Podcasts about Cambrian

First period of the Paleozoic Era, 541-485 million years ago

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Best podcasts about Cambrian

Latest podcast episodes about Cambrian

American Conservative University
Refuting 6 False Popularly Held Scientific Ideas. Dr. Steven Meyer. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 28:30


Episode 9. Refuting 6 False Popularly Held Scientific Ideas. Dr. Steven Meyer. ACU Sunday Series.   https://youtu.be/PoLwZ5YynZU Refuting 6 False Popularly Held Scientific Ideas.  The New Scientific Evidence that Points to the Existence of God John Ankerberg Show 99.1K subscribers Nov 13, 2022 Return of the God Hypothesis: How do the origin of the universe, the fine-tuning in the universe, and the information in DNA point to God as the creator? Dr. Meyer at Discovery Institute- https://www.discovery.org/p/meyer/ Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, The Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). In his first book on intelligent design, Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009) Meyer examined the mystery of the origin of the first life. With Darwin's Doubt, he has expanded the scope of the case for intelligent design to the whole sweep of life's history. Meyer's research addresses the deepest mystery surrounding the origin of life and the origin of animal life: the origin of biological information necessary to produce it. Meyer graduated from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, in 1981 with a degree in physics and earth science. He later became a geophysicist with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) in Dallas, Texas. From 1981 to 1985, he worked for ARCO in digital signal processing and seismic survey interpretation. In 1986 as a Rotary International Scholar, he began his training in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University, earning an M.Phil. in 1987 and a Ph.D. in 1991. His doctoral thesis was titled “Of Clues and Causes: A Methodological Interpretation of Origin-of-Life Research.” He returned to Whitworth in the fall of 1990 to teach philosophy and the philosophy of science. He left a tenured position as a professor at Whitworth in 2002 to direct the Center for Science and Culture full time, which he had helped found with John West in 1996. Prior to the publication of Signature in the Cell and Darwin's Doubt, the writing for which Meyer was best known was an August 2004 review essay in the Smithsonian Institution-affiliated peer-reviewed biology journal Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. The article laid out the evidential case for intelligent design, presenting it as the best explanation for the origin of the biological information necessary to produce the new forms of animal life that arose abruptly during the Cambrian explosion. Because the article was the first peer-reviewed publication arguing for intelligent design in a technical journal, it proved extremely controversial.  The journal's editor, evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg, was punished by his Smithsonian supervisors for allowing Meyer's article into print. This led to the investigation of top Smithsonian personnel by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.  The controversy was widely covered in the media with articles or news stories appearing about it in The Wall Street Journal, Science, Nature, NPR, The O'Reilly Factor and the Washington Post. The federal investigation eventually concluded that Sternberg had been wrongly disciplined and intimidated. Meyer's many other publications include contributions to, and the editing of, the peer-reviewed volume Darwinism, Design and Public Education (Michigan State University Press, 2004) and the innovative textbook Explore Evolution (Hill House Publishers, 2007). Meyer has also published editorials in national newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The National Post (of Canada), The Daily Telegraph (of London) and The Los Angeles Times.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs such as The Jim Lehrer News Hour, NBC Nightly News, ABC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, Nightline, Fox News Live, Paula Zahn Now (CNN), Good Morning America and the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.  He has also been featured in two New York Times front-page stories and has garnered attention in other top national media. In 2008, he appeared with Ben Stein in the theatrical-released documentary Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.  He has also been featured prominently in the science documentaries Icons of Evolution, The Case for a Creator, Darwin's Dilemma and Unlocking The Mystery of Life, the latter which was shown on PBS and which Meyer co-wrote with producer Lad Allen.

American Conservative University
Science and Faith. Dr. Stephen Meyer, Biologist Jonathan McLatchie, Engineer Stuart Burgess and Theologian Vern Poythress Answer Questions. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 43:18


Philosopher Stephen Meyer, theologian Vern Poythress, engineer Stuart Burgess, and biologist Jonathan McLatchie answer questions about science and faith posed to them at the Westminster Conference on Science and Faith. The session is moderated by Discovery Institute Vice President John West. This discussion was taped at the 2022 Westminster Conference on Science and Faith in the greater Philadelphia area, which was jointly sponsored by Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture and Westminster Theological Seminary. Participants: Dr. Stuart Burgess has held academic posts at Bristol University (UK) and Cambridge University (UK). He has published over 180 scientific publications on the science of design in engineering and biology. He has received many national and international awards for design, including from the Minister of State for Trade and Industry in the UK. In 2019 he was given the top mechanical engineer award in the UK out of 120,000 professional mechanical engineers. Rev. Dr. Vern Poythress (PhD, Harvard; DTh, Stellenbosch) is distinguished professor of New Testament, biblical interpretation, and systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. His books include Redeeming Science, Redeeming Mathematics, and Redeeming Philosophy, or Chance and the Sovereignty of God. Dr. Stephen C. Meyer received his PhD in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. His books include Return of the God Hypothesis: Three Scientific Discoveries That Reveal the Mind Behind the Universe (HarperOne, 2021); the New York Times bestseller Darwin's Doubt (HarperOne, 2013); and Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), named a Book of the Year by the Times Literary Supplement. Dr. Jonathan McLatchie holds a Bachelor's degree in Forensic Biology from the University of Strathclyde, a Masters (M.Res) degree in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Glasgow, a second Master's degree in Medical and Molecular Bioscience from Newcastle University, and a PhD in Evolutionary Biology from Newcastle University. Currently, McLatchie is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Sattler College in Boston, Massachusetts. Watch this video at- https://youtu.be/tzCp6KXKt00 Discovery Science 180K subscribers 6,413 views Nov 18, 2022 ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official YouTube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter: Twitter: https://twitter.com/discoverycsc/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe...   Dr. Meyer at Discovery Institute- https://www.discovery.org/p/meyer/ Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, The Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). In his first book on intelligent design, Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009) Meyer examined the mystery of the origin of the first life. With Darwin's Doubt, he has expanded the scope of the case for intelligent design to the whole sweep of life's history. Meyer's research addresses the deepest mystery surrounding the origin of life and the origin of animal life: the origin of biological information necessary to produce it. Meyer graduated from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, in 1981 with a degree in physics and earth science. He later became a geophysicist with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) in Dallas, Texas. From 1981 to 1985, he worked for ARCO in digital signal processing and seismic survey interpretation. In 1986 as a Rotary International Scholar, he began his training in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University, earning an M.Phil. in 1987 and a Ph.D. in 1991. His doctoral thesis was titled “Of Clues and Causes: A Methodological Interpretation of Origin-of-Life Research.” He returned to Whitworth in the fall of 1990 to teach philosophy and the philosophy of science. He left a tenured position as a professor at Whitworth in 2002 to direct the Center for Science and Culture full time, which he had helped found with John West in 1996. Prior to the publication of Signature in the Cell and Darwin's Doubt, the writing for which Meyer was best known was an August 2004 review essay in the Smithsonian Institution-affiliated peer-reviewed biology journal Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. The article laid out the evidential case for intelligent design, presenting it as the best explanation for the origin of the biological information necessary to produce the new forms of animal life that arose abruptly during the Cambrian explosion. Because the article was the first peer-reviewed publication arguing for intelligent design in a technical journal, it proved extremely controversial.  The journal's editor, evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg, was punished by his Smithsonian supervisors for allowing Meyer's article into print. This led to the investigation of top Smithsonian personnel by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.  The controversy was widely covered in the media with articles or news stories appearing about it in The Wall Street Journal, Science, Nature, NPR, The O'Reilly Factor and the Washington Post. The federal investigation eventually concluded that Sternberg had been wrongly disciplined and intimidated. Meyer's many other publications include contributions to, and the editing of, the peer-reviewed volume Darwinism, Design and Public Education (Michigan State University Press, 2004) and the innovative textbook Explore Evolution (Hill House Publishers, 2007). Meyer has also published editorials in national newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The National Post (of Canada), The Daily Telegraph (of London) and The Los Angeles Times.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs such as The Jim Lehrer News Hour, NBC Nightly News, ABC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, Nightline, Fox News Live, Paula Zahn Now (CNN), Good Morning America and the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.  He has also been featured in two New York Times front-page stories and has garnered attention in other top national media. In 2008, he appeared with Ben Stein in the theatrical-released documentary Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.  He has also been featured prominently in the science documentaries Icons of Evolution, The Case for a Creator, Darwin's Dilemma and Unlocking The Mystery of Life, the latter which was shown on PBS and which Meyer co-wrote with producer Lad Allen.

The Kevin Rooke Show
E91: Calle on Open Source Software, Lightning Development, LNBits, Cashu, & More

The Kevin Rooke Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 84:07


Calle is a Lightning developer who has worked on a handful of Lightning projects, including Lightning Tip Bot, LNBits, and Cashu. In our conversation we talked about the Cambrian explosion of Lightning development happening lately, the importance of open source software, e-cash mints, and we did a deep-dive into the work Calle is doing on LNBits and Cashu today. → LNBits: https://lnbits.com/ → Cashu: https://cashu.space/ Sponsors → Voltage: https://stacksats.how/voltage → Stakwork: https://stacksats.how/stakwork This show is a Lightning podcast. That means instead of asking for likes or shares, I ask for sats. The best way to show your support is to download Fountain from the App Store, load your wallet with some sats, and send them over the Lightning Network to kerooke@fountain.fm. → Fountain: https://www.fountain.fm/ → More Episodes: https://www.stacksats.how/podcast → Lightning Address: ⚡kerooke@fountain.fm Links → Stack Sats: https://www.stacksats.how/ → Twitter: https://twitter.com/kerooke → Books: https://www.kevinrooke.com/book-recommendations → Bitcoin News: https://stacker.news/r/kr Timestamps 00:00 - Intro 02:16 - Calle Intro 06:05 - The Cambrian Explosion in Lightning Development 17:08 - Why Calle Loves Open Source Software 29:44 - Was The Internet Built Backwards? 39:20 - Jack Dorsey's Nostr Donation 40:50 - Lightning Tip Bot 54:09 - How Does LNBits Work? 1:05:32 - What Is Cashu & What Are E-Cash Mints? 1:14:08 - Will Custodial LN Wallets Integrate Cashu? 1:19:43 - The Lightning Round

Tank Talks
Building a Community-Driven VC with Rex Salisbury of Cambrian Ventures

Tank Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:16


Community is a term thrown around quite a bit these days, but it is clear that building genuine networks of people and working to help others can provide real value. Our guest today is Rex Salisbury, Founder and Managing Partner of Cambrian. Cambrian began in 2015 as a community of members and founders interested in the fintech space and that eventually landed him a role at a16z as a partner on the Fintech team where he backed unicorns like Deel and Tally. We talk about launching Cambrian as a Solo-GP fund with $20M in capital and why he thinks now is the best time to build in the fintech space.About Rex Salisbury:Rex Salisbury is the Founder and Manager Partner of Cambrian, which is a community and venture fund focused on FinTech. Formerly he was a partner on the fintech team at Andreessen Horowitz. Previously he worked as an investment banker for Merrill Lynch supporting the real estate industry and as a Product Engineer at Sindeo and Checkr.In this episode we discuss:(01:35)  Rex's journey to becoming an investor(12:07)  Making big life choices(14:28)  How Rex got hired as an engineer without an engineering background(19:41)  Lessons from Rexs's time at a16z(27:27)  The process of turning Cambrian from a pure community into a community driven venture fund(29:04)  The power of the Cambrian network(30:18)  Further benefits of building a community(34:39)  Managing opportunities as a Solo GP(36:20)  Rex's definition of FinTech(40:19)  Advice to startups around interest rates(44:11)  Where crypto fits into Cambrian's investing thesis(48:38)  The sociology behind crypto(50:44)  Being a FinTech super connectorFast Favorites:*

Scripture On Creation podcast
Soft tissue preservation hits new heights

Scripture On Creation podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 13:21


Fossils from the "Cambrian explosion" supposedly over 500 million years old have been found with soft tissues well preserved.  The ability of "nature" to preserve organic material seems to have no limits!

American Conservative University
Episode 8. The Cambrian Information Explosion. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 23:39


Episode 8. The Cambrian Information Explosion. ACU Sunday Series. Watch this video at- https://youtu.be/N8vW9nT2Yx4 Episode 8. The Cambrian Information Explosion. The New Scientific Evidence that Points to the Existence of God John Ankerberg Show Nov 6, 2022 The Cambrian Information Explosion: What does it take to build new animal life? Dr. Meyer at Discovery Institute- https://www.discovery.org/p/meyer/ Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, The Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). In his first book on intelligent design, Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009) Meyer examined the mystery of the origin of the first life. With Darwin's Doubt, he has expanded the scope of the case for intelligent design to the whole sweep of life's history. Meyer's research addresses the deepest mystery surrounding the origin of life and the origin of animal life: the origin of biological information necessary to produce it. Meyer graduated from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, in 1981 with a degree in physics and earth science. He later became a geophysicist with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) in Dallas, Texas. From 1981 to 1985, he worked for ARCO in digital signal processing and seismic survey interpretation. In 1986 as a Rotary International Scholar, he began his training in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University, earning an M.Phil. in 1987 and a Ph.D. in 1991. His doctoral thesis was titled “Of Clues and Causes: A Methodological Interpretation of Origin-of-Life Research.” He returned to Whitworth in the fall of 1990 to teach philosophy and the philosophy of science. He left a tenured position as a professor at Whitworth in 2002 to direct the Center for Science and Culture full time, which he had helped found with John West in 1996. Prior to the publication of Signature in the Cell and Darwin's Doubt, the writing for which Meyer was best known was an August 2004 review essay in the Smithsonian Institution-affiliated peer-reviewed biology journal Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. The article laid out the evidential case for intelligent design, presenting it as the best explanation for the origin of the biological information necessary to produce the new forms of animal life that arose abruptly during the Cambrian explosion. Because the article was the first peer-reviewed publication arguing for intelligent design in a technical journal, it proved extremely controversial.  The journal's editor, evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg, was punished by his Smithsonian supervisors for allowing Meyer's article into print. This led to the investigation of top Smithsonian personnel by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.  The controversy was widely covered in the media with articles or news stories appearing about it in The Wall Street Journal, Science, Nature, NPR, The O'Reilly Factor and the Washington Post. The federal investigation eventually concluded that Sternberg had been wrongly disciplined and intimidated. Meyer's many other publications include contributions to, and the editing of, the peer-reviewed volume Darwinism, Design and Public Education (Michigan State University Press, 2004) and the innovative textbook Explore Evolution (Hill House Publishers, 2007). Meyer has also published editorials in national newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The National Post (of Canada), The Daily Telegraph (of London) and The Los Angeles Times.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs such as The Jim Lehrer News Hour, NBC Nightly News, ABC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, Nightline, Fox News Live, Paula Zahn Now (CNN), Good Morning America and the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.  He has also been featured in two New York Times front-page stories and has garnered attention in other top national media. In 2008, he appeared with Ben Stein in the theatrical-released documentary Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.  He has also been featured prominently in the science documentaries Icons of Evolution, The Case for a Creator, Darwin's Dilemma and Unlocking The Mystery of Life, the latter which was shown on PBS and which Meyer co-wrote with producer Lad Allen.

