 792   Mr. Baker replied that deponent would be fucked out of his money by Mr. Brown.   transitive. In oaths and imprecations (chiefly in optative with no subject expressed): expressing annoyance, hatred, dismissal, etc. Cf. damn v. 6, bugger v. 2a. See also fuck it at Phrases 2, fuck you at Phrases 1b. 1922   J. Joyce Ulysses ii. xv. [Circe] 560   God fuck old Bennett!   Phrases   Imprecatory and exclamatory phrases (typically in imperative or optative with no subject expressed sense).  P1. Expressing hostility, contempt, or defiant indifference. Categories » go fuck yourself and variants. 1895   Rep. Senate Comm. Police Dept. N.Y. III. 3158   By Senator Bradley: Q. Repeat what he said to you? A. He said, ‘Go on, fuck yourself, you son-of-a-bitch; I will give you a hundred dollars'; he tried to punch me, and I went out.   fuck you. 1905   L. Schindler Testimony 20 Dec. in People State of N.Y. Respondent, against Charles McKenna (1907) (N.Y. Supreme Court) 37   Murray said to me, ‘Fuck you, I will give you more the same.' And as he said that, I grabbed the two of them.   P2. fuck it: expressing dismissal, exasperation, resignation, or impetuousness. 1922   E. E. Cummings Enormous Room iv. 64   I said, ‘F— it, I don't want it.'   P3. fuck me and elaborated variants: expressing astonishment or exasperation. 1929   F. Manning Middle Parts of Fortune II. xi. 229   ‘Well, you can fuck me!' exclaimed the astonished Martlow. Cunt Cunt is a vulgar word for the vulva or vagina. It is used in a variety of ways, including as a term of disparagement. Reflecting national variations, cunt can be used as a disparaging and obscene term for a woman in the United States, an unpleasant or stupid man or woman in the United Kingdom, or a contemptible man in Australia and New Zealand. However, in Australia and New Zealand it can also be a neutral or positive term when used with a positive qualifier (e.g., "He's a good cunt"). The term has various derivative senses, including adjective and verb uses.   Feminist writer and English professor Germaine Greer argues that cunt "is one of the few remaining words in the English language with a genuine power to shock". The earliest known use of the word, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was as part of a placename of a London street, Gropecunt Lane. Use of the word as a term of abuse is relatively recent, dating from the late nineteenth century. The word appears not to have been taboo in the Middle Ages, but became that way toward the end of the eighteenth century, and was then not generally not allowed to be printed until the latter part of the twentieth century.   There is some disagreement on the origin of the term cunt, although most sources agree that it came from the Germanic word (Proto-Germanic *kunto, stem *kunton-), which emerged as kunta in Old Norse. The Proto-Germanic form's actual origin is a matter of debate among scholars. Most Germanic languages have cognates, including Swedish, Faroese, and Nynorsk (kunta), West Frisian, and Middle Low German (kunte), Middle Dutch (conte), Dutch kut (cunt), and Dutch kont (butt), Middle Low German kutte, Middle High German kotze ("prostitute"), German kott, and maybe Old English cot. The Proto-Germanic term's etymology ia questionable.   It may have arisen by Grimm's law operating on the Proto-Indo-European root *gen/gon "create, become" seen in gonads, genital, gamete, genetics, gene, or the Proto-Indo-European root guneh or "woman" (Greek: gunê, seen in gynaecology). Relationships to similar-sounding words such as the Latin cunnus ("vulva"), and its derivatives French con, Spanish coño, and Portuguese cona, or in Persian kos (کُس), have not been conclusively demonstrated. Other Latin words related to cunnus are cuneus ("wedge") and its derivative cunēre ("to fasten with a wedge", (figurative) "to squeeze in"), leading to English words such as cuneiform ("wedge-shaped"). In Middle English, cunt appeared with many spellings, such as coynte, cunte and queynte, which did not always reflect the actual pronunciation of the word.   The word, in its modern meaning, is attested in Middle English. Proverbs of Hendyng, a manuscript from some time before 1325, includes the advice:   (Give your cunt wisely and make [your] demands after the wedding.) from wikipedia. The word cunt is generally regarded in English-speaking countries as unsuitable for normal publicconversations. It has been described as "the most heavily tabooed word of all English words".   