Podcasts about Management science

Study of problem-solving in human organizations

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Best podcasts about Management science

Latest podcast episodes about Management science

Catalyst Health and Wellness Coaching Podcast
How to Improve Our Luck and Creative Potential (Dr. Tina Seelig - #239)

Catalyst Health and Wellness Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 46:45


What does it take to light a fire under our creative potential? What does Risk have to do with luck? And are there practical steps we can take to positively move the dial in each of these?Welcome to the latest episode of the Health, Wellness & Performance Catalyst. Today we're revisiting a hidden gem to take an evidence-based deeper dive into creativity, risk-taking and much, much more. Our guest is Dr. Tina Seelig, Professor within Stanford University's Department of Management Science and Engineering, and a faculty director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program. Dr. Seelig earned her PhD in Neuroscience at Stanford Medical School, and has been a management consultant, entrepreneur, and author of 17 books, including inGenius, Creativity Rules, and What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20. Looking for weekly tips, tricks and turbo boosts to enhance your life? Sign up for the CATALYST 5 here, a brief weekly bullet point list of 5 ideas, concepts or boosts Dr. Cooper has discovered to improve your personal and professional life!For more information about the Catalyst Community, earning your health & wellness coaching certification, the annual Rocky Mountain Coaching Retreat & Symposium and much more, please see https://www.catalystcoachinginstitute.com/ or reach out to us Results@CatalystCoachingInstitute.com If you'd like to share the Be A Catalyst! message in your world with a cool hoodie, t-shirt, water bottle stickers and more (100% of ALL profits go to charity), please visit https://teespring.com/stores/be-a-catalyst If you are a current or future health & wellness coach, please check out our Health & Wellness Coaching Forum Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/278207545599218.  This is an awesome group if you are looking for encouragement, ideas, resources and more. Finally, if you enjoy the Catalyst Podcast, you might also enjoy the YouTube Coaching Channel, which provides a full library of freely available videos covering health, wellness & performance: https://www.youtube.com/c/CoachingChannel

The CMO Podcast
Shanee Ben Zur (Crunchbase) | CMO's and the Impact on Business Metrics

The CMO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 50:12


Shanee Ben Zur is the Chief Marketing and Growth Officer for Crunchbase, a company founded in 2007 by Michael Arrington, initially as a place to track the startups his parent company TechCrunch was writing about. Then Aol bought TechCrunch and Crunchbase in 2010 but Crunchbase went private again in 2015. Shanee worked at a PR firm founded by ex-Apple executives and from there she held roles at Salesforce, Nvidia, and Dropbox. Now after 3 years at Crunchbase she's CMO. She has a degree in Management Science from UC San Diego.Shanee and Jim talk about the importance of holding on to relationships in business, and how important it is to explain the CMO's impact on business metrics. Also both Shanee and Jim have a hard time discussing what makes them special. CMOs often hold one of the most innovative and challenging roles in business today. Those who excel can operate at the highest level to drive growth and create value for their organizations. To learn more how Deloitte helps bolster the value CMOs deliver, visit www.cmo.deloitte.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

What's Next with Aki Anastasiou
Secureworks' Rafe Pilling discusses the cyber threat landscape

What's Next with Aki Anastasiou

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 20:43


Rafe Pilling is a security researcher at Secureworks Counter Threat Unit, where he focuses on cyber threat intelligence. Pilling has over 13 years of experience in the cyber security industry and is recognised as an expert in the field. Pilling holds his Honours in Computer Science and Management Science from the University of Edinburgh and a Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Networking and Web Technologies from Edinburgh Napier University. In this episode of What's Next in Security, Pilling says that there has been a significant increase in both the scale and frequency of malicious cyber activity – with ransomware being one of the more prolific threats.

Packaging Brothers Podcast
Sightline Systems is Providing an AI-powered Data Monitoring and Analytics Solution

Packaging Brothers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 19:42


Sightline System is a software company based in Fairfax, Virginia, and has a pretty colorful history. The company first started doing data performance monitoring collection for mainframe environments. About 15 years ago, Brandon was on a trip to Japan, and one of the customers there said his work would be great for their manufacturing plant. They were having issues and were trying to understand what was causing them. With Sightline, they were able to go in and collect data in real-time and give them an easy-to-use way of seeing what was happening, and that's kind of how their journey into manufacturing started just by accident.On this episode, we'll talk about:When it comes to data collection, how does the system work, particularly in areas such as packaging and manufacturing?How do they use artificial intelligence to optimize either information collection or processing?When things start to go wrong, can the data or the AI predict potential fixes, potential solutions, or even potential problems?How many manufacturers in the United States use systems to optimize production?Have they come across any circumstances where data has been able to be shared with other members of the supply or value chain to assist in improving production timelines, preventing issues, inventory levels, or something similar?Is there any other way that sightline may be used to improve the sustainability of package manufacturing?Who is their ideal customer, or who do they think would benefit the most from the sightline in the packaging or manufacturing industries?Is he seeing many opportunities or changes for sightline to adopt some of those technologies as the world shifts into web 3.0 and blockchain and all of that?Where does he see the sightline system heading in 10 years, 20 years, or 50 years? What is the potential?Brandon Witte, CEO of SightLine System, experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the computer software industry. Skilled in Requirements Analysis, Enterprise Software, Enterprise Architecture, IT Strategy, and Professional Services. Strong business development professional with a Bachelor of Science (BS) focused in Management Science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University - Pamplin College of Business.For more information and to explore other episodes, go to www.ppcpackaging.com/the-packaging-brothersFollow PPCPackaging on social media!  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pacific-packaging-components-inc-/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PPCPackaging/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ppcpackaging/?hl=en Website: http://www.ppcpackaging.com/Find out more about Brandon on his website and connect with him on LinkedIn.Website: https://www.sightline.com/LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/brandon-witte-76a5653The views and opinions expressed on the "Packaging Brothers" podcast are solely those of the author and guests and should not be attributed to any other individual or entity. This podcast is an independent production of Packaging Brothers, and the podcast production is an original work of the author. All rights of ownership and reproduction are retained—copyright 2022.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Climate Justice

