Podcasts about South Pole

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Southern point where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects its surface

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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about South Pole

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Latest podcast episodes about South Pole

Comite de Lectura
[CONEXIÓN JAGUAR] Ep. 2: Las amenazas

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 6:38


En el día internacional del jaguar, nuestro curador principal Augusto Townsend explora cuáles son los principales peligros que enfrenta esta especie y qué se está haciendo en Perú ya para hacerle frente a esas amenazas. Este podcast ha sido producido por Comité de Lectura en alianza con ISA REP y sus aliados técnicos Panthera y South Pole.

Saturday Live
Monica Galetti

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 85:23


Nikki Bedi and Richard Coles are joined by Monica Galetti: chef, judge on Masterchef and chef proprietor of her own restaurant, judge on the BBC programme MasterChef: The Professionals since 2009 and has presenter of Amazing Hotels... In the studio we have Raymond Antrobus, one of the most exciting and acclaimed poets working today whose journey includes discovering he was deaf aged 6 and finding his passion for writing. Royd Tolkien's brother Mike was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease aged 37 and very sadly died a couple of years later. Before his death, he told Royd about a bucket list he'd written for Royd to do, which included some pranks and stunts and took Royd on an emotional and physical journey. In January 2020, listener and mum of four Wendy Searle left her office job and reached the South Pole after a 42 day journey alone, dragging all her kit and food with her on a a Pulk (sled). She became only the 7th woman in the world to complete the journey. She did the journey to show that anything is possible… and now plans to go again next winter…. We also have the Inheritance Tracks of Jack Dee who chooses Downtown by Petula Clarke and Really Free by John Otway and Wild Willy Barratt and your Thank you. Producer is Corinna Jones

Curiously Polar
142 Climate COP26 in Glasgow

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:08


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Comite de Lectura
[CONEXIÓN JAGUAR] Ep. 1: El jaguar y su hábitat

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:01


En esta temporada de 4 episodios les contamos cuáles son las principales amenazas que afronta este animal y los esfuerzos para proteger esta especie y a su hábitat. Este podcast ha sido producido por Comité de Lectura en alianza con ISA REP y sus aliados técnicos Panthera y South Pole.

Optimize Yourself
Ep170: How to Avoid Burnout and Live a More ‘Effortless' Life | with Greg McKeown

Optimize Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 87:16


"There are two kinds of people in the world - people who are burned out, and people who know they are burned out." - Greg McKeown There is an epidemic of exhaustion and burnout in not only Hollywood but globally across countless industries. The culture of overwork and exploitation specifically in the entertainment industry is beyond toxic at this point, and something needs to change. My theory is that many of the people at the top in Hollywood did not get there because they are always the best at what they do or because they are great leaders. I believe a lot of those who dictate how the industry works got where they are today because they have simply been willing to endure the most abuse, and they are the ones willing to maintain the status quo - i.e., saving money at the expense of saving lives. “The Great Resignation” is evidence that people are fed up with the status quo. The old model of “work longer and harder” is not a tenable model anymore. There are no more hours left in the day to work harder, therefore finding a way to work smarter is the only solution left. Luckily, there is a new model already out there, and my guest today, best selling author Greg McKeown, is here to tell us all about how to live not only an essential but also an effortless life. Greg is a return guest who made his first appearance on the show to talk about his book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less (which I thought so highly of I included it as core curriculum in my Focus Yourself program). His latest book, Effortless: Make it Easier to do What Matters Most, picks up where Essentialism left off. After making his own life "essential" and achieving great success from his book, Greg found that ironically he could no longer even fit just the essential things in his life anymore. He was doing all the right things, but he was doing them the wrong way. And in today's conversation Greg and I discuss how we all can apply his Effortless model to both make our lives easier while also having a positive effect on our work culture as a whole. Want to Hear More Episodes Like This One? » Click here to subscribe and never miss another episode   Here's What You'll Learn: Recap of Essentialism for the uninitiated. How the success of Essentialism led him to a new problem and his new book. How to apply the concept of the three rocks to you life. Why the old way of thinking that working harder is what will get you success is not sustainable anymore. KEY TAKEAWAY:  Ask yourself "how am I making this harder than I need to?" Greg reveals his true feelings and best insights of the culture of Hollywood based on his experience working in a wide variety of industries. Why Greg believes competition against Hollywood is a good thing. How the pandemic has led to more burnout than ever before. Greg's mindset for adapting to the pandemic and how it led to greater success in his career. The pandemic created an experience of involuntary essentialism for many people. An illustration of how the effortless way led to greater success in a race to the South Pole. The importance of knowing your lower bounds and upper bounds of any particular task or endeavor. How I changed my ANW workout routine to make it more effortless and the results I achieved from it. Greg explains the difference between running hard and running fast. Why we should reject the motto: No pain. No gain. How gratitude helped Greg make dealing with his daughter's illness easier. One simple rule for practicing gratitude. The advice he received that inspired the idea of effortless. Useful Resources Mentioned: Greg McKeown - Essentialism Advocate | Inspirational Speaker | Bestselling Author Ep34: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less | with Greg McKeown Effortless - Greg McKeown Essentialism - The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown Amundsen vs Scott: The Deadly Race to the South Pole - Life in Norway Continue to Listen & Learn Ep113: The Importance of Setting Boundaries, Advocating For Yourself, and Asking For Help | with Janace Tashjian Dear Hollywood...We Create Entertainment For a Living. We're Not Curing Cancer. Dear Hollywood: We Don't Want to “Go Back to Normal." Normal Wasn't Working. Ep128: How to Have a Successful Career Without Sacrificing Family | with Farrel Levy Ep149: How Modern Society Is Damaging Your Brain (and the Simple Steps to Reverse It) | with Dr. Dave Jenkins Ep35: FOCUS: The Superpower of the 21st Century | with Cal Newport Ep04: The Zen-like Art of 'Getting Things Done' | with David Allen Ep144: Redefining What It Means to Be “Productive” (and Aligning Your Values With Your Time) | with Tamara Torres Ep136: Promoting Mindfulness, Well-Being, and Sanity In the Edit Bay | with Kevin Tent, ACE Tired of Holding it Together All the Time? Here are Five Basic Needs to Get You Back On Track Ep55: How Tiny Changes Can Create Remarkable Results | with James Clear Ep132: How to Pursue Fulfilling Work and Find Your ‘Calling' | with Dr. Tal Ben-Shahar Ep75: The Four Tendencies' (aka ‘The Matrix' For Understanding Yourself & Others) | with Gretchen Rubin Ep105: Ramit Sethi on Forging The Path Towards Your Own ‘Rich Life' Ep86: How to Become ‘Indistractable' | with Nir Eyal Our Generous Sponsor: This episode was brought to you by Ergodriven, the makers of the Topo Mat (my #1 recommendation for anyone who stands at their workstation) and now their latest product. New Standard Whole Protein is a blend of both whey and collagen, sourced from the highest quality ingredients without any of the unnecessary filler or garbage. Not only will you get more energy and focus from this protein powder, you will notice improvements in your skin, hair, nails, joints and muscles. And because they don't spend a lot on excessive marketing and advertising expenses, the savings gets passed on to you. Guest Bio: Greg McKeown is a speaker, a bestselling author, and the host of the popular podcast What's Essential. He has been covered by The New York Times, Fast Company, Fortune, Politico, and Inc., has been interviewed on NPR, NBC, Fox, and The Steve Harvey Show, and is among the most popular bloggers for LinkedIn. He is also a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum. McKeown's New York Times bestselling book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less has sold more than a million copies worldwide. Originally from London, England, he now lives in California with his wife, Anna, and their four children. Show Credits: This episode was edited by Curtis Fritsch, and the show notes were prepared by Debby Germino and published by Glen McNiel. The original music in the opening and closing of the show is courtesy of Joe Trapanese (who is quite possibly one of the most talented composers on the face of the planet).

Beer on the Run Podcast
44. Kendl Winter

Beer on the Run Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 92:36


This week Kendl Winter joins Clint and Jack to chat about playing the banjo--including playing at the finish line of Rainshadow events--, living at the South Pole and winning the South Pole marathon, small town festivals and whiskey. . Check out Kendl on Instagram @winterkendl, check out Kendl's music on her website, https://www.kendlwinter.com/, youtube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnnVBQ1H0NDUnoOzydeVtuA, and patreon, https://www.patreon.com/KendlWinter, and check out the Lowest Pair, https://thelowestpair.com/home. Help support our show on Patreon. Get a shout out and get some bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/beerontherun Find our podcast on Instagram @BeerOnTheRunPod and on Twitter @BeerOnTheRun. All of our links are on our Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/BeerOnTheRunPod. Come by and say hi and let us know what you think about our show. Please check out our friend and sponsor's website and podcast. Luis Escobar is the host of The Road Dog Podcast and puts on races at All We Do Is Run. 

Power Corrupts
Space Wars

Power Corrupts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:08


Is the next war going to happen in space? What are space weapons like, anyway? And why should we be worried about the space ventures of billionaires? In this episode, we look at the militarization of space, including everything from giant space mirrors to a new Chinese space weapon that flies right over the South Pole.     

The Brian Keane Podcast
#355: Dean Karnazes on Ultra Running, Embracing The Suck and Silencing The Voice That Tells You To Quit!

The Brian Keane Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 47:11


Dean is an Athlete and a legend in the sport of ultrarunning.   He is also a two-time New York Times bestselling author and the author or the great new book A Runner's High.   Dean was named by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world for pushing his body and mind to inconceivable limits. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons, in all 50 US states, in 50 consecutive days. He's run across Death Valley in the middle of summer, and he's run a marathon to the South Pole.   His list of competitive achievements includes winning the World's Toughest Footrace, the Badwater Ultramarathon, and winning the 4 Deserts Challenge, racing in the hottest, driest, windiest and coldest places on earth.   This is our round 2 of the podcast, Dean also appeared on episode 182: Getting Comfortable Being Unconformable in 2018. In today's show we talk all things ultra-running and mindset for this long overdue episode.    Here are some of the things we talked about:        Developing the mindset of embracing the suck and silencing the voice that tells you to quit     Why you are the sum totals of all your habits and how to create new ones     Why endurance never sleeps and running an ultra is simple, all you have to do is not stop  The importance of mindset growing pains – until you go over the edge, you don't know how far the edge is       Why the struggle aftermath is important– “that is is most difficult to endure is the most satisfying to reminisce”     Using forward projection to avoid quitting when things get really hard     The game changing advice Dean offered me when I first got into ultra-running      And much more          Books   A RUNNERS HIGH https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0062955500/ref=as_li_tl?camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0062955500&ie=UTF8&linkCode=as2&linkId=252d4b253b1a1b91081199045e5cde61&tag=ultramarathon-20   ULTRAMARATHON MAN https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001QNVPHW/ref=as_li_tl?camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B001QNVPHW&ie=UTF8&linkCode=as2&linkId=123d43bfed91b13307313b24e948644f&tag=ultramarathon-20   50/50 https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0446581844/ref=as_li_tl?camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0446581844&ie=UTF8&linkCode=as2&linkId=bd2dfd81ec6ec21751fb006b9493afa3&tag=ultramarathon-20   RUN! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1609613813/ref=as_li_tl?camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1609613813&ie=UTF8&linkCode=as2&linkId=4b36923f3b1301caceb548bda2ca2e4d&tag=ultramarathon-20   THE ROAD TO SPARTA https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DVF12V2/ref=as_li_tl?camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00DVF12V2&ie=UTF8&linkCode=as2&linkId=7ee1e0610fa9dbb4b91e2ff33f4a97b4&tag=ultramarathon-20     Social links https://www.facebook.com/DeanKarnazes https://twitter.com/DeanKarnazes https://www.instagram.com/ultramarathon/     Website  https://ultramarathonman.com/

Daily Signal News
China's New Strategic Weapon Has 'Unlimited Range.' Here's What That Means for US.