Quoted from wikipedia: Some American feminists of the 1970s sought to eliminate disparaging terms for women, including "bitch" and "cunt". In the context of pornography, Catharine MacKinnon argued that use of the word acts to reinforce a dehumanisation of women by reducing them to mere body parts; and in 1979 Andrea Dworkin described the word as reducing women to "the one essential – 'cunt: our essence ... our offence'".   While “vagina” is used much more commonly in colloquial speech to refer to the genitals of people with vulvas than “cunt” is, its  origins are defined by its service to male sexuality, making “cunt” —  interestingly enough — the least historically misogynistic of the two. “Cunt” has also been used in Renaissance bawdy verse and in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, but it was not until Shakespeare's era that its meaning began to fundamentally shift, during the dawn of Christian doctrine.   Arguably, if cunt simply means and refers to “vagina”, then why would that be bad? Vaginas are pretty great! They provide people with pleasure, they give life, and they're even a naturally developed lunar calendar! So, why would a person refer to another, assumedly pissy person as a vagina?    So, should we as society fight the negative stereotypes and embrace the term cunt again? It's a tiny word that bears a lot of weight, but it should be anything but scary or offensive. It can be a massive dose of love instead of an enormous force of hate if we actively define our vocabulary rather than letting it define us.   Words only have that type of power when the uptight, vanilla flavored, missionary only Karen's and Kevin's of the world decide they don't like them. This has been going on for as long as we've been using words. So, let's take it back. We love you, ya cunts!   coarse slang in later use. Thesaurus » Categories » The female genitals; the vulva or vagina. Cf. quaint n.1 a1400   tr. Lanfranc Sci. Cirurgie (Ashm.) (1894) 172   In wymmen þe necke of þe bladdre is schort, & is maad fast to the cunte. 1552   D. Lindsay Satyre Procl. 144   First lat me lok thy cunt, Syne lat me keip the key. 1680   Earl of Rochester et al. Poems 77   I fear you have with interest repaid, Those eager thrusts, which at your Cunt he made. 1865   ‘Philocomus' Love Feast iii. 21   I faint! I die! I spend! My cunt is sick! Suck me and fuck me!   A woman as a source of sexual gratification; a promiscuous woman; a slut. Also as a general term of abuse for a woman. 1663   S. Pepys Diary 1 July (1971) IV. 209   Mr. Batten..acting all the postures of lust and buggery that could be imagined, and..saying that the he hath to sell such a pouder as should make all the cunts in town run after him.   As a term of abuse for a man. 1860   in M. E. Neely Abraham Lincoln Encycl. (1982) 154   And when they got to Charleston, they had to, as is wont Look around to find a chairman, and so they took a Cunt   A despised, unpleasant, or annoying place, thing, or task. 1922   J. Joyce Ulysses ii. iv. [Calypso] 59   The grey sunken cunt of the world.   Bitch   Women were frequently equated to dogs in Ancient Greek literature, which was used to dehumanize and shame them for their alleged lack of restraint and sexual urges. This is believed to have originated from the hunter goddess Artemis, who was frequently depicted as a pack of hounds and was perceived to be both beautiful and frigid and savage. According to popular belief, the term "bitch" as we use it today evolved from the Old English word "bicce," which meant a female dog, about the year 1000 AD. The phrase started out as a critique of a woman's sexuality in the 15th century but eventually evolved to signify that the lady was rude or disagreeable.   Clare Bayley has connected this growth of the term "bitch" as an insult to the suffrage struggle and the final passage of women's suffrage in the early 20th century, particularly the 1920s. Men were intimidated when women started to challenge their subordinate roles in the patriarchal power structure, and the phrase started to be used to ferocious and irate females. Men's respect for women and the prevalence of the term are clearly correlated, since usage of the term rapidly decreased during World War II as men's appreciation of women's contributions to the war effort increased.   