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


Adil Najam, professor and dean emeritus of the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University, leads the conversation on climate justice. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Welcome to today's session of the Fall 2022 CFR Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Adil Najam with us to talk about climate justice. Dr. Najam is professor of international relations and Earth and environment and dean emeritus of the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University. Previously he served as vice chancellor of the Lahore University of Management Sciences in Pakistan, and as a director of the Boston University Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future. He has also taught at MIT and Tufts University and served on the UN Committee on Development and on Pakistan's Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs. Dr. Najam was a coauthor for the Third and Fourth Assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the IPCC, and has served on various boards and written over a hundred scholarly papers and book chapters. So, Dr. Najam, thank you for being with us today to talk about this very important topic. Can you talk a little bit about what climate justice is, and why it is so important for international relations? NAJAM: Thank you. Thank you, Irina. It's wonderful to be here. It's wonderful to see a lot of participants here. So I'm looking forward to this conversation. I want to just maybe sort of frame a few ideas in the next ten, fifteen minutes on global climate justice. And I purposely added the “global” to it. I am very happy, and I hope we will have a discussion also and questions on domestic climate justice, because climate justice is not simply a global issue. It is a live issue in many countries—all countries, actually, including in the United States. I want to focus on the global aspect partly because I think we in recent years don't focus enough on it, and because I think it's about to hit the ceiling. I think we will hear a lot about it in the coming months in this year and going forward, including because of Pakistan, which is where I'm from and where I was literally sort of two days ago. And this background you see behind me is Lahore University of Management Sciences. And I say that because of the massive floods that you and your viewers have been reading about. In many ways, that has brought not only for Pakistan but for the world this issue of global climate justice back into focus, as the UN secretary-general came to Pakistan, and all that. If you allow me to just share a few slides to say a bit about what climate justice is, I'm hoping you see a black screen now, and you see my name sort of coming up. If people are seeing that and they are seeing my slides. I won't go into the details of sort of who I am. You have done that. But I wanted to use this to contextualize a couple of questions around this. And the first one of this is about what I was just saying, which is we are beginning to sort to think again about what the climate is telling us. Not want we want from the climate, but we are now at a point in climate change reality where the climate is giving us signals, and it is giving us signals about justice. The second is, just to raise a few questions and thoughts about what I call the age of adaptation, which essentially—I'm assuming all your viewers know the difference between mitigation and adaptation. We have been fixated, as we should have been, about mitigation, which is what can we do to keep climate change from happening. The fact is, we have failed. The fact is, we are now in what I call the age of adaptation where, at least by my calculation, about 2.5 billion—2 ½ billion people—are now having to adapt to global climate change, including, for example, the thirty million Pakistanis who were displaced in these recent floods. And what that means for climate justice is that in the age of climate adaptation, justice becomes much more of an issue. Because let's just put it up there to think about what that means as individual countries, beginning developing countries now, the impacts are happening on the people who have very little and sometimes nothing to do with causing the problem. And then the argument becomes, well, you have a fingerprint. You live in Boston. You have been emitting many times more than, for example, your brother living in Pakistan. And yet, the impacts there are happening to people who have got nothing to do with it, and that's the justice argument, right? And that leads to what we call sort of talks of reparation. That leads to loss and damage, which is a language that you hear a lot about. And finally, this question of why is climate now and in the future essentially a justice issue? And I would add, you know, essentially is the key thing that I mention there. It is good to see people on Zoom, though Zoom is not essentially my favorite medium. I think the only good thing it does is we can change our backgrounds. That was me teaching my class on sustainable development last year. But that's not the point. The point I want to come to about climate justice is the following: That, as I said, we are coming to a head. I think you have done this literally at the point when we are coming to a head. And the reason we are coming to a head is, A, the age of adaptation I talked about and, B, sort of where we are in this post-Paris, the climate agreement, world. And there were two essential things that came out of that. One was this number. And if you count the zeros there, I don't know how many of the people sort of, find it easy when there are that many zeros, but that's 100 billion. That's the number that came out of Paris, saying that's the amount that will be invested in developing countries in particular, per year, on climate adaptation as well as mitigation. I'll only put the point out there, why this is a climate issue. It hasn't materialized. The last couple of climate negotiations were entirely about that. And therefore, you have a lot of countries that are now beginning to face the impacts saying: We in good faith went and started doing something about this issue that wasn't even of our making on this agreement that the world would come together. And the world hasn't come together. The reality of climate is even more stark. These two numbers that you're all familiar with, 1.5 and two (degrees). The fact of the matter is, I know of no science at this point where 1.5 (degrees) can actually be achieved. I hope I'm wrong. I hope I'm wrong. I think we cling to the hope, but just from a reality perspective 1.5 (degrees) is nearly out of the game. And two (degrees) may be very closely coming to the game. And that is making a lot of countries very scared. If you remember why 1.5 (degrees) came, it is that Paris actually wanted a two-degree target. And then the small, especially island, states said: By two degrees we aren't there. It's existential for us. We are underwater, or nearly underwater. So what I'm trying to set up here is that there's a moment that we are in global affairs where this issue of climate justice is just boiling. If I—if you will allow me just a bit—you know, we often talk about 2020 because of COVID as a year like no other. Let me remind us what else was happening other than COVID in that year. Why it was really a year like no other. January 2020, hottest January ever—ever recorded since we started recording. February, second hottest ever recorded. March, second hottest. April, second hottest ever. May, hottest ever. You see the pattern here, right? And you remember seeing these. You might have tweeted about it. By July, no one was tweeting about it because the cat was more interesting—the dancing cat. And we had started getting used to this, you know, just barrage of climate data coming every month. Eight out of those twelve, as far as I can tell, records have been broken since then. Why am I putting this as climate justice? Again, you have a lot of places in the world—floods in Pakistan being one, heat in India being another, floods in Bangladesh being another—all across the world who are now seeing that impact in the age of adaptation. I'll give you just two very quick other pictures, and then come to the climate—sort of, you know, open up very soon. And why I mean—why I state that we are in the age of adaptation, right? I hope people can see this. I some years ago decided I'm not going to put future data on climate. This is recorded, past data for every month ever since we started keeping climate records. So this is not about what will happen. This is about what has happened. And this ends around 2016. You can take it to 2022 now. And it starts touching 1.5 (degrees) even more. Touching 1.5 (degrees) doesn't really mean that the barrier has been crossed because sort of, you know, that's the way sort of it's counted. But you see the pattern again. And you see, again, for a lot of countries—and it's not just countries. For the poorest people in the countries. This is true about the Pakistan floods, for example. If you look at the floods, it's not the affluent in Pakistan whose homes get sort of blown away. It is the poorest. So essentially what we are seeing is that the poorest people, the most vulnerable people around the world, are paying the cost of our inaction—my inaction, other—(inaudible)—inaction, right? Now, you might be saying, that's fine, but I don't live on the planet. I live in a particular place. So choose your place. Same data. For every point on Earth that we have data for, ever since we have data on climate. So what I'm trying to say is the age of adaptation is here. Just look at that picture. Choose the place you are interested in, and you start seeing that pattern. And if we are in the age of adaptation, once people start seeing impacts, right, they're starting to see impacts. As soon as you start seeing impacts, you start demanding a very different sort of action. And that's where—that's where climate justice comes. Let me show a quick map. This is actually an old map, 2014. But the interesting thing—the reason I still use is it's from Standard & Poor's. It's from a rating agency of risk. And if you look at that map, and you look at the red countries where the impacts are the most immediate, and you start thinking about where the emissions are coming from, this tells you what the climate justice argument globally is. One very last—one very last point, and then I move to you. That while it is a global issue, it is also a domestic issue. And again, we think of climate justice by linking it to other justice issues, as we should. I'm only putting one picture here. What happened in the age of adaptation that makes it a justice issue? One of the things that happens is it immediately changes from an energy issue—a primarily energy issue, to a predominantly water issue. When you're thinking about mitigation, right—mostly when we talk about the climate, we talk about how we can reduce emissions. And as soon as you talk emissions, you're essentially talking energy. You're essentially carbon management, right? You're bringing down carbon emission. Most of them are in energy. And therefore, a lot of our policy is about that. As soon as you start talking age of adaptation, a lot of it is about water. What do I mean by that? Think about impacts. When you think about what's happened, not just in Pakistan. I'm using the Pakistan example because I've just come from there but think about wherever you are. A lot of the immediate impacts are about water. Water rises, sea-level rise. Water melts, glaciers. Water disappears, drought. Water falls from the sky like no one's business, extreme events. That's what a flood looks like in a country like Pakistan, but it's not just Pakistan. It's many other countries. And again, if it becomes water, it immediately becomes something that affects the poorest people, the most vulnerable people, the most marginalized people, and those who have historically been least responsible. To give you just a picture of what a flood like this means in Pakistan, this is from 2010. But if you look at that blue squiggle, that's the area covered by the flood. That blue, the dark blue and light blue, is the severe and very severe. I put that on a map to scale of the U.S. to give a sense of what is covered like what you see in that picture. It's up from Vermont down to Florida. I put it on the map of Japan, it covers the whole country. I put it on a map of Europe, Denmark to France. And the point of that is now you are in this moment that I'm talking about where it becomes a justice issue because within developing countries there is this immense pressure of climate being see as a reality, right? And that pressure then starts pushing domestic politics, and domestic politics start pushing international politics. So that's my context of climate justice, as we see it. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much for that sobering overview. And I think the slides that you showed really bring it to life and make it so much—you see it really so starkly. So thank you for that. So now we want to go to all of you for your questions. (Gives queuing instructions.) So now I'm just going to go to questions and see—we have several raised hands. OK. So I'm going to take the first question from Fordham University. I don't know who's asking the question, so please let us know who you are. Q: Good afternoon, everyone. Thank you for the discussion. My name is (inaudible), representing the International Political and Economic Development—I'm part of that program. And my question is just in regards to what we're currently seeing. So I'm originally from South Africa and the just transition was a very topical point when it came to climate change and climate adaptation. And there was a push for the emerging markets to actually adopt renewable energy, moving away from coal. However, we see that recently, with the Russian and Ukrainian war, there has been an increase in demand and exports from Africa to the northern regions for coal. And you see that certain regions, such as Germany, has started powering up their coal-powered station, due to the lack of energy that they'll see from the Russian nation. So my question is, what is the impact of what we see with this event being the war, and the impact on the increase in coal? And what does this mean for climate adaptation? Especially from regions from Europe, where African regions will be looking to them to actually see them adapting this change in climate and energy, I guess. NAJAM: Irina, do you want to take a few questions and then come back, or? Whichever way you want. FASKIANOS: I think we should just go—let's go through them one at a time. NAJAM: Sure. Sure. Thank you for that question. It has many layers. I'll pick up on a few. And the first one is that you are exactly right. In a world that is crisis prone, in a world that is turbulent—we saw that with COVID, we are seeing that with the economic turmoil of COVID that still continues in all sorts of ways, and we've seen that with the war in Ukraine—climate comes as this sort of—you know, we used to say climate is a threat multiplier. And now I think climate is the threat, and everything else is multiplied. And so we should expect that climate is going to be exacerbated by all these other things, and these other things are going to be exacerbated by climate. So what you are talking about in terms of energy is one issue, but as I talked to my friends in Africa, it is not just energy. Food, for example, is going to be hit equally hard. So in terms of energy, in terms of the Ukraine war, we see that not just in Africa but in other parts of the world. We see it in some places in coal. We see it all places in oil prices. But what is—what is hitting Africa particularly hard, for example, is food. Now, what does that have to do with climate adaptation? What it has to do with climate adaptation is that it comes at a time when the stress on food production—because, for example, water stress is already there, right? So that's the multiplier thing. One of the most difficult things I find in my work for policymakers is that they want clarity. And I keep telling them, there isn't clarity. There isn't going to be clarity. This is why the floods, for example, were important. Immediately the question is, but how do we know this is because of climate? We've had floods before, right? Or we have had droughts before. And what is now becoming increasingly clear is it's not like climate is going to give you a new set of issues. It is going to take the issues and do two things. One, the magnitude increases. And two, the frequency goes berserk, because whatever you thought was a twenty-year flood or a fifteen-year drought, now you have no way of doing it. And that creates an uncertainty for developing countries. But the justice question really—the justice question is that whose fingerprint is on it? And that's the one that I would say you should keep—it is not going to be made for good politics. What I say is coming, I am very scared, because the politics it leads to is the politics of division. Till now we've had the politics on climate mostly—you know, even if it's ineffective—it's about mostly in the form of let's all come together, it's a common problem. What you saw in these floods—and the reason I keep mentioning it—one important thing is the UN secretary-general goes to Pakistan and for the first time clearly says: This is because of climate. That means, you know, this is coming from the top. You hear it at the top, and that is going to lead to a divisive politics. FASKIANOS: So there's a written question from Mark Hallim, who's a doctoral student, global security student, at the American Military University. How can climate change be achieved without leadership, political will, and development by nation-state leaders? NAJAM: (Laughs.) Not easily. Not easily. (Laughter.) Not easily. The fact, Mark, you said, right? FASKIANOS: Mark, yes. NAJAM: Mark. The fact, Mark, is that we have been kicking this one down the road. And that's why we are confronting it. Till now—you know, I've been on this thing for at least thirty years. I was at Rio in 1992. I've been following the climate for nearly at every COP, at least until Copenhagen. And it's not that the issue is new. We knew this from the beginning. The hope, the hope—because those of us who work on climate are essentially optimists. We want this problem to be licked. The hope was that we won't come to the age of adaptation. The hope was that we would do enough on mitigation, right? What is adaptation? It's the failure of mitigation. We would do enough that we wouldn't come to this point of finger pointing. And therefore, it is going to become more and more difficult. Now, interestingly, again, if—the most important thing that's happened in climate justice, to answer your question, this last week—I still haven't read the exact document. But for the first time a country, in this case Denmark, has said that they are going to acknowledge the principle of loss and damage. Now, this is huge. For those of us who study—so, I'm assuming all of our audience are people who study this. Loss and damage, what's loss and damage? You know, it's just words. But it is more than words, if you take it seriously. Loss and damage means that if there is loss to someone or damage to someone, those who are responsible for it will somehow pay for it. We don't do international relations like that. There are nearly no other areas in which we have things like that. I think what Denmark is trying, to answer Mark's question, is saying: Let us restart, rethinking how we do climate assistance and climate aid, to address loss and damage. The challenge—the reason I'm scared about this is, imagine—you know, not even imagine. You don't have to imagine. Just remember what happened in the summer. You had about twenty countries that had potentially climatically induced massive events—whether they were of heat, whether they were of fire, whether they were of drought, right? You get a planet where you see more and more of these things happening. It is not just the appetite for assistance. It is simply the capacity for assistance that will go. One last line, because I want to hear from others. And at the same time you have climate justice issues within developing countries, right? Now you have to choose between climate justice within the U.S. and countries elsewhere also pushing. That is why I'm insisting that it doesn't make for pretty politics. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Isaac Alston-Voyticky, who has raised your hand. Q: Thank you very much. Can you hear me? FASKIANOS: Yes. NAJAM: Yes. Q: Great. So I'm actually a CUNY law student. And I am working on kind of the intersection between technology and environmental change. And I have kind of a combination question. First, what are your predictions for the combination of sea level rise and tides for mean higher high-water levels? For example, can we predict that higher sea level will actually have an effect on tidal highs and lows outside of the traditional modeling? And then, as a follow up to that, are there any models or maps out there which illustrate combination climate data. One of the most annoying things I find in my research is that, for example, NOAA's sea level rise and tidal flooding can't be compounded on its interactive map. They don't show what will happen when sea level rises and tides also happen. So I don't know if there's anything out there. NAJAM: Isaac, I'll be honest. I don't know the answer to that, to the technical part of that. But the question is very, very good from a policy side. And I'm particularly happy that you're coming from a law direction to this. So what policymakers often want, and they are also disturbed, just like you are, they want clear answers, right? I've been working on this for years. And they say, well, tell us what climate will do to my agriculture. I say, I don't know. I wish I did. I wish I could tell you it will be ten times worse, this or that. Because then at least you would have something to plan with. The thing about climate change is not just the climate, it is the change. What makes it scary is that we don't know what the change will be. But let me—let me, in not answering your question—not knowing the answer to the technical part—I have not seen those maps either. And I do not know what the combination is. There are many people I know who are as worried about that combination as you are, particularly in small island states. Because what people are realizing is that it's not going to be one thing at one time. You get here, and you get hit there, and then you get hit in the face again, right? And again, just because of what—where I'm coming from, I'll give you the Pakistan example. These floods that you've been hearing about, actually, the flood isn't that bad. Pakistan is used to floods, and it isn't that bad. Something happened there which was in some ways synonymous to what you are talking about. What happened is that six weeks before the floods, there was massive heat and near drought, which means you essentially get a clay soil, right, that has been totally depleted. Three weeks before what we call the floods, there was massive rain—monsoon which was seven times the expected normal—seven times. And those were the first pictures that came. And again, that is clearly because of climate. Seven times doesn't happen. You know, and they came. And what that meant was on totally dry land they created this sort of lake effect, the type of picture you saw. And then came a flood which was higher than usual, but would have been manageable. Why am I giving you this example? That's the one punch, two punch, three punch, much like your tides. Now, if you are a small island country, that's what you are worried about. You are worried about that even if sea level rise on its own you can deal with in adaptation, you can prepare for. What happens when that happens, and the tidal change happens? It is the uncertainty—what makes climate particularly unpredictable is the uncertainty of what we are seeing, not simply the magnitude of the change. Now, and this is particularly true for sea level rise. I am an optimist still. I think we are a wise enough species, particularly for sea level rise. We are able to change our life patterns and where we live. We have technology in many places to deal with it. But the reason we worry about is not because sort of—you know, it's not like Hollywood, where New York will be half underwater. I really don't think that will happen. I think we will get—come to our senses well before that. But it is this one-two-three punch of multiple climatic events happening together. Sorry I don't have a technical answer to your question, but it is a very good question. FASKIANOS: I'm going to take the next question from Molly O'Brien, who's at George Mason University. Climate change demonstrates the complex ways in which food, energy, and water are interconnected systems. What are the most promising approaches you've seen to addressing climate change from a nexus perspective, rather than addressing distinct aspects of food, energy, and water individually? NAJAM: Thank you for that. I have seen some promising discussion, even if not fully implemented yet. You know, I've talked about—and I'm glad you talk about this. So as I've talked about this age of adaptation, there is a—I don't know if it's an opportunity—but there is—there is a hidden opportunity in that. And the hidden opportunity is that adaptation is essentially development. Show me any adaptation activity, and I will show you a development activity. I'm particularly talking about developing countries. And it is particularly about food, water—in particular about food and water. Food, in many ways, is nature's way of packaging water. And so that's—the nexus is the answer. Now, one of the things—I'll give you one example of work that I had done many years—a few years ago. Again, in Pakistan, where we looked at potential climatic impacts on agriculture. This is a mostly agriculture country. And what we found—we were only looking at certain crops and certain parts of the country. So it's not for the entire—but still for a country that majorly depends on this. The finding—I may be slightly off on the numbers, but I'm trying to recall—was that yield could go down by about 12 percent, right? Twelve percent is huge, if countries' economies are depending on something. The interesting thing is not that. As I said, the number may be slightly off, somewhere in that range. What was interesting was that with adaptation interventions, good management, agricultural management, water management, better water use efficiency, better use of various technologies and so on and so forth, there could be a net benefit, even after accounting for climate change. And what that means is that there may be an opportunity around the world, if we take the nexus approach—and this is why sort of moving simply from carbon management to what you're calling the nexus approach is not only a good answer, it is the only answer. And again, we see this not only in developing countries. We see this as countries think about net zero. I want to come to net zero again, because I'm not fully a fan of it. But the good thing about net zero is that it says: What can we do as a system rather than as a one-point lever on carbon going up and down? So short answer to your question is, what you're calling the nexus approach is the only approach to adaptation. And in fact, having the most vulnerable countries start focusing on that food-water nexus, rather than only on emissions, is a good thing. You know, Bangladesh can bring its emissions down to zero. World emissions aren't going to see much of a dent, right? But if Bangladesh starts focusing on food and water, it can make an actual difference on the type of impacts that 200 million people will face. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, raised hand, from Evaristus Obinyan. Q: Can you hear me? FASKIANOS: Yes. Tell us your affiliation, please. Q: I'm Dr. Evaristus Obinyan. I'm a criminologist. (Laughs.) As you can see, I'm not in the science field, but I'm very interested in this particular issue. I'm a professor at the Middle Georgia State University in Macon, Georgia. Now, I—listening to you intently, I thought I heard you say stop it from happening. But after I've seen the digitized presentations, I realized that you were—you wanted to use it—it's sort of happening or deteriorating. Because you are saying that to stop the—this from happening—you know, absolutely, it's already happening—to stop it from deteriorating. Now, some say, like myself—I said nothing works. This is just the story of the planet. It has to go through this major evolution. How, then, can we stop the deterioration? Maybe, actually, it won't matter really, or maybe we can use science and technology to manage or attempt to mitigate the natural planet evolution. FASKIANOS: Thank you. NAJAM: I hope I got the gist. I think I did, but if I failed—if I missed something, my apologies. There are two central points I want to pick up from that. I am not as pessimistic as you seem to be. I do think things work. I think—first of all, you're right. You're right, what we are seeing is a deterioration. Our efforts to try to mitigate have not yielded. And despite the fact that we have much higher interest in climate, and despite the fact that people sort of want to do the right thing, the fact of the matter is that line about emissions is just going upward, and upward, and upward. So that's a reality. You are exactly right. But I am not going to extrapolate that into the belief that we can't do anything. I think we have been reluctant to change lifestyle. And despite the fact—you know, we are an amazing generation. We are—my generation was amongst the first generation in the world which had more food than the world needed. And yet, people were hungry. We have more technology, better science than ever before. And we had more money, and yet people were sleeping poor. So the question is not of the ability to do it. The question is of willingness to do it. I mean, I have—I have faith in our species. I believe that it is a race between human knowledge and human wisdom. I think we have the knowledge to lick the problem, without creating lifestyles that are extremely uncomfortable. I'm not sure we have the wisdom to do it in time. We keep seeing that again. So I'm not willing to give up and say, well, this is inevitable. This is not inevitable. This is a choice. We make the choice. And I hope we can make an alternative choice. Now, the question then is, how will we do that? And I know it's going to sound glib, I think at least theoretically the answer is what we've had for a number of years, which is sustainable development. But we need to look at this growth model again, that growth for its own sake as a goal keeps too fixated on this constant growth pattern, as opposed to moving towards a lifestyle that is comfortable and yet that doesn't kill the planet that has given you this amazing sort of set of resources. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. I'm going to take Ivan Ramirez's question, from the University of Colorado, Denver. And he's originally from Ecuador. When I think about and discuss climate justice, I focus or relate it to health, existing disparities, and how climate exacerbates inequities. From your perspective, how is health being leveraged in the climate negotiations, as it relates to climate justice? NAJAM: On that last part, unfortunately it's not. Unfortunately, it's not. It's a beautiful question. Thank you very much for asking that. And health is just one of the areas, like many that, you know, the first question pointed out about that, about—from South Africa. This is the nature of not just climate, but of the development. That once one thing goes wrong, there is a cycle of other things unraveling. Again, since today I've been talking about floods in Pakistan, right now the biggest issue in Pakistan is actually not water. It is dengue. It is the mosquito. It is health, right? So that is one way in which climate events trigger. The other and more important way to answer this is, you know, you've noticed that I talk about ourselves as a species. I hope other people do too. I think it is useful to think of ourselves as a species, amongst many, on this planet. If you think about that, one of the things that happens is you realize we're not the only species adapting to climate change. That's why dengue is happening in Pakistan, even in the north, next to the Himalayas. It shouldn't. It's a tropical disease. So the mosquito also changes when the climate changes. And that is what's called vector-borne disease. So amongst the scariest things in the science, and amongst the things that we actually know much less about—because we've been focused on carbon—is what is going to happen on vector disease? But just about all climate scientists are worried about if the climate changes, it is not just what happens to humans or, you know, the big sexy species like panda bears and polar bears. But what is going to happen to disease vectors? And disease starts moving to places where it wasn't endemic. Which means those places are not ready for it. And again, we are still struggling to come out of COVID. Now, COVID wasn't because of this, but people who study Ebola have been—started worrying about that, that disease vectors move. Dengue is probably amongst the one that is talked about the most, because here is a tropical, maybe equatorial disease, that has been moving upwards, both in South Asia and the Mediterranean. So the health impacts are, in fact, one of those big ones, though they have not been talked about as much as climate change. Which is not to say that people are not interested in it, it is just that we don't know enough about it. But people are worried about it. The justice issue of all of these things—I don't want us to lose the justice aspect. The justice aspect essentially comes from the fact that those who are most vulnerable, those who are most likely to see the impacts, are not the ones who are most responsible for creating this. That's the dynamic that creates that divisive politics of injustice. FASKIANOS: Let me go next to Gary Prevost, who's raised his hand. And if you could—there we go. Q: Gary Prevost, College of St. Benedict in Minnesota. As I understand it, you're basically suggesting that the resource allocation in the coming years needs to be much more on the side of adaptation than mitigation, especially in the global south. Does this mean that, say, the $100 billion a year, if it could be achieved, that would be used in the global south would be primarily more traditional development aid for the—in all of the fields that we've talked about, and not so much to create green energy in the—in the south? And that in the north it would still continue to be the focus on mitigation, since we're the ones creating the carbon footprint. Am I understanding your basic argument that way? And then finally, if it is going to be traditional—more traditional development aid, do you think that's going to make it easier or harder to achieve it politically from the global north countries? NAJAM: Gary, that's a brilliant question. And you've really sort of unwrapped what I'm saying, what I was saying politely you have said more bluntly. And you've also highlighted, very, very politely and diplomatically, why it is very, very difficult. So the easiest part of your question is the last part, will it make it easier or more difficult? Clearly, more difficult. Will it even be possible? Probably not. So when I say that's what—if I think that's what should happen, that doesn't mean that I think it will happen. Because we don't have any models of massive reparations or, you know, international affairs doesn't work on your fault, you pay me. There isn't an international environmental court, or any court, that is going to do this. So how is this going to happen, except through goodwill? And at the scale, that goodwill there is no evidence we will be seeing. But let me first come to your question, because your—the way you framed it, which is—which is kind of right. Kind of right. So I do think that going to the old essential principle that no one else talks about these days, but which was part of the original UN agreements on climate, et cetera, which is common but differentiated responsibility. I wish we had taken it more seriously. The idea of common but differentiated responsibility was: Global climate change is all of our responsibility, but it is a differentiated responsibility. Those who have had high emissions already have a high responsibility to bring them down. Those who have low emissions now have a responsibility to try to keep it lower and not go on that same trajectory by using better technology, et cetera. And those who have historical high responsibility for emissions should help create the conditions that whatever impacts happen are not catastrophic. So which meant that all countries should do something, but different countries should do differently. In a way, if you are a developing country person, as I am, one of the arguments that comes to mind, and many people say it out loud, is that the north, if you will, the industrialized countries, have been pushing developing countries to do what they were supposed to do. We aren't really cutting our emissions that much, but why don't you do it, Bangladesh? Bangladesh, you do EV policy. Bangladesh, you do solar policy. Or Pakistan. Or Papua New Guinea, or Burkina Faso, or whatever. I do think that it will be better, rather than pushing them only on emissions—because, you know, their emissions aren't that much—so it is to bend the curve so that their future emissions are restricted, I understand that, right? But it's not really solving the problem. Now that we have adaptation looming at us, I do think it is the right policy to have countries, especially with large vulnerabilities and large populations, get ready for the hit that is coming, that is already there. I don't see that easily happening, but I do think that that is the right thing. Now, you have rightly exactly pointed out the argument from my climate friends usually is: But that's not climate. That's just development. That's what they wanted to do anyhow, right? And the argument is, you're trying to divert our climate money to your traditional development agenda. I understand the argument. I don't agree with it, because, A, I hope it is not traditional. So let's take a country that's not a developing countries, the Netherlands. If there's any country in the world that is historically prepared for climate impacts, past climate impacts, it is the Netherlands. How did it do that? Infrastructure. So I understand a lot of adaptation investment will be infrastructure. A lot of adaptation expenditure will look like traditional development. But I hope it is not traditional development. I hope it is sustainable development. And you are exactly right. I think one of the reasons we haven't gone back—(audio break)—that route is because my old friends, people like myself maybe, who come to the climate side look at adaptation as somehow a dilution, even stealing climate money for development. And that is why—Irina has heard me say this before—climate is not, must not be, cannot be seen as the opposite of development. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to combine two written questions from Leda Barnett at Our Lady of the Lake University, who says: You've discussed insights on shared governance via COP and the shortcomings of multilateral diplomacy. We should continue that, of course, but do you think approaches like sanctions or smart power would be effective? Are there examples of this being used effectively? And then Diamond Bolden, who's an undergraduate at Xavier University of Louisiana: U.S. is not impacted as much as other countries. However, we contribute to it. What policy can we implement to progress on environmental justice? Or I guess, she meant to help progress on environmental justice. NAJAM: You know, because of, again, the recent events, I see a lot of anger in a number of developing countries. That's what I'm trying to bring here that, you know, there's something growing out there. And a lot of it, you've seen that in major newspapers, New York Times, Washington Post, sort of, you know, people from developing countries are writing op-eds about reparations, about—some compare it to slavery and payments have to be made, and all that. Logically, I partly sympathize with that. But I am a realist enough to recognize that's not how politics happens. So sanctions on who, right? (Laughs.) Are we going to put sanctions on floods? The flood isn't going to—just because I tell it to stop, going to stop. So I'm sure you don't mean that. Are we seeing sanctions on rich countries or rich people to pay? That sort of power dynamic, I don't know any example in history where the weak can impose sanctions on the rich, on the strong. Now, one of the things, by the way no one has pushed me on this. You should. I keep talking north and south, but it's not just north and south. It's not rich countries, poor countries. It's rich people, poor people. The same flood in Pakistan, you know, people ask me, is your family safe? Yes, they are. I come from middle class, affluent enough. The flood impacts the poorest people in Pakistan. And the richest people in Pakistan also have high emissions, right? So it's not as stark as that. And this goes back to the last part of the second question you asked. Yes, the U.S. has higher emissions but, again, the question that hasn't come, the U.S. has serious environmental injustice questions of its own. It doesn't mean that all of the U.S. is equally responsible. And as the climate changes, it is the poorest and most vulnerable in the U.S. who are going to be impacted. Again, the reason I keep saying I am particularly worried about this is as that happens whatever will there might be amongst my U.S. friends to talk about global climate justice, they are going to be distracted immediately by the most real, much more close, much more visible impacts of climate justice within the country. I'll take a slight detour, Irina, but I think it's a relevant one. This is from Professor Bullard's work many, many—thirty years ago. You know, when he used to point out—this is not about climate, but it's very much related—take a map of the U.S. And on that map, put a pin on wherever a superfund, most hazardous waste dumps are. And what you have just created is a map of the poorest African American communities in the U.S. OK, that's the environmental justice question here. So just—it hasn't come up, but I don't want to sound as if this is simply a north-south issue. Within the south, within the north, and then within the north-south, because climate is not looking at those borders. Those are our creations, not the climate's. FASKIANOS: Yes. I'm going to take the next question from Keith Baker, who has a raised hand. Q: Can you hear me? FASKIANOS: We can. Q: Hey, yeah. I'm Keith Baker. I work for Dallas College. I teach accounting and finance. One of the things I've noticed of the last several years is that rural water systems in the United States are deteriorating at a very rapid rate. As a matter of fact, some ones I'm personally aware of, because I have some friends who work in the education industry for teaching water treatment plant people, is that they're sending out notices to very large populations of people that says it's not safe to drink this water. It's not safe to bathe in this water. Do not get this water in your eyes. Oh, by the way, extended exposure to this water in taking a shower might give you cancer. Now, if that's happening in rural America, that means that some of the other infrastructure problems that we have, like in the Dallas area where I live where we've had these what I call downpours that have increased in intensity in the last several years, where our water runoff system has been overwhelmed. And neighborhoods that are a good hundred feet above the normal floodplains coming from creeks are having waters back up from the storm sewer system being overwhelmed, and starting to see some houses flooded that you would have never seen flooded twenty years ago or thirty years ago. NAJAM: So, Keith, this goes back to my previous point that climate doesn't discriminate, in this sense. Now, the map I showed there is greater vulnerability in certain parts of the world, but all parts are vulnerable. The distinction also is that if you are in a richer country, you at least theoretically have the ability to deal with it. Like hurricanes, I mean, the same hurricane comes to Haiti and then to Florida. We here in the U.S. have a greater ability to—to just to be able to buy our way out of the impacts. We can build better. We can move people. We have the resources. And therefore, one of the things you always notice about with hurricanes is that when they hit the Caribbean the headlines are about how many lives lost. And when they hit our shores, the headlines are usually about the economic cost of that. That's a good thing. I hope for every country it's only an economic loss, right? But you are exactly right, now the—again, from a political point of view, as these things that you are describing in rural America, and some of it very scary from what you say, as that happens countries are going to find it more and more difficult. They're already not inclined to support other countries for environmental justice, for climate justice. And if the pressure from within their country is higher, they're going to be less and less inclined. And this relates, for those of you who study geopolitics, not even climate, what that means is that another fault line in a very fractured world appears. So you already have a world, in terms of geopolitics, that seems to be fracturing in various ways, and you have various pulls and pushes. In comes climate, just like we saw in COVID, right, when we thought vaccine diplomacy from different countries. That reaction is also going to exacerbate. But that's the multiplier. FASKIANOS: So I'm going to take the next question from Jeanie Bukowski, who is at Bradley University, and sitting in now with her undergraduate class. Thirty-four students, science and politics of global climate change. Could you talk a little more about how individuals, especially young people, can take action on climate justice? NAJAM: I hope I'm amongst friends. (Laughs.) I'll tell you what I tell my students and what I tell my kids. The good news is that we have now the type of—particularly in the U.S., but all across the world, actually—all across the world, all across the world, particularly in the young, there is a very heightened sense that this issue is real and that something has to be done. A lot of that has been channeled at you guys, meaning my generation, haven't done what you were supposed to do, which is exactly correct. But not enough—as, you know, my grandmother used to say, point one finger at someone and at least three point back at you. Not enough is being spent on what we are doing with our own lifestyle. And I think sort of that—the reason why we keep talking more about it but the graph on actual emissions doesn't shift we need to interrogate, right? And some of those easy answers don't really work. So, for example, and I hope I am among friends so I'll be blunt. It is—it is nice not to have a car and say, OK, because I don't have a car therefore I don't have emissions. But if you're using a lot of Uber, those are your emissions. Those are not the emissions of that car—the Uber driver. When you get UberEats to deliver food, those are not the emissions of the restaurant. Those are your emissions. When I get Amazon packages three times delivered to my home, the world's statistics might count them as China's emissions, because something was created in China, but those are my emissions, right? And ultimately, it is this question of lifestyle. And what I was saying earlier about we are—we have the technology. We have the knowledge. I am not sure we have the wisdom. And ultimately, that wisdom will come individually. I do not see scientifically any way—absolutely we are running out of time. I'll be absolutely blunt. We are still living the dream that somehow I won't change anything I do, but by corporations doing it or governments doing it there will be a magic wand by which this will be solved. I just do not see the math. And therefore, responsibility does begin with the letter I, me. FASKIANOS: I think that is a perfect place to end this discussion. So thank you for that. Adil Najam, this was a terrific hour. And there are so many questions—good questions and comments, both raised hands and in the Q&A, I regret that we could not get to all of them. But we'll just have to have you back. So thank you very much. Appreciate it. NAJAM: Thank you for having me. Good luck to the planet, everyone. FASKIANOS: Yes, exactly. We all—we all have to think about the “I” of what we are doing, for sure. The next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, September 28, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time. We are hosting Christopher Tuttle, who is the senior fellow and director of the Renewing America initiative here at CFR. In the meantime, I'd encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic. And you can visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues. Thank you all, again, for being with us today. And we look forward to you joining us again next week on September 28. So thank you, again. And thank you, Dr. Najam, for this hour. NAJAM: Thank you all. (END)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking
506: Managing Digital and Globalization (with Satish Nambisan)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 53:24