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Atypical PKC and persistent FoxP expression are key molecular components of operant self-learning, a form of motor learning, in Drosophila motor neurons

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.12.16.520755v1?rss=1 Authors: Ehweiner, A., Brembs, B. Abstract: Motor learning is not only a key invention of the many new animals evolving new body plans during the Cambrian, it is also central to human existence such as in learning to speak or walk, rehabilitation after injury, or sports. Evidence suggests that all forms of motor learning may share an evolutionary conserved molecular plasticity pathway. Here we present novel insights into the molecular processes underlying a kind of motor learning in the fruit fly Drosophila, operant self-learning. We have discovered that the Forkhead Box gene FoxP is not required in the fly brain for this type of learning. Instead, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) appears to be a central component in a plasticity process that takes place in FoxP-expressing motor neurons in the ventral nerve cord. Using CRISPR/Cas9 to knock out canonical aPKC interaction partners bazooka and the kidney and brain gene (KIBRA) in adult animals, we found that aPKC likely acts via non-canonical pathways in this form of learning. We also found that 14 but not 7 days after CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of FoxP in adult animals, learning is impaired, suggesting that adult FoxP expression is required for operant self-learning. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

Screaming in the Cloud
Winning Hearts and Minds in Cloud with Brian Hall

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 37:51


About BrianBrian leads the Google Cloud Product and Industry Marketing team. This team is focused on accelerating the growth of Google Cloud by establishing thought leadership, increasing demand and usage, enabling their sales teams and partners to tell their product stories with excellence, and helping their customers be the best advocates for them.Before joining Google, Brian spent over 25 years in product marketing or engineering in different forms. He started his career at Microsoft and had a very non-traditional path for 20 years. Brian worked in every product division except for cloud. He did marketing, product management, and engineering roles. And, early on, he was the first speech writer for Steve Ballmer and worked on Bill Gates' speeches too. His last role was building up the Microsoft Surface business from scratch as VP of the hardware businesses. After Microsoft, Brian spent a year as CEO at a hardware startup called Doppler Labs, where they made a run at transforming hearing, and then spent two years as VP at Amazon Web Services leading product marketing, developer advocacy, and a bunch more marketing teams.Brian has three kids still at home, Barty, Noli, and Alder, who are all named after trees in different ways. His wife Edie and him met right at the beginning of their first year at Yale University, where Brian studied math, econ, and philosophy and was the captain of the Swim and Dive team his senior year. Edie has a PhD in forestry and runs a sustainability and forestry consulting firm she started, that is aptly named “Three Trees Consulting”. As a family they love the outdoors, tennis, running, and adventures in Brian's 1986 Volkswagen Van, which is his first and only car, that he can't bring himself to get rid of.Links Referenced: Google Cloud: https://cloud.google.com @isforat: https://twitter.com/IsForAt LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brhall/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: This episode is brought to you in part by our friends at Veeam. Do you care about backups? Of course you don't. Nobody cares about backups. Stop lying to yourselves! You care about restores, usually right after you didn't care enough about backups. If you're tired of the vulnerabilities, costs, and slow recoveries when using snapshots to restore your data, assuming you even have them at all living in AWS-land, there is an alternative for you. Check out Veeam, that's V-E-E-A-M for secure, zero-fuss AWS backup that won't leave you high and dry when it's time to restore. Stop taking chances with your data. Talk to Veeam. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This episode is brought to us by our friends at Google Cloud and, as a part of that, they have given me someone to, basically, harass for the next half hour. Brian Hall is the VP of Product Marketing over at Google Cloud. Brian, welcome back.Brian: Hello, Corey. It's good to be here, and technically, we've given you time to harass me by speaking with me because you never don't have the time to harass me on Twitter and other places, and you're very good at it.Corey: Well, thank you. Again, we first met back when you were doing, effectively, the same role over at AWS. And before that, you spent only 20 years or so at Microsoft. So, you've now worked at all three of the large hyperscale cloud providers. You probably have some interesting perspectives on how the industry has evolved over that time. So, at the time of this recording, it is after Google Next and before re:Invent. There was also a Microsoft event there that I didn't pay much attention to. Where are we as a culture, as an industry, when it comes to cloud?Brian: Well, I'll start with it is amazing how early days it still is. I don't want to be put on my former Amazon cap too much, and I think it'd be pushing it a little bit to say it's complete and total day one with the cloud. But there's no question that there is a ton of evolution still to come. I mean, if you look at it, you can kind of break it into three eras so far. And roll with me here, and happy to take any dissent from you.But there was kind of a first era that was very much led by Amazon. We can call it the VM era or the component era, but being able to get compute on-demand, get nearly unlimited or actually unlimited storage with S3 was just remarkable. And it happened pretty quickly that startups, new tech companies, had to—like, it would be just wild to not start with AWS and actually start ordering servers and all that kind of stuff. And so, I look at that as kind of the first phase. And it was remarkable how long Amazon had a run really as the only player there. And maybe eight years ago—six years ago—we could argue on timeframes, things shifted a little bit because the enterprises, the big companies, and the governments finally realized, “Holy crow. This thing has gotten far enough that it's not just for these startups.”Corey: Yeah. There was a real change. There was an eye-opening moment there where it isn't just, “I want to go and sell things online.” It's, “And I also want to be a bank. Can we do that with you?” And, “Huh.”Brian: My SAP—like I don't know big that darn thing is going to get. Could I put it in your cloud? And, “Oh, by the way, CapEx forecasting stinks. Can you get me out of that?” And so, it became like the traditional IT infrastructure. All of the sudden, the IT guys showed up at the party, which I know is—it sounds fun to me, but that doesn't sound like the best addition to a party for many people. And so essentially, old-school IT infrastructure finally came to the cloud and Microsoft couldn't miss that happening when it did. But it was a major boon for AWS just because of the position that they had already.Corey: And even Google as well. All three of you now are pivoting in a lot of the messaging to talk to the big E enterprises out there. And I've noticed for the last few years, and I'm not entirely alone. When I go to re:Invent, and I look at announcements they're making, sure they have for the serverless stuff and how to run websites and EC2 nonsense. And then they're talking about IOT things and other things that just seem very oriented on a persona I don't understand. Everyone's doing stuff with mainframes now for example. And it feels like, “Oh, those of us who came here for the web services like it says on the name of the company aren't really feeling like it's for us anymore.” It's the problem of trying to be for everyone and pivoting to where the money is going, but Google's done this at least as much as anyone has in recent years. Are those of us who don't have corporate IT-like problems no longer the target market for folks or what's changed?Brian: It's still the target market, so like, you take the corporate IT, they're obviously still moving to the cloud. And there's a ton of opportunity. Just take existing IT spending and see a number over $1 trillion per year, and if you take the run rates of Microsoft, Amazon, Google Cloud, it's certainly over $100 billion, but that means it's still less than ten percent of what is existing IT spending. There are many people that think that existing IT spend number is significantly higher than that. But to your point on what's changing, there's actually a third wave that's happening.So, if the first wave was you start a company. You're a tech company, of course, you start it on AWS or on the Cloud. Second wave is all the IT people, IT departments, the central organizations that run technology for all the people that are not technology people come to the cloud. This third wave is everybody has to become a technology person. If you're a business leader, like you're at a fast-food restaurant and you're responsible for the franchisee relations, before, like, you needed to get an EDI system running or something, and so you told your IT department to figure out.Now, you have to actually think about what apps do we want to provide to our customers. How do I get the right data to my franchisees so that they can make business decisions? How can I automate all that? And you know, whereas before I was a guy wearing a suit or a gal wearing a suit who didn't need to know technology, I now have to. And that's what's changing the most. And it's why the Target Addressable Market—or the TAM as business folk sometimes say—it's really hard to estimate looking forward if every business is really needing to become a technology business in many ways. And it didn't dawn on me, honestly, and you can give me all the ribbing that I probably deserve for this—but it didn't really dawn on me until I came to Google and kept hearing the transformation word, “Digital transformation, digital transformation,” and honestly, having been in software for so long, I didn't really know what digital transformation meant until I started seeing all of these folks, like every company have to become a tech company effectively.Corey: Yeah. And it turns out there aren't enough technologists to go around, so it's very challenging to wind up getting the expertise in-house. It's natural to start looking at, “Well, how do we effectively outsource this?” And well, you can absolutely have a compression algorithm for experience. It's called, “Buying products and services and hiring people who have that experience already baked in either to the product or they show up knowing how to do something because they've done this before.”Brian: That's right. The thing I think we have to—for those of us that come from the technology side, this transformation is scary for the people who all of the sudden have to get tech and be like—Corey, if you or I—actually, you're very artistic, so maybe this wouldn't do it for you—but if I were told, “Hey, Brian, for your livelihood, you now need to incorporate painting,” like…Corey: [laugh]. I can't even write legibly let alone draw or paint. That is not my skill set. [laugh].Brian: I'd be like, “Wait, what? I'm not good at painting. I've never been a painting person, like I'm not creative.” “Okay. Great. Then we're going to fire you, or we're going to bring someone in who can.” Like, that'd be scary. And so, having more services, more people that can help as every company goes through a transition like that—and it's interesting, it's why during Covid, the cloud did really well, and some people kind of said, “Well, it's because they—people didn't want to send their people into their data centers.” No. That wasn't it. It was really because it just forced the change to digital. Like the person to, maybe, batter the analogy a little bit—the person who was previously responsible for all of the physical banks, which are—a bank has, you know, that are retail locations—the branches—they have those in order to service the retail customers.Corey: Yeah.Brian: That person, all of the sudden, had to figure out, “How do I do all that service via phone, via agents, via an app, via our website.” And that person, that entire organization, was forced digital in many ways. And that certainly had a lot of impact on the cloud, too.Corey: Yeah. I think that some wit observed a few years back that Covid has had more impact on your digital transformation than your last ten CIOs combined.Brian: Yeah.Corey: And—yeah, suddenly, you're forcing people into a position where there really is no other safe option. And some of that has unwound but not a lot of it. There's still seem to be those same structures and ability to do things from remote locations then there were before 2020.Brian: Yeah. Since you asked, kind of, where we are in the industry, to bring all of that to an endpoint, now what this means is people are looking for cloud providers, not just to have the primitives, not just to have the IT that they—their central IT needed, but they need people who can help them build the things that will help their business transform. It makes it a fun, new stage, new era, a transformation era for companies like Google to be able to say, “Hey, here's how we build things. Here's what we've learned over a period of time. Here's what we've most importantly learned from other customers, and we want to help be your strategic partner in that transformation.” And like I said, it'd be almost impossible to estimate what the TAM is for that. The real question is how quickly can we help customers and innovate in our Cloud solutions in order to make more of the stuff more powerful and faster to help people build.Corey: I want to say as well that—to be clear—you folks can buy my attention but not my opinion. I will not say things if I do not believe them. That's the way the world works here. But every time I use Google Cloud for something, I am taken aback yet again by the developer experience, how polished it is. And increasingly lately, it's not just that you're offering those low-lying primitives that composed together to build things higher up the stack, you're offering those things as well across a wide variety of different tooling options. And they just tend to all make sense and solve a need rather than requiring me to build it together myself from popsicle sticks.And I can't shake the feeling that that's where the industry is going. I'm going to want someone to sell me an app to do expense reports. I'm not going to want—well, I want a database and a front-end system, and how I wind up storing all the assets on the backend. No. I just want someone to give me something that solves that problem for me. That's what customers across the board are looking for as best I can see.Brian: Well, it certainly expands the number of customers that you can serve. I'll give you an example. We have an AI agent product called Call Center AI which allows you to either build a complete new call center solution, or more often it augments an existing call center platform. And we could sell that on an API call basis or a number of agent seats basis or anything like that. But that's not actually how call center leaders want to buy. Imagine we come in and say, “This many API calls or $4 per seat or per month,” or something like that. There's a whole bunch of work for that call center leader to go figure out, “Well, do I want to do this? Do I not? How should I evaluate it versus others?” It's quite complex. Whereas, if we come in and say, “Hey, we have a deal for you. We will guarantee higher customer satisfaction. We will guarantee higher agent retention. And we will save you money. And we will only charge you some percentage of the amount of money that you're saved.”Corey: It's a compelling pitch.Brian: Which is an easier one for a business decision-maker to decide to take?Corey: It's no contest. I will say it's a little odd that—one thing—since you brought it up, one thing that struck me as a bit strange about Contact Center AI, compared to most of the services I would consider to be Google Cloud, instead of, “Click here to get started,” it's, “Click here to get a demo. Reach out to contact us.” It feels—Brian: Yeah.Corey: —very much like the deals for these things are going to get signed on a golf course.Brian: [laugh]. They—I don't know about signed on a golf course. I do know that there is implementation work that needs to be done in order to build the models because it's the model for the AI, figuring out how your particular customers are served in your particular context that takes the work. And we need to bring in a partner or bring in our expertise to help build that out. But it sounds to me like you're looking to go golfing since you've looked into this situation.Corey: Just like painting, I'm no good at golfing either.Brian: [laugh].Corey: Honestly, it's—it just doesn't have the—the appeal isn't there for me for whatever reason. I smile; I nod; I tend to assume that, “Yeah, that's okay. I'll leave some areas for other people to go exploring in.”Brian: I see. I see.Corey: So, two weeks before Google Cloud Next occurred, you folks wound up canceling Stadia, which had been rumored for a while. People had been predicting it since it was first announced because, “Just wait. They're going to Google Reader it.” And yeah, it was consumer-side, and I do understand that that was not Cloud. But it did raise the specter of—for people to start talking once again about, “Oh, well, Google doesn't have any ability to focus on things long-term. They're going to turn off Cloud soon, too. So, we shouldn't be using it at all.” I do not agree with that assessment.But I want to get your take on it because I do have some challenges with the way that your products and services go to market in some ways. But I don't have the concern that you're going to turn it all off and decide, “Yeah, that was a fun experiment. We're done.” Not with Cloud, not at this point.Brian: Yeah. So, I'd start with at Google Cloud, it is our job to be a trusted enterprise platform. And I can't speak to before I was here. I can't speak to before Thomas Kurian, who's our CEO, was here before. But I can say that we are very, very focused on that. And deprecating products in a surprising way or in a way that doesn't take into account what customers are on it, how can we help those customers is certainly not going to help us do that. And so, we don't do that anymore.Stadia you brought up, and I wasn't part of starting Stadia. I wasn't part of ending Stadia. I honestly don't know anything about Stadia that any average tech-head might not know. But it is a different part of Google. And just like Amazon has deprecated plenty of services and devices and other things in their consumer world—and Microsoft has certainly deprecated many, many, many consumer and other products—like, that's a different model. And I won't say whether it's good, bad, or righteous, or not.But I can say at Google Cloud, we're doing a really good job right now. Can we get better? Of course. Always. We can get better at communicating, engaging customers in advance. But we now have a clean deprecation policy with a set of enterprise APIs that we commit to for stated periods of time. We also—like people should take a look. We're doing ten-year deals with companies like Deutsche Bank. And it's a sign that Google is here to last and Google Cloud in particular. It's also at a market level, just worth recognizing.We are a $27 billion run rate business now. And you earn trust in drips. You lose it in buckets. And we're—we recognize that we need to just keep every single day earning trust. And it's because we've been able to do that—it's part of the reason that we've gotten as large and as successful as we have—and when you get large and successful, you also tend to invest more and make it even more clear that we're going to continue on that path. And so, I'm glad that the market is seeing that we are enterprise-ready and can be trusted much, much more. But we're going to keep earning every single day.Corey: Yeah. I think it's pretty fair to say that you have definitely gotten yourselves into a place where you've done the things that I would've done if I wanted to shore up trust that the platform was not going to go away. Because these ten-year deals are with the kinds of companies that, shall we say, do not embark on signing contracts lightly. They very clearly, have asked you the difficult, pointed questions that I'm basically asking you now as cheap shots. And they ask it in very serious ways through multiple layers of attorneys. And if the answers aren't the right answers, they don't sign the contract. That is pretty clearly how the world works.The fact that companies are willing to move things like core trading systems over to you on a ten-year time horizon, tells me that I can observe whatever I want from the outside, but they have actual existential risk questions tied to what they're doing. And they are in some ways betting their future on your folks. You clearly know what those right answers are and how to articulate them. I think that's the side of things that the world does not get to see or think about very much. Because it is easy to point at all the consumer failings and the hundreds of messaging products that you continually replenish just in order to kill.Brian: [laugh].Corey: It's—like, what is it? The tree of liberty must be watered periodically from time to time, but the blood of patriots? Yeah. The logo of Google must be watered by the blood of canceled messaging products.Brian: Oh, come on. [laugh].Corey: Yeah. I'm going to be really scared if there's an actual, like, Pub/Sub service. I don't know. That counts as messaging, sort of. I don't know.Brian: [laugh]. Well, thank you. Thank you for the recognition of how far we've come in our trust from enterprises and trust from customers.Corey: I think it's the right path. There's also reputational issues, too. Because in the absence of new data, people don't tend to change their opinion on things very easily. And okay, there was a thing I was using. It got turned off. There was a big kerfuffle. That sticks in people's minds. But I've never seen an article about a Google service saying, “Oh, yeah. It hasn't been turned off or materially changed. In fact, it's gotten better with time. And it's just there working reliably.” You're either invisible, or you're getting yelled at.It feels like it's a microcosm of my early career stage of being a systems administrator. I'm either invisible or the mail system's broke, and everyone wants my head. I don't know what the right answer is—Brian: That was about right to me.Corey: —in this thing. Yeah. I don't know what the right answer on these things is, but you're definitely getting it right. I think the enterprise API endeavors that you've gone through over the past year or two are not broadly known. And frankly, you've definitely are ex-AWS because enterprise APIs is a terrible name for what these things are.Brian: [laugh].Corey: I'll let you explain it. Go ahead. And bonus points if you can do it without sounding like a press release. Take it away.Brian: There are a set of APIs that developers and companies should be able to know are going to be supported for the period of time that they need in order to run their applications and truly bet on them. And that's what we've done.Corey: Yeah. It's effectively a commitment that there will not be meaningful deprecations or changes to the API that are breaking changes without significant notice periods.Brian: Correct.Corey: And to be clear, that is exactly what all of the cloud providers have in their enterprise contracts. They're always notice periods around those things. There are always, at least, certain amounts of time and significant breach penalties in the event that, “Yeah, today, I decided that we were just not going to spin up VMs in that same way as we always have before. Sorry. Sucks to be you.” I don't see that happening on the Google Cloud side of the world very often, not like it once did. And again, we do want to talk about reputations.There are at least four services that I'm aware of that AWS has outright deprecated. One, Sumerian has said we're sunsetting the service in public. But on the other end of the spectrum, RDS on VMWare has been completely memory-holed. There's a blog post or two but nothing else remains in any of the AWS stuff, I'm sure, because that's an, “Enterprise-y” service, they wound up having one on one conversations with customers or there would have been a hue and cry. But every cloud provider does, in the fullness of time, turn some things off as they learn from their customers.Brian: Hmm. I hadn't heard anything about AWS Infinidash for a while either.Corey: No, no. It seems to be one of those great services that we made up on the internet one day for fun. And I love that just from a product marketing perspective. I mean, you know way more about that field than I do given that it's your job, and I'm just sitting here in this cheap seats throwing peanuts at you. But I love the idea of customers just come up and make up a product one day in your space and then the storytelling that immediately happens thereafter. Most companies would kill for something like that just because you would expect on some level to learn so much about how your reputation actually works. When there's a platonic ideal of a service that isn't bothered by pesky things like, “It has to exist,” what do people say about it? And how does that work?And I'm sort of surprised there wasn't more engagement from Amazon on that. It always seems like they're scared to say anything. Which brings me to a marketing question I have for you. You and Amazing have similar challenges—you being Google in this context, not you personally—in that your customers take themselves deadly seriously. And as a result, you have to take yourselves with at least that same level of seriousness. You can't go on Twitter and be the Wendy's Twitter account when you're dealing with enterprise buyers of cloud platforms. I'm kind of amazed, and I'd love to know. How can you manage to say anything at all? Because it just seems like you are so constrained, and there's no possible thing you can say that someone won't take issue with. And yes, some of the time, that someone is me.Brian: Well, let's start with going back to Infinidash a little bit. Yes, you identified one interesting thing about that episode, if I can call it an episode. The thing that I tell you though that didn't surprise me is it shows how much of cloud is actually learned from other people, not from the cloud provider itself. I—you're going to be going to re:Invent. You were at Google Cloud Next. Best thing about the industry conferences is not what the provider does. It's the other people that are there that you learn from. The folks that have done something that you've been trying to do and couldn't figure out how to do, and then they explained it to you, just the relationships that you get that help you understand what's going on in this industry that's changing so fast and has so much going on.And so,   And so, that part didn't surprise me. And that gets a little bit to the second part of your—that we're talking about. “How do you say anything?” As long as you're helping a customer say it. As long as you're helping someone who has been a fan of a product and has done interesting things with it say it, that's how you communicate for the most part, putting a megaphone in front of the people who already understand what's going on and helping their voice be heard, which is a lot more fun, honestly, than creating TV ads and banner ads and all of the stuff that a lot of consumer and traditional companies. We get to celebrate our customers and our creators much, much more.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Uptycs, because they believe that many of you are looking to bolster your security posture with CNAPP and XDR solutions. They offer both cloud and endpoint security in a single UI and data model. Listeners can get Uptycs for up to 1,000 assets through the end of 2023 (that is next year) for $1. But this offer is only available for a limited time on UptycsSecretMenu.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S Secret Menu dot com.Corey: I think that it's not super well understood by a lot of folks out there that the official documentation that any cloud provider puts out there is kind of a last resort. Or I'm looking for the specific flag to a specific parameter of a specific command. Great. Sure. But what I really want to do whenever I'm googling how to do something—and yes, that—we're going to be googling—welcome. You've successfully owned that space to the point where it's become common parlance. Good work is I want to see what other people had said. I want to find blog posts, ideally recent ones, talking about how to do the thing that I'm trying to do. If I'm trying to do something relatively not that hard or not that uncommon, if I spin up three web servers behind a load-balancer, and I can't find any community references on how to do that thing, either I'm trying to do something absolutely bizarre and I should re-think it, or there is no community/customer base for the product talking about how to do things with it.And I have noticed a borderline Cambrian explosion over the last few years of the Google Cloud community. I'm seeing folks who do not work at Google, and also who have never worked at Google, and sometimes still think they work at Google in some cases. It's not those folks. It is people who are just building things as a customer. And they, in turn, become very passionate advocates for the platform. And they start creating content on these things.Brian: Yeah. We've been blessed to have, not only, the customer base grow, but essentially the passion among that customer base, and we've certainly tried to help building community and catalyzing the community, but it's been fun to watch how our customers' success turns into our success which turns into customer success. And it's interesting, in particular, to see too how much of that passion comes from people seeing that there is another way to do things.It's clear that many people in our industry knew cloud through the lens of Amazon, knew tech in general through the lenses of Microsoft and Oracle and a lot of other companies. And Google, which we try and respect specifically what people are trying to accomplish and how they know how to do it, we also many ways have taken a more opinionated approach, if you will, to say, “Hey, here's how this could be done in a different way.” And when people find something that's unexpectedly different and also delightful, it's more likely that they're going to be strong advocates and share that passion with the world.Corey: It's a virtuous cycle that leads to the continued growth and success of a platform. Something I've been wondering about in the broader sense, is what happens after this? Because if, let's say for the sake of argument, that one of the major cloud providers decided, “Okay. You know, we're going to turn this stuff off. We've decided we don't really want to be in the cloud business.” It turns out that high-margin businesses that wind up turning into cash monsters as soon as you stop investing heavily in growing them, just kind of throw off so much that, “We don't know what to do with. And we're running out of spaces to store it. So, we're getting out of it.” I don't know how that would even be possible at some point. Because given the amount of time and energy some customers take to migrate in, it would be a decade-long project for them to migrate back out again.So, it feels on some level like on the scale of a human lifetime, that we will be seeing the large public cloud providers, in more or less their current form, for the rest of our lives. Is that hopelessly naïve? Am I missing—am I overestimating how little change happens in the sweep of a human lifetime in technology?Brian: Well, I've been in the tech industry for 27 years now. And I've just seen a continual moving up the stack. Where, you know, there are fundamental changes. I think the PC becoming widespread, fundamental change; mobile, certainly becoming primary computing experience—what I know you call a toilet computer, I call my mobile; that's certainly been a change. Cloud has certainly been a change. And so, there are step functions for sure. But in general, what has been happening is things just keep moving up the stack. And as things move up the stack, there are companies that evolve and learn to do that and provide more value and more value to new folks. Like I talked about how businesspeople are leaders in technology now in a way that they never were before. And you need to give them the value in a way that they can understand it, and they can consume it, and they can trust it. And it's going to continue to move in that direction.And so, what happens then as things move up the stack, the abstractions start happening. And so, there are companies that were just major players in the ‘90s, whether it's Novell or Sun Microsystems or—I was actually getting a tour of the Sunnyvale/Mountain View Google Campuses yesterday. And the tour guide said, “This used to be the site of a company that was called Silicon Graphics. They did something around, like, making things for Avatar.” I felt a little aged at that point.But my point is, there are these companies that were amazing in their time. They didn't move up the stack in a way that met the net set of needs. And it's not like that crater the industry or anything, it's just people were able to move off of it and move up. And I do think that's what we'll see happening.Corey: In some cases, it seems to slip below the waterline and become, effectively, plumbing, where everyone uses it, but no one knows who they are or what they do. The Tier 1 backbone providers these days tend to be in that bucket. Sure, some of them have other businesses, like Verizon. People know who Verizon is, but they're one of the major Tier 1 carriers in the United States just of the internet backbone.Brian: That's right. And that doesn't mean it's not still a great business.Corey: Yeah.Brian: It just means it's not front of mind for maybe the problems you're trying to solve or the opportunities we're trying to capture at that point in time.Corey: So, my last question for you goes circling back to Google Cloud Next. You folks announced an awful lot of things. And most of them, from my perspective, were actually pretty decent. What do you think is the most impactful announcement that you made that the industry largely overlooked?Brian: Most impactful that the industry—well, overlooked might be the wrong way to put this. But there's this really interesting thing happening in the cloud world right now where whereas before companies, kind of, chose their primary cloud writ large, today because multi-cloud is actually happening in the vast majority of companies have things in multiple places, people make—are making also the decision of, “What is going to be my strategic data provider?” And I don't mean data in the sense of the actual data and meta-data and the like, but my data cloud.Corey: Mm-hmm.Brian: How do I choose my data cloud specifically? And there's been this amazing profusion of new data companies that do better ETL or ELT, better data cleaning, better packaging for AI, new techniques for scaling up/scaling down at cost. A lot of really interesting stuff happening in the dataspace. But it's also created almost more silos. And so, the most important announcement that we made probably didn't seem like a really big announcement to a lot of people, but it really was about how we're connecting together more of our data cloud with BigQuery, with unstructured and structured data support, with support for data lakes, including new formats, including Iceberg and Delta and Hudi to come how—Looker is increasingly working with BigQuery in order to make it, so that if you put data into Google Cloud, you not only have these super first-class services that you can use, ranging from databases like Spanner to BigQuery to Looker to AI services, like Vertex AI, but it's also now supporting all these different formats so you can bring third-party applications into that one place. And so, at the big cloud events, it's a new service that is the biggest deal. For us, the biggest deal is how this data cloud is coming together in an open way to let you use the tool that you want to use, whether it's from Google or a third party, all by betting on Google's data cloud.Corey: I'm really impressed by how Google is rather clearly thinking about this from the perspective of the data has to be accessible by a bunch of different things, even though it may take wildly different forms. It is making the data more fluid in that it can go to where the customer needs it to be rather than expecting the customer to come to it where it lives. That, I think, is a trend that we have not seen before in this iteration of the tech industry.Brian: I think you got that—you picked that up very well. And to some degree, if you step back and look at it, it maybe shouldn't be that surprising that Google is adept at that. When you think of what Google search is, how YouTube is essentially another search engine producing videos that deliver on what you're asking for, how information is used with Google Maps, with Google Lens, how it is all about taking information and making it as universally accessible and helpful as possible. And if we can do that for the internet's information, why can't we help businesses do it for their business information? And that's a lot of where Google certainly has a unique approach with Google Cloud.Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where's the best place for them to find you?Brian: cloud.google.com for Google Cloud information of course. And if it's still running when this podcast goes, @isforat, I-S-F-O-R-A-T, on Twitter.Corey: And we will put links to both of those in the show notes. Thank you so much for you time. I appreciate it.Brian: Thank you, Corey. It's been good talking with you.Corey: Brian Hall, VP of Product Marketing at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice. Whereas, if you've hated this podcast, please, leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting angry comment dictating that, “No. Large companies make ten-year-long commitments casually all the time.”Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Next in Tech
Holidays with supply chains

