Podcasts about multidisciplinary

Combination of two or more academic disciplines into one activity

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Latest podcast episodes about multidisciplinary

The How to ABA Podcast
BCBA Collaboration Tips

The How to ABA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 11:54


As BCBAs, collaboration is a very critical part of our job. However, a lot of us have trouble collaborating effectively. Unfortunately, some of the other professionals we may encounter don't have a great opinion about ABA, as it does have a bit of a negative reputation. Because of this, it's important to have the right conversations about what we do and how we can help our clients reach their goals. It's also important to be open to other disciplines, like speech and OT, as they offer their own unique perspectives.Here, we discuss how we can collaborate with other professionals and incorporate them into some of our programmings. The first step is open communication, which includes keeping others updated and getting feedback when appropriate. Second, be open to new ideas, try them out, and make collaboration a group effort. Try to use regular terminology instead of ABA acronyms others may not understand. Sharing training sessions are also an effective way to support each other and get on the same page. Always keep in mind that we're all human beings and professionals in our own unique areas. What's Inside:Why collaboration is an essential component of being a successful BCBA.Steps to effective collaboration with multi-disciplinary professionals.Mentioned In This Episode:HowToABA.com/joinHow to ABA on YouTubeFind us on FacebookFollow us on InstagramFree BCBA Skills Assessment 

Clever
Ep 182: Experience Designer Nick DuPey on Harnessing the Generativity of Creative Hives

Clever

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 75:35


Multidisciplinary designer, Nick DuPey, hit a few rough patches growing up in Chattanooga. When his girlfriend's mom suggested he take an art class, he found a path to fine art, graphic design, and a creative hive. His career led to IDEO, where he added human-centered design to his practice. Now, in Experience Design at co:collective, he cultivates collaborative co-creation informed by purpose.Images, links and more from Nick!Please say Hi on social! Twitter, Instagram and Facebook - @CleverPodcast, @amydevers,If you enjoy Clever we could use your support! Please consider leaving a review, making a donation, becoming a sponsor, or introducing us to your friends! We love and appreciate you!Clever is hosted & produced by Amy Devers, with editing by Rich Stroffolino, production assistance from Ilana Nevins and Anouchka Stephan, and music by El Ten Eleven. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Cardionerds
258. Guidelines: 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure – Question #5 with Dr. Clyde Yancy

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 12:02


The following question refers to Section 7.1 of the 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure. The question is asked by New York Medical College medical student and CardioNerds Intern Akiva Rosenzveig, answered first by Cornell cardiology fellow and CardioNerds Ambassador Dr. Jaya Kanduri, and then by expert faculty Dr. Clyde Yancy.Dr. Yancy is Professor of Medicine and Medical Social Sciences, Chief of Cardiology, and Vice Dean for Diversity and Inclusion at Northwestern University, and a member of the AHA/ACC/HFSA Heart Failure Guideline Writing Committee.The Decipher the Guidelines: 2022 AHA / ACC / HFSA Guideline for The Management of Heart Failure series was developed by the CardioNerds and created in collaboration with the American Heart Association and the Heart Failure Society of America. It was created by 30 trainees spanning college through advanced fellowship under the leadership of CardioNerds Cofounders Dr. Amit Goyal and Dr. Dan Ambinder, with mentorship from Dr. Anu Lala, Dr. Robert Mentz, and Dr. Nancy Sweitzer. We thank Dr. Judy Bezanson and Dr. Elliott Antman for tremendous guidance.Enjoy this Circulation 2022 Paths to Discovery article to learn about the CardioNerds story, mission, and values. Question #5 Ms. L is a 65-year-old woman with nonischemic cardiomyopathy with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 35%, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. She has been admitted to the hospital with decompensated heart failure (HF) twice in the last six months and admits that she struggles to understand how to take her medications and adjust her sodium intake to prevent this.  Which of the following interventions has the potential to decrease the risk of rehospitalization and/or improve mortality? A Access to a multidisciplinary team (physicians, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, care managers, etc) to assist with management of her HF   B Engaging in a mobile app aimed at improving HF self-care   C Vaccination against respiratory illnesses   D A & C   Answer #5   The correct answer is D – both A (access to a multidisciplinary team) and C (vaccination against respiratory illness).   Choice A is correct. Multidisciplinary teams involving physicians, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, care managers, dieticians, and others, have been shown in multiple RCTs, metanalyses, and Cochrane reviews to both reduce hospital admissions and all-cause mortality. As such, it is a class I recommendation (LOE A) that patients with HF should receive care from multidisciplinary teams to facilitate the implementation of GDMT, address potential barriers to self-care, reduce the risk of subsequent rehospitalization for HF, and improve survival. Choice B is incorrect.  Self-care in HF comprises treatment adherence and health maintenance behaviors. Patients with HF should learn to take medications as prescribed, restrict sodium intake, stay physically active, and get vaccinations. They also should understand how to monitor for signs and symptoms of worsening HF, and what to do in response to symptoms when they occur. Interventions focused on improving the self-care of HF patients significantly reduce hospitalizations and all-cause mortality as well as improve quality of life. Therefore, patients with HF should receive specific education and support to facilitate HF self-care in a multidisciplinary manner (Class I, LOE B-R). However, the method of delivery and education matters. Reinforcement with structured telephone support has been shown to be effective. In contrast the efficacy of mobile health-delivered educational interventions in improve self-care in patients with HF remains uncertain. Choice C is correct. In patients with HF, vaccinating against respiratory illnesses is reasonable to reduce mortality (Class 2a, LOE B-NR). For example, administration of the influenza vaccine in HF patients has been shown to reduce...

Empowered Patient Podcast
Integrative Care Models Highlight Need for Multidisciplinary Holistic Approach with Charlie Noel Northwestern Health Sciences University TRANSCRIPT

Empowered Patient Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023


Charlie Noel is the Executive Director at Northwestern Health Sciences University's Institute for Integrative Care, which is working to transform healthcare from a disease-focused model to a holistic approach. The Institute provides practical tools to help healthcare organizations move to an integrative care model while encouraging multidisciplinary groups and community engagement to provide care for the whole person. Charlie explains, "The traditional hierarchy structure of mainstream healthcare limits the input from some professionals. So that means we should also be bringing in some of these other disciplines and also building an environment where we embrace emerging mainstream and complementary healthcare to eliminate the silos in care delivery and enhance outcomes." "The Institute is collaboratively working with organizations and communities to build systems where all people benefit from integrative care. We want to meet people, organizations, and systems where they're at and then be able to develop plans to help them move towards integrative care and look at it through this whole-person lens. And the way that we've broken it down is into three different domains." "But even more important is how do we now reimagine healthcare curriculum to where we can also incorporate these different pieces? We have some integrative care competencies that we are interweaving through the curriculum so that whenever people graduate, they have a better understanding of what integrated care is." @NWHealthU #IntegrativeCare #HealthcareLeaders #CIH #SDoH #HolisticCare #CommunityEngagement #WholePersonCare nwhealth.edu Listen to the podcast here

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
Questions Answered on ART Safety and Tolerability in Aging Patients and Populations With Cardiometabolic Toxicities

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 23:00


In this episode, Marta Boffito, MD, PhD, FRCP, and Jens D. Lundgren, MD, DMSc, address key considerations when evaluating antiretroviral therapy safety and tolerability in aging patients and those with possible cardiometabolic toxicities, including:Monitoring for cardiometabolic syndromes (eg, lipid panels, coronary artery calcification scores)Approaching antiretroviral-related weight gain in clinical practiceInterpreting results from RESPOND on cardiovascular risk with integrase strand transfer inhibitorsCollaborating with other specialties (eg, cardiologists, dietitians) to provide a multidisciplinary approach for managing comorbidities, including prevention and managementFaculty: Marta Boffito, MD, PhD, FRCPConsultant Physician/ProfessorHIV/ResearchChelsea and Westminster HospitalImperial College LondonLondon, United KingdomJens D. Lundgren, MD, DMScProfessorRigshospital, University of Copenhagen DirectorCentre of Excellence for Health, Immunity and Infection (CHIP)Rigshospital, University of CopenhagenCopenhagen, DenmarkLink to full program:http://bit.ly/3PM3nYeLink to downloadable slides: http://bit.ly/3WgYycz

Cancer Buzz
Prioritizing a Multidisciplinary Team Approach in the Care of Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer

Cancer Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 12:09


Because most cases of SCLC are diagnosed at advanced stages, it is rarely curable by the time of diagnosis. However, for some patients, treatment can improve quality of life. Multidisciplinary care coordination is especially important with aggressive cases of SCLC, as there may be several unique challenges to be addressed. CANCER BUZZ spoke to Ahmed Al-Hazzouri, MD, Medical Oncologist, Ryan Schroeder, MD, Pulmonologist, and Justin Wu, MD, Radiation Oncologist, from AdventHealth's Cancer Institute Waterman, Tavares, FL. Hear what impact a multidisciplinary team approach can have on patient experience and health outcomes. “The Lung Nodule Clinic is a way for us to also promote community outreach to say, not only should you get screened, and educate the public about being screened, but can help you if there is an applicable finding.”  – J. Ryan Schroeder, MD   Ahmed Al-Hazzouri, MD Medical Oncologist AdventHealth's Cancer Institute Waterman Tavares, FL Ryan Schroeder, MD Pulmonologist AdventHealth's Cancer Institute Waterman Tavares, FL Justin Wu, MD Radiation Oncologist AdventHealth's Cancer Institute Waterman Tavares, FL   Resources:  Cancer Support Community ClinicalTrials.gov Go2 for Lung Cancer LUNGEVITY Lung Cancer Research Foundation

Empowered Patient Podcast
Integrative Care Models Highlight Need for Multidisciplinary Holistic Approach with Charlie Noel Northwestern Health Sciences University

Empowered Patient Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 18:21


Charlie Noel is the Executive Director at Northwestern Health Sciences University's Institute for Integrative Care, which is working to transform healthcare from a disease-focused model to a holistic approach. The Institute provides practical tools to help healthcare organizations move to an integrative care model while encouraging multidisciplinary groups and community engagement to provide care for the whole person. Charlie explains, "The traditional hierarchy structure of mainstream healthcare limits the input from some professionals. So that means we should also be bringing in some of these other disciplines and also building an environment where we embrace emerging mainstream and complementary healthcare to eliminate the silos in care delivery and enhance outcomes." "The Institute is collaboratively working with organizations and communities to build systems where all people benefit from integrative care. We want to meet people, organizations, and systems where they're at and then be able to develop plans to help them move towards integrative care and look at it through this whole-person lens. And the way that we've broken it down is into three different domains." "But even more important is how do we now reimagine healthcare curriculum to where we can also incorporate these different pieces? We have some integrative care competencies that we are interweaving through the curriculum so that whenever people graduate, they have a better understanding of what integrated care is." @NWHealthU #IntegrativeCare #HealthcareLeaders #CIH #SDoH #HolisticCare #CommunityEngagement #WholePersonCare nwhealth.edu Download the transcript here

Wellness Center Creators
Healing through Creativity: Expressive Arts & IFS with Julie Collura