However, as they competed with women for employment after the war ended and the men went back to work, the word's usage increased once more. As the housewife paradigm started to fade away during the war, the position of women in the workplace and society as a whole underwent an irreparable change. However, males perceived the presence of women in the workforce as a challenge to their supremacy in society.   With songs like Elton John's "The Bitch is Back" ascending the charts in 1974, the slur became more common in mainstream culture and music in the latter decades of the 20th century. As a result of artists like Kanye West and Eminem using the term "bitch" to denigrate women and depict violence against them in their lyrics, hip-hop culture has also long been accused of being misogynistic.   We just need to look at Hillary Clinton's recent campaign for president in 2016 to understand how frequently this slur is leveled at women, especially those in positions of authority who are defying patriarchal expectations and shattering glass ceilings. Rep. AOC being called a "fucking bitch" by a GOP Rep. is another similar example. It is evident that the usage of the phrase and the degree to which males regard women to be a danger are related.   bitch (v.)   "to complain," attested from at least 1930, perhaps from the sense in bitchy, perhaps influenced by the verb meaning "to bungle, spoil," which is recorded from 1823. But bitched in this sense seems to echo Middle English bicched "cursed, bad," a general term of opprobrium (as in Chaucer's bicched bones "unlucky dice"), which despite the hesitation of OED, seems to be a derivative of bitch (n.).   bitchy (adj.) 1925, U.S. slang, "sexually provocative;" later (1930s) "spiteful, catty, bad-tempered" (usually of females); from bitch + -y (2). Earlier in reference to male dogs thought to look less rough or coarse than usual. The earliest use of "bitch" specifically as a derogatory term for women dates to the fifteenth century. Its earliest slang meaning mainly referred to sexual behavior, according to the English language historian Geoffrey Hughes:   The early applications were to a promiscuous or sensual woman, a metaphorical extension of the behavior of a bitch in heat. Herein lies the original point of the powerful insult son of a bitch, found as biche sone ca. 1330 in Arthur and Merlin ... while in a spirited exchange in the Chester Play (ca. 1400) a character demands: "Whom callest thou queine, skabde bitch?" ("Who are you calling a whore, you miserable bitch?").   In modern usage, the slang term bitch has different meanings depending largely on social context and may vary from very offensive to endearing, and as with many slang terms, its meaning and nuances can vary depending on the region in which it is used.   The term bitch can refer to a person or thing that is very difficult, as in "Life's a bitch" or "He sure got the bitch end of that deal". It is common for insults to lose intensity as their meaning broadens ("bastard" is another example). In the film The Women (1939), Joan Crawford could only allude to the word: "And by the way, there's a name for you ladies, but it isn't used in high society - outside of a kennel." At the time, use of the actual word would have been censored by the Hays Office. By 1974, Elton John had a hit single (#4 in the U.S. and #14 in the U.K.) with "The Bitch Is Back", in which he says "bitch" repeatedly. It was, however, censored by some radio stations. On late night U.S. television, the character Emily Litella (1976-1978) on Saturday Night Live (portrayed by Gilda Radner) would frequently refer to Jane Curtin under her breath at the end of their Weekend Update routine in this way: "Oh! Never mind...! Bitch!"   Bitchin' arose in the 1950s to describe something found to be cool or rad. Modern use can include self-description, often as an unfairly difficult person. For example, in the New York Times bestseller The Bitch in the House, a woman describes her marriage: "I'm fine all day at work, but as soon as I get home, I'm a horror....I'm the bitch in the house."Boy George admitted "I was being a bitch" in a falling out with Elton John. Generally, the term bitch is still considered offensive, and not accepted in formal situations. According to linguist Deborah Tannen, "Bitch is the most contemptible thing you can say about a woman. Save perhaps the four-letter C word." It's common for the word to be