Welcome to an interview with globally recognized academic thought-leader on digital transformation and innovation management, Satish Nambisan. Get Satish's book here: https://amzn.to/3QpWQE3 In this episode, Satish spoke about real-world examples of companies that use digital technology as their unique competency to move and globalize faster. He defined “globalization” and “digital” in a broader perspective, and elaborated on their role in a company to thrive through an emotional connection with customers. Satish also explained the idea of tight and loose coupling and how it allows companies to continuously adapt to disturbances that happen in different parts of the world without reinventing the business model, processes, or operations. Satish Nambisan, Ph.D. is the Nancy and Joseph Keithley Professor of Technology Management at the Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University. His current work focuses on how digital technologies, platforms, and ecosystems shape innovation, entrepreneurship, and international business. His publications have appeared in journals such as Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, Management Science, Journal of International Business Studies, Organization Science, Academy of Management Review, and Stanford Social Innovation Review. He is the co-author of The Global Brain: Your Roadmap for Innovating Faster and Smarter in a Networked World (Wharton School Publishing). His latest book is The Digital Multinational: Navigating the New Normal in Global Business (MIT Press, 2022). Get Satish's book here: The Digital Multinational: Navigating the New Normal in Global Business (Management on the Cutting Edge). Satish Nambisan & Yadong Luo: https://amzn.to/3QpWQE3 Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Software at Scale
Software at Scale 50 - Redefining Labor with Akshay Buddiga