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 14:18


Unlock your full potential with Julie Collura, a licensed clinical social worker and expressive arts practitioner who believes everyone is innately creative. "Expressive Arts is intermodal - giving us more tools to work with and offering folks more ways of expressing, other than just talking, as a tool for healing and a tool for expression." - Julie Collura Julie Collura is a licensed clinical social worker, therapist, musician, and expressive arts practitioner. She believes in using creativity as a tool for healing and uses a multi-arts or intermodal approach in her work. Julie believes in the power of creativity to heal and change. She holds a license in Oregon and Louisiana and has worked with survivors of violent crimes and domestic and sexual violence. Julie believes that everyone can benefit from her approach, regardless of experience in the arts. In her work, she uses techniques from Internal Family Systems Therapy to help clients get to know their inner systems and work with their parts. She has learned to be patient and brave in her new private practice, and to network and make human connections to build her practice. In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. What are Expressive Arts, and what are the differences between it and art therapy? 2. How can Internal Family Systems Therapy and Expressive Arts be integrated in therapy sessions? 3. What was Julie Collura's journey to becoming a therapist, and what has she learned from starting her own private practice? Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Sa Labas ng Classroom (Outside the Classroom)
Research Literacy in the Indigenous Communities Utilizing Multidisciplinary Studies

Sa Labas ng Classroom (Outside the Classroom)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 55:32


"Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought." - Albert Szent-Gyorgyi Disclaimer: This episode contains themes related to grief, fear of blood, VAWC, and gender inequality. This episode also briefly mentions suicide attempts as part of a response included in a research. This episode was recorded last year, and some of the projects mentioned by the guest have likely been concluded. Lastly, the episode includes background noises such as the barking of dogs. I tried my best to minimize the said noises, but I couldn't remove them entirely. I apologize in advance for the inconvenience this may cause to your listening experience. After months of not posting anything, Sa Labas ng Classroom podcast enters 2023 with an episode that features the importance of research and research literacy. Ma'am Maria Jesusa Gambulao graces the podcast with her expertise as she shares how her passion for research started, what researches can contribute to the society, and how research in indigenous communities serve as valuable resources for major life changes. We briefly talk about our fear of blood and our opinions about 'fact checking'. Additionally, ma'am MJ discusses how the mental health field can benefit from researches that utilize multidisciplinary studies. Finally, don't miss how ma'am MJ highlights the importance of the mental health of our teachers! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/salabasngclassroom/message

Future Prairie Radio
S6E1: By Any Means with David Shirkhani

Future Prairie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 18:18


Multidisciplinary creative David Shirkhani on creating Black & Gifted, his art collective exploring mental health.

Wellness Center Creators
A Journey in Offering Wellness Services to the BIPOC Community with Wayneisha Walker

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 19:00


"Let's heal! We want people just to come in and heal however you need to." - Wayneisha Walker Wayneisha Walker is a Las Vegas native and owner of Inherent Wellness PLLC, a multi-disciplinary wellness center located in Houston, Texas. She is a licensed psychotherapist specializing in treating trauma, mood disorders, and adjustment disorders. After opening the doors at the start of 2020, the pandemic forced Wayneisha to close and reevaluate the way the business could offer care. She decided to take on clinical interns and expand to include yoga, reiki, and massage therapy to provide a one-stop shop for her clients. Her business provides low-cost and no-cost services, such as by-donation yoga and free raffle micro-sessions, to help the BIPOC community access the care they need. In the future, she hopes to continue to collaborate with other organizations and reach out to young people to provide more resources for growth and development. In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. How does the inclusion of different modalities such as yoga, reiki, and massage therapy create a one-stop shop for mental health services? 2. How is Wayneisha Walker's business helping to make mental health services more accessible to the BIPOC community? 3. What new initiatives is Wayneisha Walker planning to provide mental health services to young people? Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Kent Creative Show
Kent Creative Ep 110 - Tracie Peisley - Multidisciplinary artist

Kent Creative Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 19:56


Peisley's work is intense, highly charged with an emotional content that relates to the everyday drama of existing. In this podcast she explores the depth of her own self and discusses the making of art. Watch the original video of this podcast here: https://youtu.be/aR0gGWLvLcQ More about Tracie Peisley: https://cultureinkent.org/profiles/tracie-peisley/ Recorded in Whitstable. Hosting and photography: Nathalie Banaigs

AcademicCME Podcast
Hyperkalemia 4: A Multidisciplinary and Interprofessional Approach to Best Treat Hyperkalemia and Associated Comorbidities – Challenging Patient Case Studies

AcademicCME Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 31:19


Please go to academiccme.com/hyperkalemiapodcast/ and complete the evaluation to receive your CE/CME Credit.

Wellness Center Creators
Conquer Stress and Burnout with Gabrielle Juliano-Villani: From Dread to Delight in One Year

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 17:45


"If you put your mind to it and you set the goals in place, you can do whatever you want." - Gabrielle Juliano-Villani Gabrielle Juliano-Villani is a licensed clinical, social worker, consultant, coach, sound healer, entrepreneur, and educator based in Sarasota, Florida. After realizing her own burnout in 2021, she sold her thriving group practice and made her mission to educate others on the impact stress has on our everyday lives. After attending a retreat in Costa Rica, Gabrielle changed her daily routine and began consulting and training with other therapists, as well as providing executive coaching and clinical training on working with clients who have chronic illnesses. She now enjoys a much healthier lifestyle, with a morning routine and time to do things she enjoys. In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. How Gabrielle Juliano-Villani sold her thriving group practice to heal from burnout. 2. The powerful exercise of mapping out a current day versus an ideal day to help prevent burnout. 3. How Gabrielle has specialized in providing mental health services to clients with chronic illnesses and medical trauma. Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

ChroniFI Podcast
The Multidisciplinary Nature of Fulfilling Work: Interview with Seavron Banus

ChroniFI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 40:37


Work/Life Balance - Seavron Banus works in private equity at Berkshire Partners, is the founder of Stepwise (a financial education platform), and also works as a personal finance/leadership coach. We discuss finding work/life balance amidst competing priorities, bringing multiple skills to bear on one problem, and building a meaningful business that actually helps people. You can check out Stepwise here: https://stepwisewealth.com/ Get ChroniFI: https://www.chronifi.com

Wellness Center Creators
Designing for Wellness: Neena Folliott & Meg MacPherson on Crafting a Unique Space

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 29:02


Neena Folliott and Meg MacPherson are practicing physiotherapists with over 25 years of experience between them. They have created Articulate Design Co. to bring thoughtful design to the forefront of healthcare and elevate the experience for all. "Your physical space is so integral to understanding and optimizing how you're going to generate income. We see this far too often that people don't design for growth, so they're left with choppy layouts where people are working on top of each other, or they're just not optimizing the space for the areas that actually make them money." Meg and Nina, two experienced physiotherapists, had a keen interest in design and decided to create Articulate Design Co. to bridge the gap between clinical care and design. Through their company, they have designed clinics all over the world with the mission of creating spaces that match the talent and care of the practitioners within them. They believe that thoughtful design is important for businesses, as it can affect the client journey and the provider journey. They also advise practice owners to prioritize design in their budget, follow through on the design plan, and inject their own personality into the space. They emphasize that it is never too early to start thinking about space design. In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. Why is space design important for businesses, and how does it affect the client journey? 2. What are the top three design errors clinicians make and how can they be avoided? 3. How can collaboration between architects, web designers, and brand packaging professionals help create a cohesive space? Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go
S1 Ep62: Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go: Experts Share Multidisciplinary Takeaways From 2022 SABCS

Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 14:23


During the 2022 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), CancerNetwork® spoke with several multidisciplinary oncology experts from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota about their respective key takeaways from the presentations on developments in the breast cancer space, including surgery, radiotherapy, and biomarker research.  Judy C. Boughey, a surgical oncologist of the Division of Breast and Melanoma Surgical Oncology and the Department of Surgery, discussed her research on the impact of breast conservation therapy on local recurrence rates in multiple ipsilateral breast cancer in the phase 2 ACOSOG Z11102 (Alliance) trial (NCT01556243). Robert Mutter, MD, an associate professor of the Department of Radiation Oncology, spoke about his work on a randomized phase 2 trial assessing the use of conventional vs hypofractionated proton radiotherapy following a mastectomy among patients with breast cancer.  Siddhartha Yadav, MD, MBBS, a medical oncologist and assistant professor of Medicine and Oncology, highlighted data from the population-based CARRIERS study, assessing germline pathogenic variants and other factors as risks for contralateral breast cancer. Don't forget to subscribe to the “Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go” podcast on Apple Podcasts,Spotify, or anywhere podcasts are available.

Crypto Hipster Podcast
Asset Segregation, CBDCs, and Crypto Insights from Brazil with Vinicius P. Dias @ Lbank

Crypto Hipster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 40:01


Vinicius Porazza Dias completely fell in love with the concept of Blockchain, Web3, and the crypto economy. He has been working for two years with Growth Marketing for companies that use Blockchain and are Crypto-related. • Completely in love with the concept of Blockchain, web3, and crypto economy. I have been working for two years with Growth Marketing for companies that use Blockchain and Crypto-related. • Extensive knowledge of the LATAM financial market (especially Brazil) and the evolution of the crypto market. • 16 years of experience in Digital Marketing working in successful companies such as Mercado Bitcoin, Facebook, PagSeguro, UOL, and Lopes Imobiliária. • Business and Data driving (WebAnalytics, ROAS, ROI, EBITDA) • Agile Mindset with certifications in Lean/Kanban, Product Owner, and Management 3.0 • International marketing experience in PagSeguro, working in the Local Payments Business Unity. Building Content Marketing, Lead Generation, and Events in U.S, China, and Europe (Money 20/20, IRCE, ChinaJoy, GDC, Gamescom) • Eight years of experience in advertising agencies working with Strategic Planning, Media, and Conception for major brands such as Café 3 Corações, Wickbold, Cacau Show, Baden Baden, Roche, Hasbro, Natura, Grupo Raia e Drogasil, Uninove, BB Seguros, Uniban. • Multidisciplinary person with macro thinking in all conversion funnel stages while seeking to strengthen the brand as a whole. • Curious and passionate about neuroscience and human behavior • A hands-on professional, always working directly with the team, no matter what. • Experience in managing multidisciplinary and international teams Portfolio: www.cargocollective.com/viniciusporazza --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crypto-hipster-podcast/support

The Indian Edit
Ep. 77: Engineering paper to tell stories - Karishma Chugani Nankani on the global influences that shape her multidisciplinary work

The Indian Edit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 74:40


Growing up in Morocco, then studying in England, France and Spain have all shaped artist, writer, and illustrator Karishma Chugani Nankani in countless ways. Among the many stories she has shared is one of her widespread Sindhi clan which she tells through her art and her books. Karishma also guides others in connecting with their own stories and artistic expression through workshops in person and online. Join me in hearing how she works in different media and on different projects which all tie back to her childhood love of books. Listen here or at www.theindianedit.com and please take a second to rate us wherever you're listening so the voices of these inspiring women can be heard all over the world!SHOWNOTES FOR EPISODE 77:Find Karishma at her website, on instagram and her classes on DomestikaL'Ecole de PapierKarishma's course on the artistic process and sketchbooksPODCASTS we discussed:Listen to children's media producer and Karishma's cousin Sandhya's episode hereEmpire podcast with Anita Anand and William DalrympleBOOKS we discussed:Angela Carter's Book of Fairy TalesArtist Lynda Barry and her booksLeila Slimani's In the Country of OthersLeila Lalami's The Moor's AccountHeirs to the Past by Driss ChraibiFatima Mernissi's work and legacyThe Game of ForgettingArundhati RoyBen OkriHanif KureishiQuestions? Comments? Get in touch @theindianeditpodcast on Instagram !Special thanks to Varun Dhabe and the team @ Boon Castle / Flying Carpet Productions for audio post-production engineering!