Next in Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 28:38


The pandemic has made us all supply chain specialists as we worked to find things in a time of constraint. Eric Johnson, a Senior technology editor at the Journal of Commerce, joins host Eric Hanselman to talk about technology in the logistics industry and what's changing in this complex market. Much like the ecosystems around the cloud, there's a Cambrian explosion of companies working to address logistics complexity. Check out the TMP Tech conference: https://events.joc.com/tpmtech/

American Conservative University
Episode 7. DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design – Part 2. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 24:53


Episode 7. DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design – Part 2. Watch this video at- https://youtu.be/5-aQcACtQOg The New Scientific Evidence that Points to the Existence of God Series. John Ankerberg Show Nov 4, 2022 DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design – Part 2: What “language” do we find in DNA? How does that language function?   Dr. Meyer at Discovery Institute- https://www.discovery.org/p/meyer/ Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, The Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). In his first book on intelligent design, Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009) Meyer examined the mystery of the origin of the first life. With Darwin's Doubt, he has expanded the scope of the case for intelligent design to the whole sweep of life's history. Meyer's research addresses the deepest mystery surrounding the origin of life and the origin of animal life: the origin of biological information necessary to produce it. Meyer graduated from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, in 1981 with a degree in physics and earth science. He later became a geophysicist with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) in Dallas, Texas. From 1981 to 1985, he worked for ARCO in digital signal processing and seismic survey interpretation. In 1986 as a Rotary International Scholar, he began his training in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University, earning an M.Phil. in 1987 and a Ph.D. in 1991. His doctoral thesis was titled “Of Clues and Causes: A Methodological Interpretation of Origin-of-Life Research.” He returned to Whitworth in the fall of 1990 to teach philosophy and the philosophy of science. He left a tenured position as a professor at Whitworth in 2002 to direct the Center for Science and Culture full time, which he had helped found with John West in 1996. Prior to the publication of Signature in the Cell and Darwin's Doubt, the writing for which Meyer was best known was an August 2004 review essay in the Smithsonian Institution-affiliated peer-reviewed biology journal Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. The article laid out the evidential case for intelligent design, presenting it as the best explanation for the origin of the biological information necessary to produce the new forms of animal life that arose abruptly during the Cambrian explosion. Because the article was the first peer-reviewed publication arguing for intelligent design in a technical journal, it proved extremely controversial.  The journal's editor, evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg, was punished by his Smithsonian supervisors for allowing Meyer's article into print. This led to the investigation of top Smithsonian personnel by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.  The controversy was widely covered in the media with articles or news stories appearing about it in The Wall Street Journal, Science, Nature, NPR, The O'Reilly Factor and the Washington Post. The federal investigation eventually concluded that Sternberg had been wrongly disciplined and intimidated. Meyer's many other publications include contributions to, and the editing of, the peer-reviewed volume Darwinism, Design and Public Education (Michigan State University Press, 2004) and the innovative textbook Explore Evolution (Hill House Publishers, 2007). Meyer has also published editorials in national newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The National Post (of Canada), The Daily Telegraph (of London) and The Los Angeles Times.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs such as The Jim Lehrer News Hour, NBC Nightly News, ABC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, Nightline, Fox News Live, Paula Zahn Now (CNN), Good Morning America and the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.  He has also been featured in two New York Times front-page stories and has garnered attention in other top national media. In 2008, he appeared with Ben Stein in the theatrical-released documentary Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.  He has also been featured prominently in the science documentaries Icons of Evolution, The Case for a Creator, Darwin's Dilemma and Unlocking The Mystery of Life, the latter which was shown on PBS and which Meyer co-wrote with producer Lad Allen.

The Uncensored Unprofessor
288 Shotgun—Evolution Challenged, The 2nd Coming, Grieving the Spirit

The Uncensored Unprofessor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 46:09


The Cambrian explosion—as scientists call it—raises some fascinating challenges to Darwinian evolution. I explore how that is so. I also variously work through fairness at the Southern border, whether I miss teaching, taking on the establishment, local television news in Idaho, the Evangelical framing of Christianity, the worldview of America's founders, and the second coming of Christ. Interspersed throughout are some NFL helmet-slogan inspired catch-phrases. Come think and laugh out loud with me!