Software at Scale

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 75:46


Akshay Buddiga is the co-founder and CTO of Traba, a labor management platform.Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google PodcastsSorry for the long hiatus in episodes! Today's episode covers a myriad of interesting topics - from being the star of one of the internet's first viral videos, to experiencing the hyper-growth at the somewhat controversial Zenefits, scaling out the technology platform at Fanatics, starting a company, picking an accelerator, only permitting in-person work, facilitating career growth of gig workers, and more!Highlights[0:00] - The infamous Spelling Bee incident.[06:30] - Why pivot to Computer Science after an undergraduate focus in biomedical engineering?[09:30] - Going to Stanford for Management Science and getting an education in Computer Science.[13:00] - Zenefits during hyper-growth. Learning from Parker Conrad.[18:30] - Building an e-commerce platform with reasonably high scale (powering all NFL gear) as a first software engineering gig. Dealing with lots of constraints from the beginning - like multi-currency support - and delivering a complete solution over several years.The interesting seasonality - like Game 7 of the NBA finals - and the implications on the software engineers maintaining e-commerce systems. Watching all the super-bowls with coworkers.[26:00] - A large outage, obviously due to DNS routing.[31:00] - Why start a company?[37:30] - Why join OnDeck?[41:00] - Contrary to the current trend, Traba only allows in-person work. Why is that?We go on to talk about the implications of remote work and other decisions in an early startup's product velocity.[57:00] - On being competitive.[58:30] - Velocity is really about not working on the incorrect stuff.[68:00] - What's next for Traba? What's the vision?[72:30] - Building two-sided marketplaces, and the career path for gig workers. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.softwareatscale.dev

Nobody Told Me!
Bob Sutton: ...how to deal with assholes

Nobody Told Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 33:41


Joining us on this episode is Bob Sutton, the New York Times best-selling author of "The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal With People Who Treat You Like Dirt". He is also Professor of Management Science and Engineering and Professor of Organizational Behavior at Stanford University. His website is https://www.bobsutton.net/ Note: This episode was previously aired. Thanks to our sponsors of this episode!: Gladskin is a new category of skin treatment made for people of all ages with eczema-prone, acne-prone, and rosacea-prone skin. You may have wondered what actually causes the itchiness, redness, inflammation, and discomfort in the skin. It's a disruption of the bacterial environment also called the skin microbiome. Gladskin specifically works to target the imbalance in your skin's microbiome. But unlike other skin brands and prescription medications, Gladskin uses Micreobalance - a revolutionary protein that restores the balance of the good and bad bacteria that live on your skin so it can finally heal. So if you've been frustrated with your treatment options, don't wait to try Gladskin. They are offering our Nobody Told Me! listeners 15% off plus free shipping on your first order at gladskin.com/NOBODY. Ritual's Essential Protein is a delicious, plant-based protein powder with three distinct formulas designed to meet the body's changing protein needs during different life stages. There's Daily Shake 18+, Daily Shake 50+ and Daily Shake Pregnancy and Postpartum. Each of these three thoughtful formulas contains 20 grams of pea protein per serving. Ritual's Essential Protein powder is a good foundation for your health that's easy to incorporate into your daily rituals—just add water, shake and sip! Ritual offers a super flexible subscription service with free shipping for subscribers, free, easy cancellation and a money-back guarantee within the trial period. Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Our Nobody Told Me! listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/NTM. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

R.O.G. Return on Generosity
92. Shane Portfolio - Why ”Priority” is Singular

R.O.G. Return on Generosity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 29:58 Transcription Available


92. Shane Portfolio - Why "Priority" is Singular  “A culture is defined by the worst behavior you are willing to accept.” — Shane Portfolio Guest Info: Shane is a 14-year veteran of the U.S. Army, where he was a Platoon Sergeant recognized as a Top Gun for Colorado and served as a leadership instructor for Combat Arms Units. Shane is also a lifelong learner; after earning his Bachelor of Science at Metropolitan State University of Denver in Computer Information Systems and Management Science, he went on to earn several advanced degrees, including master's degrees in Organizational Leadership from Regis University and in Telecommunications from Denver University. He is now in his PhD program focused on diversity and inclusion in the technology industry, with an expected completion of 2022.  Shane Portfolio is Senior Vice President of Field Operations Engineering for Comcast Cable leading the company's One Network, XOC, Headend Operations and Plant Maintenance organizations. Most recently, he served as Senior Vice President of Technical Operations and Engineering for Comcast Cable's West Division, with responsibility for engineering, technical operations and advanced services for more than six million customers. Shane oversaw the Division's fiber network and IP-based infrastructure. He also led the Division's technical operations and engineering teams responsible for testing and deployment of new technologies and resources to deliver innovative new products and services as well as a reliable network and customer experience. Previously, Shane served as Regional Vice President of Engineering for the California region, responsible for the oversight, guidance, direction and vision for all technical engineering aspects throughout the Comcast California footprint. With a career at Comcast spanning 23 years, his journey has taken him from the Central Division's Engineering and eXcellence in Operations Centers (XOC), which monitors the network around the clock to identify and address issues that could impact service for multiple customers, to the National Engineering and Technical Operations center, which oversaw Comcast's nationwide backbone and wholesale organization, to leadership roles in IP Operations and network capacity planning. Shane's extensive experience, leadership ability, and passion continues to assist with setting the pace and direction of the Engineering teams across the enterprise. Favorite Quote: “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” —  Dr. Maya Angelou  R.O.G. Takeaway Tips: The Great Reset: Mission clarity. Do you see the value and purpose of the work you do each day? What is fulfilling about your current role? Is the mission of my organization clear to you? Does it inspire you to bring your best energy to work? Are you making a creative contribution to the mission? Career growth. In what ways are you growing? You listen to podcasts to grow – that's admirable. In what other ways are you growing? What opportunities are available to you within your organization? How are you taking responsibility for your continual improvement? Do you see an opportunity for development and advancement? Is it a career or a job? Curiosity culture – is your voice heard? Can you ask questions? Are you encouraged to be curious? That sense of wonder is the missing ingredient in any Fixed mindset, stagnant culture, situation, and relationships. How well do you model a growth mindset.? For example: are you inspired by the success of others or do you judge them as lucky or brown nosers? Do you see challenges as opportunities for growth or unfortunate things happening TO you? Growth mindset is something we can practice daily. Two more: Focus on your priority Prioritize self-care Resources: Shane Portfolio on LinkedIn (in/shaneportfolio) Shane Portfolio — Comcast.com Shane Portfolio Bio Network Diversity Index Quiz Coming Next: Episode 93: Generous Leader Coaching Tip on Crucial Conversations with Shannon Cassidy Credits: Shane Portfolio, Sheep Jam Productions, Host Shannon Cassidy, Bridge Between, Inc.   If you'd like to experience this episode with closed captions, please listen on Podbean: Episode #92. Shane Portfolio - Why ”Priority” is Singular

PBS NewsHour - Science
Death toll in Pakistan passes 1,110 as monsoon floods reach historic levels

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 8:55


Historic flooding in Pakistan has now killed 1,100 people and caused $10 billion in damage since mid-June. At least 33 million people have been impacted and one-third of the country is submerged. Sara Hayat, a lawyer specializing in climate change and adjunct professor at Lahore University of Management Sciences in Pakistan, joined Amna Nawaz to discuss the growing disaster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Death toll in Pakistan passes 1,110 as monsoon floods reach historic levels

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 8:55


Historic flooding in Pakistan has now killed 1,100 people and caused $10 billion in damage since mid-June. At least 33 million people have been impacted and one-third of the country is submerged. Sara Hayat, a lawyer specializing in climate change and adjunct professor at Lahore University of Management Sciences in Pakistan, joined Amna Nawaz to discuss the growing disaster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Death toll in Pakistan passes 1,110 as monsoon floods reach historic levels

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 8:55


Historic flooding in Pakistan has now killed 1,100 people and caused $10 billion in damage since mid-June. At least 33 million people have been impacted and one-third of the country is submerged. Sara Hayat, a lawyer specializing in climate change and adjunct professor at Lahore University of Management Sciences in Pakistan, joined Amna Nawaz to discuss the growing disaster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Resoundingly Human
We're going to need a bigger … data set: Shark attacks and wicked problems

Resoundingly Human

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 53:48


Today's episode will be a little different than most, we're going to take a bit of a detour but stick with me and I promise, I'll bring us back around to data science. I'm going to take us back in time a little, back to the first time I watched what was to become my favorite movie, Jaws. It was the summer between 4th and 5th grade (probably way too young to be watching a movie about a killer shark) and I was at a sleepover where the next day, after being thoroughly terrified by this movie, we went to the beach where, wait for it, a shark had washed up on shore! Needless to say, I spent much of the rest of that summer playing in the dunes, BUT, it cemented in me an absolute fascination and, let's be honest, fear of sharks. So fast forward a couple of decades to this summer, I'm on my morning run through the Pennsylvania woods, far from any beach, and listening to my newest podcast obsession, “Reunion: Shark Attacks in Paradise,” which is about a series of unprecedented shark attacks on the French island of Reunion. All of a sudden, I hear the host mention “the totally fascinating academic journal Management Science.” That's right, the INFORMS journal Management Science! He's referring to an article by UC Berkey professor Charles West Churchman titled “Wicked Problems” and proceeds to lay out the shark attacks on Reunion as a wicked problem! I literally stop dead in my track, I'm texting my coworkers, “The coolest thing ever just happened!” and of course, I keep bingeing the podcast. So needless to say, I am beyond excited to welcome Daniel Duane, award winning journalist and author, and host of my new favorite podcast, to talk about what exactly data science has to do with a series of shark attacks on a small island in the Indian Ocean.