Wellness Center Creators
Make Life Easier and Reach Success Faster Using Jane App's Intuitive System with Monika Marx

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 14:57


Monika Marx was a business owner who used to own a gym in North Vancouver, British Columbia. She experienced first-hand the power of software through Jane App, which was developed by her friend. Monika is now a product specialist for Jane App and is responsible for onboarding US corporate accounts. She is passionate about how technology can make life easier for business owners. She often talks to clinics about the features that Jane App offers, which include electronic claim submissions and payments. Monika advises new entrepreneurs to find software that is intuitive and has a good support team, in order to make the day-to-day operations easier. "Start the way you want to finish - having an intuitive, helpful software can be the make or break, and can make the day to day so much easier." - Monika Marx In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. How Jane App is helping to revolutionize medical billing systems with its innovative US insurance features. 2. The challenges clinics face when booking and billing clients, and how Jane App is making life easier. 3. The advice Monika gives to new entrepreneurs about finding intuitive, helpful software to streamline operations. Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

ReachMD CME
Improving Outcomes in Patients with Ovarian Cancer: Multidisciplinary Patient-Centered Care

ReachMD CME

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022


CME credits: 0.25 Valid until: 20-12-2023 Claim your CME credit at https://reachmd.com/programs/cme/improving-outcomes-in-patients-with-ovarian-cancer-multidisciplinary-patient-centered-care/14565/ Follow along as Dr. Floortje Backes walks us through a patient case and demonstrates the shared decision-making process of selecting an appropriate maintenance treatment regimen for advanced ovarian cancer.

Podcasts360
Heart Failure: Multidisciplinary Dialogue: Clinical Rounds and Case Reviews, Ep. 11

Podcasts360

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 53:03


In this podcast episode, Anil Harrison, MD, discusses evaluating and treating a patient with heart failure, including the types of heart failure, the pathophysiology, risk factors, and more.

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration / Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:48


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration and Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:51


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration and Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:51


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration / Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:48


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Gastroenterology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration & Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Gastroenterology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:51


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Gastroenterology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration & Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Gastroenterology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:48


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration / Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:48


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Video
Amit Singal, MD, MS - It Takes a Team for HCC: Improving Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Collaboration / Modern Therapeutics

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 91:51


Go online to PeerView.com/QYD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the choice of regimens for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to expand with new standard-of-care therapies for advanced disease, and emerging innovative locoregional and multimodal strategies for early- and intermediate-stage disease, clinicians who treat liver cancer have increased opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and improve patient outcomes. Designed to guide professionals into a new era of team-based personalized care, this Seminars & Tumor Board activity features a multidisciplinary panel of experts who will link current science and treatment recommendations to practical guidance on therapeutic decision-making. Using case-based discussion, the expert panel will address a variety of clinical issues such as treatment selection, sequencing, and the integration of systemic therapy with locoregional management. It takes a team to provide the best care for your patients—participate in this activity to hear the latest on using collaborative strategies to optimize outcomes in HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of novel and emerging systemic therapy approaches for patients with advanced/metastatic HCC; Review the latest evidence on innovative strategies, including novel locoregional modalities, combinations of locoregional and systemic therapies, and perioperative/conversion approaches, for patients with HCC across the disease continuum; Develop contemporary, personalized management plans for patients with HCC that consider the available clinical evidence, expert/guideline recommendations, clinical trial opportunities, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors; and Implement best practices for multidisciplinary collaboration and care coordination when managing patients with HCC, including team-based strategies to maximize treatment efficacy, safety, tolerability, and patient quality of life.

Cybercrimeology
Cyber Predators: Writing wrongs

Cybercrimeology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 29:21


About our Guests:Dr. Lauren Shapirohttps://www.jjay.cuny.edu/faculty/lauren-r-shapiro-phd Scott Wrighthttps://www.linkedin.com/in/scottwright/https://clickarmor.ca Papers or resources mentioned in this episode:Shapiro, L. R. (2022). Cyberpredators and Their Prey. CRC Press.https://www.routledge.com/Cyberpredators-and-Their-Prey/Shapiro/p/book/9780367551698 Shapiro, L. R., & Maras, M. H. (2015). Multidisciplinary investigation of child maltreatment. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.https://www.worldcat.org/title/875351759 Other:To all my fellow Internuts,  try to take a few moments away from the screen to share the holiday period with the people around you, then you can get straight back on there :). 

The NASS Podcast
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

The NASS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 17:13


Ask the Experts: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Evan K. Johnson, DPT, MS, OCS Rick Placide, MD Michael Suer, MD

Wellness Center Creators
Setting Up Systems and Processes to Serve Clients More Powerfully with Joanna Sapir

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 29:47


In this episode of the Wellness Inter Creators Podcast, Joanna Sapir, a business strategist for holistic practitioners, shares her expertise on setting up systems and processes in businesses to create consistency, enrollment of committed long-term clients, and steady income. You will learn how the sales process can impact the quality of your clients. The sales process can help practitioners enroll committed long term clients, and create steadier income and cash flow. However, many health coaches struggle with sales because they don't understand the sales process. The sales process involves five steps: invitation, filtering, nurturing, enrollment, and follow-up. By following these steps, practitioners can enroll clients that are the best fit for their services and create a more sustainable business. "When you start to base your business around the people that you love working with and the ones that see the best results from your services, you're able to start seeing that some people aren't a great fit." In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. How to build a sales process for enrolling clients into services 2. The importance of having a consultation process to assess client needs 3. How the sales process impacts the quality of clients Free Masterclass, The Client Champion Formula: https://joannasapir.com/WellnessCenterCreators Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Cancer Buzz
Optimizing SCLC Patient Outcomes Through Multidisciplinary Care Coordination

Cancer Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 6:36


Many patients with SCLC face a high symptom burden, poor prognosis, and adherence challenges due to treatment-related adverse events, stigmatization, and emotional distress. Multidisciplinary care coordination and timely diagnosis are critical in the health outcomes of patients with SCLC. CANCER BUZZ spoke to Gustavo Cumbo-Nacheli, MD, Interventional Pulmonologist and Critical Care Medicine and Pulmonary Medicine Physician at Spectrum Health in Grand Rapids, MI. Hear how care coordination through a multidisciplinary team can improve patient experience and health outcomes. Gustavo Cumbo-Nacheli, MD Interventional Pulmonologist Critical Care Medicine and Pulmonary Medicine Physician Spectrum Health Grand Rapids, MI Resources:  Cancer Support Community ClinicalTrials.gov Go2 for Lung Cancer LUNGEVITY Lung Cancer Research Foundation

The Familiar Strange
Ep #100 The laws of Robotics & Anti-Trust Frank Pasquale on AI Law & Multidisciplinary Interactions

The Familiar Strange

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 51:03


Familiar Stranger Emma sits down with Frank Pasquale from Brooklyn Law School. Frank is also currently co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cross-Disciplinary Research in Computational Law! Frank is one of the leaders in relation to AI Law and cross-disciplinary approaches, with his works of The Black Box Society The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information and New Laws of Robotics Defending Human Expertise in the Age of AI, incorporates a broad range of insight from an even broader range of disciplines. In this conversation, Emma and Frank touch on authority, Trust and the essays of Clifford Geertz. Briefly dive deep into America's Anti-Trust laws and eventually discuss ideas of where to next for AI technologies, and how disciplines can work more efficiently to drive new insights and findings.

Sundays at Café Tabac - The Podcast
Episode 17: Artist, Mickalene Thomas

Sundays at Café Tabac - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 64:07 Transcription Available


Multidisciplinary artist Mickalene Thomas is one the the most well know contemporary artists in the art scene today. She is a queer identified, African American woman working and residing in Brooklyn NY.  Her visual work examines ideas around femininity, beauty, race, sexuality, and gender.  In this episode, Mickalene speaks about her complex relationship with her mother, who inspired and influenced her photography and paintings, and set a trajectory for her visual work, as well as personal recollections on her journey of self awareness, queer liberation and coming to terms with the past. Mickalene Thomas's work is held in many collections, including, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Brooklyn Museum, The Guggenheim Museum, The Smithsonian American Art Museum, The Studio Museum of Harlem among many others. Photo: © Mickalene ThomasSupport the showRecorded at The Newsstand Studio at 1 Rockefeller Plaza in NYC. Special thanks to Joseph Hazan & Karen Song. Produced by Wanda Acosta• Find us: @cafetabacfilm on Instagram & Facebook • Email us: info@cafetabacfilm.com• Website: cafetabacfilm.com/podcast • LEAVE A REVIEW

Wellness Center Creators
From Client to Wellness Center Owner: On a Mission to Destigmatize Therapy with Juliet Kuehnle

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 22:39


This episode of the Wellness Center Creators podcast features Juliet Kuehnle, a National Board-certified counselor and mental health therapist who owns Sun Counseling and Wellness, a private practice with multiple locations and telehealth services. Juliet discusses her journey to becoming a business owner and the importance of self-care when managing a business. She shares how she created a one-stop shop with a multidisciplinary team that offers holistic treatments and normalizes conversations around mental health. Juliet also discusses the highs and lows of business ownership and how prioritizing self-care is essential. She advised to schedule in self-care before clients and start employees off as W2s from the beginning. "I'm more of a “I have this idea, and I'll figure it out, and this feels good.” Right? A lot of it has felt like I'm kind of making it up as I go along, and yet, obviously, it's still rooted." - Juliet Kuehnle In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. How Juliet Kuehnle created a unique one-stop-shop mental health clinic with a multidisciplinary team. 2. How Juliet balances her self-care while running a business, and the strategies she uses to prioritize it. 3. The challenges and rewards of starting a group practice, and what Juliet wishes she had known when she first started. Get 30% off one of Juliet's products at https://yepigototherapy.com/collections/all with code WELLNESS30 Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Wellness Center Creators
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Owning a Group Practice with Kristian Gibson-Ford

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 23:43


"A problem I have seen is that no one is talking to each other. No one's helping their clients to really figure out what's going on deep down inside." Kristian Gibson-Ford is a clinical social worker and the founder and director of Harmony 360 Counseling, a multidisciplinary practice in Indianapolis, Indiana. She provides coaching and therapeutic services for children, families, and adults with a focus on stress disorders, compassion fatigue and burnout, depression, anxiety, and other issues impacting working adults. Kristian is currently pursuing her Doctorate of Behavioral Health from Freed Hardman and is passionate about helping her clients remove barriers to better health and wellness. In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. The importance of having a clear why and long-term vision when starting a group practice. 2. The challenges of being a group practice owner, including the need for excellent management skills. 3. The value of a collaborative, holistic approach to care. Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
Hear about the new multidisciplinary art exhibit Dominus Vobiscum

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 7:47


Multidisciplinary artist Christopher Webb wants to take art lovers to church with his new exhibit. Dominus Vobiscum is a collection of oil paintings and written prose, paired with a live performance of music. Information Morning's Feleshia Chandler speaks with Christopher Webb and Reverend Lennet J. Anderson, one of the performers for the show.

Journeys through pulmonary fibrosis
Multidisciplinary teams and the importance of communication

Journeys through pulmonary fibrosis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 19:18


In the third episode of Season 3 of our ‘Journeys Through Pulmonary Fibrosis' podcast series, we explore the role multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) play in providing care for people living with pulmonary fibrosis. Our guests first help us to understand what an MDT is, who participates and how the team functions. We then examine the benefits and improvements in care that the approach can deliver for people with pulmonary fibrosis. We also hear about some of the challenges that an MDT approach can bring and discuss how their role may evolve in the future.