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:36


China has reportedly tested a new strategic weapon: a fractional orbital bombardment system armed with a hypersonic glide vehicle. What exactly does this weapon do and what is the threat to the United States?Peter Brookes, a senior research fellow focusing on weapons of mass destruction and counterproliferation at The Heritage Foundation, joins "The Daily Signal Podcast" to shed some light on this startling development. (The Daily Signal is Heritage's multimedia news organization.)"This weapon—because of its unlimited range—could be flown over the South Pole towards the United States, which would give it certain capabilities that would be difficult to defend against," Brookes explains. "For years and years, going back to the Cold War, we have developed our radar capabilities looking towards things coming over the North Pole or from east and west, and not from the south."Enjoy the show! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History Extra podcast
Surviving hell on earth: Polar explorer Ranulph Fiennes on Shackleton

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:21


Ernest Shackleton looms large in the heroic age of exploration, making two bids to reach the South Pole and famously attempting to traverse the Antarctic continent, before his ship was crushed by pack ice. Fellow polar explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes chronicles his dangerous exploits and reflects on his own expeditions in a conversation with Rhiannon Davies.(Ad) Ranulph Fiennes is the author of Shackleton: A Biography (Michael Joseph, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shackleton-Ranulph-Fiennes/dp/0241356717/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=118715083359&dchild=1&gclid=Cj0KCQjwt-6LBhDlARIsAIPRQcKRJILLUHRFfyslY6G2SY7Q2IWBFoJ617jPKW4rPHt0f2vvyQmAHZEaAgQOEALw_wcB&hvadid=506961849035&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=14826065410558208685&hvtargid=kwd-1209672137750&hydadcr=24433_1816114&keywords=ranulph+fiennes+shackleton&qid=1635519967&qsid=257-7780269-8086666&sr=8-1&sres=0241356717%2C0340826991%2C0241977258%2C1785904868%2C0753809877%2C0099422433%2CB07C7RDKXQ%2C1509896120%2C1472907159%2CB09D4VQW4X%2C1774261995%2C0753522063%2C1909263109%2CB06WD53Q24%2C1976969964%2CB08PFSDJLB&srpt=ABIS_BOOK&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
Global Warming Cruise Gets Stuck in Ice, Green Bay Freezes Over (And Aaron Rodgers Says He Isn't Gay)

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 8:58


RUSH: The global warming crew, this is so classic. I just love it. They're going down to Antarctica — the South Pole, for those of you in Rio Linda — and they're gonna prove that there's so much global warming that there isn't any ice, or very little ice, that it's melting. It's a cruise. And they get stuck in the ice far, far away from their intended destination. So icebreakers are called in. The icebreakers get stuck! There was a ChiCom icebreaker that got stuck. They needed all these fossil fuel, gigantic ships to rescue them after a week. And every news story — every one of them! Let me put it this way: Not one news story makes the connection that these are a bunch of hypocrites. Not one notes the irony. They just talk about a brave bunch of scientists needed to be rescued in Antarctica. Meanwhile, we have more record lows last year than record highs — and in Green Bay for football this Sunday? Oh-ho! https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2014/01/02/global_warming_cruise_gets_stuck_in_ice_green_bay_freezes_over_and_aaron_rodgers_says_he_isn_t_gay/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Barjory Buffet: The Cruise Detective

Barjory heads down south, VERY down south, for a South Pole sleuthing. The only living things in Antarctica are her ex lovers and penguins, and we don't even include any penguins or maybe we do but they're just quiet and keep to themselves!Written by Rachel Crowe and Brad BeidemanEdited by Brad BeidemanRachel Crowe as: Barjory BuffetVera Drew as: Dr. Rosacia StonePablo Escabosa as: Captain Lyle P. DolphayMark Gallagher as: SkapperBranson Knowles as: Fred ChristKelsey Buckley as: WendilyMagi Calcagne as: Narrator

Moonbase Theta, Out
MTO All Your Base - Episode 6: Zeta

Moonbase Theta, Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 21:29


Moonbase Zeta lies at the South Pole of the Moon, within a crater of eternal darkness. On a final inspection tour, Mining Supervisor Trina Haugen finds out how deep that darkness can reach. Transcript here. Moonbase Theta, Out: ALL YOUR BASE is an eight-episode flashback miniseries that will dive into the day to day of life on the Moon before the shutdown, through the eyes – and voices – of all-new characters in each location! FEATURING: Alicia Atkins (she/her) as Mining Supervisor Trina Haugen. Special appearances by Steven LaFond and Eva LaFond. Consortium announcer is Evan Tess Murray. Written and dialogue edited by D.J. Sylvis. Sound designed by Cass McPhee. Produced by D.J. Sylvis and Cass McPhee. We wouldn't be here without our monthly supporters on Patreon, who also get weekly updates, behind the scenes info, and more - all for as little as a dollar a month! They're also getting access to every episode of All Your Base well before the rest of the world. So if you like what you're hearing and can't wait for more, join us today! Theme music is "Star" by the band Ramp: http://www.ramp-music.net Cover art for the All Your Base series created by Aaron Lenk: https://bigsimplecomics.com Episode Transcript: https://monkeymanproductions.com/2021/10/all-your-base-e6-zeta-transcript/ More show information: https://monkeymanproductions.com/moonbase-theta-out Learn about our Network sponsors and other great shows: https://fableandfolly.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

We Are Not Saved
The 8.5 Books I Finished in October

We Are Not Saved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 33:33


Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good? by: Michael J. Sandel Quick Fix: Why Fad Psychology Can't Cure Our Social Ills by: Jesse Singal Kingsport: (The Weird of Hali #2) by: John Michael Greer The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War by: H. W. Brands Based on a True Story: Not a Memoir by: Norm Macdonald Silmarillion by: J. R. R. Tolkien The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity by: Carlo M. Cipolla The Last Place on Earth: Scott and Amundsen's Race to the South Pole by: Roland Huntford How God Works: The Science Behind the Benefits of Religion by: David DeSteno

Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Antarctica

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 126:33


Grab your parkas, put on those winter boots, don't forget those big ol mittens and hang out with us tonight as we head to the place where the coldest temperature on earth has ever been recorded, a mild -89.2°C (-128.6°F). Maybe we should bring swim trunks instead, eh? Well, aside from the coldest temps known anywhere, there is also possibly Nazis, maybe a hole to the center of the earth, a blood waterfall, and giant sea spiders with legs ranging up to 70cm, and for those of you who aren't sure if that's big or not cus we're a bunch of archaic buttholes that don't do metric… It's big.. Like close to 28 inches big… oh and how could we forget… the Penguins!! Lots of penguins! Well, if you haven't figured it out yet, we're heading to Antarctica! We're going to be discussing the continent and find out a little about it and then we'll talk about some creepy natural things going on and of course creepy conspiracies. It should be a fun one so let's get going!!!   So let's learn a little about Antarctica first off. Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents. Most of Antarctica is a polar desert, with annual precipitation of 200 mm (8 in) along the coast and far less inland; yet 80% of the world's freshwater reserves are stored there, enough to raise global sea levels by about 60 metres (200 ft) if all of it were to melt. The temperature in Antarctica has dropped to −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F) (or even −94.7 °C or −138.5 °F, as measured from space), although the average for the third quarter (the coldest part of the year) is −63 °C (−81 °F). Organisms native to Antarctica include many types of algae, bacteria, fungi, plants, protista, and certain animals, such as mites, nematodes, penguins, seals and tardigrades. Vegetation, where it occurs, is tundra. Wanna know some fun facts… Well, tough shit negative Nancy, we're gonna tell ya anyways.    Antarctica holds most of the world's fresh water An incredible 60-90% of the world's freshwater is locked in Antarctica's vast ice sheet. The Antarctic ice sheet is the largest on Earth, covering an incredible 14 million km² (5.4 million square miles) of Antarctic mountain ranges, valleys and plateaus. This leaves only 1% of Antarctica permanently ice-free. Some areas are ice-free in the summer, including many of the areas we visit on the Antarctic Peninsula.   At its deepest, Antarctica's ice is 4.5km (2.7 miles) thick – that's half the height of Mt Everest! Again, If it all melted, global sea levels would rise about 60 m (200 ft).   As mentioned, Antarctica is a desert With all of that fresh water held in the ice sheet, how could Antarctica be a desert?   When most of us think of deserts we think of sand dunes, cactuses and sizzling temperatures, but technically a desert doesn't have to be hot or sandy, it's more about how much precipitation the area receives as rain, snow, mist or fog. A desert is any region that receives very little annual precipitation.   The average annual rainfall at the South Pole over the past 30 years was just over 10 mm (0.4 in). Although there is more precipitation towards the coast, the average across the continent is low enough to classify Antarctica as a polar desert.   So, while Antarctica may be covered in ice, it has taken an incredible 45 million years to grow to its current thickness, because so little rain falls there.   As well as being one of the driest continents on Earth, Antarctica is also the coldest, windiest and highest.   Antarctica used to be as warm as Melbourne Australia! Given that the coldest ever land temperature was recorded in Antarctica of -89.2°C (-128.6°F), it can be hard to imagine Antarctica as a warm, temperate paradise. But Antarctica hasn't always been an icy land locked in the grip of a massive ice sheet. In fact, Antarctica was once almost as warm as Melbourne is today.   Researchers have estimated that 40-50 million years ago, temperatures across Antarctica reached up to 17°C (62.6°F). Scientists have also found fossils showing that Antarctica was once covered with verdant green forests and inhabited by dinosaurs!   The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming areas on Earth The Antarctic Peninsula is warming more quickly than many other areas on Earth. In fact, it is one of the most rapidly warming areas on the planet. Over the past 50 years, average temperatures across the Antarctic Peninsula have increased by 3°C (37.4°F), five times the average increase on Earth.   This has led to some changes, for example where and when penguins form colonies and sea ice forms. It also means that the lush mosses of the Antarctic Peninsula have a slightly longer growing season.   There is no Antarctic time zone The question of time in Antarctica is a tricky one. At the South Pole the lines of longitude, which give us different time zones around the globe, all meet at a single point. Most of Antarctica experiences 6 months of constant daylight in summer and 6 months of darkness in winter. Time starts to feel a little different without the normal markers for day and night.   Scientists working in Antarctica generally stay in the time zone of the country they departed from, but this can cause some issues. For example, on the Antarctic Peninsula you can find stations from Chile, China, Russia, the UK and many other countries. You can imagine that if all of these neighbouring stations keep to their home time zones it could get a little confusing trying to share data and resources without accidentally waking one another up in the middle of the night!   For travellers with Aurora Expeditions, they generally stay on Ushuaia time – unless they're travelling to the Falkland Islands and South Georgia. Then they adjust to their local times, changing as they travel.   Every way is north! If you stand at the South Pole, you are at the southernmost point on Earth. It doesn't matter which way you look, every direction is north. So why do we talk about the Antarctic Peninsula as being in West Antarctica, and the section directly south of Australia as East Antarctica?   It's based on the prime meridian, an imaginary line which passes through Greenwich in the UK at 0 degrees of longitude. If you stand at the South Pole and face towards Greenwich, everything to your left is west Antarctica and everything to your right is east Antarctica. Got that?   Antarctica has active volcanoes Antarctica is home to several volcanoes and two of them are active. Mount Erebus, the second-highest volcano in Antarctica, is the southernmost active volcano on Earth. Located on Ross Island, this icebound volcano has some unique features such as ice fumaroles and twisted ice statues that form around gases that seep from vents near the volcanic crater.   The first ascent of Mt Erebus was made in 1908, when a team led by Australian scientist Edgeworth David, and including Douglas Mawson, completed an arduous and very chilly five day climb to the steaming crater.   The second active volcano is on Deception Island, a volcanic caldera in the South Shetland Islands. Once home to a thriving whaling station and later a scientific station, it was abandoned after the most recent eruption in 1969, and today it is a fascinating place that we visit on some of our Antarctic Peninsula voyages.   Antarctica has its own Treaty When humans caught their first glimpse of Antarctica in 1820, it was the only continent without an indigenous population. Several nations quickly made claims to the continent, which led to significant tension. While some countries argued that Antarctica was rightfully theirs, others heartily disagreed.   As tension mounted, everyone agreed on the need for a peaceful resolution. In December 1959, 12 countries signed the Antarctic Treaty, an unprecedented international agreement to govern the continent together as a reserve for peace and science. Since then, 41 other countries have signed the Treaty and participate in annual meetings, where decisions are made about how human activity in Antarctica is managed. All decisions made within the Antarctic Treaty System are made by consensus, with collaboration and agreement as the central pillars. Today, the Antarctic Treaty System has expanded to include strict guidelines for commercial fishing, sealing, and a complete ban on mining and mineral exploration.    We got those fun facts  from Aurora expeditions. Com   So let's look at some of the weird natural phenomena that goes on in Antarctica.    You guys like weird sounds? Well we got weird sounds for you. Scientists and researchers at the Ross ice shelf have recorded a slow seismic hum being generated by wind whipping across the Antarctic ice shelves. The scientists also discovered that the frequency of the vibrations changed in response to changing weather conditions on the shelf — when the temperature rose or fell, for instance, and when storms resculpted the shelf's snow dunes. The firn was "alive with vibration," Douglas MacAyeal, a glaciologist at the University of Chicago, said in a written commentary that accompanied the paper. "This vibration was found to be driven by the wind blowing across the firn layer and interacting with the intrinsic roughness of the surface called sastrugi." MacAyeal also offered a more poetic description of the sound, comparing it to "the buzz produced by thousands of cicada bugs when they overrun the tree canopy and grasses in late summer."   Julien Chaput, a geophysicist and mathematician at Colorado State University in Fort Collins and the leader of the research, told NBC News MACH in an email that the sound was "a little like yodeling, except with 10 people all singing in dissonance. It's a little eerie." But the singing ice is more than a sonic curiosity. Chaput and his colleagues argue in their paper that it might be possible to tap into seismic data to help monitor the health of ice shelves, which have been thinning in response to global warming — and causing sea levels to rise around the world. so that's all pretty crazy. Antarctica is singing to us. (Play sound)   Ever hear of a solar pillar? Well you're about to. The air in Antarctica is frequently very dry. The low temperatures mean that little or no water vapour is held in the air, instead it freezes and falls out, or builds up on surfaces as frost. Sometimes however, depending on the particular atmospheric conditions, the frozen water vapour remains in the air as suspended ice crystals. In these conditions the crystals can reflect sunlight in a variety of ways forming atmospheric phenomena of different types.   One of these phenomena is the "Solar Pillar" in the picture. The sun is reflected very strongly off tiny suspended flat ice crystals in the air which are oriented at or almost horizontally, so that the reflection is almost as bright as the sun itself. Like a rainbow, this sight depends on the viewing angle, where the light is coming from and where the observer is standing. The pillar appears to move when the observer moves, but always remains directly below the sun because the ice crystals are found throughout the air but only act as mirrors for the sun at the correct viewing angle.   Most of you have heard of the northern lights, but did you know there are southern lights? The Southern Lights, commonly known as the Aurora Australis, is one of the world's greatest wonders. The Southern lights are much more elusive than their Northern Hemisphere counterpart-Aurora Borealis. There is significantly less land mass in the Southern Hemisphere and fewer ideal viewing spots to see the Aurora. However, the Southern Lights are just as, if not more, impressive. Boasting a breathtaking colour palette that goes beyond the green and blues commonly seen at the Northern Lights, to include pinks, purples, oranges and golds.   Here's a little nerdy science for ya: The Aurora Australis phenomenon occurs when charged particles from solar winds bombard the Earth's atmosphere and interact with gases in our planet.   These highly energised particles are emitted from the sun and smash into the Earth's magnetic field at more than 6 million kilometres per hour.   For the most part, Earth is protected from solar winds by the magnetosphere, which sounds like Magneto from the X-Men franchise's bachelor pad. The magnetosphere is a region of space that surrounds the Earth's magnetic field and has a primary purpose of preventing cosmic rays, such as solar winds from entering Earth's atmosphere. However, occasionally, at particular times of the year, a few charged particles from solar winds make their way through the magnetosphere into our atmosphere. The charged particles move along the Earth's magnetic field lines towards the south and north pole. When they reach the each pole, they collide with atoms in the atmosphere, particularly nitrogen and oxygen, and become increasingly charged. Once the electrons settle back down to their normal level of excitement they glow, creating the magnificent light display, we know as an Aurora.   One more fun natural thing for you guys and probably the creepiest. BLOOD FALLS! THIS FIVE-STORY, BLOOD-RED WATERFALL POURS very slowly out of the Taylor Glacier in Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys. When geologists first discovered the frozen waterfall in 1911, they thought the red color came from algae, but it's true nature turned out to be much more spectacular.   Roughly two million years ago, the Taylor Glacier sealed beneath it a small body of water which contained an ancient community of microbes. Trapped below a thick layer of ice, they have remained there ever since, isolated inside a natural time capsule. Evolving independently of the rest of the living world, these microbes exist in a place with no light or free oxygen and little heat, and are essentially the definition of “primordial ooze.” The trapped lake has very high salinity and is rich in iron, which gives the waterfall its red color. A fissure in the glacier allows the subglacial lake to flow out, forming the falls without contaminating the ecosystem within. If you've never seen the falls it's pretty awesome and metal. We'll post pics for sure.   Ok so enough of the sciency and nerdy stuff let's get into the crazy shit.    The first one is a fun one. In 2020 a clip from Google Earth was loaded onto youtube showing what appears to be an ice ship! So what exactly is it? Well friends, it depends on what you want to believe. The video sparked a conversation of epic conspiracy proportions! Some think that the "ship" is something connected to a secret Nazi base, which we'll get to later. Others claim ties to the secret elite and illuminati.    “I was told a couple of years ago that there are ships built underground somewhere on upper east coast (like the ones in the movie 2012) to save the rich and powerful when canary islands get hit with massive earthquake that will take out east coast,” one commenter wrote.    Other theory's range from military and government cover ups to some claiming it to be Noah's ark. The mundane exfoliation is that it's our minds playing a trick on us… but that's fucking lame and we're going with the fact that it's something creepy and crazy!!   Another fun thing found by Google Earth is a giant mountain sized alien face. Yes you heard right. And if you don't think this is leading to crazy talk… You are seriously mistaken.    Conspiracy theorists Blake and Brett Cousins – of YouTube channel thirdphaseofmoon – shared their thoughts on the Google Earth image.   "It appears to be a massive, ancient structure of some kind of face that is being revealed for the first time on Google Earth,” Blake said in his video.   "I would have to concur that whatever we're looking at resembles some sort of megastructure."   Brett added: "Could this be something that was left behind by the ancient civilisations of Antarctica?   "Ice melting could be revealing structures that would baffle the world."    There it is folks, a giant alien face structure hiding a civilization under Antarctica. Can't argue with the facts. I mean I guess you could say that it's just a case of pareidolia but that's not really that fun so… You know… Alien civilization it is.    Speaking of aliens, A video posted to an “alien" sub-section on Reddit shows how zooming in on a certain area of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands reveals a mysterious vast section of disturbed snow. It shows what looks like something that crashed into the snow and skidded some 3000ft. Of course that brought out the nut jobs, and moody, claiming that it is a ufo crash site.    Reddit user Hey-man-Shabozi captioned the post: "What's over 200ft long, casts a shadow of 50ft, and appears to have crashed on an antarctic  island, moving so fast that it slid over 3,000ft?”   The island, located near Antarctica, has a strange snow formation in the area near Mount Carse.   It looks very similar to an avalanche but the video posted on Reddit goes into detail about how it could be more than what it seems. The main point of contention for the Reddit user is that there appears to be a long thin object that has created a lengthy straight track away from the disrupted area as if it crashed at speed. The Reddit user estimated that the tracks were more than 3,000 feet long.   He also claims to have worked out that the object responsible was 200 feet long.   Let's be honest… If you can't trust a reddit user… Who can you trust these days? Of course most people will say “oh it was just a big rock falling during an avalanche”, but everyone else who actually knows… They know it's a ufo. And they all know that the claims of a rock falling during an avalanche is just another global cover up to hide the fact that there are aliens.  Another one comes thanks to a visual grab from Google Earth, which seems to suggest that there might actually be a tall building standing on the ice in Antarctica. These findings have been uploaded to YouTube Channel MrMBB33 (who coincidentally was also responsible for finding the ice ship we discussed earlier) and the conspiracy theorist who runs this channel suggests that this structure is as much as 2,000 feet in height and the width spans six football fields. Viewers are clearly interested in what they are seeing. “Strange that all countries want to take over land but no country claims Antarctica. I think there is something they know that we don't," comments a user Lorrie Battistoni. Another user suggested that something on the lines of the Project Iceworm was active in Antarctica—the Project Iceworm was a then top-secret project of the United States Army which attempted to build a network of tunnel based and mobile nuclear missile launch sites under the ice sheet in Greenland. Equally, there are sceptics who suggest this is nothing more than a block of ice, albeit with a slightly different shape.     Since we brought up tunnels, there's supposedly an air vent on top of a “metallic shield” in a no-fly zone on the icy continent. Estimates are that the area is over 150 feet wide — based on measurements using Google Earth tools. Its two distinctive features: a pitch-black “opening” and a metal-like “shield.”   "That looks like some sort of vent, a thermal vent that goes underground. You can tell that the snow is darker than any other snow in the surrounding area,” one person said “That would imply to me that there is heat transfer going on” and suggests the top section is some metal or metal alloy man-made structure “over an opening that goes underground.   Someone else points out there is no volcanic activity nearby: “It is just there all by itself.”   So what is it? Just a cave? A man made structure hiding a secret underground base? Should we just go back to aliens for this one? What do you guys think? Ok how about Hitler and the Nazis? Well since people believe there are Nazis and maybe even Hitler himself still hiding out in Antarctica. This theory originates from a story about a Nazi expedition to Antarctica.  The story says that while exploring and mapping the area, they uncovered a multitude of underground caves and rivers.  One of the caves was particularly large and was turned into a large city that would be home to both Nazi's and other powerful groups, like the illuminati.  Along the way, the Germans either came across alien technology or made contact with the aliens.  The Germans learned how to use the technology and were able to build a number of weapons.  This belief is extraordinary because there is no evidence that the Nazis ever did, or were even capable of building such a base.  Geologist and Oceanographer, Colin Summerhayes, partnered with journalist and historian, Peter Beeching, to examine evidence about Antarctica and the Nazis. In  support of this claim is the fact that the Nazis did at one point carry out an expedition to Antarctica in 1938.  Many conspiracy theorists claim that this was a large-scale expedition, with militarized and scientific ships. Another bit of evidence for this theory is about the Nazi's agreeing to The Antarctic treaty.  The treaty makes Antarctica a research zone and states that Antarctica cannot be targeted in any way by bombs or missiles.  Conspiracy theorists jump on this and say why would Nazi Germany sign this agreement?  The claim is that they signed this agreement to deter other nations from visiting Antarctica and stumbling upon their base and the research being done there.  There has been no evidence found to corroborate that point.  Additionally, some claim that Hitler himself is actually in Antarctica.  The evidence for this idea is based on the claim that a German ship arrived at an Argentinian base located in Antarctica after the war ended.  Another popular conspiracy theory is that Hitler escaped to Argentina at the end of the war, and so therefore he was picked up by a German ship, and sent to Antarctica to live at the secret bunker.  However there is no evidence that Hitler ever made it to Argentina or that the supposed German boat ever went to Argentina's Antarctic base… At least that's what they want you to believe! Since there have been other strange military activity there such as supposed German boats coming or the U.S. project “Operation Highjump”, since people really think that this is a feasible thing. Of course These strange events, and the lack of information around them, often lead people to conclude that it must be because there is something going on there that the government doesn't want us to know about.  Many of these beliefs actually come from Flat Earth.  Flat Earthers often propose that it is illegal to go to Antarctica and has a constant military presence, that's why none of them can go investigate if the ice wall is out there.  There is a subgroup of flat earth who believes that part of the reason you “can't go” to Antarctica is because of the Nazi base there. So think about that one...flat earthers believing there are Nazis bases in Antarctica… Good Lord. In 1978, Miguel Serrano, a Chilean diplomat and Nazi sympathizer, published El Cordón Dorado: Hitlerismo Esotérico [The Golden Thread: Esoteric Hitlerism] (in Spanish), in which he claimed that Adolf Hitler was an Avatar of Vishnu and was, at that time, communing with Hyperborean gods in an underground Antarctic base in New Swabia. Serrano predicted that Hitler would lead a fleet of UFOs from the base to establish the Fourth Reich. In popular culture, this alleged UFO fleet is referred to as the Nazi flying saucers from Antarctica. Oh boy. We really gotta figure out if the Nazis are on the moon or in Antarctica!   How about pyramids… You like pyramids? We got pyramids… maybe. THE oldest pyramids on Earth are hidden away under the deep cold snow of Antarctica, conspiracy theorists have shockingly claimed . Ancient alien theorists who are certain secret pyramids are concealed all around the globe, think some may be hidden on Antarctica. Conspiracy theorists, in particular, point to a pyramid-like structure near the Shackleton mountain range on the icy continent. The “pyramid” in question, when viewed on satellite imagery, does appear to have four steep sides much like the Great Pyramid of Giza. Conspiracy theory author David Childress told Ancient Aliens there is a distinct possibility the Shackleton pyramid is the oldest of its kind on Earth.   He said: “If this gigantic pyramid in Antarctica is an artificial structure, it would probably be the oldest pyramid on the planet and in fact, it might be the master pyramid that all the other pyramids on planet Earth were designed to look like.” Another conspiracy theorist agreed, saying: "All the way around the world we find evidence of pyramid structures.   "We should start looking at the possibility there was habitation on Antarctica.   "Was it a lost civilization? Could it be ancient astronauts?   "And just maybe, the earliest monuments of our own civilization came from Antarctica.”    But the theory was challenged by Dr Michael Salla, author of Exopolitics Political Implications of the Extraterrestrial Presence. The alien expert argued the Antarctic pyramid is just one node in a global network of power-generating pyramids strategically placed around Earth.   A popular pyramid conspiracy claims the triangular structures act as power generators of sorts, built for the purpose of transiting vast amounts of energy wirelessly.   Dr Salla said: “There has been extensive research done on pyramids throughout the world, in terms of their structure and what they really are.   “One of the theories is that pyramids are power generators and so if you have these pyramids strategically placed around the world generating a charge, it's possible to create a general standing wave around the world that is a wireless transmission of energy.”   Also There is a claim that the British set up a base called Maudheim-1 (there are no records) in Dronning Maud Land during the war to observe the apparent Nazi base, this was supposedly attacked by the Nazis in July 1945 followed by SAS led (failed) retaliatory attacks from October to December that year.   How about a couple quick hits:    Some think that the remains of a  Motte and Bailey castle were uncovered. Motte-and-bailey castle is a European fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised area of ground called a motte, accompanied by a walled courtyard, or bailey, surrounded by a protective ditch and palisade. Relatively easy to build with unskilled labour, but still militarily formidable, these castles were built across northern Europe from the 10th century onwards, spreading from Normandy and Anjou in France, into the Holy Roman Empire in the 11th century. The Normans introduced the design into England and Wales. Motte-and-bailey castles were adopted in Scotland, Ireland, the Low Countries and Denmark in the 12th and 13th centuries.    The structure is about 120m across which makes it of the appropriate size range and has two sort-of circles, though the whole thing appears to be more or less completely flat rather than having any significant raised earthworks which in part define a Motte and Bailey castle, the mounds of such castles in towns, cities and in the countryside in Europe are particularly enduring across the centuries. There's a scientific explanation for it but that doesn't stop people from believing what they want.    Then of course you have the flat earthers . There is a weird conspiracy theory that Antarctica and the South Pole do not exist. This belief is most common among flat-earthers who claim that our planet is flat. Flat-earthers believe that the North Pole is at the center of the world while the South Pole surrounds the Earth. According to flat-earthers, Antarctica is actually a thick wall about 30 to 60 meters (100 to 200 ft.) high that surrounds our planet. The wall stops everything from falling over the edge of the Earth. Flat-earthers say we cannot confirm the existence of the wall because world governments and the United Nations have strict no-fly and no-sail zones around Antarctica. Conspiracy theorists believe that the British Captain Cook is one of the few humans to have ever seen the wall apart from government agents. Supposedly, Captain Cook reported seeing the huge wall during the three voyages he made to Antarctica. The wall covered the entire coastline, and he could not land anywhere because it was just too tall to climb.   Speaking if stupid, we touched on this not long ago so we'll just mention it in passing… But apparently there's a hole at the south pole that is the entrance to the hollow earth...I mean… Come On people… Is this where we are as a society??   Going along with this theory of a hole at the pole, there are people that think the world is hiding that fact with a fake south pole. So when people go to the spot that is thought to be the south pole is actually an arbitrary random spot chosen by the powers of the world to throw everyone off the trail of hollow earth.    Some people also believe that there is actually a tropical region that is  hidden in Antarctica. Yes, a tropical region. Some say it is in the no fly zone that is also attributed to the spot where the hole to hollow earth is… we think these guys should fight it out. To the death. Like, no survivors. On the other hand there is recent evidence that there used to be rain forests on the continent so maybe the believers aren't as crazy as we think. Just kidding. They're nuttier than squirrel turds.   Some other crackpots also really believe Antarctica is the Land of The Ancient Race of Super-Beings With Big Angular Heads. Some of them tried to leave many years ago and made it to Easter Island where their enormous weight made them sink into the ground and a simple common bacterial infection turned them to stone. The bacterium cannot live in Antarctica so they continue their highly sophisticated secret society under the ice, dude we can't make this stuff up. Maybe it was Medusa… see, we can make shit up, too!   And finally… Is Antarctica really the lost city of atlantis? The theory that Antarctica is Atlantis is a relatively new one, dating back to the mid 20th Century.   According to Charles Hapgood's 1958 book 'Earth's Shifting Crust',  the continent of Antarctica was in fact originally much further north than its current position. Due to the shifting of the Earth's crust, the continent was displaced, and the climate of the continent, which had been mild, plummeted to below freezing.   This shift in location and temperature has led some to argue that an ancient Civilisation existed on the continent, which was subsequently destroyed by this monumental geographical realignment.   In 2016, faint credence was given to this claim with the revelation that remains of a human settlement had been found under the Antarctic ice.   One report claimed, 'the pictures, taken using remote sensing photography for NASA's Operation IceBridge mission to Antarctica, show what online sleuths believe could be a city.' Ranker list of best winter thriller movies https://www.ranker.com/list/thriller-movies-set-in-snow/ranker-film