New Things Under the Sun
Innovation at the Office

New Things Under the Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 27:08


For decades, the office was the default way to organize workers, but that default is being re-examined. Many workers (including me) prefer working remotely, and seem to be at least as productive working remotely as they are in the office. Remote capable organizations can hire from a bigger pool of workers than is available locally. All in all, remote work seems to have been underrated, relative to just a few years ago.But there are tradeoffs. I've written before that physical proximity seems to be important for building new relationships, even though those relationships seem to remain productive as people move away from each other. This podcast narrows the focus down to the office. Does bringing people together in the office actually facilitate meeting new people? (spoiler: yes) But I'll try and get more specific about how, when, and why this happens too.This podcast is an audio read through of the (initial draft of the) post Innovation at the Office, originally published on New Things Under the Sun.Articles Mentioned:Allen, Thomas and Gunter Henn. 2007. The Organization and Architecture of Innovation. Routledge Publishing. Link.Miranda, Arianna Salazar and Matthew Claudel. 2021. Spatial proximity matters: A study on collaboration. PLoS ONE 16(12): e0259965. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259965Catalini, Christian. 2017. Microgeography and the Direction of Inventive Activity. Management Science 64(9) https://doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2017.2798Roche, Maria P., Alexander Oettl, and Christian Catalini. 2022. (Co-)Working in Close Proximity: Knowledge Spillovers and Social Interactions. NBER Working Paper 30120. https://doi.org/10.3386/w30120Hasan, Sharique, and Rembrand Koning. 2019. Prior ties and the limits of peer effects on startup team performance. Strategic Management Journal 40(9): 1394-1416. https://doi.org/10.1002/smj.3032Appel-Meulenbroek, Rianne, Bauke de Vries, and Mathieu Weggeman. 2017. Knowledge Sharing Behavior: The Role of Spatial Design in Buildings. Environment and Behavior 49(8): 874-903. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013916516673405Kabo, Felichism W., Natalie Cotton-Nessler, Yongha Hwang, Margaret C. Levenstein, and Jason Owen-Smith. 2014. Proximity effects on the dynamics and outcomes of scientific collaborations. Research Policy 43(9): 1469-1485. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2014.04.007

SikhArchive
Communism in Punjab and The Ghadar Party in Russia with Professor Ali Raza

SikhArchive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 67:54


Hi, I'm Sukhraj Singh from Sikh Archive and welcome to the 51st episode of our Podcast series of conversations with historians, authors, academics, researchers and activists on topics related to their areas of expertise on Sikh or Panjabi history.  In this episode, we are joined by Ali Raza, who is a historian specializing in the history of modern South Asia from the Lahore University of Management Sciences. His research and teaching interests include the social and intellectual history of South Asia, comparative colonialisms, decolonization, and post-colonial theory.  Today we will be discussing his work on the communist internationalism in Colonial India, in particular the establishment of the Ghadar Party, their role with the Communist Party as well as their connection with Moscow. We also take a close look at the Kirti Kisan Party in Punjab and the evolution of this movement after independence. ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Through the Noise
E23: Grace Isford - Making Long-Term Bets on Contrarians

Through the Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 33:35


Grade Isford is a Principal at Lux Capital, a venture capital firm with over $4B in AUM that invests in emerging science and technology ventures at the outermost edges of what's possible. Grace leads investments at the nexus of web3, data infrastructure, and applications of AI & ML from pre-seed to growth. Before joining Lux, Grace was a principal at Canvas Ventures. While there, she sourced 10 investments, including open-source robotic process automation platform Robocorp and blockchain-powered, real-time data sharing platform Vendia. Grace also holds a Masters of Science in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford, where she is also on the board of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program. Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com

Resoundingly Human
How to ‘up the ante' on your Fitbit goals!

Resoundingly Human

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 16:51 Very Popular


We're just about halfway through the summer, and with many days of warm weather still ahead, most of us are planning fun outdoor activities or family adventures, or maybe just working toward our summertime fitness goals. But for some, ok many of us, staying active can be a struggle, not only to reach our fitness goals, but to stick to our good exercise habits in the long run. The use of wearable heath devices, such as a Fitbit can serve as a valuable tool not just for tracking progress, but of setting goals and helping motivate users to meet them. However, new research shows that there are ways to enhance the effectiveness of these tools, for even longer-term benefits through a process called gain-loss incentives. I'm pleased to introduce Idris Adjerid from Virginia Tech to discuss the findings of his study, “Gain-Loss Incentives and Physical Activity: The Role of Choice and Wearable Health Tools,” which will be published in the INFORMS journal Management Science.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S38E23 - The Benefits of Externship Programs for the Student and for Organizations, with Matt Wilkerson

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 35:48


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Matt Wilkerson about the benefits of externship programs for the student and for organizations. See the video here: https://youtu.be/0MhTslAtMGM. Matt Wilkerson (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattwilkerson/) is the Co-founder & CEO of Paragon One which scales real work and experiential learning between companies, schools, and students. The company's flagship product, Remote Externships, are an alternative to internships that provide students with more access, flexibility, and credentialing opportunities so that they can build their resume while developing fundamental skills that employers seek. Matt holds both a B.S. degree in Computer Science & Engineering and a B.S. in Management Science from the MIT. Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon and leaving a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out BetterHelp.com/HCI to explore plans and options! Go to cardiotabs.com/innovations and use code innovations to get a free Mental Health Pack featuring Cardiotabs Omega-3 Lemon Minis and Curcumin when you sign up for a subscription. Check out Zapier.com/HCI to explore their business automations! Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Generation Bold Radio
This week we discuss the connection between COVID, CANCER, and ALZHEIMER'S. Meet Gerald Commissiong, CEO, of Todos Medical

Generation Bold Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 41:26


Meet Gerald Commissiong, CEO, of Todos Medical, a diagnostic and therapeutic development company working in prescription and over-the-counter drugs to strengthen the immune system. Discover: · The surprising connection between cancer and Covid · How Covid can trigger Alzheimer's · The treatment of long COVID · Diagnostic advances in Cancer and Alzheimer's · Why Alzheimer's occurs in the brain and how that can be connected to the immune system Gerald answers the question of why we should seek an early diagnosis of a disease, like Alzheimer's that yet has no cure. Gerald Commissiong serves as Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Board of Directors of Todos Medical. He has over ten years of experience in therapeutic and diagnostic development, including all aspects of product licensing, research collaborations, and go-to-market strategies. He is the former CEO and co-founder of Amarantus Bioscience, a company that developed LymPro, an Alzheimer's diagnostic currently being advanced by Todos Medical. Mr. Commissiong has raised over $70 million in research capital to forward numerous scientific development programs, including those currently underway at Todos. He is a former professional football player for the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League who received a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Science and Engineering with a focus in Financial Decisions from Stanford University.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - THOMAS KELLER - The Total Novice's Guide to UFOs

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 49:28


Keller is an aerospace engineer and graduate of the School of Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles. He received a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a Master of Science degree in Management Science from the University of Southern California. Mr. Keller was a computer systems analyst at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and developed a computer system for the management of resources for JPL's interplanetary exploration projects. The system was used for resources management in the Mariner, Viking and Voyager missions. His experience in the aerospace and construction industries led to the development of Space MAX: Space Station Construction Simulator, a project management simulator for the construction of the first commercial space station. Mr. Keller has also worked for Douglas Aircraft and British Aerospace.******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The Deep Wealth Podcast - Extracting Your Business And Personal Deep Wealth
John Nantz On Little Known Strategic Planning Strategies That Get Results (#145)

The Deep Wealth Podcast - Extracting Your Business And Personal Deep Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 42:36 Transcription Available


John Nantz is the Founder and Strategic Consultant of Redwood Advisors, a business consulting and services firm focused on delivering strategic, organizational, and digital consulting projects to executives at large and high-growth mid-sized companies. Formerly with McKinsey & Company, John has accomplished more than 50 consulting projects while working as a management consultant over the last ten years.John's academic portfolio includes earning a BA with distinction in Economics and an MS in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. Under Redwood, John and his team have rendered consulting services to the Unified Physician Management, BioScrip, National Veterinary Associates, Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Solutions, Sidewalk Labs, Ares Private Equity, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Geographic, NASA Education, and among others.Aside from being a Stanford-educated and McKinsey-trained strategy consultant, John is the author of "Rediscovering Republicanism," a political history book.Enjoying taking on significant challenges in the company of great people, John specializes in serving outpatient healthcare, business service, and technology companies. He is also passionate about Kite surfing and yoga outside his professional work. He is looking forward to getting booked on your show!Click here to subscribe to The Sell My Business Podcast to save time and effort.SELECTED LINKS FOR THIS EPISODEjohn.a.nantz@rwadvisors.comRedwood Advisorshttps://www.facebook.com/john.a.nantz/John Nantz - Founding Partner - Redwood Advisors | LinkedInWatch John Nantz's Newest TikTok VideosThe Deep Wealth Sell My Business PodcastCockroach Startups: What You Need To Know To Succeed And ProsperFREE Deep Wealth eBook on Why You Suck At Selling Your Business And What You Can Do About It (Today)Book Your FREE Deep Wealth Strategy Call

Subject to
Subject to: Tom Van Woensel

Subject to

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 77:17


Tom Van Woensel is Full Professor of Freight Transport and Logistics in the Operations, Planning, Accounting and Control group of the department of Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. Since July 2019, he is appointed as the Director of Education and Graduate Program Director of the Department of Industrial Engineering & Innovation Sciences (around 2500 students in various BSc, MSc and PhD programs). He is also the program chair of the Bachelor Program Industrial Engineering. Tom serves as Academic Director of the Global Supply Chain Management program at the Antwerp Management School, Belgium. As a collaborating member, he is connected to the CIRRELT in Canada. His research is mainly focused on Freight Transport and Logistics. He published over 110 papers in leading academic journals (including Management Science, Transportation Science, Transportation Research Part B, C, D, E, Production and Operations Management, Interfaces, Computers and Operations Research, European Journal of Operational Research, etc.) and several chapters in international books. As the lead scientist from the TU/e, he was involved in securing several grants coming from industry, national science foundations, and Europe. He is associate editor for several journals in the transportation field. Tom conducted a large number of projects with industry, mainly with and through his Master, Professional Doctorate, and Doctorate students. He is also director of the European Supply Chain Forum, a collaborative effort with about 75 large multinational companies.

Lean Blog Interviews
Torbjorn Netland, PhD on Company Production Systems, Lean & Technology, and More

Lean Blog Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 61:05


Episode page: https://leanblog.org/450 My guest for Episode #450 of the Lean Blog Interviews Podcast is Professor Torbjorn Netland, Ph.D. Tor is the chair of production and operations management in the department of management, technology and economics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland.  He is a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Future Council on Advanced Manufacturing and Value Chains and a Fellow of the European Academy for Industrial Management.  His award-winning research on managing performance improvement appears in leading scientific journals such as Management Science, MIT Sloan Management Review, Journal of Operations Management,  and more. Tor is a recognized thought-leader in operational excellence (including lean) and is the recipient of two Shingo Research Awards and numerous teaching awards.  His blogs at www.better-operations.com. Like my recent guest, Dr. Lisa Yerian (ep 449), Tor is going to be one of the keynote speakers at the 2022 AME Conference, being held in Dallas — Oct 17 to 20. I'll be there and I hope you will be too. Today, we discuss topics and questions including: Tor, what is the topic of your keynote talk on the AME theme of “Embrace Disruption”? Tell us your thoughts on the role of new technologies in Lean? Not just emulating Toyota of the 1960s Lessons learned about bringing new ideas to people? The dream of the lights-out factory has been haunting us for a while now – GM CEO Roger Smith in the 1980s and in more recent years Elon Musk at Tesla… is that still a dream? Is it a dystopian nightmare? Or something in between? How did you first get interested in Lean and Operational Excellence? Dogma vs practical realities – Buffers? Inspection? Last year, you blogged about the confusion around “what is Lean?” How do you define Lean and what's the most common confusion? Different views of researchers?  How do you describe the role of company-specific production systems? Difference in having YOUR production system vs. just a name? “If you like heated debates, start a discussion thread on the definition of lean on LinkedIn.” Another heated debate — Lean is not TPS? Goes beyond TPS? Tell us why it's wrong to blame JIT for pandemic-era supply chain problems… You have a textbook, written with Michel Baudin, coming out — tell us about that? The podcast is sponsored by Stiles Associates, now in their 30th year of business. They are the go-to Lean recruiting firm serving the manufacturing, private equity, and healthcare industries. Learn more. This podcast is part of the #LeanCommunicators network. 