Wellness Center Creators
Exceptional Online Continuing Education That Isn't Boring with Dr. Jess Reynolds

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 17:08


Jess Reynolds is a practicing doctor of acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine, as well as a registered massage therapist located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. In early 2020, he and his partner Brianne founded Aim Online Education, a company dedicated to providing online continuing education courses for integrative and allied health care providers. Jess's company is different from other continuing education providers companies because they approach the online aspect of continuing education differently. They make a real effort to make their courses affordable and to reflect the fact that it is being taken online as opposed to in person. Jess has been teaching for about ten years and has a background in teaching in person as well. The company offers courses on acupressure, which is their most popular course, yoga, business skills, and many more. Some are free, so give them a try! In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. What makes Aim Online Education different from other continuing education providers? 2. What is the focus of the courses offered by Aim Online Education? 3. What are some of the most popular courses offered by Aim Online Education? Get 40% off any course purchase at Aim Online! https://www.aimonline.com/wccp Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

CEConversations
Pulmonology Perspectives on Biomarker Testing in NSCLC: Multidisciplinary Management in an Era of Rapid Change

CEConversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 107:28


To receive up to 2.0 CME/CE credit please complete the evaluation and request form here: https://www.ceconcepts.com/2022chest-podcast This dynamic live symposium, led by top experts in the field of pulmonary medicine and NSCLC, will take attendees on a deep dive into the sentinel role of the pulmonologist in the NSCLC management paradigm, exploring adaptive mechanisms to optimize collaborative strategies in a patient centric manner.Learning ObjectivesReview the sentinel placement of the pulmonologist in the management of NSCLC, including their principal role in diagnostics, disease staging, and molecular testing.Evaluate clinical and patient-value driven factors that may help inform nodule evaluation and diagnostic strategies for pulmonologists, thus ensuring “the right tissue in the right amount from the right place for the right patient.”Demonstrate knowledge of guideline recommendations and practical considerations for the use of EBUS-TNBA techniques by pulmonologists, emphasizing the fundamentals of safely and effectively obtaining adequate tissue for diagnosis and molecular characterization.Describe the evolving role of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in NSCLC and analyze currently FDA-approved therapeutics across the NSCLC disease continuum, highlighting the role of molecular testing for guiding treatment and individualizing patient care.Explore the established utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and discuss the potential for emerging “next-generation” biomarkers in the NSCLC management paradigm.Apply patient-centric, evidence-supported collaborative care strategies to real-world, case-based scenarios in order to elucidate the pivotal role of the pulmonologist on the multidisciplinary team across the NSCLC continuum of care.Presented by Creative Educational Concepts, LLC.Supported through an independent educational grant from AstraZeneca.

Wellness Center Creators
Pelvic Health, Physical Therapy, and Other Common Women's Health Issues with Buffy Stinchfield

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 21:06


Buffy Stinchfield is a passionate advocate for women's and public health. After years of suffering in silence with pelvic pain, she realized she finally needed to specialize in public health. After the birth of her first child in 2008, when her labor was anything but simple and her recovery was even more difficult, she began her studies into this specialty. She is now committed to helping women of all ages resolve and overcome issues including pelvic pain, endometriosis, bladder pain syndrome, pelvic organ prolapse, urinary leakage, bowel leakage, constipation, tailbone pain and injuries, postpartum recovery, back and neck pain, hip pain, and more. "If we actually had someone assess us going into our delivery, they could help us learn how to really connect with our core, how to breathe well, and fully understand in our own body what phase one of labor looked like." In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. The staggering statistics in pelvic health that point to the fact that pelvic health issues are very common. 2. The importance of preventative care and holistic care for pelvic health. 3. The new trend of occupational therapists entering the field of pelvic health. Take the Pelvic Health Quiz to see if pelvic health dysfunction is affecting your quality of life: https://www.pinnaclewt.com/pelvic-health-quiz Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!

Precision: Perspectives on Children’s Surgery
Multidisciplinary Care for Children with Colorectal Conditions

Precision: Perspectives on Children’s Surgery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022


Lurie Children's is among the only pediatric hospitals with a specialized colorectal center. The multidisciplinary team cares for children with colorectal conditions such as imperforate anus, Hirschsprung disease and severe constipation. Learn more from two of the center's leaders, Dr. Julia Grabowski and Dr. John Fortunato, about how their comprehensive approach to treating children with these conditions stands out.

BackTable Podcast
Ep. 261 Essentials of a Multidisciplinary Team for PE with Dr. Rohit Amin

BackTable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 59:34


In this episode, host Dr. Aaron Fritts interviews interventional cardiologist Dr. Rohit Amin about his private practice PE response team, including his treatment algorithm, follow-up protocol, and how he believes AI can contribute to PE care. --- CHECK OUT OUR SPONSOR RapidAI http://rapidai.com/?utm_campaign=Evergreen&utm_source=Online&utm_medium=podcast&utm_term=Backtable&utm_content=Sponsor --- SHOW NOTES Dr. Amin trained at Ochsner Clinic in New Orleans, and now works in private practice in Pensacola, Florida. He and a partner decided to start a PE response team (PERT) to better serve patients in the area and expand their practice. It took a lot of groundwork. They had to pitch it to administration and raise awareness, which they did by hosting CME such as grand rounds. They struggled to get a pulmonologist on board in 2013 when there was less clinical data and guidelines. Next, we discuss how the PERT algorithm functions in his private practice. An ER doctor or hospitalist evaluates the patient first. If the CT shows proximal thrombus, the PERT is notified. If it is a massive PE or submassive with clinical severity, he does thrombectomy promptly. If there is no elevated troponin and normal hemodynamics, the patient gets admitted and evaluated with a stat echo and venous doppler. Dr. Amin's practice prefers an echo with PE protocol to risk stratify RV dysfunction - i.e. RV size, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). He also evaluates pulmonary artery (PA) pressure, PA saturation, and cardiac index which are important clinical factors that determine the optimal route of intervention. For patients with submassive PE who get admitted overnight, he gives all patients a heparinoid, preferably lovenox over heparin. He sees the patient in the morning and if the clot is submassive or proximal, he does a thrombectomy that day. Lastly, we cover the importance of treating PE and how Dr. Amin approaches longitudinal follow up. Dr. Amin refers to the ICOPER trial that showed that the 30 day mortality for submassive PE is 15%, higher than that of NSTEMIs. If a PE is left untreated or if treatment is significantly delayed, a patient can develop post-PE syndrome or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), which significantly worsen morbidity and mortality. Dr. Amin treats his PE / DVT patients with one week of lovenox before transitioning to a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC). He sees them in the office in one month and gets an echo at 3 months. He then sees patients semi-annually or annually for 3-5 years. --- RESOURCES BackTable Episode 196: https://www.backtable.com/shows/vi/podcasts/196/building-a-pe-response-team PERT Consortium: https://pertconsortium.org ICOPER Trial: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(98)07534-5/fulltext

Swallow Your Pride
256 – Multidisciplinary Dysphagia Board: One Place, One Day, One Purpose, One Team

Swallow Your Pride

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 49:46


I have a conversation with Jessica Gregor, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S Dr. Allon Kahn, MD, and Dr. Will Karle, MD, about the ideal collaboration: a multidisciplinary dysphagia board that meets in person to provide continuous, congruent, cohesive care to their dysphagia patients. The post 256 – Multidisciplinary Dysphagia Board: One Place, One Day, One Purpose, One Team appeared first on Swallow Your Pride Podcast.

La Vie Creative
EP 266: Parisian multidisciplinary artist Leslie McAllister

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 28:20


Leslie McAllister is a multidisciplinary artist originally from Pennsylvania in the United States, but now based in Paris. Her works explore a diverse array of process and media. Among her recent endeavors are a street art project, Lost Art, for which she harvests discarded objects from the street, paints on them, and returns them to where they were found along with her contact information; and a series of abstract plein air paintings which sculpturally incorporate natural materials found onsite. She also creates sound and performance pieces as her alter ego Lesteria, for which she conceives projected video environments. Lost Arthttps://www.lesliemcallister.com/Lost_Art.htmlPlein Air Abstractshttps://www.instagram.com/p/Cd5dwwyjv0e/Lesteriahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qXk7Mzp9NISupport the show

BackTable Urology
Ep. 63 Multidisciplinary Management of RCC with Dr. Rana McKay and Dr. Raquibul Hannan

BackTable Urology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 47:58


In this special episode, Dr. Phil Pierorazio (University of Pennsylvania) invites Dr. Rana McKay (UC San Diego) and Dr. Raquibul Hannan (UT Southwestern) about treatment options for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in preparation for the 2022 International Kidney Cancer Symposium in Austin, Texas. --- SHOW NOTES First, the doctors discuss their excitement for the 2022 IKCS. They have benefited greatly from participating in collaboration and networking, improving their wellness strategies, learning about new clinical trials, and debating difficult cases at academic conferences like IKCS. Next, Dr. Pierorazio presents four different difficult RCC classes to the doctors and asks for an outline of their treatment plans. He starts with localized disease and works towards more aggressive and nodally invasive cancer. For each case, Dr. McKay and Dr. Hannan explain recent developments in clinical trial data, side effect considerations, and the importance of assessing patient comorbidities. All three doctors draw conclusions based on their previous patients as well. Additionally, Dr. McKay explains why it is important to understand what the patient understands about their cancer diagnosis before presenting these treatment options to patients. Dr. Pierorazio has learned to ask patients about their greatest cancer-related fear in order to guide his treatment decisions. Dr. Hannan advises doctors to look at the failure rates of clinical trials along with the success rates. Cases presented: Localized clear cell RCC patient with 1 kidney Adjuvant chemotherapy for a post-nephrectomy patient with T3a clear cell RCC Papillary RCC patient with a 10 cm mass and a 10 cm para aortic lymph node Chromophobe RCC patient with an 8 cm renal mass and spinal metastasis

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus
Episode #76: Racism In Drug Policy, Separate Healing Spaces For POC From White People & Stopping Whiteness From Controlling The Narrative, With Ifetayo Harvey, Founder Of The People Of Color Psychedelic Collective