Into the Impossible
Barry Barish Interviews Brian Keating: Part 2

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 43:51


In February 2021 Dr. Barry Barish, co-recipient of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for the LIGO experiment, interviewed me at his home in Los Angeles. The topic was his thoughts and reactions to my book, Losing the Nobel Prize (http://amzn.to/2sa5UpA). We discussed scientific leadership, academic stress, burnout, the role of mentors and managers in science and a lot about my book too. Losing The Nobel Prize By Brian Keating The inside story of a quest to unlock one of cosmology's biggest mysteries, derailed by the lure of the Nobel Prize. What would it have been like to be an eyewitness to the Big Bang? In 2014, astronomers wielding BICEP2, the most powerful cosmology telescope ever made, revealed that they'd glimpsed the spark that ignited the Big Bang. Millions around the world tuned in to the announcement broadcast live from Harvard University, immediately igniting rumors of an imminent Nobel Prize. But had these cosmologists truly read the cosmic prologue or, swept up in Nobel dreams, had they been deceived by a galactic mirage? In Losing the Nobel Prize, cosmologist and inventor of the BICEP (Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization) experiment Brian Keating tells the inside story of BICEP2's mesmerizing discovery and the scientific drama that ensued. In an adventure story that spans the globe from Rhode Island to the South Pole, from California to Chile, Keating takes us on a personal journey of revelation and discovery, bringing to vivid life the highly competitive, take-no-prisoners, publish-or-perish world of modern science. Along the way, he provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific progress, may actually hamper it, encouraging speed and greed while punishing collaboration and bold innovation. In a thoughtful reappraisal of the wishes of Alfred Nobel, Keating offers practical solutions for reforming the prize, providing a vision of a scientific future in which cosmologists may, finally, be able to see all the way back to the very beginning. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Into the Impossible
Barry Barish Interviews Brian Keating: Part 1

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:52


In February 2021 Dr. Barry Barish, co-recipient of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for the LIGO experiment, interviewed me at his home in Los Angeles. The topic was his thoughts and reactions to my book, Losing the Nobel Prize (http://amzn.to/2sa5UpA). We discussed scientific leadership, academic stress, burnout, the role of mentors and managers in science and a lot about my book too. Losing The Nobel Prize By Brian Keating The inside story of a quest to unlock one of cosmology's biggest mysteries, derailed by the lure of the Nobel Prize. What would it have been like to be an eyewitness to the Big Bang? In 2014, astronomers wielding BICEP2, the most powerful cosmology telescope ever made, revealed that they'd glimpsed the spark that ignited the Big Bang. Millions around the world tuned in to the announcement broadcast live from Harvard University, immediately igniting rumors of an imminent Nobel Prize. But had these cosmologists truly read the cosmic prologue or, swept up in Nobel dreams, had they been deceived by a galactic mirage? In Losing the Nobel Prize, cosmologist and inventor of the BICEP (Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization) experiment Brian Keating tells the inside story of BICEP2's mesmerizing discovery and the scientific drama that ensued. In an adventure story that spans the globe from Rhode Island to the South Pole, from California to Chile, Keating takes us on a personal journey of revelation and discovery, bringing to vivid life the highly competitive, take-no-prisoners, publish-or-perish world of modern science. Along the way, he provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific progress, may actually hamper it, encouraging speed and greed while punishing collaboration and bold innovation. In a thoughtful reappraisal of the wishes of Alfred Nobel, Keating offers practical solutions for reforming the prize, providing a vision of a scientific future in which cosmologists may, finally, be able to see all the way back to the very beginning. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The You Project
#613 Exploring Human Potential - Dean Karnazes

The You Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 54:59


Dean Karnazes is a freak in the best possible way. I don't often feel lazy or out of shape but next to this bloke, I'm Humphrey Bear in a hammock. If you're into human optimisation, developing resilience, exploring your potential, lowering your biological age and living healthy into old(er) age, you'll dig this episode. TIME magazine named Dean one of the "Top 100 Most Influential People in the World." Men's Fitness hailed him as one of the fittest men on the planet. Stan Lee, of Marvel Comics fame, called him, "A real superhuman." An acclaimed endurance athlete and NY Times bestselling author, Dean has pushed his body and mind to inconceivable limits. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons, in all 50 US states, in 50 consecutive days, he's run 350 continuous miles (563km), foregoing sleep for three nights. He's run across the Sahara Desert in 120-degree temperatures, and he's run a marathon to the South Pole in negative 40 degrees. On ten separate occasions, he's run a 200-mile relay race solo, racing alongside teams of twelve. His long list of competitive achievements includes winning the World's Toughest Footrace, the Badwater Ultramarathon, running 135 miles nonstop across Death Valley during the middle of summer. He has raced and competed on all seven continents of the planet, twice over. Like I said, freak. Enjoy.

Speak Like a Leader
Lessons from High Mountains | Satyabrata Dam

Speak Like a Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 50:26


Satyabrata Dam is a globetrotting thrill-seeker and a die-hard adrenalin junkie. At the age of 10 when he stepped on his first Himalayan Glacier and looked up awestruck at the peak, he was about to attempt, Satyabrata knew then that he was born to climb and the mountains of this world would become his home, friends, and family. Since then he has been climbing and exploring all the mountain ranges across the globe and beyond.Over the past 35 years, some of the things Satyabrata has done include:Climbed the highest peaks of all the 7 continents, including Mt Everest (seven summits)Skied to the North and South PolesClimbed the second highest peaks of 5 continents (I am one of the three people in the world to have done this)Climbed more than 350 peaks worldwideWalked the length of Africa from Tunisia to South AfricaTraversed the ancient Silk Route from Mongolia to IstanbulSkied across the Greenland ice capVisited 146 countries and climbed to the highest spot of nearly allFollowing his passion, Satyabrata became the only person in the world to have successfully led expeditions to the three poles (Mt Everest, North, and South Poles) and the first submariner in the world to do so as well. For 22 years he was a submariner in the Indian Navy and has now taken voluntary retirement to devote more time to his adventures. Find Satyabrata  at SatyabrataDam.com Check out his book Life on Top: Lessons from High Mountains on Amazon.Here are some of Satyabrata's Mom's cookbooks available on Barnes & Noble: Mom's Snacks Kitchen and Mom's Kitchen. 