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking
487: Innovation Through Customer Collaboration (with Ben M. Bensaou)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 72:23


Welcome to an episode with a well-recognized professor, Ben M. Bensaou. Get Ben's book here: https://amzn.to/3xpI9Zb Many people think that you need a genius leader or need to become a start-up to innovate. But we all have the potential to innovate. In this episode, Ben speaks about everyone's role in innovation and how it can be performed like a habit in our everyday lives. He also discussed the need to develop a deeper understanding of customers and create a culture of collaborating with customers to offer the ideal combination of performance, attributes, price, and other characteristics that customers need and want, or produce a product and service with a powerful market appeal. Ben M. Bensaou is a Professor of Technology Management and Professor of Asian Business and Comparative Management at INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France. He served as Dean of Executive Education in 2018–2020. He was a Visiting Associate Professor at Harvard Business School in 1998-1999, a Senior Fellow at the Wharton School of Management in 2007-2008, and a Visiting Scholar at the Haas School of Business at the University of California Berkeley in 2013-2015. He received his PhD in Management from MIT Sloan School of Management, Cambridge, US, and his MA in Management Science from Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, Japan; his Diplôme d'Ingénieur (MSc) in Civil Engineering and DEA in Mechanical Engineering from respectively the Ecole Nationale des TPE, Lyon and the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, two Grandes Ecoles in France. His research and teaching activities focus on: (1) how to create innovating capabilities and competencies as a way to build an innovating organization and culture; (2) Blue Ocean Strategy and value innovation implementation, and roll out processes across the whole organization; (3) how to build social capital within firms; (4) new forms of organizations, in particular networked corporations, strategic alliances, joint ventures, and value-adding partnerships; and (5) the impact of information technology on innovation. Professor Bensaou addresses these issues from an international comparative perspective, with a special focus on Japanese organizations. Professor Bensaou's research on buyer-supplier relations in the US and Japanese auto industries won him the Best Doctoral Dissertation Award in the field of information systems and a finalist nomination for the Free Press Award for outstanding dissertation research in the field of business policy and strategy. His case studies on innovation won the 2006, 2008 and 2009 ECCH Best Case Awards (with Kim & Mauborgne). His publications include papers in Academy of Management Journal, Management Science, Information Systems Research, Organization Science, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, book chapters and conference proceedings. He has been a member of the Editorial Board of Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly and MISQ Executive. He has been listed in the Who's Who in the World since 1998. He has been consulting for Asian, European and US corporations since 1993. At INSEAD, Professor Bensaou developed two new MBA courses: 'Managing Networked Organisations' and 'Understanding Japanese Business.' He also teaches courses on Competitive Strategy, Innovation, Blue Ocean Strategy and Value Innovation, Information Technology and Comparative Management (in English and French). He was a Visiting Professor at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, where he taught his 'Information Technology and Corporate Transformation' course. He has also been teaching (in Japanese) in Executive Education programs at Keio Business School, Tokyo, Japan. Get Ben's book here: Built to Innovate: Essential Practices to Wire Innovation into Your Company's DNA. Ben M. Bensaou: https://amzn.to/3xpI9Zb Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - THOMAS KELLER - The Total Novice's Guide to UFOs

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 41:28


Keller is an aerospace engineer and graduate of the School of Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles. He received a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a Master of Science degree in Management Science from the University of Southern California. Mr. Keller was a computer systems analyst at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and developed a computer system for the management of resources for JPL's interplanetary exploration projects. The system was used for resources management in the Mariner, Viking and Voyager missions. His experience in the aerospace and construction industries led to the development of Space MAX: Space Station Construction Simulator, a project management simulator for the construction of the first commercial space station. Mr. Keller has also worked for Douglas Aircraft and British Aerospace.******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

Si-Suite
CEO Christina Qi's failure-filled origin story

Si-Suite

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 41:56


Christina Qi is the CEO of Databento, an on-demand market data platform. She formerly founded Domeyard LP, a hedge fund focused on high frequency trading (HFT) that traded up to $7.1 billion USD per day. Failing to earn a job offer after a Wall Street internship, Christina started Domeyard from her dorm room with $1000 in savings, about 9 years ago. Her fund was a tiny minnow amongst the tigers of the hedge fund world, but after Michael Lewis's Flash Boys came out in 2014 and HFT firms hid from the spotlight, Domeyard accidentally found itself in the center of the ring. Over the next decade, her company's story was featured on the front page of Forbes and Nikkei, and quoted in the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, CNN, NBC, and the Financial Times as a result of the controversy and fascination with HFT. By a series of accidents, Christina became a voice in her industry, contributing to the World Economic Forum's research on AI in finance, guest lecturing at dozens of universities, and teaching Domeyard's case study at Harvard Business School. She is grateful to be able to open up about her mistakes, and to help people turn failures into opportunities. No amount of therapy has quashed Christina's impostor syndrome, but she will always be proud of her non-profit volunteer work. Christina was elected as a Member of the MIT Corporation, MIT's Board of Trustees. She is Co-Chair of the Board of Invest in Girls, bringing financial literacy education to underserved populations across the US. Christina also sits on the Board of Directors of The Financial Executives Alliance (FEA) Hedge Fund Group, drives entrepreneurship efforts at the MIT Sloan Boston Alumni Association (MIT SBAA), and served on the U.S. Non-Profit Boards Committee of 100 Women in Finance. Although "X Under X" lists are a gimmick, she'll admit that Forbes 30 Under 30 made a positive impact on her life by giving her a community - friends who dragged her out of bed during the lowest days of her life. Christina holds a Bachelor of Science in Management Science from MIT and is a CAIA Charterholder. Christina wrote a book about her many hedge fund mistakes, but is hesitating to publish it because she wants to spend her 30's out of the spotlight. If it ever gets published, you can sign up for a notification by visiting www.christinaqi.com Learn more about Christina LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/christinaqi Twitter: christinaqi Website: christinaqi.com Shout-out: Today's Diversity Leader Shout-out goes to Tiffany Zimmerman, Senior Director, Invest in Girls Program Music: Vente by Mamá Patxanga is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License Amor Y Felicidad by SONGO 21 is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 International License --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/si-suite/message

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do
Changing Strategy for Today's World with Ron Adner

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:23


For episode 726 of "Making Waves at C-Level", host Thom Singer sits down with a strategy professor from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. Ron Adner has written two unbelievably great books and loves everything about strategy. His newest book, "Winning the Right Game: How to disrupt, defend, and deliver in a changing world" is a MUST READ for everyone in leadership. In this conversation they talk about changes from classic disruption and ecosystem disruption. How leaders can navigate these changes. They also touch on how this new world impacts companies and industries.  About Ron Adner Ron Adner is The Nathaniel D'1906 and Martha E. Leverone Memorial Professor of Business Administration and Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. Prior to joining Tuck, he was the Akzo-Nobel Fellow of Strategic Management at INSEAD, where he served on the faculty for ten years. Dr. Adner's award winning research introduces a new perspective on value creation and competition when industry boundaries break down in the wake of ecosystem disruption. His two books, The Wide Lens: What Successful Innovators See that Others Miss (2012) and Winning the Right Game: How to Disrupt, Defend, and Deliver in a Changing World (October 2021) have been heralded as landmark contributions to the strategy literature. Clayton Christensen (Innovator's Dilemma) described his work as “Path-breaking” and Jim Collins (Good to Great) has called him “One of our most important strategic thinkers for the 21st century.” Dr. Adner has held editorial and board positions in the leading peer-reviewed academic journals of his field, including the Academy of Management Review, Management Science, the Strategic Management Journal, and Strategy Science. His managerial articles have been published in outlets including the Harvard Business Review, The Atlantic, Fast Company, Forbes, Wired, The Financial Times, and the Wall Street Journal . Dr. Adner's work is a rare convergence of rigorous academic research, profound managerial insights, and practical, powerful frameworks. Applied, tested, and validated in some of the world's leading companies, his approach to seeing the bigger strategy picture has been transformative in driving effective innovation in both the corporate and social sectors. Dr. Adner is founder of the Strategy Insight Group, whose mission is to help clients eliminate strategy blind spots and build robust go-to-market strategies in complex ecosystems, internal and external. He is a keynote speaker, consultant, and advisor to companies around the world. His engagements have transformed strategy at Fortune 500 firms as well as at entrepreneurial startups. He is an accomplished teacher and a seven-time winner of the annual, student-voted, Award for Teaching Excellence at both Tuck and INSEAD (2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2011, 2019). Dr. Adner holds a PhD and an MA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as master's and bachelor's degrees in mechanical engineering from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. https://thomsinger.com/podcast/ron-adner Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

My Favorite Mistake
MIT Professor Arnold (Arnie) Barnett's "Obnoxious" Media Mistake Got Him A Lot of Attention

My Favorite Mistake

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 49:07


Episode page with video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #169 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Arnold (Arnie) Barnett. He is the George Eastman Professor of Management Science and a Professor of Statistics at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Barnett holds a BA in mathematics from Columbia College and a PhD in mathematics from MIT. His research specialty is applied mathematical modeling with a focus on problems of health and safety. Cited as “the nation's leading expert on aviation safety,” Barnett was recognized with the 2002 President's Citation from the Flight Safety Foundation for “truly outstanding contributions on behalf of safety.” MIT Sloan students have honored him on 14 occasions for outstanding teaching. In this episode, Arnie shares his “favorite mistake” story about blurting out something to a New York Times reporter who called to get his comment about a US Airways crash that had occurred earlier in the day. Even though he regrets saying what he did, it gave him a reputation for being “willing to talk straight” which led a torrent of requests to speak and to be interviewed in venues ranging from radio programs to NBC's Today Show. We also talk about questions and topics including: 1994 US Air had a number of crashes – a “temporary spasm of bad luck”? The NY Times article he was quoted in — the “mistake” The word “amazing”: “causing great surprise or wonder; astonishing” Lesson about talking with the press? Are we bad at estimating probabilities in general? Bad at estimating the risk of driving vs. flying? You wrote an opinion piece in late March 2022 titled “Don't end the mask mandate for US airlines” “ending the requirement now would be a serious mistake.” —> why did you say that then and do you still say that now? I saw you give a talk about this — is the Electoral College a mistake? Is it a mistake that can be fixed? A simple fix for gerrymandering? “MIT now has a reputation of being very much woke” Tell us about the Leaders for Global Operations program… you are a popular internship and thesis advisor. Why do you like working with LGO students? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/favorite-mistake/support