ThinkEnergy
What Electricity Customers Want with Julie Lupinacci

ThinkEnergy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 54:55


The energy sector is evolving at lightning speed, and customer expectations are at an all-time high. As are concerns about electricity itself – how it's produced, how reliable it is, how much it costs, and how efficiently it's powering our lives. So, how are utilities planning to meet expectations and address these concerns? In episode 100 of the thinkenergy podcast, we sit down with Hydro Ottawa's Chief Customer Officer, Julie Lupinacci, to discuss what electricity customers want and the solutions we're delivering.  Related links   Julie Lupinacci, LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/juliejlupinacci/   Julie Lupinacci, Twitter: https://twitter.com/juliejlupinacci  Power outage safety: https://www.hydroottawa.com/en/outages-safety/outage-centre/outage-safety  Energy saving resources: https://www.hydroottawa.com/en/save-energy 2021–2025 strategic direction: https://hydroottawa.com/en/about-us/our-company/our-reports    To subscribe using Apple Podcasts To subscribe using Spotify To subscribe on Libsyn --- Subscribe so you don't miss a video: YouTube Check out our cool pics on Instagram     Transcript:   Think_Energy_Podcast_EP100_V2 What Electricity Customers Want SUMMARY KEYWORDS customers, ottawa, working, hydro, people, electricity, programs, julie, city, planning, energy, pandemic, talk, utilities, component, industry, happening, community, cases, helping SPEAKERS Dan Seguin, Julie Lupinacci   Dan Seguin  00:06 This is thinkenergy, the podcast that helps you better understand the fast changing world of energy through conversations with game changers, industry leaders, and influencers. So join me, Dan Seguin, as I explore both traditional and unconventional facets of the energy industry. Hey, everyone, welcome back. Today's show marks the 100th podcast episode. Woohoo. It's hard to believe that we've already reached this milestone. I want to thank everyone that has worked behind the scenes on the show, our incredible guests who graciously share their time and expertise. And of course, dear listener, thank you for tuning into our program. It's truly been an honor for me to share information about the energy sector and all of the amazing people that work in this industry. So with that, let's get on with today's 100th podcast episode. As we discussed over many interviews, the energy landscape is evolving at lightning speed. Those innovations and changes are coming fast and furious. And there's a lot for customers to absorb. It's clear that perhaps more than at any other time in history, customers are thinking about their electricity, how it's made, how reliable it is, how much it costs, and how they can be more in control of it to power their lives. What customers want and expect is changing the electricity sector. It's changing how utilities do business, how they communicate, and what service offerings they provide. customer expectations have never been higher, and utilities must evolve, innovate and provide exceptional expertise, programs and technology to give customers what they want and expect from a modern utility from smart home tech that can help customers manage their device and overall consumption to home generation technology like solar panels, batteries for energy storage, and incentives for installing goes renewables and even how to better prepare for a changing climate, more storms and an increase in frequent and prolonged power outages. So, here's today's big question. How are utilities planning to meet the expectations of today's customer and their needs? Today's guest is my boss, Julie Lupinacci. As the Chief Customer Officer at Hydro Ottawa, Julie is responsible for developing and implementing the customer strategy, transforming the total customer experience and guiding the direction of the business in terms of customer needs. She provides oversight for customer service marketing, product development, external communications, Public Affairs, corporate reputation, and the overall branding strategies. With more than 15 years in Customer Care, sales and marketing, Julie has a wide background in business including project management, customer and vendor relations, international partner program management, procurement, sales, marketing, and program development. Wow. Julie, thanks for joining us today. Now, you've been in the electricity industry approximately five years now, maybe a little more in comparison to your experience with customers in other industries? How are electricity customers different? How are their needs unique?   Julie Lupinacci  04:11 Yeah, so it's been interesting. And when I when I got this question, I was thinking back on the last five years and how much I've learned about the industry and learn about our customers in particular and I would say the basis of what's different is is the industry we're in right like Hydro Ottawa is a this is essentially provides an essential service to our customers, which didn't happen in my previous in my previous world. So the fact that the customers rely on us for a product that is so essential in so many aspects of their lives. For some customers, it's a matter of life and death, right? That in itself changes how we work with our customers and what their needs are, and what we need to support. So that reality is something that we have to hold in the forefront of everything that we do. The very nature of what customers need from us makes that different, right? The timelines of what they need are tighter. And the criticality of our communications to customers becomes even more heightened. Whether it be a storm, or an outage, or an outage at one person's house, like that doesn't matter, the customer is out of what we need to provide. And the criticality of getting that back in a very condensed time frame, in order for that customer to continue moving forward, becomes essential. So everything becomes a lot tighter and more critical. And I would say the other component of what we provide, it's not a, in some cases, customers don't have a choice right on whether they need electricity or not, like I guess in fundamentally, they could figure that out. But if you've come to rely on electricity for your daily needs, and to run your households, the fact that electricity is now part of your requirements, you don't get to have a choice necessarily do I? Do I want electricity today or tomorrow to put my lights on? Affordability becomes a big component. And it's one that we need to think about for our customers: the choices on how we develop the grid, how we evolve as an organization, we need to keep affordability, sustainability, and the fact that energy needs to be attainable for our customers that has to guide what we do. And that's not true for every of every industry, and definitely not true for the previous ones I've worked for.   Dan Seguin  06:53 Julie, what are the three biggest issues for electricity customers right now?   Julie Lupinacci  07:01 Yeah, I think right now, in the November 2022, or December 2022, as this airs, affordability is probably front of mind, for most customers, the share of wallet is just not going as far with the cost of inflation. I think that's probably the primary issue for electricity customers right now. But I would say that a close second is, what the reliability of this electricity is. So the climate adaptation that we are doing as an entire city, as we're looking at what you know, more extreme weather events that are coming, the reliability of what we provide is probably a close second, right? So they want to be able to afford the commodity that is coming into their house. But they also want to be able to rely on it. And as they're making choices for what their energy future is going to be, as they're making choices about what car they're going to be purchasing next, as they're going to make choices for how they're going to heat and cool their home and making choices about fuel sources. You want to make sure that you're choosing what's reliable and that you know, reliability is there. So I think affordability and reliability are close one and two. And that is sustainable, right? We've got a lot of people that are thinking about their future, their carbon footprint, their net zero. So I think people are looking at how I conserve my energy usage? How am I smart about what I'm doing? And how am I making sure that I'm choosing things that are going to be there for the long haul, right and looking for something that's sustainable, that's good for our planet, but it's going to be around and something that they can count on. Okay,   Dan Seguin  08:53 Now I have a follow up question. What are some of the ways that hydro Ottawa is addressing those customer issues?   Julie Lupinacci  08:59 Yeah, so we're doing a number of different things. So one, I think how we put together plans for the growth of the grid, how we put plans to maintain the grid and evolve the grid is definitely something that we look at with those three things in mind. But also from a customer perspective, we are looking at bringing programs to them to help them have more access and more readily access to that information. So get a hold of their data so they can start making decisions. We're working with the Ministry of Energy on different pricing programs that might make sense according to the different behaviors, not everybody has the same lifestyle. Not everybody operates only you know, in the evenings in their house and people in especially during the pandemic like we have with we've seen very different lifestyle, and workdays come to be. So we're really well Looking at all of those things that are happening here in Ottawa, and marrying programs that make sense both from a pricing perspective, as well as energy choice. So looking at different Evie programs that we are bringing forward, looking at different energy efficiency programs that might be there and getting information into the hands of customers. In particular, there's been a lot of conversation over the last couple years, I'd say maybe a little bit more about netzero. And with the announcements the federal government, provincial, government and even municipal government have made customers are thinking about how they play in that. And there's a lot of questions and hydro Ottawa is providing information to those customers to be able to help them to be informed of what's possible, and then help give programs to get them on pathways to get there for themselves.   Dan Seguin  10:52 We are all aware that Ottawa has had some major major weather events, these past five to six years. What would you say to customers that are worried about reliability, power outages, and restoration?   Julie Lupinacci  11:10 Yeah, weather events have been tough. They're tough fun. And I don't think Ottawa has seen something like this in a very long time, like probably since the 98' Ice Storm. And I'm not even sure that really measured up to the same impact right of what we saw and what customers dealt with. But what I would, what I would say is hydro Ottawa has put a lot of focus on what we need to do from a grid perspective to adapt to the changing climate that we're seeing here in Ottawa. And that includes those weather events. Like I don't want to pretend that I know more than our chief electricity distribution officer, like I think you interviewed him maybe a couple of weeks ago. And in that podcast, he talks about what we're doing to future proof, the grid against those extreme weather events. So I'm not going to, I'm not going to try to think that I have anything more impactful that he will say on that front. But I will say that, from a front office perspective, from a customer service, from a communications perspective, we are really looking at a lot of those tools, and further modernizing them. And what I mean by that is, is taking a look at some different technology that allows us to receive more phone calls into our system, triage those phone calls, using some cloud based technology, so that not everybody is forced to talk to an individual because even at the height of the storm, like you're not going to have 10,000 people answering phone calls within a couple of minutes of a storm hitting, but we can use technology to triage to allow our customers to know that we know if they are out of power and provide them with the information that we have at that time. So looking at updating some of the telephony software that we have in utilize some of the new technology there. So we are actively working on that. The other component to communications because I think communications really is that biggest avenue for our customers especially during these winter weather events is pushing information out. And we are looking through and working on an SMS text based technology system that allows us to push information out similar to what we're pushing out through our social media channels today. Now sending that information directly to customers either on their iPhone or potentially in their email box however they want to receive those inputs and alerts from hydro Ottawa. We also took some steps to help people become aware like the weather alert, the weather system and the weather alerts that are out there giving people a heads up on systems that are coming through. Like that's, that's one thing. But I think customers want to know, when we're looking at a weather event that's different, right? You'll you'll know when rains coming into Ottawa and you'll get those alerts about snow and all of those things, but not all weather impacts our grid and what we're looking at is to be able to provide an alert system again through through whether it's SMS or an email out directly into customers inboxes so to speak, giving them a heads up when we're watching it differently right and if we're watching it differently, you know, messages are going out make sure phones are charged make sure that you've got blankets make sure you know where your your flashlights and your your candles are. So really concentrate on getting people ready for what they need to do. So there's you know, there's a few steps and you can follow us on hydro ottawa.com to get better details on that. But that's what we're doing and making sure that we're putting that out there. Additionally, we've piloted -Sorry Dan, I got one more. Additionally, we've piloted a battery program. This was used to be able to support some of our capital work. But in the recent storm this year, we use that battery pilot to be able to help some of the most vulnerable customers in Ottawa, that are really relying on electricity to be able to breathe, right and working with the paramedics hand in hand to make sure that these batteries got to those households so that they, you know, had some additional time for us to get the power back on, either to their house or to the community.   Dan Seguin  15:32 Now telling me Julie, what are some of the things customers can do to be better prepared for emergencies? And outages?   Julie Lupinacci  15:42 Yeah, so I think there's a few things that we need to do . I think we need some major awareness about what that is, like, going back to our elementary school days, when we had to plot out the fire, you know, the fire escape plan for our house, right? And go back to thinking about if there's an emergency, do we have an emergency kit together? Right? Do we have bottled water in our systems in our house? Do we have working flashlights, right? Not just flashlights that don't have batteries? But what are those batteries? And they are up to date, right? Making sure that you have them not all over the place, but you know where these flashlights are right? If anybody's like my kids, they come in, they grab the flashlights, and all of a sudden they're in different locations around the house like they need to be, your emergency kit needs to be in one central place so that you know how to get to it, whether the lights are on or off. The other piece is I would, I would make sure that you're following us on our social channels, because we do put information out there. So make sure if you haven't connected with us that you do connect with us. And you can go to our website to find out what those are, I won't, I won't run them off here. But the other piece that I would really strongly suggest is that people go and update their contact information into our database, or into our database, which will become even more crucial as we start sending these alerts and messages directly to you. Right, no longer just through social media but directly to you in your household to be able to let you know what's going. And if I could say one other thing is that I think planning based on our reliability that we've always had, and the experience that you've always had to these dates, it's no longer enough, right? Like Hydro Ottawa is going to do everything that we can to get the power back on. But you need to plan for worst case scenario, you can't plan only for the best case. So having an alternative place to go speaking with family and saying if power is out here, we're going to come over and what do we need to bring? Having those plans in place in advance makes you better equipped to withstand any weather event that comes through that may have an outage associated with it?   Dan Seguin  17:49 Okay, moving on. Hydro Ottawa released its 2021- 2025 strategic direction. Why is that five year plan important? And what are the highlights from a customer perspective that customers should be aware of? Yeah,   Julie Lupinacci  18:08 I think any organization that's not looking five years out, so it's going to be really awakened as you start to figure out what capital planning looks like. Like it doesn't take. You can't build a substation overnight. You cannot bring additional capacity into a city without some plans. And our strategic direction really helps us do that. And it helps put some guideposts in place with regards to keeping us focused, right. There's a lot of new technology that makes shiny things that people want. But really having a strategic direction that allows us to go back to what that Northstar is, what those guiding points are, what is that end goal that we're trying to get to is really important, because cities aren't planned on a dime. And neither is the grid that supports those cities. So that five year plan really looks and works with the city to say, Where are you going? How is growth happening? And then how do we support that? And then, in in line with this strategic direction, we've also taken a very, very big leadership role in in setting ourselves up for net zero and not just us as as as hydro Ottawa, but as a partner with the city of Ottawa as a integral component of the Ontario electricity grid, an integral component of the Canadian grid. And I think that comes with a responsibility to make sure that we're looking forward and making the decisions that have to happen today for some of those assets that are going to be around for that 2050 goal that Canada has. So we're really focused on maintaining the reliability that we've been seeing over the last decade. We've had great reliability here in Ottawa despite some of the storms that have happened. Our reliability numbers continue to Be strong. So making sure that we're continuing to evolve in a smart way. And making sure that we maintain that reliability in line with the growth that's happening in the city, right, where we're seeing not only expansion into some of the other, you know, we're seeing suburbs butting up against each other now, right. And, you know, I'm not even sure if there's a true delineation between Canada and Stittsville. Sometimes, because it's like a bridge, you just go over one, one street, and now you're in the different suburbs. So, that blurring that's happening is fine. So that's the growth that's happening and expanding of the city. But we're also densifying some of the downtown core areas, so we're going upwards. And that requires a different type of planning on the infrastructure that already exists. We need to grow that infrastructure, we need to change how we're adopting those arrows potentially, and then look at planning for vehicle switching from gas to EVs. Right? So the electric, the electric vehicles, how do we support that growth? How do we support some of the growth with buildings that are converting from gas to electricity, or some of the new buildings that are looking at different technology and making sure that as they're building, the capacity is there. So all of those things are aligned within that, that we have an eight point strategy that's there. And, and the customer continues to be the center of that strategy? So as we're making decisions, we're thinking of it through that customer lens? And how is the customer going to be impacted? How is the customer going to work with us, and let's make sure that we're spending money and time and focus energy on ensuring that the electricity grid is there for the needs of the future. And then the last piece that I would put is, we're really looking at streamlining processes for our customers, right, there's a lot of steps that are in place. And in some of those, those process flows, that in some cases, technology allows us to leapfrog for our customers. Many customers don't want to talk to us directly anymore. So they want to use chat functionality, or they want to just be able to go and search a Frequently Asked Questions area, or get a how to documents sent to them so that they can do it, in some cases themselves. And we are hearing that from our customers. And we are taking the steps to make sure that we streamline those processes for that,   Dan Seguin  22:25 Julie, what role does Hydro Ottawa or utilities in general have when it comes to delivering solutions for customers to reduce their consumption and greenhouse gas emissions?   Julie Lupinacci  22:38 So, I think that we have a big responsibility there to keep people informed. I think awareness is pretty key when it comes to energy efficiency. And knowing where you're starting from, I think is a big component. So as utilities, I think we need to constantly ask ourselves, where is the customer in, in their knowledge of what we're trying to get them to do or what they're needing to do or what they're wanting to do. So I would hazard a guess that not many people have a true understanding of what their carbon footprint is, I would hazard a guess that we don't all know what our emission baseline is. So asking people to do something to reduce that. And they don't know what their baseline is, I think I think that's a misstep. So utilities, in general, I think have a responsibility to help customers understand how to do that calculation. And then identify pathways and programs that they can make choices that help enrich them towards what they're trying to do. So in some cases, it's painting the picture of what that future looks like, giving them choices of what the future can look like. And then once the customer chooses that, help them to make decisions to get them closer to that. So whether that be having a digital footprint with us, right reducing the need for us to mail a bill. So they're going off of paper and onto an email bill or coming to a website to get all of the details behind their bill. I think helping them understand what that impact is, is important. Making sure that we are doing sustainable business practices for our customers is important as well, right? Like we've made different choices in our building with regards to how we process waste, how we are moving around the city, what we do, when we have trucks that may not be Eevee. There may not be an Eevee model ready for the trucks that we need. But how are we planning for that to bring in those sustainable business practices? How are we leveraging tools to be able to take not necessarily like I'm unnecessary steps out of the process, whether it be a new material that a lot, that's a more sustainable material that doesn't have us cutting down trees or others. Like I think there's some things that we are looking at that to make choices about what that what that future is going to look like. And I think the other component that we have as utilities is we need to be leaders in the field, right, we need to look at what's happening, not just here in Canada, but there are other jurisdictions around this globe that have been doing conservation because they've needed to do conservation. And and so they've, they've, I don't want to say perfected it, but they've advanced it significantly. And in some cases, we can leapfrog what their program is to an even better program with potentially new technology or even a different focus. So we're looking at, we're looking into Europe, and what are they doing with regards to conservation? What are they doing with regards to energy efficiency? And how can we take what they're doing and adopt it here. And so I think utilities have a obligation to look outside of our own four walls, look outside of our province, even look inside of our country to see what are some of those things that are working elsewhere, that can be brought here for our customers.   Dan Seguin  26:21 Now, wondering if you could outline some initiatives that hydro Auto is doing to help its customers in that area?   Julie Lupinacci  26:30 Sure, there's a whole load of ones that we can talk to, and I would encourage you to follow our blog, because we talk about a lot of those pieces and share some of those details in greater detail. And some of the case studies that we do share, may have a direct impact on some other customers. And you would see how that translates into your business or interior household. But we work very closely with the City of Ottawa on their energy evolution file. And taking a look at everything from where public EV chargers need to be set up, talking to them about how to retrofit their own buildings and be future proofed from and have a smart energy component to that, talking about how we build better communities. So we're there talking with them at the planning stages of that. So those are things that we do with the city, we are looking at distributed energy resources in a very thoughtful and deliberate way, and seeing how we can leverage some of the distributed energy resources that exist in our city today, how we align it to the grid, and how we use these distributed energy resources to bridge the evolution that's needed to be able to get to that future where the capacity need is, is maybe even three times what we're seeing today. So how are we planning for that with traditional assets? But also how can we bridge and leverage distributed energy resources that exist and will exist in our service territory? So we're doing that tons of education says, as I talked about, whether you look at our blogs, the newsletters that go out, read them, there's some really cool things and ideas that are in there for you as residential customers, and even commercial customers. We had an amazing symposium where we just started some of the conversation about what these different projects and initiatives are that we're doing with customers and can do with customers. You look at the Zibi Community, right downtown, like right behind shudder right beside sheer falls and behind the parliament. And that community itself is built completely differently, right, looking at using renewable energy, looking at using the steam off of Kruger that's just across the river, and how that heats the building and heats the community. And then looking at, you know, from an environmental footprint, what we did at a shelter falls with the eel ladder and helping with the eel migratory patterns is one element. We have a new substation in barre haven where we were very deliberate and kept a parcel of that land for a pollinator meadow. And really looking at how we promote the pollinators to be in the area that helped that particular growth. And then a number of conservation programs that we're working with with either the ISO which is our Independent Electricity System, distributor, or off operator and working with them and the Ministry of Energy on here are some programs that we see that can help bridge a defer capital investments because the capacity is here and we're sharing the capacity a little bit different, and even encouraged people to conserve energy, you know, not leaving their lights on not leaving motors running, generators, running, and all kinds of different programs that we can look at from that perspective. So lots of pilots, lots of different programs that are in flight and pilots to come.   Dan Seguin  29:59 What new and innovative plans are you making for the short, mid and long term when it comes to customers? And what hydro Ottawa offers?   Julie Lupinacci  30:12 Yeah, so I think I mentioned our, our battery loan program, you know that that was a one that we had thought would be a one and done type of thing during, during the early days of the pandemic. And the results that we saw on that program just made it one that we don't see going away anymore. So looking at continuing to evolve that program and scale it up. So I think that would be, you know, a short term. One. Another short term one is some of the Eevee programs that we're working on, that are coming to market with regards to being able to not only see where the EVs are coming up, but predict where the next EVs are going to be coming in. And even having a bit of a different relationship with those Eevee owners. So some type of a demand response program, you'll see that too short to mid term. With regards to helping customers understand that if they defer or delay charging their car until the evening, there might be a cost benefit, but also some benefit to us overall. So I think you'll see a lot of those kinds of demand response pilots to really see how and what we need to do, and engage our community and help us get there, right? We can't do this as single, single folks, we need to do this as a full community looking towards that future. And long term, I think you'll see some of those continuing to innovate. With regards to just building smarter communities, renewables within communities, you'll look at a different way of doing some substation work, and bringing that power here into the city of Ottawa.   Dan Seguin  31:51 Now, in 2021, hydro Ottawa announced that it will achieve Net Zero operations by 2030. How will this help or improve the lives of Ottawa residents?   Julie Lupinacci  32:04 It's a very philosophical question in some cases, because I think there's still a lot of misconception or confusion around what net zero means, right? And people think that going to net zero means there's no emissions. And that's not true. Net Zero means that we are becoming carbon neutral or emission neutral. So we may emit some emissions on one side of the business. But we're, we're offsetting in another area. So I think, I think it's a few different things. I think it gets us off thinking in a very different way. It helps to stimulate a conversation that is much needed to be able to advance. And I think we have a corporate responsibility to move that forward here within the City of Ottawa, especially being the capital of Ottawa, when you have your Prime Ministers sit up there and say, we're going to be net zero by 2050. And nobody moves until 2049. It's not going to work great. So people need to move early. And I think hydro Ottawa has demonstrated a lot of those advancements towards this net zero operations even in advance of, of when we announced it, right, like a lot of some of what we were doing a lot of what we were doing sorry, was really in play before that we had a very different way of building our our generation downtown Ottawa and we took the environment into account, we took a very accountable, measured approach to how we were doing our development and you're gonna see that continue in what we do. As we build substations, how do we do that to make sure that we have the least impact on the environment, and that we leave the space that we're in as good or better is really what we're trying to do than that have been when we got there, I look at the the Cambrian substation and bar Haven, and it is better than when we put our plant there because we have a pollinator meadow that's very deliberate, and what we're doing, we're taking care of the lands that are that are there, and you're gonna see that happen throughout. And it's all in for that larger view. With regards to Ottawa residents, I think it's important for them to know that they have a utility provider that cares about that as much as they do. And that are putting very thoughtful approach to how we go about doing things and we're not just doing it for the sake of doing it it means something this last spring, although small, in its in its in its infancy and I see it growing you know, we we planted trees, as part of our employees as part of their volunteer day that they get with the company went out into community and planted trees in an area that was where they were much needed. So I think you'll see a lot of those types of initiatives all happening within the city and with our company.   Dan Seguin  35:04 Julie, is this what customers expect from a modern utility? What other ways is hydro Ottawa innovating?   Julie Lupinacci  35:14 Yeah, I think expectations on on utilities as well as most organizations is changing significantly, customers are wanting organizations, corporations to not just be good corporate citizens, but to be accountable for the decisions and the activities that they do to be transparent, and why we're making those decisions, and how we're making those decisions. So when we talk about bringing in renewables, when we talk about being ready for electric vehicles, when we talk about bringing an energy management expertise into the area, it's it's really meant to make sure that customers have the information that they're already asking for, and that they're having information from a somewhat neutral party, right. In some cases, we're not looking at pushing one way or another, but making sure that people are informed to make the best decisions, and know what the outcomes are. And I think we're uniquely positioned to do that. There's a lot of people that might sell renewables, and they help install solar panels. And we're not looking to replace any of those, those people like it takes all kinds to make these things, all kinds of components in the supply chain to make this come to reality. But I think there is a natural space for hydro Ottawa to be there to help inform customers on how to do this effectively, what this means to them, like adding solar panels to your rooftop has complications. And it also has implications for you as a homeowner. And I think it's important that people be informed as they're making those decisions to put two and two together so that they don't, later on, find out that, you know, use this example, they bought an Eevee. And they bring it home, and they have nowhere to plug it in. Because their condo Corporation isn't set up effectively. There's nowhere for them to do public charging systems, I think that we need to make sure that we're helping customers make those informed decisions, and how we can do that together. So things around, like you mentioned, cybersecurity, and energy management, one of our conversations, and we're getting in, we're playing a big role in that, like, I think if we would be naive to think that customers don't expect us to have some of the best cybersecurity programs in place we are, are the custodians of the network that makes sure that they have energy to run their lives and electricity to run their lives. And I mentioned at the beginning of this, that some people count on that to stay alive. So that is of utmost importance, and a certainty that we need to play a space in that. And then energy management, like who you turn to other than somebody is really accountable to make sure that energy comes to your house, to be able to provide that expertise and help you through that and guide you through that process.   Dan Seguin  38:19 Now, what are some community carbon reduction projects that hydro Ottawa has been involved in, that customers might not be aware of?   Julie Lupinacci  38:29 Yeah, so hydro Ottawa has been working with the city and a lot of customers around the Ottawa area to be able to help them bring some of the carbon reduction projects that they have to life and to reality. So one of the big ones that I think maybe will touch everybody in the city of Ottawa is streetlight conversions. So we converted them all the street lights to LEDs, so that provided a significant cost savings to the City of Ottawa with regards to their energy bill, but in most cases provided better lighting, to the city streets, and has an element of controls in those lights to be able to allow the city to turn them up or down depending right so there's some technology that's built into those city lights, and all done through cost savings to the to the city overall. So I think that that was a big one that folks may not know about. We have been working with the city on their electric buses and bringing that vision to fruition. Electric buses, although we're not in the bus business, we are in the business now to support getting electricity to those buses and to where they need it and planning where those bus resting stations are to recharge, making sure there's enough in electricity capacity going into the main headquarters where the buses park at night, do their maintenance, make sure that they get charged up for the routes and working to make sure that they have everything there at To add a Edie, affordable process for the city, right, making sure that we're looking at, at this model that we worked on with the city to make sure that hydro water was working and supporting everything up to that charger. And the city's buses are running the routes, but we're, you know, we're staying in our lanes with regards to core competency, but making sure that we're bringing that vision to reality. And we're doing that same thing with the airport. No, we're not in the flight business. But we are in the business of making sure that as airports, specifically the airport here in Ottawa, are looking at electrifying everything under the wing, making sure doing fuel switching even in their passenger terminals. So you know, look at lighting solutions all across, whether it's, you know, the parking garage or in the building, you know, working with the report on helping them get to their net zero commitments, and making sure that we have the expertise brought in. Sometimes it comes with, you know, understanding what different programs are out there and marrying those up. And we do that. And then the last one, I think we've been working with some customers like the airport, so the airport's not a standalone, customer story. We've got a number of those stories that we're working with customers to do. We're working with Ottawa police services to be able to help look at their fleets and how do you support moving, moving their fleets to electric vehicles and other other customers that are like that? And then looking and working with the City of Ottawa on public charging stations? Where would these be, you know, our new mayor, as part of his campaign talked about public charging stations talked about ebike charging stations, and we're working hand in hand with them to help bring those visions and those plans to reality that is not just to talk, but it is bringing those projects to life.   Dan Seguin  41:59 Okay, Julie, let's rewind and go back to the strategic plan. What are the key change drivers that are influencing hydro Ottawa is future planning.   Julie Lupinacci  42:10 So we've used a five-d framework in our strategic direction, because these are the drivers that are not just impacting our industry, but they're impacting everybody. And they're, they're things that are happening, and you'd have to understand what it is and then look at your own business and then how you support customers. So the customers need to be aware as well. So we're really looking at these five days. So the first one is decarbonisation. You know, I think we've had a lot of that conversation so far. It needs to be part of our programs, it needs to be part of our future design, it needs to be part of our discussions with customers. The second one is digitization. And this one has been around for a while, right, like people have been migrating to, to using electronics, like E bills, emails versus you know, getting your your bill in the mail, paying through through some type of paper pay service versus sending in a check, or coming in to drop off money at hydro. We haven't done that for a while. But those are pathways to this digitization. And I would say it's going further than that. We're looking at how to make sure that customers have access to their data through a digital output? How can they connect their systems to that to make some decisions for them? So digitization is a big one for us. Not just on the customer front? I would say how we're developing our systems as well. Decentralization is one of those third G's that people are looking at. And I always laugh because industries go through centralization, decentralization. It's kind of a little bit of a flux piece that happens. But we are in a decentralization component because they think the reality of an Ottawa is in the ecosystem that we have. It's a pretty vast city, like, you know, from a miles long miles wide component. It's vast. It's not as big as some of the service territories that you know, like Hydro Quebec takes care of the entire province. But it's vast enough that you would think why are we decentralizing? But there's the reality of things like the storm that bring it to light that you need some loops within the system that are centered around where people are living and making sure that we can have some redundancy in different areas. So we are looking at that. And what we do is diversification diversifying. Like we talked about overhead underground a lot this year, especially after the storms. That's one form of diversification. But there's also looking at how do you incorporate renewables? It's a different type of energy production. How do you incorporate solar in a different way in a very thoughtful way and I can be stressed enough because you can't just put solar across the entire city and think that that's going to work right, you need to be able to integrate those pieces, right? If you want that energy future, you have to integrate solar into the existing grid, and look at how we do this as a community based component. So diversification is definitely leading a lot of discussions here. And what we do, and the last one is demographics that the city is changing. You know, we used to be English, French only, we have different languages that are coming to be so that, you know, like, that's the basics of it. But also taking a look at the changing demographics of the workplace, the changing demographics of where people are working, and how people are working, like demographics is a little bit different. Right? There's, you know, there's a socio graphic component to that, or a psycho psychographic component that comes into that as well, that we're looking at how we speak to customers? How do we make sure that they have information? What are we making sure that we're doing when we plan work, right? Like we have to do maintenance on our system? How do we do that support, support our customers, so all five of those DS, really our part of how we evaluate the work of the projects that we get involved in?   Dan Seguin  46:18 What has been the impact of the pandemic on electricity customers, and how has that influenced your role, and also hydro Auto has relationship with its customers,   Julie Lupinacci  46:30 The pandemic has, I think, thrown a very different work life reality here. Ottawa, for the most part, did not see the unemployment rates as some of the other cities across Canada. So in some cases, we've been fortunate, but the impacts are still there. So for the utility, and I talked about it in the previous question a little bit, but for the utility, how we go about doing our work matters more. Now, I would say, you know, coming through the pandemic, it matters more, because when we used to plan work on our grid, we used to plan it during the day. So we would go into a community. And we would know that the bulk of the customers in that community were at work between nine and five, let's say or nine and three. And we could get a lot of work done without really impacting customers. And now, it's not like those homes have become daycares, not just during the pandemic, but as a, as a perpetual thing. Now, right, we've got hybrid work components, so you can't decide that this or you can't even hazard an educated guess that this community is going to be predominantly out between these hours on this day, like that just doesn't, that doesn't happen anymore. So working with customers and giving them more advanced notice, in some cases, more, making sure that they get this information in a timely manner so that they can plan around it the same way that we're planning is super critical. And I would say that, ultimately, the biggest change that we've seen with our customers is making sure that we can continue to do the work with the least impact to our customers. And I think that's why we talked about the battery loan program. That's why it's become such an important piece of the future that our customers will not be able to give it to everybody. But you know, at least it's a program that will kind of look at how we can evolve and be able to support our customers through those types.   Dan Seguin  48:41 Okay, Julie, we always end our interviews with some rapid fire questions, and we've got some for you. Are you ready?   Julie Lupinacci  48:50 I am. Okay, Julie,   Dan Seguin  48:52 What are you reading right now?   Julie Lupinacci  48:53 I'm actually reading two books right now. One is called Ed Mylett The Power of One More, which is a pretty inspirational story that was based on his father just doing one more thing. One more minute talking to a customer reaching out to one more customer. It's kind of a really cool dynamic when you pull it into a workspace, and the other one is Brene Brown's Atlas of the Heart. I'm reading that as part of our we had a lot of conversations about crisis, communication and emotion and Atlas of the heart was one of those recommendations. So I have taken her up on that.   Dan Seguin  49:27 Now, what would you name your boat? If you had one?   Julie Lupinacci  49:32 Yeah, I don't know if I thought this one 100% through but I think I would say Unstoppable. Maybe Unsinkable Boat.   Dan Seguin  49:43 Okay, let's move on to the next one. Who is someone that you admire?   Julie Lupinacci  49:46 That so many people to choose from? But here I'd say my mom, she's a powerhouse. She's mastered the balance of staying calm, and keeping calm even in the craziness of the chaos. She has that ability to fight kind of to find a path forward for people and during insanely stressful situations, so she like, reaches down and likes to pick people up gently, sometimes sometimes not so gently, and gives you a good kick in the butt, you know, to get you into overdrive when needed. So if I could, if I could garner some of that into who I am, I think I think that would be amazing.   Dan Seguin  50:21 Okay, what is the closest thing to real magic that you've witnessed?   Julie Lupinacci  50:27 Yeah, this is, this is a hard one for me to put into words. But let me see if I can take, again, the chaos of some of these weather events that we've seen, like I've witnessed our team go from full throttle heads down, like almost militant robotic work mode, trying to get the power back on. And they can stop in those tracks and become this completely empathetic supportive, human being to some of the most vulnerable people that they they encounter, whether it be somebody who they see is needing help to shovel their driveway because they're struggling or, you know, a child comes up to them with a with a bunch of cards to give to hydro auto, because they're their classmates made them in in class, and they want to give them to them. And they're right, coming up right to a workstation, like I see this switch happen on a dime. And in my opinion, it's so magical. So I guess in my opinion, that would be pure via pure magic moment.   Dan Seguin  51:28 Okay, next one here, what has been the biggest challenge to you personally, since the pandemic began?   Julie Lupinacci  51:35 Yeah, as a single parent, I think it's easy for me to say something like anytime the schools were doing virtual learning and trying to juggle, juggle all of you know, work. Being a teacher is the hardest job in the world. Especially in some of those, with with some of those kids that just can't sit still, which is, which is my son. But I would have to say the hardest part, for me, has been witnessing folks who are struggling, trying to get back on their feet, whether that be financially, but more so I would say struggling to get back on their feet mentally coming out of the pandemic. Okay,   Dan Seguin  52:13 moving on. We've all been watching a lot of Netflix and TV. What are your favorite movies or shows?   Julie Lupinacci  52:23 It's funny because I saw this. And I would say, yes, that's a true statement. But I haven't been watching a lot of Netflix and TV, but my family Friday Night Movie go twos, these last few weeks has been the Home Alone series. And I don't know why. Coming up to Christmas. I guess that's what it is. But home alone has been the movie. I think we're up to the third one or fourth one now at our Friday movie nights.   Dan Seguin  52:47 Lastly, what's exciting you about your industry, our industry right now?   Julie Lupinacci  52:53 Oh, geez, what's not exciting. We're I think we're in a pivotal moment and the energy industry, like a kind of table clearing moment when we're working across boundaries, like I'm talking about physical boundaries, cross fuel providers cross. The local distributor companies talking together across energy providers, you know, private, public energy providers have all kinds of different solutions out there. Everybody's at this table working to develop solutions. It's such an exciting time, because it's the egos in some cases get completely put outside and just really focused on the same goal on trying to get us to that smart, sustainable, affordable energy future. And to me, that is absolutely the most exciting part of our industry right now. Well, Julie,   Dan Seguin  53:41 we've reached the end of another episode of The thinkenergy podcast. If our listeners wanted to learn more about you and our organization, how could they connect?   Julie Lupinacci  53:54 So I am on LinkedIn. So you can find me Julie Lupinacci at LinkedIn, or you can connect right through our website. So if you send something through there, saying you want to talk to me, it'll find its way to me directly.   Dan Seguin  54:08 Again, Julie, thank you so much for joining me today. I hope you had a lot of fun.   Julie Lupinacci  54:12 I did.   Dan Seguin  54:14 Thanks for tuning in for another episode of The think energy podcast. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a review wherever you're listening. And to find out more about today's guests or previous episodes, visit thinkenergypodcast.com And I hope you'll join us again next time as we spark even more conversations about the energy of tomorrow.  