NTN » The DawgHouse - Motorcycling news, racing and analysis
The DawgHouse Motorcycle Racing #644: MotoGP Ducati and the South Pole… REALLY!

NTN » The DawgHouse - Motorcycling news, racing and analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 30:54


Royal Enfield going to South Pole! E-Moto with Ducati..... Really.... Ducati makes electric bikes? We are all over the place talking about MotoGP... Warren dooms several racers!

Roll With The Punches
EP238 Life, Loss & The Love Of Running | Dean Karnazes

Roll With The Punches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 47:00


Named by TIME magazine as one of the “100 Most Influential People in the World,” Dean Karnazes has pushed his body and mind to inconceivable limits. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons, in all 50 US states, in 50 consecutive days. He's run across Death Valley in the middle of summer, and he's run a marathon to the South Pole. On ten separate occasions he's run a 200-mile relay race solo, racing alongside teams of twelve. His list of competitive achievements include winning the World's Toughest Footrace, the Badwater Ultramarathon, and winning the 4 Deserts Challenge, racing in the hottest, driest, windiest and coldest places on earth. It's fair to say he runs a touch more than I do that's for sure! And would you believe he's never sustained an injury?!? We talk about the day (or night) he put down his last birthday drink, stripped down to his shorts and left the bar to run an impromptu marathon. We talk about the loss of his sister, the gain of his passion and purpose and what drive him to run and run and run :) Enjoy! EPISODE SPONSOR | EMILY WALLACE BUYERS ADVOCATES Website: https://emilywallace.com.au DEAN KARNAZES https://www.ultramarathonman.com TIFFANEE COOK Linktree: https://linktr.ee/rollwiththepunches Website: www.rollwiththepunches.com.au LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/tiffaneecook/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/rollwiththepunchespodcast Instagram: www.instagram.com/rollwiththepunches_podcast Instagram: www.instagram.com/tiffaneeandco --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/roll-withthepunches/message

The Checkpoint
Ep24. Preet Chandi

The Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 64:10


In episode 24 of The Checkpoint sponsored by The North Face®️, we talk to Preet Chandi. Preet is an army officer, physiotherapist, ultrarunner and endurance athlete. She is aiming to complete a solo, unsupported trek to the South Pole, travelling 700 miles, pulling a sledge with all of her kit, in temperatures of -50c. The journey will take approximately 47 days and will be Preet's first expedition in Antarctica. Preet has said: “There are only a few female adventurers that have completed a solo, unsupported trek on this continent. It is time to add some more names, diversity and to make history.” We talk about what it means to Preet, as a woman of colour, to take on this challenge, what strategies she has in place for when things get tough and what her favourite expedition foods are. This was a broad conversation, full of great take-aways and we look forward to tracking Preet's progress to the South Pole starting next month! Follow Preet on Instagram @polarpreet For latest news and more information on Preet visit: https://polarpreet.com/