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 62:08


INTRODUCTION: Ifetayo Harvey is the founder and board president at the People of Color Psychedelic Collective. Ifetayo's experience of growing up with her father in prison brought her to drug policy reform work at the Drug Policy Alliance. In 2013, Ifetayo was the opening plenary speaker at the International Drug Policy Reform Conference in Denver, Colorado. Ifetayo briefly worked at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies in 2015 where she was inspired by Kai Wingo's Women and Entheogens Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Ifetayo worked at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) for five years because of her passion for ending the war on drugs. While at DPA, Ifetayo penned the piece Why the Psychedelic Community Is So White in 2016 and began organizing other folks of color and allies in psychedelic circles. Ifetayo comes from a family of seven children raised by her mother in Charleston, South Carolina. She has a Bachelor's degree from Smith College in history and African studies. INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE (But not limited to):  ·      Breakdown Of What The POCPC Is·      Whiteness Controlling The Narrative ·      Racism in Drug Policy·      White Fragility ·      The Need For POC To Have Healing Spaces Apart From White People·      The Benefits Of Psychedelics – And Risks·      Stories Of Racism In The South·      Theory Vs. Real Life·      Internalized Superiority & Internalized Inferiority ·      The Student Loan Forgiveness Hypocrisy   CONNECT WITH IFETAYO: Website: https://www.pocpc.org/Website:  https://www.ifetayo.meYouTube: https://bit.ly/3FS2Z9xFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/pocpsychedelics/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pocpsychedeliccollective/Twitter: https://twitter.com/POCpsychedelicsLinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3Fx8p9H  CONNECT WITH DE'VANNON: Website: https://www.SexDrugsAndJesus.comWebsite: https://www.DownUnderApparel.comYouTube: https://bit.ly/3daTqCMFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/SexDrugsAndJesus/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sexdrugsandjesuspodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TabooTopixLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/devannonPinterest: https://www.pinterest.es/SexDrugsAndJesus/_saved/Email: DeVannon@SexDrugsAndJesus.com  DE'VANNON'S RECOMMENDATIONS: ·      Pray Away Documentary (NETFLIX)o  https://www.netflix.com/title/81040370o  TRAILER: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk_CqGVfxEs ·      OverviewBible (Jeffrey Kranz)o  https://overviewbible.como  https://www.youtube.com/c/OverviewBible ·      Hillsong: A Megachurch Exposed (Documentary)o  https://press.discoveryplus.com/lifestyle/discovery-announces-key-participants-featured-in-upcoming-expose-of-the-hillsong-church-controversy-hillsong-a-megachurch-exposed/ ·      Leaving Hillsong Podcast With Tanya Levino  https://leavinghillsong.podbean.com  ·      Upwork: https://www.upwork.com·      FreeUp: https://freeup.net VETERAN'S SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS ·      Disabled American Veterans (DAV): https://www.dav.org·      American Legion: https://www.legion.org ·      What The World Needs Now (Dionne Warwick): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfHAs9cdTqg  INTERESTED IN PODCASTING OR BEING A GUEST?: ·      PodMatch is awesome! This application streamlines the process of finding guests for your show and also helps you find shows to be a guest on. The PodMatch Community is a part of this and that is where you can ask questions and get help from an entire network of people so that you save both money and time on your podcasting journey.https://podmatch.com/signup/devannon  TRANSCRIPT: [00:00:00]You're listening to the sex drugs and Jesus podcast, where we discuss whatever the fuck we want to! And yes, we can put sex and drugs and Jesus all in the same bed and still be all right at the end of the day. My name is De'Vannon and I'll be interviewing guests from every corner of this world as we dig into topics that are too risqué for the morning show, as we strive to help you understand what's really going on in your life.There is nothing off the table and we've got a lot to talk about. So let's dive right into this episode.De'Vannon: Ifetayo Harvey is the founder and board president at the People of Color, Psychedelic Collective, y'all. I love the name of that organization so much. I believe, I'll say it one more time. I said the people of color, psychedelic collective. Fat's experience of growing up with our father in prison ignited the spark that has led to this amazing individual's body of work in the area [00:01:00] of drug policy reform.Please join us today as we discuss politics, drugs, and how racism and whiteness plays into all of.Hello, all, all my beautiful souls out there. I appreciate each and every last one of you and the time that you take the tune into the sex drugs in Jesus podcast. Well, if today we're gonna be talking a lot more about drugs than we are gonna talking about the Lord, hallelujah. But I wouldn't be surprised if Jesus didn't do a little hit of something back in his day and you know what I mean?Just cuz it ain't written, don't mean it didn't happen. Hallelujah, tabernac and praise. So the day I have with me, lovely, lovely, lovely darling, lady by the name of Epi Atta darling, and she is the founder of the People of Color psychedelic Collective. Ain't that a fucking mouthful? I'm gonna say it again, [00:02:00] y'all.I'm say it again y'all. The people of color, psychedelic collective. My homeboy, Jay Schiffman, over at the Chooses Struggle podcast told me about this individual here and I felt like Dracula as we getting close to Halloween, I need to just sink my bangs into her. And today I have her. How are youIfetayo: Oh, I'm doing great now that I'm talking to you. Oh, how are you doing?De'Vannon: fan? Fucking fantastic. And you know, I'm on this whole new like drug discovery journey myself, and what I've been doing is working hard to siphon off out of my mind. The voices that I realized that were present affecting me that I didn't know. And what I mean by that, Voices from the military, voices from the church, voices from my parents' house.You know, I'm thinking, I say for instance, I used to really look [00:03:00] down upon drugs, you know, and things like that. Well, you know, I thought about it. It was like, okay, where the fuck did I get that from? Was that due to personal discovery? Was that what they told me? You know? And so many of the voices in my head I've been finding lately, even as I'm approaching 40, you know, it's still, you know, what they told me.And it's not actually my own voice. I've been angry about it. I've been pissed off about it. I've been up about it, I've been down about it. And so I love the work that you do. And it's so on tempo at the times right now, is this resurgence? You know, psychedelics is coming now. You started this back in 2017. And and so just tell us about. What in your words, the people of color psychedelic Collective is and why you started it?Ifetayo: Yeah, so people of Color Psych Collective, we are a non-profit doing education and community building for folks of color interested in learning about [00:04:00] psychedelics and ending the war on drugs. And so since we've started, we've done panel discussions, We've had a conference, we had a retreat and of course this covid started happening.We've done online workshops on varying topics. And the reason why I started was because I was tired of seeing whiteness dominate the conversation on psychedelics. And I was also tired of people trying to have conversations about race where they were afraid to speak directly on race and . Okay. I wanted to make a space for people to be able to.Talk about those things without having to worry about, Oh, what is this white person gonna think? Or, Oh, is white fragility gonna get in the way? Because a lot of times it does. So that was part of my motivation. The other part was [00:05:00] prior to me creating my organization, I worked at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, which is also a mouthful. People call it maps. And they do clinical research on psychedelics. And so I worked there for about eight months and I was the only black person there. And it was clear during my time that like working on, you know, racial trauma for black folks was not a priority. Working on even unpacking. The whiteness of the organization was not a priority either. And even involving black folks or other folks of color in their research wasn't our priority. And to me, in my mind, I was just like, we as black people, we have, you know, some, some of the highest rates of trauma in this country. You know, just [00:06:00] given our, how we got here, our story in this country. You know, I, I grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, where we have a number of plantations, old historical sites is where a lot of us were brought through, right?A lot of our ancestors. So to me it just didn't make sense. , Black people's trauma wasn't being talked about. Indigenous folks'. Trauma wasn't being talked about or centered in these conversations around trauma. A lot of times it center just white, middle classness. Right. I was just tired of our trauma and our pain and our healing being second to theirs, and I wanted to create a space where we could talk about our experiences of using these substances, but also our experiences of the war on drugs and how it impacted our communities and how, you know, this new narrative of [00:07:00] psychedelics.You know, reemerging kind of leaves us out.De'Vannon: When you, Thank you for that beautiful breakdown. So when you mention the war on drugs, I like to to talk about it a little bit so, As I understand it, something I learned. I've been watching all my documentaries. I'm a documentary whore. I was watching that one, , How To Change Your Mind on Netflix. And then there's one on PBS called The History of Mental Illnesses.And they both went over like the different psychedelics. But what they, what they made me aware of was how psychedelics were used many years ago before, I think it was fdr, Franklin d Roosevelt, I think started that initial war on drugs. Don't quote me on that, but I think it was him. You know, And then all the clinical studies shut down because of the government policy.And so, and now we're seeing this resurgence of the psyche's coming back because the war on drugs clearly hasn't worked. And I was reading Emmi [00:08:00] Lord Emily Duff's book about, what's it called? Nope. I have to look that up because it's all about like marijuana. It's called grassroots and the rise and fall of marijuana, you know, in the book, her book and then the documentary gets into how, you know, drugs are demonized and they made it seem like people were gonna like, you know, smoke the weed and then go rape the white women, you know, and shit like that.You know, all of our mental health issues was us attacking someone else as opposed to something happening to us. But this is the trap we fall into when they, like you said earlier, going snatch our ancestors up out of Africa where they were just happy bouncing around doing them. Teddy's flopping in the red wind dick swinging as it should be Then here comes some people snatching you up and lo and behold, you [00:09:00] traveling internationally when you, you probably didn't know about no fucking other nations. And so, so the narrative was controlled by the people from CaucasianIfetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: so the c cassity of it all. And so I love how it's like, I feel like we're taking more of this power back or getting it for the first time maybe.You know, and a lot of this is coming through psychedelics, so I appreciate the fact that you, that you started this and then you stuck with it all this time. Covid has come, you still got it going on, so I commend you on that.Ifetayo: Oh, thank you. Thank you. Yeah. Yeah. And I think you make an interesting point about the history of drug prohibition in, in the US I will say. So it was Nixon who started the war on drugs, the official war on drugs, but even prior to Nicks and there were a lot of drug laws on the books. You know, we had alcohol [00:10:00] prohibition in the twenties and that didn't work.And lots of people die cuz they're making , you know, moon shine and other stuff. And it sometimes was poisoned or, you know and you're right, a lot of drug. Ma rooted in racism, just point blank period. I think you used the example of like the whole reefer madness talking about like the fear of you know, black men or Latino men smoking weed and going to have sex with white women.And that's pretty much, you know, the same for cocaine. Opium, It's, they've all been all these drugs have been used to build a certain narrative around racial groups, and it's all been built around white fear and white fragility. Yeah.De'Vannon: fragile though it don't take, it don't take much to piss Karen off. [00:11:00] Not at all. Not at all. And I, look, I'm not talking about all you white people out there. I've had to be so much white dick in my life. Real and I intend to have some more. So it's not all of y'all. You know who you are, Karen, probably not even listening to this type of show.maybe you are, of you're open minded. I had a dream like a couple of weeks or months ago or whatever, getting in this dream. It's like the Lord was telling me I've been a gifted dream or so It was about like four or five. That's how, that's how the spirit first revealed himself to me was it was like in this dream and I've been dreaming ever since,Ifetayo: mm-hmm.De'Vannon: but, but recently I had this dream and it was like, it was like these like conservative people, like white people were singing a song.Ifetayo: Hmm.De'Vannon: Whenever you hear music in a dream, a good thing, especially, well if it's melodious and.Ifetayo: I D.De'Vannon: but the heart song, like the heart message of it, the heart of the song was, is like they were [00:12:00] asking me like, is there a way, is there something they could do different? Is there, was there a way that they, something they could change?And I felt like, and I felt like, you know, that there is a, now we've always had like, you know, even back in slavery days, the, the white defectors, you know, the, our allies, you know, But in this dream here, these were people who have been closed minded to the struggles of minorities and people who are different from them.And it's like, in this dream, it's like the Lord is showing me that. Like, maybe he's like, he's turning their hearts or they're changing their minds, or something like that. And so I'm, I'm revealing this dream here to say that I think that the work that you're doing and stuff like that, even though these people might not, you know, go on the news, go on Fox News wherever, and say they're changing their minds. I think it's making a difference because otherwise that dream wouldn't have come to me because I don't, I don't invest a lot of energy into trying to change conservative people. I focus on the people they have hurt, [00:13:00] and so I really think that what you're doing is going a long way.Ifetayo: Well, thank you. Thank you. That's, that's, that means a lot especially, you know, caring or connecting that to your dream. Cuz I'm really into dream meetings. And yeah, it's, it sometimes feels like our country's progressing into old ideas or outdated ideas, but I, I still have hope that, you know, that's not the case for a majority of the people, even though sometimes the kids feel like.De'Vannon: Yeah, that's why it's good to take a media purge Sometimes I just don'tIfetayo: Oh yeah.De'Vannon: for like a few days and just detox a media detox.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: So the services you provide, I'm gonna talk about 'em from your website, beautiful website, y'all. All that information will go in the showy [00:14:00] notes, as it always does. And then they're, they're on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, all of that will go in the showy notes. You know, you have like community building, education, arts and culture. So do kind a person like walk into like your office and receive some sort of service, or are you mainly doing outreach, like on the ground? What is it?Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. So interesting. We are remote based. We've always been remote based since before the pandemic. I live in New York and I've been in New York for about six years, and I have folks in DC Chicago go. Colorado and California, and Portland, Oregon. So we don't provide any direct services partly because a lot of these substances are illegal. So we cannot legally, I mean, in some states, , well, I would say [00:15:00] decriminalized, but in some, in some states it would be decriminalized. But we can, we can't do like psychedelic therapy or like a healing ceremony officially under our organization. But we do connect people, you know, if someone like reaches out to us and say like, Hey, I need help.We can connect people to other services practitioners and other resources out there. And you know, before the pandemic we would go to different cities. Events and, you know, do discussions. Theres, so, like back in 2018, we did a kind of like a partnership panel with the DC Psychedelic Society and the Philadelphia Psychedelic Society.And we talked about patriarchy and psychedelics and that, I mean, much needed conversation. So we'll do, we'll do things like that. I hope in the future we're able to do more direct [00:16:00] services. We've been really focused on building our capacity as an organization. So like we recently incorporated as a non-profit and we're waiting for our 5 0 1 C three to come in and we we received our first grant last year.So yeah, we're, we're, we're slowly building toward that. And I I put emphasis on the slowly because. I think that there's this trend in the site up space for everyone to wanna start their own group and just be known for psychedelics and . That's cool, but it's not sustainable. There's a lots of, you know, different people out there and, and psychedelics are powerful substances.And I am in no rush to, you know, I don't wanna say I'm, I'm not in a rush to give people psyched dogs. I mean, I'm not doing that, but I'm just not in a rush to do that because I know that they're [00:17:00] very powerful substances and it, they take some preparation and and it's also not something to play around with. I, I believe in building a strong container of care for folks if you're going to hold space for them. And I think you do that by being. Prepared. So studying and also just being ethical. So, yeah.De'Vannon: You all, I might have to get your Portland Connect and your New York connection referral cause I'll be in Portland at the end of the month dealing about doing some on the ground research.Ifetayo: Okay.De'Vannon: And I have some jet blue miles that I need to burn. And from New Orleans down here where near where I live, they Jet Blue only goes to New York Fort Lauderdale and Boston.And I've been all three of 'em already, so I may need to come fuck with y'all in the, in the end. Why?Ifetayo: [00:18:00] Yes.De'Vannon: So, so you mentioned a couple of other organizations that you partner with.