Lagrange Point
Episode 511 - How the earliest brains developed and handle touch

Lagrange Point

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 16:59


Peering into the history of brains with some amazing tiny fossils. How did the earliest brains develop? Is a head just an extension of a segmented body or something else entirely? How did the first brains and nervous systems evolve in arthropods. How does your body process the sense of touch? The faintest sensations of touch are handled by specialist cells in your spinal cord. How do your  brain stem and spinal cord help your body process the senses? Nicholas J. Strausfeld, Xianguang Hou, Marcel E. Sayre, Frank Hirth. The lower Cambrian lobopodian Cardiodictyon resolves the origin of euarthropod brains. Science, 2022; 378 (6622): 905 DOI: 10.1126/science.abn6264 Turecek, J., Lehnert, B.P. & Ginty, D.D. The encoding of touch by somatotopically aligned dorsal column subdivisions. Nature, 2022 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-022-05470-x Anda M. Chirila, Genelle Rankin, Shih-Yi Tseng, Alan J. Emanuel, Carmine L. Chavez-Martinez, Dawei Zhang, Christopher D. Harvey, David D. Ginty. Mechanoreceptor signal convergence and transformation in the dorsal horn flexibly shape a diversity of outputs to the brain. Cell, 2022; 185 (24): 4541 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2022.10.012