Pushing The Limits
Ultramarathoning: How to Do the Impossible with Dean Karnazes

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 64:16


When was the last time you got up and ran? Simply jogging around the neighbourhood during the weekends to keep fit may be daunting for some. Now, imagine the sheer amount of dedication, endurance, and resilience ultramarathoning requires. This type of long-distance running is an activity that tests the limits of human endurance. You might think running a thousand miles is impossible, but today's guest continues to prove others wrong. He's on a mission to exceed his limits and inspire others to do the same. Dean Karnazes joins us in this episode to get up close and personal about his experiences in ultramarathoning. He candidly shares the highs and lows, the triumphs and defeats. We also find out the importance of failure and finding magic in misery.  If you're interested in discovering how you can build your character, embrace pain and failure, and get inspired to push your limits, then this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Discover how to cope with the ups and downs of ultramarathoning. Learn about the importance of pain and failure. Get inspired by Dean's valuable takeaways from his career.   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health program all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/. You can also join their free live webinar on epigenetics.   Online Coaching for Runners Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching. You can also join our free live webinar on runners' warm-up to learn how a structured and specific warm-up can make a massive difference in how you run.   Consult with Me If you would like to work with me one to one on anything from your mindset, to head injuries,  to biohacking your health, to optimal performance or executive coaching, please book a consultation here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/consultations   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: http://relentlessbook.lisatamati.com/ For my other two best-selling books, Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   My Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness!  Listen to my other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #8: Dean Karnazes - The Road to Sparta #183: Sirtuins and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova Connect with Dean: Website Books by Dean Karnazes:  Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner A Runner's High: My Life in Motion Dean's other books   Episode Highlights [05:21] Dean's Lockdown Experience in Australia Dean was supposed to go on a 1000-mile run across New South Wales.  After boarding a jet to Australia, he found that the pandemic situation was getting worse.  And so, Dean and Pat Farmer will be doing their run in a military base instead. Although he's quarantined inside a hotel room, Dean always stays moving and does bodyweight exercises to remain active. It was challenging to go from California, where 80% have been vaccinated, to Australia, which is still in lockdown. [11:18] Chronological and Biological Age Chronologically, Dean is closer to 60 than 50 years old. There are various ways to test your biological age, like C-reactive proteins and inflammation. Tune in to the full episode to learn more about what else goes into calculating your biological age. [14:17] Dean's Greek Heritage Dean's mother is from Ikaria, a Blue Zones with the highest concentration of centenarians worldwide. People in Ikaria live long, healthy lives. They don't pay attention to time and live in a strong community. Therefore, they are not prone to stress. Dean doesn't have any back, muscle, or joint pain. [18:50] Know What Your Body is Built For People are built to run at different speeds and distances. Various factors affect what you're optimised to do.  What's important is knowing the things that are optimal for your health. Dean has run over 300 traditional marathons in his career. He has also seen people well past their 70s who are still physically able and active. [22:04] What is A Runner's High About? A Runner's High is about the changes that he, the world, and ultramarathoning has undergone. Ultramarathoning impacts the people closest to you. Dean wanted to write a true and honest story about his reflections over the past three decades.  [24:00] Running the Western States Endurance Run This 100-mile trail race starts in Sierra Nevada, California. Dean first did this race in 1994. To him, this was an unforgettable experience. Going back after 13 times, Dean found that watching his dad and son crew for him and seeing how things changed over time was transformative for him. Dean recounts his experiences in detail in A Runner's High. [25:54] The Surprises of Parenting Kids grow faster than parents can adjust to them growing up.  Dean describes his son Nick as dichotomous, recounting how he would complain about his roommates being slobs while his own room is a mess. Nick volunteered to crew for him. Dean thought Nick would be irresponsible. Nick surprised Dean; he was much more responsible than Dean's dad. It's a parent's burden to accept that their child is now a self-sufficient, capable adult. [29:58] Did Dean's Career and Fame Affect His Family? Ultramarathoning has always been a family affair for Dean.  He would take his family to where his marathons are. Dean's kids had the opportunity to travel to different places from a young age. Fans that come up to him asking for autographs and selfies are decent people. [34:44] Dealing with Pain and Failure When you're in pain, it's difficult to interact with others. Dean admits that it can be tough when his fans come up to chat with him during this time. He commits to setting aside his ego and always gives 100% in everything he does, including ultramarathoning and interacting with fans. [40:44] The Value of Failing Success builds character, but failure more profoundly so. The emotional range that comes with failure makes one a better human. Don't shy away from hitting rock bottom because you'll be missing out on a profound character-building opportunity. In the end, it's a matter of perspective. Most people will applaud the distance that you run, whether you come in first or not. [44:49] Ultramarathoning is Achieving the Impossible Dean initially thought there was trickery involved in ultramarathoning. The moments that stuck to Dean in his career weren't victories or crossing finish lines.  What stuck to him were the moments when he was on the verge of giving up but persisted through difficulty. [48:04] The Importance of Character Ultramarathoning teaches you to be resilient through the tough times. Running doesn't hurt when you're doing it right. Some people try to avoid difficult things and pain, while others embrace them. We've built our world around comfort, but somehow we're still miserable. However, the more struggle you experience, the more strength you build. [53:21] Dean's Biggest Takeaways From Ultramarathoning To Dean, it's the little moments that are the most priceless. Ultramarathoning is a journey, a passion, and a commitment. Staying true to yourself is valuable, simple, and magical. [56:11] Forming Connections Through Books Writing is laborious, but the motivation it brings to people makes it worthwhile. Dean dictates the things he wants to write on his phone while running.  Running clears Dean's thoughts. To him, motion stirs emotion. A singularity of purpose is achieved when focusing on a specific goal or mission.   7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘Some people are built to run far and slow, and other people are built to run quick and short.' ‘In school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test, and then you get the lesson.' ‘What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best.' ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' ‘I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way.' ‘We've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable.' ‘I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that.'   About Dean Dean Karnazes is a renowned ultramarathon runner. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons in 50 days on 50 consecutive days, gone across the Sahara Desert in 120-degree temperatures, and ran 350 miles without sleep. He has also raced and competed in all seven continents twice. Dean has carried the Olympic Torch twice. He appeared on the covers of Runner's World, Outside, and Wired, and has been featured in TIME, People, GQ, and Forbes. He was named one of the "Top 100 Most Influential People in the World". Men's Fitness has also labelled him as one of the fittest men in the world. To top it off, Dean is also a New York Times bestselling author and a much sought-after speaker and panellist in running and athletic events worldwide.  If you want to learn more about Dean, his incredible adventures and his achievements, you may visit his website.   Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can find inspiration from Dean's stories on ultramarathoning and the lessons he learned along the way. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You can also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Trasncript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com. Lisa Tamati: Good day, everyone. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits, your host Lisa Tamati here. Today, I have one of my longtime friends and a guy who has had a massive influence in my life both as a role model and as someone who has facilitated me with a lot of help with my books and so on. He's a worldwide legend. He is Dean Karnazes. He is the author of four books. And he has a new one out called the Runner's High, which I was excited to give me an excuse to chat to my buddy, and see what he's been up to, and to talk everything, ultramarathon running. We talk a whole lot about getting older in ultramarathon running, and the difficulties, and we talk about life in general and longevity, and the beauty of the sport. He's an incredible ambassador for our sport. He's done so much. He's brought so many people into the sport worldwide and he's an incredible human being. He's actually stuck in lockdown in Australia right at the moment as we were recording this and was about to do a race ride around Australia with my other friend, Pat Farmer. Another incredible human being. These guys are just next level crazy, and bloody COVID has ripped everything so they're now down to doing thousand-mile race around a military base in Australia in New South Wales. But in true ultramarathon form, where there's a will, there's a way. And when there's an obstacle, you find a way around it. Improvise, adapt, and overcome as my friend Craig Harper always says. So that's what these guys have been doing. So I hope you enjoy this episode with Dean Karnazes. Without him, I wouldn't have my books. He is a very generous and caring person as well as being an incredible athlete. Before we head over to the show, just want to remind you, we have our BOOSTCAMP live webinar series coming up starting on the first of September 2021. If you're listening to this later on, we will be doing these on an ongoing basis. And actually, we have planned to set up a mastermind that goes the year long. I don't know how long it's gonna take us to get organised but that is our goal. We're all about helping each other upgrade our lives and be the best versions of ourselves that we can be. This one's called BOOSTCAMP. This eight-week-long webinar series that Neil and I are doing. This is a live series where you hang out with us once a week for an hour and get a lot of great information: the latest science, the latest biohacking, the latest longevity, everything about mental toughness, resilience, everything that's going to basically upgrade your life and help you be a better human. The stuff that we've spent years and decades actually studying, learning, and doing. So I hope you get to enjoy this with us. You can head on over to peakwellness.co.nzboostcamp. That's B-O-O-S-T camp. BOOSTCAMP, not boot camp. We won't be making you run around doing anything. We're just going to be having wonderful chats and education. A lot of lectures and a lot of fun to be had along the way. And, I think, what's most important is you'll be networking with like-minded individuals. They say that you are the sum total of the five people that you hang out with most. And make those five people, in this case, it will be a few more, some top-quality people who are all on a mission the same as you are. So if you want to come and join us, that's BOOSTCAMP. We also have our epigenetics program. If you want to know all about your genetics, and how to upgrade your life through your genes, understanding what your genes do, if you're dealing with a difficult health journey, and you don't know where to go to next, this is a very good place to start. This is our flagship program that we've been running for years now. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program. And it's really an incredible all-encompassing program that looks at your food, your exercise types, what time of the day to do different things, your mood and behaviour, and lots, lots more. So come and check that out at lisatamati.com and hit the ‘Work with Us' button then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program there if you're interested in doing that. Right. Now, over to the show with Dean Karnazes who's sitting in lockdown in Australia. Well. Hi, everyone and welcome to the show. Today, I have my very good friend and absolute legend of ultramarathoning, Dean Karnazes, with me. Dean, welcome to the show, again. Repeat offender. Dean Karnazes: Oh, it's so nice to be back on with you. Thank you for having me. We always have such lively conversations. I love it. Lisa: We do, right? I just absolutely enjoy your company. Whenever I've had the chance to spend a little bit of time with you, it's been absolute gold whether it's been on the podcast, or interviewing you, or hanging out with you on the Gold Coast like we did last year. That was absolutely awesome. Dean, you've just brought out another book. Another amazing book called Runner's High, and that's why we had to get you back on, because I want to share about all this book. But before we get into the book, you're sitting in lockdown in Australia. Tell me what is going on there. Dean: It's a long story but it started with a run across Australia with Pat Farmer. So from Western Australia to the East Coast, and that was the original idea; it was 5,000 kilometres. And this was six months ago when the world was going in a better direction, and over the past six months, boy, the world has done just the opposite. And we, like you, are a fighter and we kept saying we're going to persevere the same... Well, the run across Australia got mixed to a run across New South Wales, a thousand-mile run across New South Wales. And we kept thinking, 'This is going to happen. This is going to happen.' I boarded the plane, I flew to Australia with 10 people on the huge jet, yeah. And when I get to Australia, I realise how bad the situation is here. And every day, I turn on the news. It's getting worse, it's getting worse as I'm in quarantine, and then finally Pat called me a couple days ago and said, 'We can't do the thousand-mile run now. We could still the thousand-mile run. It's just going to be contained within a military base because we need to stay in our own bubble.' And I thought 'Oh.' Lisa: He has flown away from America to Australia to run around the military base. It sounds a bit like being tactic stuff. Dean: Oh, yeah. And not only the... To sit in quarantine. To your point, I've been in our hotel room for 12 days now, waiting to get out, yeah. Lisa: For someone like you... You're just like me. Obviously, you're even more extreme than me. It must be torture. I just can't comprehend being in a room. This must be awful for you. Dean: Don't remind me, but yeah. Basically, from the moment I get up, I'm staying active. We both know the importance of movement. So from the moment my head leaves the pillow, I'm not sitting down ever. Even right now, I'm pacing back and forth in this room, and I'm doing bodyweight exercises just constantly, at least throughout the day. Lisa: I used to... If I was travelling and I was stuck in a hotel room somewhere in a dangerous city or whatever, I'd put on something running on TV and run along with them. I was doing the Boston Marathon in Budapest in a hotel room one day. Just run along the spot. Doesn't matter. You got to do something to keep active, so I can imagine it being a bit of a mission for you. So my heart goes out to you and hang in there for two more days. And all my love, please, to Pat Farmer. I love the guy. He's just amazing. We got to hang out when we're in the Big Red Run together, which I failed spectacularly, by the way. I had a back injury that walked me out in the middle of that race. But one of the big advantages of that run was actually getting to meet Pat Farmer because he's an absolute legend of the sport. So you two together would be a really powerful combination. I'm really sad that he's not going to go right around Australia because imagine the people that would have come out and enjoyed meeting you two. Dean: Oh, he pulled all the strings. He's very well connected in political circles and the Australian Army is crazy for us. So we had 13 Army personnel and they're setting up a tent city every night, and they're cooking for us. It was amazing but COVID had other plans. Lisa: Oh, bloody COVID. It's wrecking every damn thing. Hey, but it's ultramarathon runner and Pat Farmer who has run from the North Pole to the South Pole, people. Absolute crazy guy. Obstacle? Find a way around it. Obstacle? Find a way around. And that's what you guys are doing, and you have to be flexible. That's a good lesson for this day and age because we're all having to be very, very flexible right now, and adapt to a hell of a lot of change, and being able to cope in different situations. So I bet you guys would just find a way through it and it will be another incredible story at the end of the day. Dean: I think the world needs it. As controversial as the Olympics were, I think it was an amazing thing, and it's so scaled back, right? But still, people are stuck in their house and now, what are they doing? They're watching the Olympics. They're getting energised, and they're thinking about the future so yeah, thank you. It's been a very emotional journey for me to leave a place... Where I live in California, we're over 80% vaccinated. So to leave a place where there was no masks then come here, it's been eye-opening and challenging. Lisa: You should have Pat go to you and run around California. You got it backwards. I have no doubt that you guys will just find a way through, and you'll make it epic, anyway. Say you get given lemons, you make lemonade. Dean: Yeah well, at least we're staying in military barracks, and we're basically running. Every day, we're staying in the same place so logistically, it'll be easier. Lisa: Yeah. Oh my god, you guys just don't stop. I admire you guys so much, and I was saying to you last year, when we're in the Gold Coast, 'I've hit the wall at about 48 but to be honest, I had a pretty hit on, full-on war with my body and....' But you guys just seem to keep going, and going, and going. I had Mum as well so I did have an excuse, guys. But pretty