censored on Prime time TV, often rendered as "the b-word". During the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign, a John McCain supporter referred to Hillary Clinton by asking, "How do we beat the bitch?" The event was reported in censored format:   On CNN's "The Situation Room," Washington Post media critic and CNN "Reliable Sources" host Howard Kurtz observed that "Senator McCain did not embrace the 'b' word that this woman in the audience used." ABC reporter Kate Snow adopted the same location. On CNN's "Out in the Open," Rick Sanchez characterized the word without using it by saying, "Last night, we showed you a clip of one of his supporters calling Hillary Clinton the b-word that rhymes with witch." A local Fox 25 news reporter made the same move when he rhymed the unspoken word with rich.   A study reported that, when used on social media, bitch "aims to promote traditional, cultural beliefs about femininity". Used hundreds of thousands of times per day on such platforms, it is associated with sexist harassment, "victimizing targets", and "shaming" victims who do not abide by degrading notions about femininity   Son of a bitch The first known appearance of "son-of-a-bitch" in a work of American fiction is Seventy-Six (1823), a historical fiction novel set during the American Revolutionary War by eccentric writer and critic John Neal.  The protagonist, Jonathan Oadley, recounts a battle scene in which he is mounted on a horse: "I wheeled, made a dead set at the son-of-a-bitch in my rear, unhorsed him, and actually broke through the line." The term's use as an insult is as old as that of bitch. Euphemistic terms are often substituted, such as gun in the phrase "son of a gun" as opposed to "son of a bitch", or "s.o.b." for the same phrase. Like bitch, the severity of the insult has diminished. Roy Blount Jr. in 2008 extolled the virtues of "son of a bitch" (particularly in comparison to "asshole") in common speech and deed. Son of a bitch can also be used as a "how about that" reaction, or as a reaction to excruciating pain. In politics the phrase "Yes, he is a son of a bitch, but he is our son of a bitch" has been attributed, probably apocryphally, to various U.S. presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Richard Nixon. Immediately after the detonation of the first atomic bomb in Alamogordo, New Mexico, in July 1945 (the device codenamed Gadget), the Manhattan Project scientist who served as the director of the test, Kenneth Tompkins Bainbridge, exclaimed to Robert Oppenheimer "Now we're all sons-of-bitches." In January 2022, United States President Joe Biden was recorded on a hot mic responding to Fox News correspondent Peter Doocy asking, "Do you think inflation is a political liability ahead of the midterms?" Biden responded sarcastically, saying, "It's a great asset — more inflation. What a stupid son of a bitch." The 19th-century British racehorse Filho da Puta took its name from "Son of a Bitch" in Portuguese. The Curtiss SB2C, a World War 2 U.S. Navy dive bomber, was called "Son-of-a-Bitch 2nd Class" by some of its pilots and crewmen. In American popular culture, the slang word "basic" is used to derogatorily refer to persons who are thought to favor mainstream goods, fashions, and music. Hip-hop culture gave rise to "basic bitch," which gained popularity through rap music, lyrics, blogs, and videos from 2011 to 2014. "Bros" is a common word for their male counterparts. Other English-speaking nations have terms like "basic bitch" or "airhead," such as modern British "Essex girls" and "Sloane Rangers," as well as Australian "haul girls," who are noted for their love of shopping for expensive clothing and uploading films of their purchases on YouTube. Oxford English Dictionary  transitive. To call (a person, esp. a woman) a bitch. 1707   Diverting Muse 131   Why how now, crys Venus, altho you're my Spouse, [If] you Bitch me, you Brute, have a care of your Brows   transitive. To behave like a bitch towards (a person); to be spiteful, malicious, or unfair to (a person); to let (a person) down. 1764   D. Garrick Let. 23 Aug. (1963) II. 423   I am a little at a loss what You will do for a Woman Tragedian to stare & tremble wth yr Heroes, if Yates should bitch You—but she must come.   intransitive. To engage in spiteful or malicious criticism or gossip, esp. about another person; to talk spitefully or cattily about. 