ReFi Podcast
State of The ReFi Nation with Rez from Solid World DAO

ReFi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 61:03


John Ellison is joined by Rez, co-founder of Solid World DAO and co-host of This Week in ReFi Podcast. They take a look at the last year in the world of ReFi, the Cambrian explosion of innovation at the intersection of climate and Web3. Where we are now, and where we are headed as we continue our collective ReFi journey together... Mentioned in The Show People Stenver Jerkku. https://twitter.com/stenverjerkku Companies eAgronom https://eagronom.com/en/ghg-platform/ Solid World https://www.solid.world/ Toucan https://toucan.earth/ Verra https://verra.org/programs/verified-carbon-standard/ FTX https://cases.ra.kroll.com/FTX/ CTA Links https://refijobs.com https://future.quest/submit Screenshares https://www.klimadao.finance/ https://carbon.klimadao.finance/carbonmarket https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/money-supply-m0 https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/GFSR/Issues/2022/10/11/global-financial-stability-report-october-2022 https://nasdaq.com/market-activity/index/comp https://nasdaq.com/market-activity/index/comp https://co2.earth https://www.climatepolicyinitiative.org/publication/global-landscape-of-climate-finance-2021/ 00:00 Intro 01:32 State of The ReFi Nation 03:04 Rez's Journey 08:45 JE's journey 12:45 Klima DAO launch 16:40 JE's time at Toucan 17:55 KlimaDAO Launch 19:20 NCT Launch 22:50 Verra pausing Tokenization 26:50 Verra Consultations & Gold Standard 33:40 Where are we now? 34:00 State of tokenized carbon 36:22 How we dealt with COVID-19 36:43 US Money Supply 38:26 Macro Finance, IMF GFSR 40:40 Tech Stocks 41:04 Tech Company Layoffs 43:03 Changing Narrative of Crypto 47:45 Atmospheric CO2 48:20 Global Co-ordination 55:40 The next chapter of ReFi 57:34 Future Quest 1M grant pool Connect with Rez, check out Solid World Dao & This week in ReFi Rez on Twitter https://twitter.com/0xRez Solid World https://www.solid.world This Week in ReFi https://twitter.com/ThisWeekInReFi --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/refipodcast/message

Screaming in the Cloud
Couchbase and the Evolving World of Databases with Perry Krug

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 34:21


About PerryPerry Krug currently leads the Shared Services team which is focused on building tools and managing infrastructure and data to increase the productivity of Couchbase's Sales and Field organisations.  Perry has been with Couchbase for over 12 years and has served in many customer-facing technical roles, helping hundreds of customers understand, deploy, and maintain Couchbase's NoSQL database technology.  He has been working with high performance caching and database systems for over 15 years.Links Referenced: Couchbase: https://www.couchbase.com/ Perry's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/perrykrug/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: InfluxDB is the smart data platform for time series. It's built from the ground-up to handle the massive volumes and countless sources of time-stamped data produced by sensors, applications, and systems. You probably think of these as logs.InfluxDB is programmable and performant, has a common API across the platform, and handles high granularity data–at scale and with high availability. Use InfluxDB to build real-time applications for analytics, IoT, and cloud-native services, all in less time and with less code. So go ahead–turn your apps up to 11 and start your journey to Awesome for free at InfluxData.com/screaminginthecloudCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's episode is a promoted guest episode brought to us by our friends at Couchbase. Now, I want to start off by saying that this week is AWS re:Invent. And there is Last Week in AWS swag available at their booth. More on that to come throughout the next half hour or so of conversation. But let's get right into it. My guest today is Perry Krug, Director of Shared Services over at Couchbase. Perry, thanks for joining me.Perry: Hey, Corey, thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure.Corey: So, we're recording this before re:Invent, so the fact that we both have, you know, personality and haven't lost our voices yet should probably be a bit of a giveaway on this. But I want to start at the very beginning because unlike people who are academically successful, I tend to suck at doing the homework, across the board. Couchbase has been around for a long time. We've seen the company do a bunch of different things, most importantly and notably, sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense for which I thank you. But let's start at the beginning. What is Couchbase?Perry: Yeah, you're very welcome, Corey. And it's again, it's a pleasure to be here. So, Couchbase is an enterprise database company at the very top level. We make database software and we distribute that to our customers. We have two flavors, two ways of getting your hands on it.One is the kind of legacy, what we call self-managed, where you the user, the customer, downloads the software, installs it themselves, sets it up, manages the cluster monitoring, scaling all of that. And that's, you know, a big part of our business. Over the last few years we've identified, and certainly others in the industry have, as well the desire for users to access database and other technology in a hosted Software-as-a-Service pay-as-you-go, cloud-native, buzzword, et cetera, et cetera, vehicle. And so, we've released the Couchbase Capella, which is our fully managed, fully hosted database-as-a-service, running in—currently—Amazon and Google, soon to be Azure as well. And it wraps and extends our core Couchbase Server product into a, as I mentioned, hosted and managed platform that our users can now come to and consume as developers and build their applications while leaving all of the operational and administration—monitoring, managing failover expansion, all of that—to us as the experts.Corey: So, you folks are non-relational database, NoSQL in the common parlance, which is odd because they call it NoSQL, yet. They keep making more of them, so I feel like that's sort of the Hollywood model where okay, that was so good. We're going to do it again. Where did NoSQL come from? Because back when I was learning databases, when dinosaurs roamed the earth, it was all about relational models, like we're going to use a relational database because when the only tool you have is an axe, every problem looks like hours of fun. What gave rise to this, I guess, Cambrian explosion that we've seen of NoSQL options that proliferate o'er the land?Perry: Yeah, a really, really good question, and I like the axe-throwing metaphor. So sure, 20, 30, 40 now years ago, as digital applications needed a place to store their data, the world invented relational databases. And those were used and continue to be used very well for what they were designed for, for data that follows a very strict structure that doesn't need to be served at significant scale, does not need to be replicated geographically, does not need to handle data coming in from different sources and those sources changing their formats of things all the time. And so, I'm probably as old as you are and been around when the dinosaurs were there. We remember this term called ‘Web 2.0.' Kids, you're going to have to go look that up in the dictionary or TikTok it or something.But Web 2.0 really was the turning point when websites became web applications. And suddenly, there was the introduction of MySpace and Facebook and Amazon and Google and LinkedIn, and a number of others, and they realized that relational databases we're not going to meet their needs, whether it be performance, whether it be flexibility, whether it be changing of data models, whether it be introducing new features at a rapid pace. They tried; they stretched them, they added a bunch of different databases together, and really was not going to be a viable solution. So, 10 now, maybe 15 years ago, you started to see the rise of these tech giants—although we didn't call them tech giants back then but they were the precursors to today's—invent their own new databases.So, Amazon had theirs, Google has theirs, LinkedIn, and a number of others. These companies had reached a level of scale and reached a level of user base, had reached a level of data requirement, had reached a level of expectation with their customers. These customers, us, the users, us consumers, we expect things to be fast, we expect them to be always available. We expect Facebook to give us our news feed in milliseconds. We expect Google to give us our website or our search results in immediate, with more and more information coming along with them.And so, it was these companies that hit those requirements first. The only solution for them was to start from scratch and rewrite their own databases. Fast forward five, six, seven years, and we as consumers turned around and said, “Look, I really liked the way Facebook does things. I really like the way Google does things. I really like the way Amazon does things.“Bank of America, can you do the same? IRS, can you do the same? Health care vendor number one, two, three, and four, government body, can you all give me the same experience? I want my taxi to tell me exactly where it's going to take me from one place to another, I want it to give me a receipt immediately after I finish my ride. Actually, I want to be able to change my payment method after I paid for that ride because I used the wrong one.”All of these are expectations that we as consumers have taken from the tech giants—Apple, LinkedIn, Facebook—and turned around to nearly every other service that we interact with on a daily basis. And all of a sudden, the requirements that Facebook had, that Google had, that no other company had, you know, outside of the top five, suddenly were needed by every single industry, nearly every single company, in order to be competitive in their markets.Corey: And there's no way to scale relational to get to a point where it can wind up handling those type workloads efficiently?Perry: Correct, correct. And it's not just that the technology cannot do it—everything is technically feasible—but the cost both financially and time-to-market-wise in order to do that in a relational database was untenable. It either cost too much money, or it costs too much developers time, or cost too much of everybody's time to try to shoehorn something into it. And then you have the rise of cloud and containers, which relational databases, you know, never even had the inkling of a thought that they might need to be able to handle someday. And so, these requirements that consumers have been placed on everything else that they interact with really led to the rise of NoSQL as a commodity or as a database for the masses.LinkedIn is not in the business of developing a database and then selling it to everybody else to use as a database, right? They built it for themselves, they made their service better. And so, what you see is some of those founding fathers created databases, but then had no desire to sell them to others. And then after that followed the rise of companies like Couchbase and a number of others who said, “Look, we think we can provide those capabilities, we think we can meet those requirements for everybody.” And thereby rose the plethora of NoSQL databases because everybody had a little bit different of an approach to it.If you ask ten people what NoSQL is about, you're going to get eleven or twelve different answers. But you can kind of distill that into two categories. One is performance and operations. So, I need it to be faster, I need it to be scalable, I need it to be replicated geographically. And that's what NoSQL is to me. And that's the right answer.And so, you have things like Cassandra and Redis that are meant to be fast and scalable and replicated. You ask another group and they're going to tell you, “No, no, no. NoSQL needs to be flexible. I need to get rid of the rigid database schemas, I need to bring JSON or other data formats in and munge all this data together and create something cool and new out of it.” And thereby you have the rise of things like MongoDB, who focused nearly exclusively on the developer experience of working with data.And for a long time, those two were in opposite camps, where you have the databases that did performance and the databases that did flexibility. I'm not here to say that Couchbase is the ultimate kitchen sink for everything, but we've certainly tried to approach both of those challenges together so that you can have something that scales and performs and can be flexible enough in data model. And everybody else is trying to do the same thing, right? But all these databases are competing for that same nirvana of the best of both worlds.Corey: And it almost feels like there's a convergence play in place where everything now is trying to go away from the idea of, “Oh, yeah, we started off as a purpose-built database, but you can use this for everything.” And I don't necessarily know that is going to be the path that a lot of companies want to go down. What do you view Couchbase as I guess, falling down? In other words, what workloads is Couchbase inappropriate for?Perry: Yeah, that's a good question. And my [crosstalk 00:10:35]—Corey: Anyone who can't answer that one is a zealot and that's one of those okay, let's be very careful and not take our eyes off you for one second, while smiling and backing away slowly.Perry: Let's cut to commercial. No, I mean, there certainly are workloads that you know, in the past, we've not been good for that we've made improvements to address. There are workloads that we had not address well today that we will try to address in the future, and there are workloads that we may never see as fitting in our wheelhouse. The biggest category group that comes to mind is Couchbase is not an archival database. We are not meant to have data put in us that you don't care about, that you don't want to—that you just need to keep it around, but you don't ever need to access.And there are systems that do that well, they do that at a solid total cost of ownership. And Couchbase is meant for operational data. It's meant for data that needs to be interacted with, read and/or written, at scale and at a reasonable performance to serve a user-facing or system-facing application. And we call ourselves a general-purpose database. Bongo and others call themselves as well. Oracle calls itself a general-purpose database, and yet, not everybody uses Oracle for everything.So, there are reasons that you—Corey: Who could afford that?Perry: Who could? Exactly. It comes down to cost, ultimately. So, I'm not here to say that Couchbase does everything. We like to think, and we're trying to target and strive towards an 80%, right? If we can do 80% of an application or an organization's workloads, there is certainly room for 20% of other workloads, other applications, other requirements that can be met or need to be met by purpose-built databases.But if you rewind four or five years, there was this big push towards polyglot persistence. It's a buzzword that came and kind of has gone out of fashion, but it presented the idea that everybody is going to use 15 different databases and everybody is going to pick the right one for exactly the workload and they're going to somehow stitch them all together. And that really hasn't come to fruition either. So, I think there's some balance, where it's not one to rule them all, but it's also not 15 for every company. Some organizations just have a set of requirements that they want to be met and our database can do that.Corey: Let's continue our tour of the competitive landscape here now that we've handled the relational side of the world. The best database, as anyone who's listened to this show knows, is of course, Amazon's Route 53 TXT records stuffed into DNS, especially in the NoSQL land. Clearly, you're all fighting for second place after that. How do you stack up against the idea of legitimately using that approach? And for those who are not in on the joke, please don't do this. It is not the right answer. But I'm curious to get your take as to why DNS TXT records are an inappropriate NoSQL option.Perry: Well, it's a joke, right? And let's be clear about that. But—Corey: I have to say that because otherwise, someone tries it in production. I've gotten that wrong a few times, historically, so now I put a disclaimer in because yeah, it's only funny, so long as people are in on the joke. If not, and I lead someone down the primrose path to disaster, I feel bad. So, let's be very clear. We're kidding.Perry: And I'm laughing. I'm laughing here behind the camera. I am. I am.Corey: Yeah.Perry: So, the element of truth that I think Couchbase is in a position, or I'm in a position to kind of talk about is, 12 years ago, when Couchbase started, we were a key-value database and that's where we saw the best part of the market in those days, and where we were able to achieve the best scale and replication and performance, and fairly quickly realized that simple key-value, though extremely valuable and easy to manage, was not broad enough in requirements-meeting. And that's where we set our sights on and identified the larger, kind of, document database group, which is really just a derivative of key-value, where still everything is a key and a value; it's just now a document that you can reason about, that you can create an index on, that you can query, that you can run full-text search on, you can do much more with the data. So, at our core, we are still a key-value database. When that value is JSON, we become a document database. And so, if Route 53 decided that they wanted to enter into the document database market, they would need to be adding things that allowed you to introspect and ask questions of the data within that text which you can't, right?Corey: Well, not with that attitude. But yeah, I agree with you.Perry: [laugh].Corey: Moving up the stack, let's talk about a much more fearsome competitor here that I'm certain you see an awful lot of deals that you wind up closing, specifically your own open-source product. You historically have wound up selling software into environments, I believe, you referred to as your legacy offering where it's the hosted version of your commercial software. And now of course, you also have Capella, your cloud-hosted version. But open-source looks surprisingly compelling for an awful lot of use cases and an awful lot of folks. What's the distinction?Perry: Sure. Just to correct a little bit the distinction, we have Couchbase Server, which we provide as a what we call self-managed, where you can download it and install it yourself. Now, you could do that with the open-source version or you could do that with our Enterprise Edition. What we've then done is wrapped that Enterprise Edition in a hosted bottle, and that's Capella. So, the open-source version is something we've long been supporters of; it's been a core part of our go-to-market for the last 12 or 13 years or so and we still see it as a strong offering for organizations that don't need the added features, the added capabilities, don't need the support of the experts that wrote the software behind them.Certainly, we contribute and support our community through our forums and Discord and other channels, but that's a very big difference than two o'clock in the morning, something's not working and I need a ticket to track. We don't do that for our community edition. So, we see lots of users downloading that, picking it up building it into their applications, especially applications that are in their infancy or are with organizations that they simply can't afford the added cost and therefore they don't get the added benefit. We're not here to gouge and carve out every dollar that we can, but if you need the benefit that we can provide, we think there's value in that and that's what we're trying to run a business as.Corey: Oh, absolutely. It doesn't work when you're trying to wind up charging a license fee for something that someone is doing in their spare time project for funsies just to learn the technology. It's like, and then you show up. It's like, “That'll be $700. Surprise.”Yeah, that's sort of the AWS billing model approach, where—it's not a viable onramp for most folks. So, the open-source direction down there make sense. Counterpoint. If you're running a bank on top of it, “Well, we're running it ourselves and really hoping for the best. I mean, we have access to the code and all.” Great, but there are times you absolutely want some of the best minds in the world, with respect to that particular product, able to help troubleshoot so the ATM start working again before people riot in the streets.Perry: Yeah, yeah. And ultimately, it's a question of core competencies. Are you an organization that wants to be in the database development market? Great, by all means, we'd love to support you in that. If you want to focus on doing what you do best be at a bank or an e-commerce website, you worry about your application, you let us worry about the database and everybody gets along very well.Corey: There's definitely something to be said for outsourcing some of the pain, some of the challenge around an awful lot of it.Perry: There's a natural progression to the cloud for that and Software-as-a-Service, database-as-a-service where you're now outsourcing even more by running on our hosting platform. No longer do you have to download the binary and install yourself, no longer do you have to setup the cluster and watch it in case it has a blip or the statistic goes up too far. We're taking care of that for you. So yes, you're paying for that service, but you're getting the value of not having to be a database manager, let alone database developer for them.Corey: Love how serverless helps you scale big and ship fast, but hate debugging your serverless apps? With Lumigo's serverless observability, it's fast and easy (and maybe a little fun, too). End-to-end distributed tracing gives developers full clarity into their most complex serverless and containerized applications, connecting every service from AWS Lambda and Amazon ECS to DynamoDB, API Gateways, Step Functions and more. Try Lumigo free and debug 3x faster, reduce error rate and speed up development. Visit snark.cloud/lumigo That's snark.cloud/L-U-M-I-G-OCorey: What is the point of distinction between Couchbase Server and Couchbase Capella? To be clear, your self-hosted versus managed cloud offerings. When is one appropriate versus the other?Perry: Well, I'm supposed to say that Capella is always the appropriate choice, but there are currently a number of situations where Capella is not available in particular regions or cloud providers and so downloading running the software yourself certainly in your own—yes, there are people who still run their own data centers. I know it's taboo and we don't like to talk about that, but there are people who have on-premise. And so, Couchbase Capella is not available for them. But Couchbase Server is the original Couchbase database and it is the core of Couchbase Capella. So, wrapping is not giving it enough credit; we use Couchbase Server to power Couchbase Capella.And so, there's an enormous amount of value added around the core database, but ultimately, it's the behind the scenes of Couchbase Capella. Which I think is a nice benefit in that when an application is connecting to either one, it gets the same experience. You can point an application at one versus the other and because it's the same database running behind the scenes, the behavior, the data model, the query language, the APIs are all the same, so it adds a nice level of flexibility four customers that are either moving from one to another or have to have some sort of hybrid approach, which we see in the market today.Corey: Let's talk economics for a second. I can see scenarios where especially you have a high volume environment where you're sending tremendous amounts of data back and forth and as soon as it crosses an availability zone boundary or a region boundary, or God forbid, goes out to the internet via standard egress fees over in AWS-land, there's a radically different economic modeling that comes into play as opposed to having something in the same availability zone, in the same subnet just where that—or all traffic back and forth is free. Do you see that in your customer base, that that is a model that is driving people towards self-hosting?Perry: No. And I'd say no because Capella allows you to peer and run your application in the same availability zone as the as a database. And so, as long as that's an option for you that we have, you know, our offering in the right region, in the right AZ, and you can put your application there, then that's not a not an issue. We did have a customer not too long ago that didn't set that up correctly, they thought they did, and we noticed some high data transfer charges. Again, the benefit of running a hosted service, we detected that for them and were able to turn around and say, “Hmm, you might want to change this to over there so that we all save some money in doing so.”If we were not there watching it, they might not have noticed that themselves if they were running it self-managed; they might not have known what to do about it. And so, there's a benefit to working with us and using that hosted platform that we can keep an eye out. And we can apply all of our learning and best practices and bug fixes, we give that to everybody, rather than each person having to stumble across those hurdles themselves.Corey: That's one of those fun, weird corner-case trivia things about AWS data transfer. When you're transferring data within the same region between availability zones, it costs a penny on the sending side and a penny on the receiving side. Everything else is one side or the other that winds up getting the charge. And what makes this especially fun is that when it shows up on your bill, if you transfer a petabyte, it shows as cross-AZ data transfer: two petabytes.Perry: Two. Yeah.Corey: So, it double-counts so they can bill for it appropriately, but it leads to some really weird hunting it down, like, “Okay, well, we found half of it, but where's the other half hiding?” It's always obnoxious to trace this stuff down. The fact that you see it on your bill, well, that's testament to the fact that yeah, they're using the service. Good for them and good for you. Being able to track it down on a per-customer basis that does speak to your level of insight into what exactly is going on in your environment and where. As someone who does this for a living, let me confirm that is absolutely non-trivial.Perry: No, definitely not trivial. And you know, we've learned over the last four or five years, we've learned an enormous amount about how cloud providers work, how AWS works, but guess what, Google does it completely differently. And Azure does it—Corey: Yep.Perry: —completely differently. And so, on the surface level, they're all just cloud providers and they give you a VM, and you put some stuff on it, but integrating with the APIs, integrating with the different systems and naming of things, and then understanding the intricacies of the ins and outs, and, yeah, these cloud providers have their own bugs as well. And so, sometimes you stumble across that for them. And it's been a significant learning exercise that I think we're all better off for, having Couchbase gone through it for you.Corey: Let's get this a little bit more germane for this week for those of you who are listening to this during re:Invent. You folks are clearly here at the show—it's funny to talk about ‘here,' even though when we're recording this, it is not near here; we're actually home and enjoying ourselves, but welcome to temporal dislocation; here we are—here at the show, you folks are—among other things—being kind enough to pass out the Last Week in AWS swag from your booth, which, thank you. So, that is obviously the primary reason that you were at the show. What are the other reasons? What are the secondary reasons that you decided to come here?Perry: Yeah [laugh]. Well, I guess I have to think about this now since you already called out the primary reason.Corey: Exactly. Wait, we can have more than one reason for things? My God.Perry: Can we? Can we? AWS has long been a huge partner of ours, even before Capella itself was released. I remember sometime in, you know, five years or so ago, some 30% of our customers were running Couchbase inside of AWS, and some of our largest were some of your largest at times, like Viber, the messaging platform. And so, we've always had a very strong relationship with AWS, and the better that we can be presenting ourselves to your customers, and our customers can feel that we are jointly supporting them, the better. And so, you know, coming to re:Invent is a testament to that long-standing and very solid partnership, and also it's meant to get more exposure for us to let it be clear that Couchbase runs very well on AWS.Corey: It's one of those areas where when someone says, “Oh yeah, this is a great service offering, but it doesn't run super well on AWS.” It's like, “Okay, so are you bad computers or is what you have built so broken and Byzantine that it has to live somewhere else?” Or occasionally, the use case is absolutely not supported by AWS. Not to beat them up some more on their egress fees, but I'm absolutely about to if you're building a video streaming site, you don't want it living in AWS. It won't run super well there. Well, it'll run well, it'll just run extortionately expensively and that means that it's a non-starter.Perry: Yeah, why do you think Netflix raises their fees?Corey: Netflix, to their credit, has been really rather public about this, where they do all of their egress via their Open Connect, custom-built CDN appliances that they drop all over the place. They don't stream a single byte from AWS, and we know this from the outside because they are clearly still solvent.Perry: [laugh].Corey: I do the math on that. So, if I had been streaming at on-demand prices one month with my Netflix usage, I would have wound up spending four times my subscription fee just in their raw costs for data transfer. And I have it on good authority that is not just data transfer that is their only bill in the entire company; they also have to pay people and content and the analytics engine and whatnot. And it's kind of a weird, strange world.Perry: Real estate.Corey: Yeah. Because it's one of those strange stories because they are absolutely a showcase customer for AWS. They've been a marquee customer trotted out year after year to talk about what they're doing. But if you attempt to replicate their business purely on top of AWS, it will not work. Full stop. The economics preclude that happening.What is your philosophy these days on what historically has felt like an existential threat to most vendors that I've spoken to in a variety of ways: what if Amazon decides to enter your market? I'd ask you the same thing. Do you have fears that they're going to wind up effectively taking your open-source offering and turning it into Amazon Basics Couchbase, for lack of a better term? Is that something that is on your threat radar, or is that not really something you concern yourselves about?Perry: So, I mean, there's no arguing, there's no illusion that Amazon and Google and Microsoft are significant competitors in the database space, along with Oracle and IBM and Mongo and a handful of others.Corey: Anything's a database if you hold it wrong.Perry: This is true. This specific point of open-source is something that we have addressed in the same ways that others have addressed. And that's by choosing and changing our license model so that it precludes cloud providers from using the open-source database to produce their own service on the back of it. Let me be clear, it does not impact our existing open-source users and anybody that wants to use the Community Edition or download the software, the source code, and build it themselves. It's only targeted at Amazon because they have a track record of doing that to things like Elastic and Redis and Mongo, all of whom who have made similar to Couchbase moves to prevent that by the licensing of the open-source code.Corey: So, one of the things I do see at re:Invent every year is—and I believe wholeheartedly this comes historically from a lot of AWS's requirements for vendors on the show floor that have become public through a variety of different ways—where you for a long time, you are not allowed to mention multi-cloud or reference the fact that you work on any other cloud provider there. So, there's been a theme of this is why, for whatever it is we sell or claim to sell or hope one day to sell, AWS is the absolute best place for you to run it, full stop. And in some cases, that's absolutely true because people build primarily for a certain cloud provider and then when they find customers and other places, they learn to run it over there, too. If I'm approaching this from the perspective of I have a database problem—because looking at my philosophy on databases is hard to imagine I don't have database problems—then is my experience going to be better or even materially different between any of the cloud providers if I become a Couchbase Capella customer?Perry: I'd like to say no. We've done our best to abstract and to leverage the best of all of the cloud providers underneath to provide Couchbase in the best form that they will allow us to. And as far as I can see, there's no difference amongst those. Your application and what you do with the data, that may be better suited to one provider or another, but it's always been Couchbase is philosophy—sort of say, strategy—to make our software available to wherever our customers and users want to, to consume it. And that goes everything from physical hardware running in a data center, virtual machines on top of that, containers, cloud, and different cloud providers, different regions, different availability zones, all the way through to edge and other infrastructures. We're not in a position to say, “If you want Couchbase, you should use AWS.” We're in a position to say, “If you are using AWS, you can have Couchbase.”Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time, and of course, your sponsorship dollars, which are deeply appreciated. Once again, swag is available at the Couchbase booth this week at re:Invent. If people want to learn more and if for some unfathomable reason, they're not at re:Invent, probably because they make good life choices, where can they go to find you?Perry: couchbase.com. That'll to be the best place to land on. That takes you to our documentation, our resources, our getting help, our contact pages, directly into Capella if you want to sign in or login. I would go there.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it.Perry: Corey, it's been a pleasure. Thank you for your questions and banter, and I really appreciate the opportunity to come and share some time with you.Corey: We'll have to have you back in the near future. Perry Krug, Director of Shared Services at Couchbase. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry and insulting comment berating me for being nowhere near musical enough when referencing [singing] Couchbase Capella.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova
Wasserbedarf, Schluckmechanismus, Verpackungsmaterial