highly, it was a stressful last five years. But you just seem to... Because how old are you now, Dean, if you don't mind sharing? Dean: Yeah. Well, when anyone would ask my age, I would say, 'Are you talking about my chronological age or my biological age?' Lisa: Well, your chronological because biological, you're probably 20 years younger. Because I definitely am. That's my take on it. Dean: Chronologically I'm closer to 60 than 50. Lisa: Exactly. Have you actually ever had your biological age done? Because that's an interesting thing. Dean: Yeah, I had a couple. There's a lot of good ways you can test it, and I've had it done a couple different times. One, I was about I was in my late 30s. And then on another, I was older than my actual chronological age. Lisa: Which one was that? Dean: It was post ultramarathon. So after racing, we spoke about C-reactive protein earlier and inflammation. And that was one of the biomarkers that they used in calculating your biological age. So when I looked at the results, I said, 'Hold it. How did you arrive at that figure?' And they gave me all the markers they looked at, and I said, 'Well, look. This is wildly elevated because just four days ago, I just ran a hundred miles.' Lisa: Exactly. And C-reactive protein, if you've just had a cold, if you've just hit like we were talking about my dad before and sepsis and his C-reactive protein was just through the roof. So that makes sense that they would be out. There's a whole clock, which is the methylation markers, which is a very good one. I've done just one very basic one that came out at 34. I was pretty pleased with that one. At the end of the day, I think if you can keep all your inflammatory markers like your homocysteine and C-reactive protein generally under control, keep your albumin levels high, they are pretty good markers. Albumin is one that is looking at, it's a protein that your liver makes, and that's a very important one. And if you albumin starts to go too low, that's one sign that things aren't going to good. So keep an eye on all those. I love studying all this longevity stuff because I plan to live to 150 at least, and I don't think that that's unrealistic now as long as I don't get run over by a bus or something. With the stuff that's coming online and the technology that's coming, we're going to be able to turn back the clock on some pretty advanced stuff already. Now, my mum's on more than me because obviously, her needs are a bit greater than mine. I can't afford for us to be on all the top stuff. But yeah, I'm very excited. We don't need to age like our grandparents have aged. We're gonna have... And someone like you, Dean, who's lived a good healthy life, apart from pushing the hell out of your body, and I'll talk about that in a sec, but I think you've got the potential to live to 150, especially because you're Greek. You come from stock. Dean: And my mom is from one of the Blue Zones. An island called Ikaria and I've been there and I've met... Ikaria, the island she's from, has the highest concentration of centenarians anywhere on Earth. Lisa: Oh my gosh. So you're going to live to 200 then. Dean: Well, the beautiful thing about these people is that not only are they over 100, they still have a high quality of life. They're still mobile; they're self-sufficient. Mentally and cognitively, they're sharp as a tack. They're active. The one thing that they have that we don't have the luxury of is the complete absence of stress. They don't pay attention to time. Lisa: That's, I think, a crucial point. Stress is a killer in so, so many ways. Dean: Even the fact that we have mortgages, and we have payments, rent, all those sort of things, I think, contribute to obviously, to stress. And fitting in with new society. It's much more of a sense of community in these villages where everyone is part of it. They all take care of each other, so it's a different lifestyle. Lisa: I think, definitely when you're actually living the old way of being out in the sunshine, from the time you get up to the end of the day, you're working outside and on the ground, in the land, hands in the dirt, all of that sort of stuff really... Because I studied lots about circadian rhythms and how our eyes, for example, you see sunshine early in the morning. That resets your circadian rhythms, sets the clock going for the day. Your adenosine starts to build up over the day. You get tired at about 14 to 16 hours later. All of these things that we've... as modern-day humans, we've taken ourselves out of the old way of living and put ourselves into this artificial comfortable environment. But this is upsetting all our ancient DNA, and that's why that's leading to problems. And then, of course, we've got this crazy life with technology, and the stuff we have to do, and work. Just like stress, what it does to the gut, the actual microbiota in the gut, and how much it affects your gut health. And of course, gut health affects everything. Your brain and your gut talk all the time. All these stuff so I think if we can harness the cool stuff of the technology coming, plus go back and start respecting as much as possible our ancient DNA, and then eating our ancestors did as best we can with these depleted soils, and pesticides, and glyphosates, and God knows what's in the environment, but doing the best we can, then we've got a good chance of actually staying around on this planet and still be running ultramarathons or at least marathons when you're a hundred plus. I don't think that that's unrealistic anymore, and that excites me. So I'm always learning on that front. Dean: But I want to be that guy that's running a marathon when you say a hundred. That's my ambition now. Lisa: I'll keep you up on the latest stuff then. What you need to be aware of. Dean: I don't have any... People say, ‘You must have arthritis, or back pain, or knee pain, or joint pain.' I don't have any of those things. I don't know why but I just... I'm so happy. I get up every morning and feel fresh. Lisa: That's absolutely amazing. I think one of the amazing things with you is that... Because I studied genetics, and I looked at my genes. And actually doing really long bouts of exercise with my combination of genetics and my cardiovascular system, especially I've got a very weak glycocalyx, which is the lining of your endothelial cells. Bear with me people. This means that if I do a lot of oxidative damage, which you do, of course, when you're running, that's pretty damaging to my lining of my blood vessel. So I've got to be a little more careful and take a lot of antioxidant support. But having that inflammation means I can now take steps to mitigate that so that I can still do what I love to do. And that's really key. It's hitting stuff off at the pass and there's so much we can do now and that's really, really exciting. But I've gone completely off topic because we should be talking about your book. Dean: No, I think it's very relevant because I think that some people are built to run far and slow and other people are built to run quick and short. Lisa: Yeah. I do and I agree and it's not just about your fast-twitch fibres. It is also about your methylation and your detox pathways, your hormonal pathways, your cardiovascular genes. All of these things do play a role, and that's why there's no one size fits all. And that's why we don't all have to be Dean Karnazes or Pat Farmer. You know what I mean? Not everybody is built for that or should be doing that, and that's okay as well. And working out what is optimal for your health is the key thing. Having role models like you guys is just mind-blowing because it does lift your perception of what the human body is capable of. That leads the way for others, and to follow, and to test out their personal limits. I think that's important too. Dean: Well, I've run over 300 traditional marathons. And you go to the Boston Marathon, you go to these big marquee marathons, the New York City Marathon, and you see people in their 70s and 80s that, compared to their peers, are off the charts. You say, 'Well, that running is gonna be bad for you.' I don't subscribe to that. Lisa: I've done what, 70-odd thousand K's. Not as much as you have. And I don't have any knee pain. I don't have any back pain because I keep my core strong and that's despite having accidents with my back and having no discs. Because I keep myself fit and healthy. I have had some issues with hormones and kidney function because when we... You would have been rhabdomyolysis, no doubt a few times. Dean: Minor, minor, but I have. Yeah. Every ultra runner has, yeah. Lisa: Yeah, so things that. You've got to just keep an eye on and make sure you don't... You look after your kidneys otherwise and do things to mitigate the damage. Because yeah there are certain things that damage. But life damages you. Like living, breathing is damaging. It's causing oxidative stress. So you've got to weigh up the pros and cons, but having an active physical life outdoors, and having adventures, and being curious and excited, and being involved in the world, that's got to be beneficial for you. So when do you actually start with this big adventure with Pat? Dean: It's on the 14th of August, so in about a week. Yep. They finish on the 24th, yeah. Lisa: Oh, I'd like to get you both back on at the end of it to give me a rundown, have a go. That will be cool. Dean, let's just pivot now and let's talk a little bit about your book. Because you brought out some incredible books over the years. You're world-famous. You're a New York Times bestselling author. You've been named by the Times magazine as one of the most hundred influential people of the world. That's just insane. And now, you're brought out Runner's High. What's different about this story? Dean: Well, my first book was Ultramarathon Man, and that was kind of a coming-of-age book. It was about me learning about this crazy universe of ultramarathon and people doing things that I thought was impossible. And Runner's High is five books later and three decades later. How am I still doing it? And how have I changed? How has the sport of ultramarathoning changed? How has the world changed? And that was the book. And it was also a very personal book and that... You're an ultramarathoner, and you know ultramarathon is an island. If you start running these long distances it impacts everyone in your life including your family. Very much for your family. The book, it is not really about running. It's funny. People read it and they say, 'Wow. It's amazing but it's storytelling.' And you and I are both good storytellers, and that was what I just set out to write a book that was true and honest, and it was enjoyable for the reader. And yeah, it's doing really well in New Zealand, actually. Lisa: It must be doing well around the world. And this one is very... It's really real, and genuine, and raw. No holds barred. No barred... What do you call it? No... How do you say that? It's very much a real and it's a love letter to, basically, like you say, to running. And you're actually revisiting the Western States, a race that you've done how many times? 13 times or something? But coming back in your 50s, late 50s to do this again in 2018. It was a bit of a tough road, shall we say. Can you tell us a little bit about that part of the journey and why Western States are so special to you? Dean: Yeah. The Western States 100 mile endurance run is in the Sierra Nevada, California. And it was the first 100-mile trail race, and I first did it back in 1994. So your first is always your best. It's kind of this amazing experience that you have, and you just never forget it. I can recall literally conversations I had in that race in 1994. I can recall what people were wearing. I can recall where I saw my parent. I recall it. It gets impressed upon your mind. So my synapses just absorbed it. So going back here after 13 goes at it and thinking, 'Wow, is this going to be a stale experience? Or what is it going to be like?' And it ended up being quite magical and quite transformative in my career as well as... I learned a lot about my father and my son, and I wrote a lot about that in the book, and watching them crew for me, and how things have changed over time. It wasn't a good race. I don't want to be a spoiler but I think good races don't make good stories. Good races, you pop the champagne, yeah, it's boring. You high five at the finish, you have some champagne, and all this good. When things go to shit, that's an interesting story. Lisa: Yeah, absolutely. I've got three books full of things turning to shit. And I think it's beautiful that you talk about your dad or what a crazy guy he is, and your son coming and how your son was actually... Like you didn't know whether he was up to crewing for you really because he's a young man. He wasn't going to take this seriously because you need your crew to be on form. How do he actually do when he was out there? Dean: Yeah. There's a saying that in school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test and then you get the lesson. You're just like, 'Boy I screwed that one up.' You lose track of your kids, especially when they go off to uni. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us. Dean: As a parent, your kids grew up quicker than you adjust to them growing up, and I always treat them as a guy that needs his diaper change kind of thing even though he's 20 years old now. Nick was just such a dichotomous individual because he complained to me when he came home from uni that his roommates were such slobs. I said, 'How do you like living with three other guys?' He's like, 'It's great. They're my best friends, but they're such slobs.' Every every time I walked past his room, I'd look in his room, and it was a Tasmanian devil had gone through it. ‘Your room is such a mess.' When he volunteered the crew for me at Western States, claiming he knew how to do it, even though the last time he'd done it, he was nine years old, and he didn't do anything. At this time, he was actually driving a vehicle. He was the most important support I had during this kind of foot race. And I just thought that it was gonna be a horrible experience. That he'd be irresponsible, he wouldn't show up, and this, and that. At least it was just the opposite. He was the most responsible, so much more responsible than my dad. So much more capable. My dad's been doing this for 30 years, and my son who's never done it was so much better than my dad. He showed me a new side of him that I'd never seen. Lisa: That's him growing up, I suppose? Dean: Yeah. I think every parent that's got a kid is kind of nodding their head as they're hearing this because they can relate. Lisa: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I think kids, sometimes when they can be a kid, they'll be a kid. They'll be the irresponsible... But when you actually put them on the spot and expect something from them, sometimes, they come to the party if you're lucky, and actually step up to the line, and actually do a good job, and obviously, Nicholas did that. Dean: Yeah. I think it's more the burden of the parent to accept and to realise that this little baby is self-sufficient and capable. Let go of the fact that they once were so dependent on you. They're not anymore. They have their own life, and they can navigate their way through the world. Lisa: It must be pretty hard to let go. What do you think it's been like for them having such a famous, crazy, extreme athlete dad? Was it hard for both of them? Because I can imagine you were away a lot. You're doing dangerous, crazy, amazing things. Everybody knows you. You're extremely well known when you go anywhere. How did that affect the family in general? Dean: It's funny. My kids have never known me as anything different. They've always known me as this ultramarathoner, and it's always been a family affair for me. My kids, they've been to Australia, they've been to Europe multiple times, South America, all over North America. I have taken them with me. I once ran 50 marathons in all of the 50 US states in 50 days, and they were along. Yeah. How many kids... My son was nine, my daughter was 11. How many kids ever, how many people ever get to see all of the states of America, let alone when you're that age? So I think that they just accept me for what I am. Sometimes I get the fan thing where people come up to me like at a restaurant. Like, 'Oh, can you sign this or that?' And it's always good people. The people that come up to me in an airport and say, 'Hey, I really admire you. Can we do a selfie?' They're decent people. Like I want to go have a glass of wine with this guy or this lady. It's not like I'm a rock star or movie star where I have all the crazy people chasing around. The people who chase me around are my peers. People I really admire myself. Lisa: Or other runners. You know what? Something I've always admired about you, too, was that you always gave every single person time of day despite... And when we did that speaking gig together last year on the Gold Coast, I was really nervous, to be honest, because I was like, 'I'm on the stage with someone who is a superstar, and I'm little me.' Right? I'm sort of like, 'How the hell am I on stage with you? Because no one's gonna be interested in what the hell I've got to say when you're standing next to...' It's like some superstar, and you're standing on the stage with them, and you've got to do... It was quite difficult in a way because everybody wanted to... The line for your books was just two hours long. The line from mine was two people long. Dean: You carried yourself beautifully. I thought together, we were a great pair. We complemented each other. Lisa: You are a gentleman. You would always straight to me and make sure that I was included, which was fantastic. I saw you. Like you take the time for every single person. You are present with everybody, and that's a really hard thing to do. It's not so hard in a book signing, but it's bloody hard in the middle of a hundred-miler or a hundred K-er or when you were half-dead, dragging yourself into a checkpoint, and somebody wants a signature from you or a selfie, and you're trying to just get your stuff together. I found that difficult on my level of stuff. Because when I enter in New Zealand, I found that really difficult. I'd have people coming out on the road with me all the way through. And in that preparation, I thought that would be cool. In the reality of the day-to-day grind, did you know when you're... Because I was running up to 70K's a day. I was in a world of pain and hurt most of the time, and just struggling to keep going, and very, very breakable, you feel like. And then, you'd have people coming out and now it's been maybe 2, 3, 4 or 5K's with you, and they're full of beans, and they want you to be full of beans and full of energy, and give them the greatest advice in their 5K's when you're half dead. I found that really, really hard because I'm actually, believe it or not, quite introverted and when I'm running, I go in. How do you deal with it? How do you deal with that without being... Because you don't want to be rude. You don't want to be disrespectful to anybody, God forbid. But there were times on that run when I just literally had to say to my crew, 'I can't cope right now. I'm in a world of pain. I need some space.' And they have to sort of politely say, 'Sorry, she's not in a good space.' How do you deal with that? Dean: Well, it's amazing that we're having