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: You had mentioned maps already. I noticed that I dropped the donation on y'all earlier. You.no. No problem honey. But, and I'm not, I'm not really bragging about that.But when I did it, the, that, like the thank you page said like maps and everything like that. So are you still connected directly with.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. Yeah. Funny how that works. We are fiscally sponsored by maps. So before, I would say from 2017 to 2020, we were I believe we were, yeah, we were incorporated as a non-profit. And when we got our grant, we were kind of in a time crunch because they were like, We wanna give you this money and we're going to offer you a match component, a $10,000 match. So we're like, Okay, well we don't have a 5 0 1 C [00:19:00] three, so how do we do this ? And they're like, Oh, well, if that's the case, we may not give you the money. . No, I'm just kidding. They didn't say that. But we had to figure out like, how are we gonna do this? And so maps, we looked at a couple other organizations maps had the internal infrastructure set up so we could do that quickly and be able to receive our grant fully.So in a way I kinda, I kind of look at it as like . It's kind of like, Oh yeah, y'all owe us this, you know, so it won't be forever. But you know, it's, it's for now.De'Vannon: Yeah. Well, congratulations on your 5 0 1 3 C status. I, I know it's there. I just know.Ifetayo: ThankDe'Vannon: And y'all for, for those of you who don't know, MAP stands for Multidisciplinary association folks, Psychedelic studies. I didn't know this much research in this much [00:20:00]organization, this many organizations was built around this.You let the news tell it. You know, you let the media tell it. Everything about shrooms and all the different psychedelics is just the devil. you know, that's not, that's just actually not the case at all Now. Now I mentioned earlier some of the pillars that you mentioned on your website, community building, education, arts, and culture.I love a quote that you have on there from arts and culture. Then I wanna talk about the art show you did in 2021. Now you said, quoting from the website along with policy and education, art in all its forms, brings about cultural change. End quote. What does that statement mean to you?Ifetayo: Well, to me it means that, Cultural change is just as impactful, if not more impactful than policy change. I've worked for a few organizations that do policy advocacy work, and I, I don't do policy advocacy work. That's not my day [00:21:00] job. I'm more of a digital communications person. But I'm not very motivated by policy work cause I don't like politicians. And I think, I mean, yeah, politicians aren't to be liked either, right? Like we treat politicians like celebrities and I mean, fuck celebrities too, but yeah, we treat them like they're our friends and it's like, no, like screw those people. So and I think. Honestly, Bureaucracy's gonna be the death of a lot of us.Like bureaucracy in this country just stops a lot of progress from happening. And the way that our political landscape is set up in this country is just, it's just a mess. So . So that's that. I do believe, I do believe that policy can change people's lives, but I do think cultural change can be more impactful.It can be more fun, [00:22:00] it can be more engaging. And at my day job, I work for a caregiver advocacy org. We have a culture change department. And so what they do a lot of times is work with influencers, celebrities, artists, musicians, actors, actresses, and get them to kind of look at our issue a little differently and maybe speak on our issue, work with us, some of the folks. In the culture change department. They also work in Hollywood writer's rooms, so getting our narratives on TV shows in film. And I, I do think that work like that gets people talking a lot quicker. I often find that policy is very jargony and not easily understandable by the average person. And I do think that's partly done by design But I'm also, you know, I'm a, I'm a child of music [00:23:00]education. I grew up you know, in South Carolina studying music since I was a kid. And it had a huge impact on my life. And I feel like what I've been noticing is. That's kind of fading away as a part of our education in the US music and arts education. And so something I'm, I'm very passionate about overall, I think that, you know, when we get, you know, people who, with influence speaking about our issues, whether it be a celebrity or just a community leader, people start to pay attention. People start to think about it differently. Unfortunately, that's just how our society works.We need a celebrity or someone with influence to speak on our to speak on our issue. And, you know, I, Hmm, Yeah, I think that, [00:24:00] that's all I'll say on that.De'Vannon: We'll love it. And, and y'all can check out a video that has to do with this art show on the website. There's lots of videos on the website and and, and of course, obviously on their YouTube channel. I love how, you know, your videos bring so much of your work to life. Can you talk to us about like the, the, the education leg, because on your website there's like you speaking at. These different conferences and things like that, there's the one conference that you spoke at you know, according to the website, you woke up with a stomach virus that day or in a food poisoning. You had food poisoning that instead of canceling it, you, you took a seat and you went on ahead and you let the Good times rollers, where, say, down here in the Cajun land, Leslie Le Bon. So, so, so, so talk to us about, about your, your speaking engagements and how, what it's been like to travel with your message.Ifetayo: Yeah, yeah. That particular speech you're [00:25:00] referencing was last year in Vegas at Meet Delic. And that was an interesting event because it was like very industry side. And so I was speaking about how we need to move beyond just the notion of wellness and how wellness has shortcomings. I think that along with the resurgence of psychedelics in the media and just in our communities in general, we're also seeing, you know, a lot of talk of varying healing modalities.And while important, I think we, we could sometimes use wellness as an escape from actually organizing. Improving our communities. And I think that there are a lot of people in the psychedelics space who, who think that by taking psychedelics, they're going to be more [00:26:00] involved, more liberated than other folks without any, doing any political work or community organizing or building or that kind of thing. So I'm often, you know, the person in a lot of these events and conferences, kind of reminding people that like structural oppression exists and psychedelics aren't coming to change that. Because I think that for a lot of folks, they just think like, Oh yeah, just take psyched dose and boom, that's, you know, and I wish it was that easy, but it's not.So I, I have to remind people that. Sure you could legalize, psyched dogs or decriminalize psychedelics, but are you integrating those substances into a burning house? Cause I mean, look at our healthcare system. Look at, I mean, just to say of our country in general. I've also given talks on like why the why people of color need our own intentional healing spaces away [00:27:00] from white folks.And for a lot of people, this is just common sense , obviously, we, you know, people don't wanna heal in the same places or with the same people who hurt them. And a lot of times when we do try to have complex conversations around race, whiteness gets in the way and detracts and sinners itself and makes everything about them.So a few years ago I gave a talk in Oakland, California. at the Women's Visionary Congress, this is in 2019. And so I was giving a talk about why p POC and digital healing spaces are necessary. And you know, I'm basically saying what I just said about how whiteness the tracks from our healing and all that.And it was a very powerful speech. I'm not saying that to brag, but I'm just I'm saying that to say like, I noticed people [00:28:00] had a very strong reaction to what I was saying. Like people did not, they were just like, Oh shit. Like, damn, you know, . And at first I initially, I told the some of the MCs at the event, I was like, I don't wanna do q and a, cuz I don't feel like dealing with any white nonsense.Right. And the person I'm seeing, there's a mix up and she took questions anyway. And so I was like, Okay, I'll, I'll answer one or two. And this white guy John Gilmore, I believe he's a, he's a board member at maps or donor maps, some rich white dude He basically says like, Oh, well what if I start a Whites only conference?Wouldn't that be racist? And I was like, Well, that's already how maps this conference is. So you wouldn't really be doing anything different than what you're already doing. And [00:29:00] if you want to compare POC and facial healing spaces to like whites only segregation in the us that's, that's on you. That's . And yeah, he thought he was being cute and he wasn't.He, there's actually a video of you wanna watch it, of this whole moment happening, But he felt real dumb after he said that. SoDe'Vannon: Honey, you opened the library on his ass. Mama RuPaul would be so proud of you. The library was open. So y'all, what she's talking about is like basically how, how did I learn this in college? Like it doesn't really, it's not gonna benefit us if individual parts are whole, but the sum total isn't whole. Kind of like that. So if, if a few of us are making it, but everybody else isn't making it, then we're all still fucked.OverallIfetayo: [00:30:00] Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: you know, But so like in the future, how I know. So, so psychedelics isn't gonna solve everything overnight, instantly. Is there, Can it benefit us getting further along as a.Ifetayo: Hm, mm-hmm. . I think that it can, but with a lot of caveats, I think, well there's this, okay, there's this notion in this psychedelic space, a lot of researchers, a lot of just advocates in general or over height, the benefits of psychedelics and totally under height, the risk associated with psychedelics.So I've been in meetings with people, I've been on panels with people who are like, Oh, psychedelics have a low risk profile. What does that mean? does it? Like, what does that mean? You know? There have [00:31:00] been plenty of people who've, who've been traumatized by using psychedelics. There have been people who killed themselves, or people who killed their families while using psyched.Right? So it's, it's kind of messed up to kind of present it as, oh, this, it's safe. The, the risks are low, or, Oh, it's super dangerous, like you're gonna die to do it. Like, we have to give people realistic information. And so that's why I say caveats. Psychedelics aren't for everyone. There are certain people who can't take it, whether they're pregnant, you know, they might be on a certain medication, they might have a certain disability where it's hard for them to take psychedelics.A lot of people, you know, in this country are poor. I grew up poor in the US and you know, my mom's a single parent of seven kids. She could not afford to take off a day to go do some mushrooms or go to a retreat. So those are [00:32:00] those things I just wanna acknowledge are real. But can psychedelics help people in general and with trauma and move our, move our culture forward?Some, I think, yeah, it does have that potential under the right conditions. Something that people say in the psychedelic and harm reduction space is set and setting, which is like kind of a harm reduction monster that people use or they're referring to the place you're in, the setting and the place you're in also in your mind and in life in general and who you're what to say that you should only use second of substances in a place where you're comfortable and with people you trust.And I think that also applies on a macro level too. Psychedelics have the potential to yes, move us forward create better mental health options for folks given the right set and setting. [00:33:00] If we don't have universal healthcare, how much forward is it gonna move us if psychedelic therapy's outta reach?For most folks, if psychedelic therapy's the only thing legalized and recreational use to psyched dust is still legal, then people are still going to be arrested. So I believe that we have to make the conditions right for psyched ups to have a positive impact because if not, it's just going to be, you know, done into our already existing circus. And I don't think that will necessarily make a lasting, impactful change.De'Vannon: right? So you're saying if, if you gonna do this shit, do this shit, write, know, realistically cover everybody and be sure everyone has access to it and dribble the shit around and henpeck at it.Ifetayo: Yeah.De'Vannon: [00:34:00] So, so I wanted to to echo, so, you know, when, when she says like, poc, that's like people of color, like, like that's what that the elder peopleIfetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: would tell me, like the stories of the things that white people would do to them when they were younger. Now these people were born in like, say like, teens, twenties, 19 teens, twenties, thirties, growing up in the south here in Louisiana. I got called a nigger once,Ifetayo: All right.De'Vannon: there were other, like, I got called like a, like an a or monkey by this white boy one time, you know, in school, you know, things like that.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: Didn't happen so much that I would say like, that cemented my perception of white people because I've also had a lot of white people open doors for me in my life, whereas the black people stood in my way. So I was like at a juxtaposition in a crossroads and not really understanding some of the things, you know, some of [00:35:00] the trauma that the elders still held onto.But now that I'm older, I get how hard it can be to really heal of some things. And I would tend to stick with you even if, if you don't want it to. And I never could get it, but I get it now and I don't hold that against them. And so they would tell us how they'd be walking to school because, no, the black people didn't have cars.You know, they didn't have backpacks cuz they took like strings to just tie the books together and the white people would zoom by them in their cars and run them into dishes and stuff like that, you know, and try to, you know, and just, you know, You know, just mean shit like that. That doesn't make any sense.You're already in a, in a, in a nice vehicle. They're on the street walking to the same place you're going, You're even not even gonna offer to, to r pick them up and take them. That's, that's not bad enough. You're gonna try to run them over on the way just for shits and giggles, and, and that sort of shit.And now these people are like in [00:36:00] elementary school, low grade schools when this is happening. And when they grew up into worse racism. And, and then this trickles down into people who, you know, into, even in my generation. And so this is why, you know, you know when, when my guest here says that black people don't need to be around white people sometimes when we heal, this is whyIfetayo: Yeah. Oh yeah, a hundred percent. And it's, I've been in like those racial justice trainings with white folks. And for me it's really frustrating when I have to witness a white person, like realize that black people are people for the first time. It's really frustrating. And I, and I know a lot of white people, even some black people will be like, Oh, well what's the big deal?Like, why can't you just, you know, be in this racial justice training together? And I'm like, It's no, like, this isn't, this to, for them is theory for us. It's our [00:37:00] lives. And so, you know, what you were just sharing about the elders in your family know, stuff like dealing with those races attached is something that I grew up with.You know, my mom was born in the fifties in North Georgia. and she also told me stories of, you know, the night riders or you know, white people shoot a or cops beating up family members for no reason. Even my grandma, my grandma will be 86 this year. She , Her memory is amazing. But she was telling my sister that when she was a kid, Yeah, white kids used to call the niggers too.And she's like, Yeah, we pulled our pants down at 'em . So we, I think we as black people have to realize that like, yeah, this trauma shit is real. It's in our parents, our grandparents, it's in us too. [00:38:00] And if that means, you know, letting your white friend know that, Hey, I wanna talk about this. I've had white people try to talk about, you know, mass incarceration with me or, and you know, other things that.Hit close to home to me. And I don't like talking to him about it because if it's not something you experience, you aren't gonna have the same perspective as I do. Right. Just like I don't have the same perspective as my dad is, you know, he's someone who's actually been in prison. I wasn't. So, I can only share it from my perspective, but a lot of people will use these topics like incarceration as just spotter for conversation and or to look cool.And I'm just, I'm, I don't, that's not why I do this. Yeah. And a and a lot of people will say that, you know, they're [00:39:00] against their war on drugs or they're against this, they're against that. And I think on an intellectual or academic level, a lot of folks are, But when it comes to. on the street. It's a lot different.So I, that's why I think it's so important for us as black people to have our own space. And other folks of color too, because we're at a different level when we talk about these things. We're like in the senior seminar course, the white kids are in the one on one freshman course when they talk about it. A lot of them think that they're on our level when it comes to talking about this stuff, but they're not. And even, you know, I know my organization called the POC Psyched Collective, but same goes for a lot of non-black people of color too. Some of them just, some of them are racist a lot. Some of them are more racist than the white rednecks I grew up with. [00:40:00] So, yeah.De'Vannon: Oh, those are those Mexicans for Trump and shit like that, and the damn gay Republicans and shit.Ifetayo: Yeah, yeah, yeah. You'd be like, Why are you so damn racist? Like, what is, where is this coming from? You know? But yeah, it's, it's a real thing, so,De'Vannon: Well, I think a lot of it gets back to what I was saying at the top of the show about how like the voices, you know, in my head, they mimic themselves as being my own, but they're not, you know, a kid isn't really just born racist. Somebody taught his little as that