1915   G. Cannan Young Earnest i. x. 92   It's the women bitching at you got into your blood.   intransitive. Originally U.S. To grumble, to complain (about something, or at someone). Frequently collocated with moan. 1930   Amer. Speech 5 238   [Colgate University slang] He bitched about the course.   †3. intransitive. To back down, to yield. Obsolete. rare. 1777   E. Burke Let. 9 May in Corr. (1961) III. 339   Norton bitched a little at last, but though he would recede; Fox stuck to his motion.   Shit shit (v.) Old English scitan, from Proto-Germanic *skit- (source also of North Frisian skitj, Dutch schijten, German scheissen), from PIE(proto indo-european) root *skei- "to cut, split." The notion is of "separation" from the body (compare Latin excrementum, from excernere "to separate," Old English scearn "dung, muck," from scieran "to cut, shear;" see sharn). It is thus a cousin to science and conscience.   "Shit" is not an acronym. Nor is it a recent word. But it was taboo from 1600 and rarely appeared in print (neither Shakespeare nor the KJV has it), and even in the "vulgar" publications of the late 18c. it is disguised by dashes. It drew the wrath of censors as late as 1922 ("Ulysses" and "The Enormous Room"), scandalized magazine subscribers in 1957 (a Hemingway story in Atlantic Monthly) and was omitted from some dictionaries as recently as 1970 ("Webster's New World"). [Rawson]   It has extensive slang usage; the meaning "to lie, to tease'' is from 1934; that of "to disrespect" is from 1903. Also see shite. Shat is a humorous past tense form, not etymological, first recorded 18th century.   To shit bricks "be very frightened" attested by 1961. The connection between fear and involuntary defecation has generated expressions in English since the 14th century. (the image also is in Latin), and probably also is behind scared shitless (1936).   shit (n.) Middle English shit "diarrhea," from Old English scitte "purging, diarrhea," from source of shit (v.). The general sense of "excrement" dates from 1580s (Old English had scytel, Middle English shitel for "dung, excrement;" the usual 14c. noun for natural discharges of the bodies of men or beasts seems to have been turd or filth). As an exclamation attested in print by 1920 but certainly older. Use for "obnoxious person" is by 1508; meaning "misfortune, trouble" is attested from 1937. Shit-faced "drunk" is 1960s student slang; shit list is from 1942. Shit-hole is by 1937 as "rectum," by 1969 in reference to undesirable locations. Shitload (also shit-load) for "a great many" is by 1970. Shitticism is Robert Frost's word for scatological writing.   Up shit creek "in trouble" is by 1868 in a South Carolina context (compare the metaphoric salt river, of which it is perhaps a coarse variant). Slang not give a shit "not care" is by 1922. Pessimistic expression same shit different day is attested by 1989. To get (one's) shit together "manage one's affairs" is by 1969. Emphatic shit out of luck is by 1942. The expression when the shit hits the fan "alluding to a moment of crisis or its disastrous consequences" is attested by 1967.   Expressing anger, despair, surprise, frustration, resignation, excitement, etc. 1865   Proc. Court Martial U.S. Army (Judge Advocate General's Office) U.S. National Arch.: Rec. group 153, File MM-2412 3 Charge II.   Private James Sullivan...did in contemptuous and disrespectful manner reply..‘Oh, shit, I can't' or words to that effect.   Ass/Asshole The word arse in English derives from the Proto-Germanic (reconstructed) word *arsaz, from the Proto-Indo-European word *ors-, meaning "buttocks" or "backside". The combined form arsehole is first attested from 1500 in its literal use to refer to the anus. The metaphorical use of the word to refer to the worst place in a region (e.g., "the arsehole of the world"), is first attested in print in 1865; the use to refer to a contemptible person is first attested in 1933. In the ninth chapter of his 1945 autobiography, Black Boy, Richard Wright quotes a snippet of verse that uses the term: "All these white folks dressed so fine / Their ass-holes smell just like mine ...". Its earliest known usage in newspapers as an insult was 1965. As with other vulgarities, these uses of the word may have been common in oral speech for some time before their first appearances in print. By the 1970s, Hustler magazine featured people they did not like as "Asshole of the Month." In 1972, Jonathan Richman of Modern Lovers recorded his song "Pablo Picasso", which includes the line "Pablo Picasso was never called an asshole."   