The Trident Room Podcast
27(1/2) - Jeff Kline and Lyla Englehorn - Warfare Innovation

The Trident Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


The Trident Room Podcast host Luke Goorsky sits down with Jeff Kline and Lyla Ann Englehorn – they discuss problem spaces, the importance of research and the future of warfare. Jeff Kline attended the University of Missouri, School of Engineering, graduating with honors in Industrial Engineering, and received his Navy commission through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program in 1979. His initial sea tour was in USS MOOSBRUGGER (DD-980) serving as Gunnery Officer and Navigator. Jeff's following sea tours included assignments as propulsion officer in USS RANGER (CV-61), Combat Systems Officer in USS JOHN L. HALL (FFG-32), Operations Officer for Tactical Destroyer Squadron 32, Commanding Officer of USS AQUILA (PHM-4), Commanding Officer of USS CUSHING (DD-985), and Deputy Operations Officer of COMSIXTHFLT. His shore tours include Marine Corps Landing Force Training Command, Pacific as an instructor in Naval Gunfire and Supporting Arms, Naval Postgraduate School as a student in Operations Research graduating with honors, and Office of the Secretary of Defense as a Naval Analyst. Jeff is also a 1997 honors graduate of the National War College in Washington D.C. Jeff is currently a Professor of Practice in the Operations Research department and is the Director of the Wayne P. Hughes Jr. Naval Warfare Studies Institute. He teaches Joint Campaign Analysis, systems analysis, executive risk assessment and contributes to maritime security education programs offered at NPS. Jeff supports applied analytical research in naval warfare, maritime operations and security, theater ballistic missile defense, and future force composition studies. Jeff was a member of the 2017 Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Design Advisory Board. He has also served on several Naval Study Board Committees. His NPS faculty awards include the 2019 J. Steinhardt Award for lifetime achievement in Military Operations Research, the Navy's Superior Civilian Service Award, 2011 Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) Award for Teaching of OR Practice, 2009 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Homeland Security Award, 2007 Hamming Award for interdisciplinary research, 2007 Wayne E. Meyers Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering Research, and the 2005 Northrop Grumman Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering. He is a member of the Military Operations Research Society and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science. Ms. Lyla Englehorn, MPP, has a research faculty appointment at Naval Postgraduate School, and supports many research initiatives involving rapid concept generation, innovation, and information sharing. At NPS she has worked on a diverse range of projects and programs, and now serves as the Warfighting Concepts Lead for the Naval Warfare Studies Institute (NWSI) where she guides rapid concept generation using tools of human-centered design. She has held a faculty appointment at NPS since 2012 and in that time has served as the Associate Director for the Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER), a member of the instruction team for the International Maritime Security course sequence, and is an active member of the NPS Design Thinking Community of Practice. Lyla earned a Master of Public Policy degree from the Panetta Institute for Public Policy at CSUMB, and completed her undergraduate work at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. Her research interests include international maritime security policy, information sharing practices, issues around climate change, and innovation processes focusing on human users. Ms. Englehorn holds a TS/SCI clearance. The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you! The views expressed in this interview are those of the individuals and do not reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, the US Navy, or the Naval Postgraduate School.

The Trident Room Podcast
27(2/2) - Jeff Kline and Lyla Englehorn - Solving Wicked Problems

The Trident Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


The Trident Room Podcast host Luke Goorsky sits down with Jeff Kline and Lyla Ann Englehorn – they discuss problem spaces, the importance of research and the future of warfare. Jeff Kline attended the University of Missouri, School of Engineering, graduating with honors in Industrial Engineering, and received his Navy commission through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program in 1979. His initial sea tour was in USS MOOSBRUGGER (DD-980) serving as Gunnery Officer and Navigator. Jeff's following sea tours included assignments as propulsion officer in USS RANGER (CV-61), Combat Systems Officer in USS JOHN L. HALL (FFG-32), Operations Officer for Tactical Destroyer Squadron 32, Commanding Officer of USS AQUILA (PHM-4), Commanding Officer of USS CUSHING (DD-985), and Deputy Operations Officer of COMSIXTHFLT. His shore tours include Marine Corps Landing Force Training Command, Pacific as an instructor in Naval Gunfire and Supporting Arms, Naval Postgraduate School as a student in Operations Research graduating with honors, and Office of the Secretary of Defense as a Naval Analyst. Jeff is also a 1997 honors graduate of the National War College in Washington D.C. Jeff is currently a Professor of Practice in the Operations Research department and is the Director of the Wayne P. Hughes Jr. Naval Warfare Studies Institute. He teaches Joint Campaign Analysis, systems analysis, executive risk assessment and contributes to maritime security education programs offered at NPS. Jeff supports applied analytical research in naval warfare, maritime operations and security, theater ballistic missile defense, and future force composition studies. Jeff was a member of the 2017 Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Design Advisory Board. He has also served on several Naval Study Board Committees. His NPS faculty awards include the 2019 J. Steinhardt Award for lifetime achievement in Military Operations Research, the Navy's Superior Civilian Service Award, 2011 Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) Award for Teaching of OR Practice, 2009 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Homeland Security Award, 2007 Hamming Award for interdisciplinary research, 2007 Wayne E. Meyers Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering Research, and the 2005 Northrop Grumman Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering. He is a member of the Military Operations Research Society and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science. Ms. Lyla Englehorn, MPP, has a research faculty appointment at Naval Postgraduate School, and supports many research initiatives involving rapid concept generation, innovation, and information sharing. At NPS she has worked on a diverse range of projects and programs, and now serves as the Warfighting Concepts Lead for the Naval Warfare Studies Institute (NWSI) where she guides rapid concept generation using tools of human-centered design. She has held a faculty appointment at NPS since 2012 and in that time has served as the Associate Director for the Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER), a member of the instruction team for the International Maritime Security course sequence, and is an active member of the NPS Design Thinking Community of Practice. Lyla earned a Master of Public Policy degree from the Panetta Institute for Public Policy at CSUMB, and completed her undergraduate work at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. Her research interests include international maritime security policy, information sharing practices, issues around climate change, and innovation processes focusing on human users. Ms. Englehorn holds a TS/SCI clearance. The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you!

The Sikh Cast
Ghazal Fifty-Two, Divan-i-Goya: Damanpreet Singh & Inni Kaur | Bhai Nand Lal | The Sikh Cast | SikhRI

The Sikh Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 69:29


Introducing Paigham-i-Goya: Expression of Love, new translations of a selection of ghazals from Bhai Nand Lal “Goya.” Today's podcast begins with a recitation of Bhai Nand Lal's ghazal in Persian, followed by a new English transcreation, the result of a unique collaboration between Dr. Fatima Fayyaz and Dr. Nadhra Khan of Lahore University of Management Sciences, Damanpreet Singh, writer, and graduate student, and Inni Kaur of SikhRI, followed by a discussion between Daman and Inni about the beauty of the ghazal and the transcreation process. Follow Damanpreet and Inni as they discuss their learnings and challenges while engaging with the words of Bhai Nand Lal. The unique and symbolic meanings that these ghazals reveal are a treat for those who yearn to get a glimpse into the court of Guru Gobind Singh Sahib. Author: Bhai Nand Lal “Goya” Collection: Divan-i-Goya Transcreators: Fatima Fayyaz, Inni Kaur, Nadhra Khan, and Damanpreet Singh Persian Narrator: Gholamhossein Sajadi English Narrator: Ryan Gillis Persian ای کمالِ تو کمال است و کمال است و کمال ای جمالِ تو جمال است و جمال است و جمال ای که نزدیکی تو از شه رگ و عالم حیران یارِ ما این چه خیال است و خیال است و خیال من ندانم که کدامم که کدامم که کدام بندهٔ اویم و او حافظِ من در همه حال دلِ من فارغ و در کوی تو پرواز کند گر زِ‌ راهِ‌ کرمِ خویش ببخشی پر و بال صاحبِ حال به جز حرفِ خدا دم نزند غیرِ ذکرش همه آواز بود قیل و مقال مرشدِ کاملِ ما بندگی ات فرماید ای زهی فالِ مبارک که کند صاحبِ حال بی تو یک دم و نفس هست مرا همچو سال این وبال است و وبال است و وبال است و وبال هر که گوید تو چه باشی و چه گوید جز تو گشت حیران همه عالم همه در عین جمال English Translation Such is our deep connection with You, That only with Your arrival, there is exuberance in the world. In Your pathway, I have spread out, My eyes and my heart—the only worthy possessions I could offer. Have some compassion for the Divine's faqīrs! ‍So that you may find bliss in this world. Direct your heart towards the Divine at all times, So you can cross the bridge of Sirāṭ with ease. No one is at ease under the ever-turning sky, So Goya, just move through this worn perpetual caravanserai. ~~~ Featuring: Damanpreet Singh, Inni Kaur #BhaiNandLal #Ghazal #Persian #Ghazal #Sikhism #GuruGobindSingh --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-sikh-cast-sikhri/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-sikh-cast-sikhri/support

What Fuels You
S15E3: Matt Ehrlichman

What Fuels You

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 52:31


Matt Ehrlichman is the CEO, Chairman, and founder of Porch Group, a Seattle-based vertical software platform for the home. Porch's mission is to help home services companies grow and through these relationships to help make the home simple, from moving to maintenance and everything in between. Prior to founding Porch, Matt created his first technology startup, Thriva, in his dorm room at Stanford University, where he also received his Bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurial Engineering and Master of Science in Management Science and Engineering. In 2007, he sold Thriva to Active Network for $60 million and went on to become Active Network's Chief Strategy Officer, where during his five-year tenure, Active grew from $60 million to more than $420 million in revenue and an initial public offering in 2011. Matt currently lives in Seattle with his wife and three children.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering
Training the next generation of entrepreneurs

The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 27:24 Very Popular


Search online and you'll find lists of all the skills entrepreneurs should have - among them are imagination, creativity, innovation, entrepreneurship. But are entrepreneurs born with these relevant skills, or can they be taught?In this episode of Stanford Engineering's The Future of Everything, Tina Seelig, professor of the practice in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford, explains the differences between imagination, creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship, and how all four can be taught and then applied to finding solutions to big challenges. Join Seelig and host, bioengineer Russ Altman, as they discuss how to train a generation of entrepreneurs who will make positive contributions to the world. Listen and subscribe here.