shit, you know, You know. But they haven't yet come to a point where they go, Maybe the elders in my family were wrong about a black person only being three fourths of a person.You know, They haven't reconciled their own voice yet, you know? Cause no logical person with a heart and a soul can look at, you know, things that happened in our country now and then in the history and [00:41:00] make the, make it logical. But when people's parents tell them that a black person is less than you, that Mexican person is less than you, that gay person is less than you, that gets ingrained in them.And it's, and I and I, I've studied hypnotherapy. I'm a licensed hypnotist. It is difficult. To upo, somebody's upbringing. You know those, that those voices out of their head. Now some people, some white people I know can't fucking stand their families. They're like, I can't racist sons of bitches. You know, I know some white people who, who have such white guilt, they're just like, God damn, and I was born the wrong raise.These white people ain't worth shit. And it stars my family up. They all burn in hell.Ifetayo: Hmm.De'Vannon: Who am I to argue with them? Know they family. I do.Ifetayo: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. Yeah. And I think you know what you're saying [00:42:00] about the voices in your mind, like not always being you, but maybe mimicking you. Goes to show that a lot of this stuff, whether it be drug propaganda or white supremacy, takes a lifetime to unpack. You know, like a lot of times people, when they come to like an event I'm speaking at, they're like, Oh, well how can I get involved?I wanna do something. And I'm like, I, I'll tell people to slow down. I'm like, Just, y'all need to read first. , y'all need to read and learn first, because we all have that intern. Jaga, we all have biases against people who use drugs, especially people addicted, especially black drug users. And we also have internalized white supremacy, like black people do.We have internalized inferiority and white people. They have internalized superiority. And it, it kills me when I, you know, see why people who, they don't necessarily say this, but they act like they've done the work [00:43:00] on anti-racism and they're good. And it's like, no, this is a, this is a lifetime of work.And then some, you know, so you should never stop learningDe'Vannon: Knowledge is power. And as you're saying that, I was thinking about it, I was reading this report cuz I follow like the the decriminalization of the drugs in Oregon because I think that's one of the most miraculous and great. That's happening in my fucking lifetime, and I cannot wait to get there at the end of the month to show my ass.But one of these cops was whining because they were like, The power's been taken for us. The streets are just running rampant with drugs and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And I'm all like, Bishop, you already, they're already running rampant with drugs. Stop being a drama queen. And what he's really whining about though, is his ability to be superior over people for having a chrome of dope or a half a tablet, half a Phoenix or whatever, and throwing a black boy in jail for one fucking pill, you know, for 15 [00:44:00] months or whatever.They, they can't do that to us anymore. So they're trying to act like, you know, the, the city's just lawless outta control, but really they hurt. They bud hurt, they hurt probably just cuz they can't dominate us and they ain't got the power no moreIfetayo: Yep. Yep. That's, that's facts. That's facts. And yeah. There's, there's so many like. Unfounded Narrows being pushed right now in a lot of major cities. Here in New York, it's the homelessness and the crime epidemic apparent, like quotes around that . But yeah, people there. I, so I worked on the campaign in Oregon.My old organization, Drug Policy Alliance funded that campaign. And so I was working the night that it got found or that the bow initiative got passed. And it was really crazy because being online and seeing people's reaction to it, [00:45:00] they were just like, what? Like people could not believe that it was real.And that was so fascinating to me because for a lot of folks, like my mom who's, who's 66, she never thought that she would be able to walk into a dispensary and buy weed. That was not the thing she thought about in the seventies, but she was my age. And now it's the thing in some places. So, yeah, it's, it's interesting and I think a lot of people are losing their shit over the fact that, yeah, they don't have power over us anymore.I mean, look at how many people reacted to the whole student loan forgiveness program that Biden in and out. People are mad. People are mad that black people have a chance at getting further in. That we have less barriers to go to college, that we have less barriers to get opportunities that makes people mad.And a lot of the progress that's hindered in this country is because of that. [00:46:00] Cuz white folks do not want us to have the same opportunities as them. That's why our public transit infrastructure in the US sucks. That's why people are okay with defunding public education because anything that benefits poor black people, , they don't care about, they're okay with increasing police budgets because that means there'll be more of them to keep us in check.De'Vannon: As the Lord said, amen and amen system. I mean it in the most non churchy way. But, but as the Lord said it, you know, in the Bible, you know, freely you have received, bitch freely give, I'm adding the bitch to it. Jesus didn't say that, but he probably thinking it. it, they, people are coming from a very, very bitter place when they bitter energy, whatever you wanna call it, negative space, LDL below, whoever.The shit ain't good when you have made it and you're gonna be particular about how the fuck somebody else makes it. So maybe you didn't get your [00:47:00] student loan forgiven, but I bet you somewhere in your life somebody gave you some shit you didn't really deserve and you took that shit, scooped it on up and I throwing off into the sunset and, and, you know, and ain't never even looked back.And you may not have even said thank you. And You know, so this is how people become hypocrites and stuff. The sort of stuff Jesus preach. Again, you may not think you being hypocritical, but the Lord remembers that time when, and even though you may have forgotten it, so the fuck what? I don't care my forgiven because I'm a 100% disabled veteran.I was praying, Lord, just wipe it all out for, you know, I don't care this, just let it go because I'm not a bitter broken bitch. And so I'm not sitting around here trying to find ways to be mad at people's progress. You know? Then half the politicians bitching. I love how the White House read them forIfetayo: Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. That was funny.De'Vannon: you wanna, wanna complain about them getting this forgiven, but you got a few hundred thousand forgiven.Ifetayo: Yeah. Right, right. [00:48:00] Yeah,De'Vannon: 10,000, but you got half a million. Bitch, go set on your ass somewhere.Ifetayo: yeah,De'Vannon: have several seeds,Ifetayo: yeah. They're proud to be hypocrites. Like they're tol. It's like no moral compass. Just, and then the crazy thing is, is that they'll say they're Christians and it's like, and you know, it's funny, I didn't grow up Christian. I grew up in South Harris, so I was around a lot of Christians, but I didn't grow up Christian.And there's so many people who give Christians a bad name like that, who I'm just like, This is not what Jesus was about. like Jesus, Jesus was about. You know, like you were saying, giving freely, he fucked with sex workers. You know, he hung out with us gays. Like he, he was not about all this shit that they make him seem about, and he probably spoke some weed too, or did some shoes, I don't know.De'Vannon: Right. That's cause it's not written. No mean it didn't happen. There's a whole [00:49:00]30, the 31st, 30 years of his life isn't really, really recorded. After he ran away from his parents in the temple, he didn't really run away, but he was like, Y'all, I got shit to do. You know, So who fuck knows what he did. And so I think he experienced life personally. Yeah.I wanna talk about before we wrap it up, I wanna talk about some of the good things. So, so what have we talked about so far? Some of the stigma surrounding psychedelics, A lot about what your organization does because I want everyone to go to your website. I'm having my assistant add your website to my resources page.Ifetayo: Well, thank you.De'Vannon: yes indeed. Any time, my dear. Because I was inspired to go on a psychedelics journey when I watched you know how to change your mind on Netflix and the history of mental illnesses on pbs. I was watching how the veterans and everything like that who have been struggling with ptsd. I'm a veteran with ptsd, you know, all this psych drugs, they give us the VA to shit don't work, it just be having us like zombies.And I'm watching these documentaries. They did two or three MDMA trips and they haven't had the [00:50:00] ptsd, PTSD problems since. So I'm here for it for the veterans. I'm here for Joe Bidens trying to get the M D M. Legalize, even if it's just at the clinic level, bitch, I will take it because I have been locked up in the mental hospital for some of these veterans before I got four felonies and I'd probably been in the mental hospital about 4, 5, 10, 50, 11 times too.You, if, if MD a is what it'll take for some of my fellow veterans to stop imagining the square tiles on the floor moving and shit like that. The shit that I witnessed when I was in there and shitting all over the floor and whatnot. Bitch give him his goddamn M D M A now. What have you witnessed in your, in like, I know y'all don't give the drugs to people cuz you can't and stuff like that, but have you heard of any stories where somebody was this way and then they got better after doing the psychedelic therapy?You know, with, with a therapist or in a safe space, any positive tells, You can tell.Ifetayo: Yeah. Yeah. I'm happy to share a little about my [00:51:00] story psychedelics, but in general, you know, I've heard people so many stories of folks saying that psychedelics have helped them with body image issues. Depression, ptsd, anxiety, O c D all kinds of things. For me personally, I got into psychedelics when I was in college. I was really depressed my senior year. And I was dealing with suicidal thoughts. I felt just passively suicidal. And it was my senior year, so, you know, when you're a senior, like turn up, you know, everybody's trying to be that . And for me, the depression hit me hard, like really, really hard that year.And it was debilitating. And, you know, I was, I had been in therapy for some time and I got prescribed like, well be shrimp. And I decided not to [00:52:00] take it cuz I, I was a little scared, I was cautious. My mom's also like a herbalist and they get a homeopathic stuff, so she's like against all that stuff.And so that's how, that was my upbringing. You know, I have a lot of friends who, Take antidepressants and it works really well for them. So I'm not, I'm not knocking it. But for me, I was, I was scared. , they said it would take away my sex drive. I was like, Oh no. Hell nowSo, so it was kind of crazy looking back at it. So basically I had interned at the Drug Policy Alliance as a media intern. I started writing about my experience of my dad going to prison and being deported, and they invited me to their conference to speak. So I spoke my first time really speaking in an audience that big. I like broke down in tears.It was [00:53:00] really cathartic for me. And, but at the same time, I knew I was under all that, I was still depressed. So I went to this panel on like end of life. End of life anxiety and p and psychedelics. So they were talking about treating people with like terminal illnesses like cancer with L S D. And I was like, Huh, this is interesting.For some reason I related to it, so I was like, I'm gonna go and do some mushrooms. So I went back to school after the conference and I was talking to my friends cuz I knew they dabbled in psychedelic. I was like how do I do mushrooms, ? At that point I only tried alcohol and wheat. I was so sonner in college.I, I still am. And so they're like, take three and a half grams, maybe put in some peanut butter cuz they taste kind of nasty. And then they're, then they're like, yeah, [00:54:00] like go in the woods or something. Like go in nature. Oh yeah. Have a sitter too. So I got my, I got my friend to, to sit for me and I ate the three and a half grams of mushrooms and went on a walk in the woods on this nature trail.It's really beautiful, overwhelming, at the same time. Experience. It lasted about eight hours for me, and it felt like a jolt that I needed in that time, like being really depressed and suicidal. I felt like I had this jolt just being like, ah, you know, like, of like release, but also happiness and beauty.Like it was showing me the beauty of life, why we're here. Yeah, it just, it, it just showed me a different side of life. It reminded me of my childhood imagination. Like we were in the woods and like the, the trees were glistening. The. The plants were talking [00:55:00] like, it, it just felt very surreal. I was, I was kind of freaking out.I was like, This is too much. So me and my friend, she took me back to my room and I felt a little bit better there. I was like, less freaked out. But yeah, it, it helped me see myself in a different context. When you are depressed, you're so used to a certain narrative that you have about yourself. It could be, Oh, I'm stupid, I'm dumb, I'm worthless, blah, blah, blah. when you take mushrooms or some other psychedelic, maybe you're seeing yourself from a, like, like, you're basically seeing yourself from a different person's perspective, like almost from the outside. And it helps you have a lot more compassion for yourself. Like you see yourself as a person, not as like,You. So I think that can be helpful [00:56:00] for anyone who's stuck in a rut, whether it be depression whether it be, you know, just bad habits that you've been trying to break for a long time. Yeah, and it, I mean, and the most important thing was that it just made me feel really happy. Like, I was laughing, like I never laughed before like giggling like a baby, you know?And that was really important because when you're depressed and down, your body forgets what it's like to laugh, like. And when you laugh like that, it's like, whoa. Like that feeling is so amazing. And when you're on Trus, you, I mean, for me at least, I laugh, I laugh a lot. things could be really, really funny.You could also go from crying to laughing, like in five seconds, , just like that. But I think that's beautiful too because that's how life can be. You know, things can be good. One minute and boom, things can change and you have to adjust and you have to [00:57:00] keep going and learn how to adapt with all those things.And for me, my, that's kind of what my work is about. You know, we're all adapting, we're all changing, but we can also use these substances as tools to change our worlds and help people like, help people with disabilities, help people who, you know, are born without certain privileges. A better place for them.De'Vannon: See the Lord is giving us everything we need right outside nature and how, how dare the white man tried to, to tell us something's wrong with these things that just grow naturally. Shrooms and weed and the, the fucking mold on the wheat that they make the fucking l s d out of and stuff like that. It's all line naturality.It's organic nun gmo, gmo, all of that. I'm sorry. You went through all those things. You went through being depressed during, during what's [00:58:00] so supposed to be such a happy time, but I'm glad you got your breakthrough. Yes. From those documentaries I watched, it seems like they were suggesting that these psychedelics have the power to rewrite like the, the neuro connectivity of the brain.So like, like you're saying, when you get, when you get sad and you get stuck in that ruck rut where you're teaching, where your mind learns how to be sad, and then these psyched dealers can remind your mind what it's like to be happy and rewire the way you process information and process life. So it can give you a whole new framework to work from. So,Ifetayo: Mm-hmm.De'Vannon: and I didn't really get into the types of psychedelics because I was watching like, I think on your YouTube channel of, I think it's in the intro video on there, you had this panel of people like y'all, y'all if Fatal, Ifta loves her panels, he loves a panel.Ifetayo: You'reDe'Vannon: It is good to have all those perspectives.But the [00:59:00] one you had, they were going over all the different psychedelics and I knew about the Melin and the, the celli and the ganja, you know, and all that. But then they started going down. He was like, But it's like, you know, designer, now you have all these different wands. And it's like, so I was like, Oh shit, I don'tIfetayo: Yeah.De'Vannon: but y'all go to the website to learn more about the different types of psyched dials. Listen to their, the information or YouTube channel she mentioned like dismantling the patriarchy. There's information and in other shows she's gone on, on her website that mentions. That, that you can access through the website that I would put in the show notes. Grief loss to death and harm reduction, things like that. You know, that you mentioned all of these are potential benefits for psychedelics when it's done right and in the right setting. I'm so happy that it's coming back around cuz all this Ritalin and shit, they got kids on calling them adhd, whatever the fuck that is.You know, all this medicine that they've had us hopped up [01:00:00] on, all it is is legal drugs. We should be able to have our shit, not just what they tell us is okay because they haven't so,So I'm gonna let you have the last word. Say whatever is you want to.Ifetayo: Oh man, you . I, I'll just say you've been an amazing host. I, I was not expecting this. You're awesome. You've like, I do a lot of podcasts, interviews and you've been the most fun. So IDe'Vannon: Well, damn. Thank you. Thank, I'll take, I'll take allIfetayo: Yes. Keep doing. You Don't change. And thank you to all your listeners. Check us out www.pocpc.org. Thank you for having me.De'Vannon: Absolutely. Thank you very much. Fat Tayo. Thank y'all so [01:01:00] much for listening and we'll see you next time on the Sex Drugs in Jesus podcast and tell them don't listen to nobody but show self.Thank you all so much for taking time to listen to the Sex Drugs and Jesus podcast. It really means everything to me. Look, if you love the show, you can find more information and resources at SexDrugsAndJesus.com or wherever you listen to your podcast. Feel free to reach out to me directly at DeVannon@SexDrugsAndJesus.com and on Twitter and Facebook as well.My name is De'Vannon, and it's been wonderful being your host today. And just remember that everything is gonna be all right. 