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 5:16


Die Themen aus den Wissensnachrichten +++So viel Wasser braucht unser Körper+++ So verschlucken Frösche und Kröten ihre Beute+++ Mehrweg-Kisten aus Plastik sind besser als Einweg-Kisten aus Karton+++ **********Weiterführende Quellen zu dieser Folge:Variation in human water turnover associated with environmental and lifestyle factors, Science, 24.11.2022XROMM Analysis of Feeding Mechanics in Toads: Interactions of the Tongue, Hyoid, and Pectoral Girdle , Integrative Organismal Biology. 15.11.2022Mehwegsteige aus Kunststoff vs. Einwegkarton aus Pappe - zwei Verpackungssysteme im Wettbewerb, Fraunhofer-Institut für Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik UMSICHT, November 2022Can pasture-fed livestock farming practices improve the ecological condition of grassland in Great Britain?, British Ecological Society, 24.11.2022A new ornithopod dinosaur, Transylvanosaurus platycephalus gen. et sp. nov. (Dinosauria: Ornithischia), from the Upper Cretaceous of the Haţeg Basin, Romania, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 23.11.2022The lower Cambrian lobopodian Cardiodictyon resolves the origin of euarthropod brains,SCIENCE 24 Nov 2022**********Ihr könnt uns auch auf diesen Kanälen folgen: Tiktok und Instagram.**********Weitere Wissensnachrichten zum Nachlesen: https://www.deutschlandfunknova.de/nachrichten

Restitutio
471 Scripture & Science 11: Scientific Objections to Evolution (Will Barlow)

Restitutio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 37:22


Since it's inception, evolutionary theory has remained controversial for many. Although one might think only uneducated laypeople find the idea unpalatable, quite a sizeable minority of scientists too struggle to come to terms with Darwinism. In today's episode, Will Barlow explores a number of major scientific objections to evolution, including the Cambrian explosion, mutations as an insufficient mechanism, irreducible complexity, and the fossil record itself. Additionally, he briefly explores the issue of abiogenesis--the presumed starting point for any evolutionary development. Listen to this episode on Spotify or Apple Podcasts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sdx6kuhRqQY&feature=emb_imp_woyt See below for notes. —— Links —— We are doing follow-up discussions to these episodes on YouTube. Check them out! See other episodes in this Scripture and Science Class Check out Barlow's previous podcast episodes Learn more about and support the church Barlow and his team are starting in Louisville, KY, called Compass Christian Church Find more articles and audios by Barlow on his website: Study Driven Faith Support Restitutio by donating here Designate Restitutio as your charity of choice for Amazon purchases Join our Restitutio Facebook Group and follow Sean Finnegan on Twitter @RestitutioSF Leave a voice message via SpeakPipe with questions or comments and we may play them out on the air Intro music: Good Vibes by MBB Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) Free Download / Stream: Music promoted by Audio Library. Who is Sean Finnegan?  Read his bio here —— Notes —— Scientific Objections to Evolution • Evidence problems (open scientific questions)• Methodological problems• Evolution or design? Evidence Problems The theory of evolution has several major open problems that are yet to be solved: • The Cambrian Explosion• Mutations The Cambrian Explosion Much of the fossil record could be viewed in a light to support evolution, but the Cambrian Explosion poses a big problem: • The theory of evolution requires slow changes over a long time• Cambrian explosion was a big change in a short period of time Simply put, what is the Cambrian explosion? • Evolution would predict species would diverge and lead to new genera, families, orders, classes, and then phyla• Most animal phyla (and many major classes within them) appear fully formed in the Cambrian period “According to modern paleontologists James Valentine, Stanley Awramik, Philip Signor, and Peter Sadler, the appearance of the major animal phyla near the beginning of the Cambrian is ‘the single most spectacular phenomenon evident in the fossil record.'”— Jonathan Wells, The Politically Incorrect Guide to Darwinism and Intelligent Design, page 16. Some scientists have suggested that pre-Cambrian organisms might be too delicate to make good fossils • Recent scientific discoveries have shown that this is untrue• Scientists have found fossils in the Cambrian period that are small and soft tissued Mutations Mutations are considered incredibly important to the evolutionary framework: • Recall that as populations are isolated and different conditions exist, random mutations lead to speciation (according to evolution)• Recent studies on mutation have challenged this understanding “Rather than mutations building up molecular machinery, improving an organism relentlessly, many mutations actually destroyed parts of a creature's DNA, or rendered some of the molecular machinery it coded for ineffective. It turns out that some of the mutations which break things can sometimes have a salutary effect.”— Michael Behe, “God and Evolution,” God is Great, God is Good, page 86. Mutations that break genes can have a positive effect. For example: • If a child receives the gene for sickle cell anemia from one parent and not the other, that child will experience more resistance to malaria Evolutionist Richard Lenski and his team observed a situation in bacteria where two successive mutations improved the survivability of the bacteria.However, there is one problem… “The first mutations to help were the breaking of genes. The bacteria rapidly lost the ability to make the sugar ribose (a component of RNA); for some reason that helped the mutant bacteria compete against non-mutants. A handful of other genes involved in metabolism were also deleted. Some bacteria had their ability to repair DNA badly damaged. Most bacteria lost the ability to metabolize the sugar maltose.” “The mutations were incoherent, scattered in different genes, with no recognizable theme among them. They were not in the process of building any new system in the cell. They simply took advantage of opportunities that helped them grow faster in their current milieu. This is what random mutation does, even when it ‘helps.'”— Michael Behe, “God and Evolution,” God is Great, God is Good, page 89. Methodological Problems The theory of evolution has many methodological problems: • Misleading Evidence for evolution• Irreducible complexity• The fossil record• Origin of life Misleading Evidence for Evolution Proponents of evolution have used several pieces of misleading information: • Haeckel's embryos• Miller's origin of life experiment Haeckel's Embryos If you look at many scientific textbooks, you will find a drawing of Haeckel's embryos.The problem is that they are fake! Miller's Experiment Stanley Miller conducted a series of experiments in 1953 to demonstrate that life could spontaneously arise: • Miller used an atmosphere of hydrogen, methane, ammonia, and water vapor — and life appeared!• However, that atmosphere is not the scientifically accepted atmosphere Irreducible Complexity “If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.”— Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species Michael Behe (professor of biochemistry) believes that there are many examples that violate Darwin's principles.He calls these “irreducibly complex” things “machines.” An “irreducibly complex” system is “a single system which is composed of several well-matched, interacting parts that contribute to the basic function, and where the removal of any one of the parts causes the system to effectively cease functioning.”— Behe, Darwin's Black Box, page 39. Behe uses an example from modern life to explain what he means by an “irreducibly complex” system: a mousetrap.Can a mousetrap work without a hammer, spring, or platform? Behe give many examples in his book of systems that, from a biochemical perspective, are irreducibly complex: • Blood clotting• Bacterial flagellum Responses to Behe: • Collins says that most of Behe's examples may have plausible solutions in the future• Dawkins argues that there is not an “all or nothing” nature to certain examples Behe gives• Lenski's experiment showed that bacteria could see successive mutations (two-step machine) The Fossil Record What about the fossil record? It is perhaps the only place where we can scientifically observe speciation (the change in species over time).Jonathan Wells challenges the fossil record. Imagine that you dig in your backyard and find two skeletons! They are both dated to 30 years ago. One is adult sized and the other is half of that.Can you assume a familial relationship? We can apply this type of critical thinking to the fossil record. Just because two fossil specimens look like they are related does not make them related. Consider archaeopteryx. Is it half-bird, half-reptile? Does it fit in the gap that evolutionists want?It does not. The supposed reptilian precursors to this animal are found after it in the fossil record. “We are not even authorized to consider the exceptional case of the archaeopteryx as a true link. By link, we mean a necessary stage of transition between classes such as reptiles and birds, or between smaller groups. An animal displaying characters belonging to two different groups cannot be treated as a true link as long as the intermediary stages have not been found, and as long as the mechanisms of the transition remain unknown.”—Pierre Lecomte du Nouy, cited in Strobel, The Case for a Creator, page 58. Origin of Life Remember that evolution does not describe the origin of life — the theory begins when life begins.However, it is interesting to challenge abiogenesis theories in conjunction with evolution. Challenges to abiogenesis theories: • The probability of randomly producing a “simple” protein are astronomically low• No natural selection available before life begins Evolution or Design? What is the best conclusion given the evidence? • If we believe in evolution, it still could be consistent with God-designed life and guidance.• If we don't believe in evolution, there is strong evidence for design in the living beings around us.• Either way, atheism doesn't do the best job of explaining the evidence.