Until the early 1990s, the word was considered one of a number of words that could not be uttered on commercial television in the United States. Comedian Andrew Dice Clay caused a major shock when he uttered the word during a televised MTV awards show in 1989. However, there were PG-13 and R-rated films in the 1980s that featured use of the word, such as the R-rated The Terminator (1984), the PG-13-rated National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989), and the PG-rated Back to the Future (1985). By 1994, however, vulgarity had become more acceptable, and the word was featured in dialog on the long-running television series NYPD Blue, though it has yet to become anything close to commonplace on network TV. In some broadcast edits (such as the syndication airings of South Park), the word is partially bleeped out, as "assh—". A variant of the term, "ass clown", was coined and popularized by the 1999 comedy film Office Space.   The word is mainly used as a vulgarity, generally to describe people who are viewed as stupid, incompetent, unpleasant, or detestable. Moral philosopher Aaron James, in his 2012 book, Assholes: A Theory, gives a more precise meaning of the word, particularly to its connotation in the United States: A person, who is almost always male, who considers himself of much greater moral or social importance than everyone else; who allows himself to enjoy special advantages and does so systematically; who does this out of an entrenched sense of entitlement; and who is immunized by his sense of entitlement against the complaints of other people. He feels he is not to be questioned, and he is the one who is chiefly wronged.   Many would believe the term ass to be used to describe an ungulate or a hoofed mammal of the smaller variety. Those people would be correct. However ass would be used as slang to describe the incompetence of people as they seem to resemble that of a donkey. Slow and stupid. We don't see donkeys in this manner but the people of old may have.   A stupid, irritating, or contemptible person; a person who behaves despicably. Cf. arsehole n. 3, shithole n. 2. Quot. 1954, from a story originally told in 1933, provides evidence for the development of this sense from figurative uses of sense 1. [1954   V. Randolph Pissing in Snow (1976) lxx. 106   When God got the job [of making men and women] done,..there was a big pile of ass-holes left over. It looks to me like the Almighty just throwed all them ass-holes together, and made the Easton family.]   Dick/dickhead   Dick is a common English language slang word for the human penis. It is also used by extension for a variety of slang purposes, generally considered vulgar, including: as a verb to describe sexual activity; and as a term for individuals who are considered to be rude, abrasive, inconsiderate, or otherwise contemptible. In this context, it can be used interchangeably with jerk, and can also be used as a verb to describe rude or deceitful actions. Variants include dickhead, which literally refers to the glans. The offensiveness of the word dick is complicated by the continued use of the word in inoffensive contexts, including as both a given name (often a nickname for Richard) and a surname, the popular British dessert spotted dick, the classic novel Moby-Dick, the Dick and Jane series of children's books, and the American retailer Dick's Sporting Goods. Uses like these have given comic writers a foundation to use double entendre to capitalize on this contradiction. In the mid-17th century, dick became slang for a man as a sexual partner. For example, in the 1665 satire The English Rogue by Richard Head, a "dick" procured to impregnate a character that is having difficulty conceiving:   “The next Dick I pickt up for her was a man of a colour as contrary to the former, as light is to darkness, being swarthy; whose hair was as black as a sloe; middle statur'd, well set, both strong and active, a man so universally tryed, and so fruitfully successful, that there was hardly any female within ten miles gotten with child in hugger-mugger, but he was more than suspected to be Father of all the legitimate. Yet this too, proved an ineffectual Operator.”   