Wellness Center Creators
Intuition, Energy, Brainspotting, and Reiki with Jenna Galligani

Wellness Center Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 24:12


Do you want to improve your mental health, but feel like you've tried everything and nothing seems to work? If you're looking for a more holistic approach to therapy, this episode is for you. And where are my fellow psychics-in-training? If you're looking to develop your intuition and psychic abilities, then you have to listen to this week's episode. Today's guest Jenna Galligani has over 15 years of experience as a licensed mental health therapist. She's a certified brainspotting therapist and a master level reiki practitioner and teacher. It was through her work as a therapist that she began to realize there is more to this world than meets the eye. Her journey into the metaphysical world launched forward when she went blind in 2012. Losing her vision forced her to tap into this unseen aspect of our existence. Her energy work acted as a catalyst to help her develop her psychic and mediumistic abilities. She has studied a variety of energy modalities over the past decade and has been developing her mediumship over the past five years, including studying with international tutors to hone her abilities as a psychic medium. Jenna is passionate about helping individuals heal and deepen their intuition. In this episode, you will learn the following: 1. How Jenna's intuition has impacted her business decisions 2. How Jenna's work as a mental health professional has changed since she lost her vision 3. How Jenna uses brainspotting and reiki in her work with clients And much more as Jenna shares her fascinating and amazing journey with her wellness career, listen in! Get all the links, resources and show notes here: https://wellnesscentercreators.com Sponsored by Jane App, Jane offers online booking, charting, scheduling, secure video and invoicing on one secure, beautifully designed system: https://jane.app/ Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it!