In the Know
James Peyer from Cambrian Biosciences and Apollo Health Ventures tells us how to play longevity to win

In the Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 52:48


This founder has been part of so many of the exciting longevity startups, investments, and discussions that you simply must understand the world the way he sees it before taking a view about life extension. In this episode, you will.

Bank On It
Episode 549 Rex Salisbury from Cambrian Ventures

Bank On It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 34:04


This episode was produced remotely using the ListenDeck standardized audio & video production system. If you're looking to jumpstart your podcast miniseries or upgrade your podcast or video production please visit www.ListenDeck.com. You can subscribe to this podcast and stay up to date on all the stories here on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio. In this episode the host John Siracusa chats remotely with Rex Salisbury,  Co-founder & General Partner at Cambrian.  Cambrian invests in fintech companies, primarily in the US, at the Angel, Pre-Seed & Seed stages. Subscribe now on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio to hear next Thursdays episode with Shelby Austin from Arteria AI. About the host:   John is the founder of ListenDeck a full-service podcast and video production company, which has produced over 1000 episodes of various podcasts. He is the host of the ‘Bank On It' podcast, which features over 500 episodes starring high profile fintech leaders and entrepreneurs.      Follow John on LinkedIn, Twitter, Medium

American Conservative University
Episode 4.  The Fine-Tuning of the Universe. Dr. Steven Meyer. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 24:48


Episode 4.  The Fine-Tuning of the Universe. Dr. Steven Meyer. ACU Sunday Series. https://youtu.be/x0Vi_DNkFMU 2,102 views Oct 9, 2022 John Ankerberg Show 98.9K subscribers The Fine-Tuning of the Universe: Scientists have discovered that the universe is very precisely calibrated to allow life to exist.   https://www.discovery.org/p/meyer/ Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, The Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). In his first book on intelligent design, Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009) Meyer examined the mystery of the origin of the first life. With Darwin's Doubt, he has expanded the scope of the case for intelligent design to the whole sweep of life's history. Meyer's research addresses the deepest mystery surrounding the origin of life and the origin of animal life: the origin of biological information necessary to produce it. Meyer graduated from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, in 1981 with a degree in physics and earth science. He later became a geophysicist with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) in Dallas, Texas. From 1981 to 1985, he worked for ARCO in digital signal processing and seismic survey interpretation. In 1986 as a Rotary International Scholar, he began his training in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University, earning an M.Phil. in 1987 and a Ph.D. in 1991. His doctoral thesis was titled “Of Clues and Causes: A Methodological Interpretation of Origin-of-Life Research.” He returned to Whitworth in the fall of 1990 to teach philosophy and the philosophy of science. He left a tenured position as a professor at Whitworth in 2002 to direct the Center for Science and Culture full time, which he had helped found with John West in 1996. Prior to the publication of Signature in the Cell and Darwin's Doubt, the writing for which Meyer was best known was an August 2004 review essay in the Smithsonian Institution-affiliated peer-reviewed biology journal Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. The article laid out the evidential case for intelligent design, presenting it as the best explanation for the origin of the biological information necessary to produce the new forms of animal life that arose abruptly during the Cambrian explosion. Because the article was the first peer-reviewed publication arguing for intelligent design in a technical journal, it proved extremely controversial.  The journal's editor, evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg, was punished by his Smithsonian supervisors for allowing Meyer's article into print. This led to the investigation of top Smithsonian personnel by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.  The controversy was widely covered in the media with articles or news stories appearing about it in The Wall Street Journal, Science, Nature, NPR, The O'Reilly Factor and the Washington Post. The federal investigation eventually concluded that Sternberg had been wrongly disciplined and intimidated. Meyer's many other publications include contributions to, and the editing of, the peer-reviewed volume Darwinism, Design and Public Education (Michigan State University Press, 2004) and the innovative textbook Explore Evolution (Hill House Publishers, 2007). Meyer has also published editorials in national newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The National Post (of Canada), The Daily Telegraph (of London) and The Los Angeles Times.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs such as The Jim Lehrer News Hour, NBC Nightly News, ABC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, Nightline, Fox News Live, Paula Zahn Now (CNN), Good Morning America and the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.  He has also been featured in two New York Times front-page stories and has garnered attention in other top national media. In 2008, he appeared with Ben Stein in the theatrical-released documentary Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.  He has also been featured prominently in the science documentaries Icons of Evolution, The Case for a Creator, Darwin's Dilemma and Unlocking The Mystery of Life, the latter which was shown on PBS and which Meyer co-wrote with producer Lad Allen.  

Bank On It
Episode 548 Will Sealy from Summer

Bank On It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 52:31


This episode was produced remotely using the ListenDeck standardized audio & video production system. If you're looking to jumpstart your podcast miniseries or upgrade your podcast or video production please visit www.ListenDeck.com. You can subscribe to this podcast and stay up to date on all the stories here on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio. In this episode the host John Siracusa chats remotely with Will Sealy,  Co-founder & CEO at Summer.  Summer​ is a digital solution that helps their employee population navigate and reduce student loan debt. Subscribe now on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio to hear next Thursdays episode with Rex Salisbury from Cambrian. About the host:   John is the founder of ListenDeck a full-service podcast and video production company, which has produced over 1000 episodes of various podcasts. He is the host of the ‘Bank On It' podcast, which features over 500 episodes starring high profile fintech leaders and entrepreneurs.      Follow John on LinkedIn, Twitter, Medium

a16z
[NEW] Why Technology Still Matters with Marc Andreessen

a16z

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 85:03


With much coverage of technology lined with pessimism, the a16z Podcast returns to highlight the bright side of technology, alongside the founders building it. But before featuring the solutions in progress, we wanted to explore why building the future is still so important.And who better to traverse this ground than a16z's own cofounder Marc Andreessen, who has built and invested in the future time and time again, especially when it wasn't the obvious thing to do.Together with Marc, this episode explores technology through the lens of history – including the three stages of human psychology as we encounter new technologies, how that process often manifests in regulation, when to change your mind, the Cambrian explosion of opportunity coming from distributed work, the importance of founder-led companies, and perhaps most importantly, we examine why there's still much reason for optimism. Resources:Marc on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pmarcaPessimist's Archive: https://pessimistsarchive.org/ Stay Updated: Find us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/a16zFind us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/a16zSubscribe on your favorite podcast app: https://a16z.com/podcastsFollow our host: https://twitter.com/stephsmithioPlease note that the content here is for informational purposes only; should NOT be taken as legal, business, tax, or investment advice or be used to evaluate any investment or security; and is not directed at any investors or potential investors in any a16z fund. For more details please see a16z.com/disclosures.

The Marketing AI Show
#24: AI in the Workplace, OpenAI Funds Entrepreneurs, and Google Unveils New AI Projects

The Marketing AI Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:14


While our Institute focuses on AI in the marketing world, some of the biggest companies in the world are finding AI applications for the business world and our personal lives. Artificial intelligence will be, and already is, embedded in our world. What are the big players working on? Mike and Paul discuss this on this week's podcast.  This episode kicks off discussing consulting firm Deloitte, who recently published a rundown of how AI for work relationships could be the next big thing in your office. Deloitte says that AI can “analyze human interactions during and after an event to generate personalized, confidential recommendations at an individual and organizational level to help improve human interactions at work.”  They give a hypothetical example to illustrate the point: Imagine a near-future workplace where AI recommends how you should write a diplomatic email to two leaders pulling you into a nasty turf war. In this scenario, AI could recommend appropriate language and courses of action to resolve the dispute. It's an interesting discussion on the opportunities and challenges, including the five areas Deloitte feels AI will have a big impact on work relationships. Next, OpenAI, the creators of GPT-3 and DALL-E 2, just launched a program to fund and support founders creating transformative AI companies. The program is called Converge. According to the company, it is a “highly-selective, five-week program for exceptional engineers, designers, researchers, and product builders using AI to reimagine products and industries.” Participants receive a $1 million equity investment from OpenAI's Startup Fund. They also get early access to OpenAI models and programming tailored to AI companies. In addition, they get workshops, office hours, and events with AI practitioners. OpenAI says it's motivated by “the belief that powerful AI systems will spark a Cambrian explosion of new products, services, and applications.” Mike and Paul discuss why hungry entrepreneurs are critical to the success and adoption of AI.  Lastly, this past week, Google revealed a handful of incredible AI projects that it's been working on, and they provide a glimpse of the near future of AI. These reveals break down into two broad categories: AI for social good and generative AI. On the social good front, Google revealed ideas such as AI for wildlife tracking, AI for flood forecasting, an AI-powered maternal health app, and an AI model that speaks the world's 1,000 most-spoken languages. On the generative AI side, Google revealed self-coding robots, where robots can autonomously generate new code. Mike goes through a cool example, and they discuss the implications of these new projects.  Listen to this great conversation with our team, and stick around for the end of the podcast for the rapid-fire discussion at the end!

The Meb Faber Show
Rex Salisury, Cambrian - a16z Partner Turned Solo GP on Why He Believes Now is the Time for Fintech | #454

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 61:19


Today's guest is Rex Salisbury, a founding partner of the a16z fintech team and is now a solo GP with Cambrian Ventures. In today's episode, Rex shares an overview of Cambrian and the benefit of the fintech community he's built over time. We touch on the three-body problem and how it relates to venture capital, the competitive advantages of different VC's, and why he believes you can be consensus and win in venture capital.    ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Subscribe for free here. ----- Interested in sponsoring the show? Email us at Feedback@TheMebFaberShow.com ----- Past guests include Ed Thorp, Richard Thaler, Jeremy Grantham, Joel Greenblatt, Campbell Harvey, Ivy Zelman, Kathryn Kaminski, Jason Calacanis, Whitney Baker, Aswath Damodaran, Howard Marks, Tom Barton, and many more.  ----- Meb's invested in some awesome startups that have passed along discounts to our listeners. Check them out here! 

American Conservative University
Episode 3. Universe from Nothing. Dr. Steven Meyer. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 24:57


Episode 3.  Universe from Nothing. Dr. Steven Meyer. ACU Sunday Series. https://youtu.be/77nvR8-1m0Q 2,039 views Oct 1, 2022 John Ankerberg Show 98.9K subscribers Universe from Nothing: Quantum Cosmology: Can science explain what actually happened at the very beginning of the universe?   https://www.discovery.org/p/meyer/ Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, The Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). In his first book on intelligent design, Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009) Meyer examined the mystery of the origin of the first life. With Darwin's Doubt, he has expanded the scope of the case for intelligent design to the whole sweep of life's history. Meyer's research addresses the deepest mystery surrounding the origin of life and the origin of animal life: the origin of biological information necessary to produce it. Meyer graduated from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, in 1981 with a degree in physics and earth science. He later became a geophysicist with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) in Dallas, Texas. From 1981 to 1985, he worked for ARCO in digital signal processing and seismic survey interpretation. In 1986 as a Rotary International Scholar, he began his training in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University, earning an M.Phil. in 1987 and a Ph.D. in 1991. His doctoral thesis was titled “Of Clues and Causes: A Methodological Interpretation of Origin-of-Life Research.” He returned to Whitworth in the fall of 1990 to teach philosophy and the philosophy of science. He left a tenured position as a professor at Whitworth in 2002 to direct the Center for Science and Culture full time, which he had helped found with John West in 1996. Prior to the publication of Signature in the Cell and Darwin's Doubt, the writing for which Meyer was best known was an August 2004 review essay in the Smithsonian Institution-affiliated peer-reviewed biology journal Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. The article laid out the evidential case for intelligent design, presenting it as the best explanation for the origin of the biological information necessary to produce the new forms of animal life that arose abruptly during the Cambrian explosion. Because the article was the first peer-reviewed publication arguing for intelligent design in a technical journal, it proved extremely controversial.  The journal's editor, evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg, was punished by his Smithsonian supervisors for allowing Meyer's article into print. This led to the investigation of top Smithsonian personnel by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.  The controversy was widely covered in the media with articles or news stories appearing about it in The Wall Street Journal, Science, Nature, NPR, The O'Reilly Factor and the Washington Post. The federal investigation eventually concluded that Sternberg had been wrongly disciplined and intimidated. Meyer's many other publications include contributions to, and the editing of, the peer-reviewed volume Darwinism, Design and Public Education (Michigan State University Press, 2004) and the innovative textbook Explore Evolution (Hill House Publishers, 2007). Meyer has also published editorials in national newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The National Post (of Canada), The Daily Telegraph (of London) and The Los Angeles Times.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs such as The Jim Lehrer News Hour, NBC Nightly News, ABC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, Nightline, Fox News Live, Paula Zahn Now (CNN), Good Morning America and the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS.  He has also been featured in two New York Times front-page stories and has garnered attention in other top national media. In 2008, he appeared with Ben Stein in the theatrical-released documentary Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.  He has also been featured prominently in the science documentaries Icons of Evolution, The Case for a Creator, Darwin's Dilemma and Unlocking The Mystery of Life, the latter which was shown on PBS and which Meyer co-wrote with producer Lad Allen.

Palaeo After Dark
Podcast 248 - Chucky D Facts

Palaeo After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 61:31


The gang discusses two papers that look at two papers that discuss the origin and evolution of a sessile filter feeding life habit. The first paper discusses how a new tommotiid fossil helps us better understand lophophorate evolution, and the second paper looks at the genetic pathways that barnacles and molluscs use to generate their shells. Meanwhile, James makes a sound, Amanda gets a surprise, and Curt shares totally real facts.   Up-Goer Five (Curt Edition): Our friends look at how animals that make hard parts and do not do much moving around first started. The first looks at one type of animal that could be the start of one of these groups of animals that do not move much. These early animals are usually hard to find because they have parts that do not stick around for along time. However, this animal that was found had a lot of soft parts that showed what these animals would have looked like. It seems that these animals started out as being able to move a lot more, even though the animals that would come later would stop moving. The second paper looks at two other groups of animals that make hard parts and do not move. It looks at how these animals make their hard parts. Even though these two groups are not close to each other, they both use a lot of the same ways of making their hard parts, with things that are not the same making sense because of how these animals need to stick to other things.   References: Guo, Jin, et al. "A Cambrian tommotiid preserving soft tissues reveals the metameric ancestry of lophophorates." Current Biology (2022). Yuan, Jianbo, et al. "Convergent  evolution of barnacles and molluscs sheds lights in origin and  diversification of calcareous shell and sessile lifestyle." Proceedings of the Royal Society B 289.1982 (2022): 20221535.

Fintech Business Podcast
Interview: Rex Salisbury, Founder & GP, Cambrian Ventures

Fintech Business Podcast

Play Episode