An 1869 slang dictionary offered definitions of dick including "a riding whip" and an abbreviation of dictionary, also noting that in the North Country, it was used as a verb to indicate that a policeman was eyeing the subject. The term came to be associated with the penis through usage by men in the military around the 1880s.   The term "dick" was originally used to describe a vile or repulsive individual in the 1960s.   A stupid, annoying, or objectionable person (esp. a male); one whose behaviour is considered knowingly obnoxious, provocative, or disruptive. Cf. dick n.1 6. 1960   S. Martinelli Let. 28 Dec. in C. Bukowski & S. Martinelli Beerspit Night & Cursing. (2001) 132   You shd listen to yr own work being broadcast [on the radio]... You cd at least tell ME when to list[en] dickhead!   Twat noun Slang: Vulgar. vulva. First recorded in 1650–60; perhaps originally a dialectal variant of thwat, thwot (unattested), presumed Modern English outcome of Old English thwāt, (unattested), akin to Old Norse thveit “cut, slit, forest clearing” (from northern English dialect thwaite “forest clearing”)   What does twat mean? Twat is vulgar slang for “vagina.” It's also used, especially in British English slang, a way to call someone as stupid, useless, or otherwise contemptible person. While twat has been recorded since the 1650s, we don't exactly know where it comes from. One theory connects twat to the Old English term for “to cut off.” The (bizarre) implication could be that women's genitalia were thought to be just shorter versions of men's.   Twat was popularized in the mid-1800s completely by accident. The great English poet Robert Browning had read a 1660 poem that referred, in a derogatory way, to a “nun's twat.” Browning thought a twat must have been a kind of hat, so he incorporated it into his own work.   Words for genitalia and other taboo body parts (especially female body parts) have a long history of being turned into abusive terms. Consider a**, d*ck, p***y, among many others. In the 1920s, English speakers started using twat as an insult in the same way some use a word like c**t, although twat has come to have a far less offensive force than the c-word in American English. In the 1930s, twat was sometimes used as a term of abuse for “woman” more generally, and over the second half of the 1900s, twat was occasionally used as slang for “butt” or “anus” in gay slang.   Twat made headlines in June 2018 when British actor Danny Dyer called former British Prime Minister David Cameron a twat for his role in initiating the Brexit referendum in 2016—and then stepping down after it passed.   Twat is still common in contemporary use as an insult implying stupidity, especially among British English speakers.   Even though it's a common term, twat is still vulgar and causes a stir when used in a public setting, especially due to its sexist nature. Public figures that call someone a twat are often publicly derided. Online, users sometimes censor the term, rendering it as tw*t or tw@t.   If you're annoying, you might be accused of twattiness; if you're messing around or procrastinating, you might be twatting around; if you're going on about something, you might be twatting on. Twatting is also sometimes substituted for the intensifier ”fucking”.   As a term of abuse: a contemptible or obnoxious person; a person who behaves stupidly; a fool, an idiot. Now chiefly British. The force of this term can vary widely. Especially when applied to a woman, it can be as derogatory and offensive as the term cunt (cunt n. 2a), but it can also be used (especially of men) as a milder form of abuse without conscious reference to the female genitals, often implying that a person's behaviour, appearance, etc., is stupid or idiotic, with little or no greater force than twit (twit n.1 2b). 1922   ‘J. H. Ross' Mint (1936) xxxv. 110   The silly twat didn't know if his arse-hole was bored, punched, drilled, or countersunk. The top 10 movies with the most swear words: The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013) – 715 Uncut Gems (Josh and Benny Safide, 2019) – 646 Casino (Martin Scorsese, 1995) – 606 Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (Kevin Smith, 2001) – 509 Fury (David Ayer, 2014) – 489 Straight Outta Compton (F. Gary Gray, 2015) – 468 Summer of Sam (Spike Lee, 1999) – 467 Nil By Mouth (Gary Oldman, 1997) – 432 Reservoir Dogs (Quentin Tarantino, 1992) – 418 Beavis and Butt-Head Do America (Mike Judge, 1996) – 414