this conversation because there are not a lot of people that can relate intimately to what you just said. Because most people will never be in that position but what.. I experienced exactly you've experienced. When running 50 marathons in 50 days or running, I ran across America as well. When you're in a world of hurt, you've got this protective shell on, and you don't want to be social, and then I'd have groups of college kids show up with my book. Like 'Oh my god. Karnazes, you're such a great influence, and we love your book.' And 'Let's order a pizza.' I just feel like I just want to crawl into a mummy bag and hide and you just got to turn it on. Lisa: You've got to step up fine. Dean: Yeah, they're so happy to see you, and they want to see you on. They don't want to see you like this groveler just dying. They want to see you strong and engaging, and it's really tough sometimes. Yeah. It's definitely really tough sometimes. Lisa: Yeah, and that's why I admire that you managed to do that most of the time. You turn it on no matter in what shape you were. If I were to pull it out whereas, to be honest, a couple of times, I just couldn't. I'm just like, 'I'm done guys.' Remember on the run through New Zealand that one time? This was not with fans. I was running for CanTeen, the kids with cancer. I was in an immeasurable world of hurt one night after running for, God knows how long I've been out there, 1200 K's or something at the stage. I had a 13-year-old boy was sent into my room to give me a pep talk. He was dying of cancer or had cancer, and he was here to give me a pep talk because I was crying. I wasn't able to get up and run the next day. And he came in and told me how much it meant to him, and to his peers, and what it meant to him that I was undertaking this journey. That was a real lesson. Like, 'Oh, get over yourself. You're not dying, okay? You're not a 13 year old with cancer. You just have to run another 70 K's tomorrow. So what?' That's a good perspective. I did get up the next morning and go again and that was like, 'Here, come on.' Some funny but really touching moments. You are human and it's very easy when you go to a speaking engagement or whatever to be what you meant to be, a professional. But it's bloody hard when the chips are down and you're in the middle of a race to do that. So I really always did admire that about you. What I also admired was that it didn't matter whether you came first or last in a race. With the Western States, it was a struggle. You never shied away from the fact that today might not have been your day, and you're having a bad day, and you weren't embarrassed about that. I've had races with Pat Farmers, a classic one in the middle of the Big Red Run where I was just falling to pieces. I was going through some personal trauma at the time, and my back went out. Yeah, I was just at a bad place. And I was embarrassed because I failed at a race at that stage. I was in that mindset. Now, I look back and go 'Give yourself a break.' How do you cope with that? How do you... Like when you don't do what the fans expect you to do on that day? Dean: To me, it's your ego. Yeah, it is such an ego thing. And let's be honest, when you're a public figure, your failures are public. You don't fail in silence. You just kind of DNF and walk away and live the race another day. You DNF and people are taking pictures of you, and it's on the internet. I always got crowded. But in the end, I just... What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best. So my commitment now is like, ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' And when you go with that mindset, no matter what happens, you're doing yourself a service. Lisa: Yeah, and you're a winner. This is such a powerful message, I think, for young people listening because often, we don't even try because we don't want to risk embarrassing ourselves, and risk failure, and risk looking like an idiot. And what you're saying is just forget your ego, set that to the side, and go, 'I'm going to give it all today, and if it isn't enough, it isn't enough and that's fine. I'll learn something out of it. And it's a journey that I'm on. And I'm going to be the best I can be today.' That's such a powerful story of perspective, and resilience, and leaving the ego at the door. I did struggle with that when I was younger because I had some pretty spectacular failures, and they really hurt. They really hurt where you take a long time to sort of go, 'Do I want to do that again in the public eye?' So to speak. And you've just always just been 'If it was a good day, it was a good day, and on to the next one if it was a bad day.' Dean: Yeah, I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way. I lean into every emotion that I have. Either success or failure, sorrow or regret. All those things that happen when you have a bad race or a bad day. I want that full emotional range. It just makes you a better human, I think. Not to shy away from those deep lows where you're just crushed. I think that people that try to avoid that are really missing out. Yeah, yeah, it's painful and it hurts but it builds your character in a profound way. Lisa: Wow. That is so deep, actually. Because we're often taught push down your emotions, and keep them in a box, and be a professional, and keep going, and keep calm and carry on type thing. And it has its place as far as when you're in the middle of a race, you've got to keep your shit together, and compartmentalise stuff, and be able to function. But I think it's also very important to experience the pain, the grief, the pain, or whatever you're going through, and the happiness. It's another thing. I would get to the end of a race and it didn't matter how well I'd done, and what I've just achieved, and how difficult it was. I remember doing one in the Himalayas and a friend coming up to me afterwards and it was 220K race, extreme altitude, hell of a journey to get there, all sorts of obstacles. I get to the finish line and he's just like, 'Wow, you're amazing. It's incredible. I can't believe what you just did. If I hadn't seen it, I wouldn't have believed it.' And I just went, 'Oh no. Someone else was faster, and there's a longer race.' You know what I mean? And I didn't integrate it. And he just went, 'Oh, for crying out loud. Can't you just take this one to the bank and actually bank it as being a success and a huge win?' And I really took that to heart. And now, I pat myself on the back when I do even a little thing good because it reinforces that neural pathway in my brain that tells me, 'This was great because I just got a little reward' rather than, 'You're never good enough.' Because that was what I was telling myself before. No matter what I did, it wasn't enough. And now, flip that script around to go, 'Hey, you managed to do your shoelaces and get to the end of the road today. Well, done.' And it's the thought of it. Dean: It is, completely. My son said something to me that was along that same vein during the Western States. I said, ‘Nicholas…' This is maybe a mile 60 or 70 of a hundred-mile run. I said, 'My race is crap. I'm not having a good race.' And he looked at me, said, 'Dad, you're running a hundred miles. To most people, that's enough.' And I put it in perspective. That although I'm with all these super elite athletes, you're not doing that... To most people that hear about anyone running a hundred miles, they don't care if you came in first or last. A hundred miles? They don't care if my time was 15 hours or 50 hours. They're just so inspired. Yeah, blown away by it. Yeah. Lisa: Exactly, And I think that puts it because when we hang out... Because you are the sum total of the people that you hang out with, the top five, as the saying goes. And that can have negative connotations as well as positive. It can be the fact that you think if you're hanging out with the five top guys in the world, then you are going to be not looking too good. But if you're hanging out with just the average person, and you're doing something this long and this incredible, for most people, that's just like, 'Huh? Humans can do that?' I did a speaking engagement yesterday in Auckland and the people were like, 'But that's humanly impossible.' I go, 'It actually isn't, and there's actually thousands of us that do the stuff.' And then, they're like, 'What? I don't get it.' Dean: That was it. That was the same reaction I had when I heard about someone running a hundred mile like that. They're, 'Oh, there's trickery.' I thought there's trickery. I thought there's hotels, or just campgrounds, or something. The guy said, 'The gun goes off and you just run, and you stop when you cross the finish line.' I couldn't wrap my head around it. Lisa: Until you did it. Dean: Until you did it. Exactly, yeah. Lisa: And you built yourself up to it, and this is the thing. It's a combination of so much and it's that journey isn't it? So I think what we're talking about is it being this incredible life journey that you go on within an ultramarathon and within the training of our ultramarathon. It's like living an entire life in short. You're going through the highs, and the lows, and everything in between. And it's long, and it's hard, and it's awesome, and it's amazing, and you meet incredible people. It's everything that you go through in life but just on an intensive timescale, I feel like. And it's just a beautiful experience to go through, especially with the value of hindsight. Sometimes, in the middle of it, mile 70 of a hundred-mile race, it's not looking too flash. Dean: Well, but I mean, to that point, when we reflect back on moments that we remember, at least me, it's not the victories. It's not the crossing the finish line first to me. It's always that time where I thought, 'I'm done. This is it. I can't get out of this chair. I'm trashed.' And somehow getting through that really, really tough moment and carrying on. That's what sticks with you. It's pretty weird, at least with me. Those are the moments that reflect back on my career. It's those horrible moments that I somehow persisted. Lisa: When you look back, you're proud of yourself and you know that when... One of the biggest values, and I've seen this with my story with Mum and, unfortunately, recently with my dad, is that when the shit hits the fan, like it did in those two situations, I knew that I could step up to do everything within my power and that I was a fighter. I knew that I was a fighter, and then I knew that I would fight to the bitter end, whatever the outcome was. And that's a really good thing to know about yourself. Because you need to know that when things are down, what character do you have? Who are you when all the niceties of our world have gone? What are you capable of? And you learn to be able to function when everyone else is gone. And that's a really powerful lesson that ultramarathoning teaches you, I think, in decades of the sort of hard work. And that's why athletes, I think... When you're employing athletes or you going into business with other athletes, you're more likely to have someone who's willing to fight through the tough times than if you just get someone who hasn't ever experienced any sort of discomfort in their life. Then they're not liable to be able to push through and be as resilient. I think that's what I'm trying to say. Dean: I agree with you completely. And I often wonder if people have those character, those values, and that's what draws them to ultra running or if ultrarunning instils those values. I remember coming home from a run one time, and my neighbour was fetching up the morning paper. He saw me running back to my house and I'd, I don't know, I'd run 30 or 40 kilometres, and he said to me, 'Doesn't running hurt?' And I said to him, 'It doesn't if you're doing it right.' And he looked at me, 'I do everything to avoid difficult things.' And I'm like, ‘And I embrace it.' It's just a different mindset. Lisa: And if you have the mindset of wanting to always avoid all sorts of pain in life, then you're not going to experience very much. And when you're in a tough situation, you won't be able to cope because you won't have experienced any sort of pain. So the more that you had to struggle, the more strength you develop from that. The old proverb: 'Strength comes from struggle' is valid in all walks of life. So unfortunately, this is the way the world is set up. If you seek comfort all the time, you're actually going to be in deeper shit somewhere along the way and not able to help yourself because you haven't learned to fight, and you haven't learned to push through and to deal with a certain level of discomfort and a certain level of pain. And I think that's a really, really valuable thing to do. Every day, I try to experience some sort of discomfort or pain: whether it's cold, whether it's pushing myself mentally, intellectually, whether it's pushing myself physically, doing some intense extreme exercise, or whatever the case may be. Every day, I try to do something that it scares the shit out of me or pushes me in some way because then, I know that I haven't gone backwards that day. I've probably learned something, and gone forward, and I've strengthened my body and my mind in some sort of way, shape, or form. Dean: Yeah, but I think you're an exception. I think most people just try to take the path of least resistance and avoid difficult things and avoid pain. I think we've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable. Lisa: Exactly. That's exactly the problem. Because by actually experiencing a little bit of pain, by doing your push-ups, going for your run, doing your pull-ups, whatever the case is, being outside and digging the garden and doing stuff that is a bit unpleasant, it actually makes your body stronger, and it makes you mentally stronger. If we all sit on the couch and watch Netflix all day every day and eat chips, what's going to happen to us? We're going to destroy our health. We're going to just be so... And this is... I think I'm scared for the younger generation, that they haven't actually... We grew up. We're roughly the same age. You're a couple years older. I grew up in the 70's where we were outside, doing something all day, every day. We came in at night time for a feed and went to bed. That was our childhood, and that was just a beautiful way to grow up. We were cold. We were hungry. We were tired. We were happy. Dean: We were playing, right? We were exercising. I remember riding my bike just everywhere. I never thought of it as exercise. It was playing. Kids don't play that way anymore, unfortunately. Lisa: It's a scary thing for them because we need to teach them. Because again, it goes back to sort of respecting our ancient DNA and that's what I think... That's another thing that ultramarathoning does, or even trekking, or adventuring in any sort of way, shape, or form. It's that we've come from stock that used to have to build their own houses, cut down their own trees, chase animals, whatever the case was, just to survive. And then, we now have it all laid on for us. We're in lovely houses. We've got light all day or night. We've got food every street corner. And our ancient DNA isn't just set up for that. This is where all the problems come. We could go on a complete rant, which I often do on this podcast. But coming back to your story in your Runner's High, what do you think now looking back at this incredibly long and prolific career and this incredible journey that you've been on so far, and I do think that you still got miles and miles to go. What are some of the biggest lessons that you've learned along the way on the thirty-odd year journey that you've been? What are the biggest takeaways from ultramarathon running? Dean: I think that it's the little moments that are the most priceless. It's not the moments where... I write about meeting with First Lady Michelle Obama. Yeah, that was great. It was amazing, and incredible, and everything else, but it's the little moments of having a moment with a crew member or your family that you just you reflect on and laugh about. So it's those things to me that are most priceless. The other thing with ultramarathoning that I've certainly learned is that it's a journey. To me, it's a passion and it's something I've committed my life to. And staying true to the person you are, there's value in that. Even though it's just running, Lisa. It's nothing hugely intellectual. I'm not winning Nobel prizes. I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that. Lisa: Oh, absolutely. You know what you're born to do. You say it's only running but actually, you're a teacher; you're an author; you're a person who empowers others. You're doing all of that in the framework of running. So you do a heck of a lot more than just running for me. You've influenced an entire generation worldwide. I hope you know. Without you, ultramarathon running would not be where it is today. So I think you know a little bit more than just running yourself. This is the power of books, and this is the power of storytelling. And it's the power of having such a unique character that is so charismatic and draws people in. And those are all the things that you've managed to take. You could have just been a silent runner who just did his thing and went away again, but you've chosen to share your journey with the world. And that's just gold because that just gives people an insight into what they can do. It's all about... when I read your books, I'm getting something for me. And everybody who's reading those books, that's actually, 'Yes, we talk. We're hearing Dean's story.' But we're actually going, 'Huh. Maybe I could do that. Maybe I could try that. Oh, yeah I've experienced that.' This is the conversation that are going on in people's heads when they read those stories, and that's why they have such an intimate connection with you. And why, even though it's weird when people come up and ask you for an autograph or any of that, they feel like they know you, and they do know you. Dean: I've got a message from a guy. Yeah, I know. Every time I think, 'Wow, this is really laborious, writing these books. And maybe it's my last book.' I got a message from a guy a couple days ago and he said, 'I was planning on reading a couple chapters of your new book before I went to bed.' And he said five hours later, 'I finished the last page.' And then, he said, 'And then I got up. I just had to go running.' Wow. Then the book worked if it motivated him to read the whole thing in one sitting and get up and go running, then it's worthwhile. Lisa: Absolutely. And you know when you read, I read books ferociously, and the list is long. I'm usually reading about 10 books at a time. And when I'm reading, I am distilling the world's top people and their entire experience, I get to absorb within the space of 10, 15 hours of reading their book. That's a good return on investment. If I want to download someone's experience, or knowledge, or whatever the case is, then reading books is just such a powerful way to do it and listening to podcasts as well. Because that's another way that you can do it without having to... You can be out and about, driving, or running, or whatever and absorbing some new information. And I think we're just so lucky to have access to all of this. It's just incredible. Dean: It is and it's a pity if you don't take advantage of that because you're so wise and educated. That conversation we had before the podcast, it's amazing how... It's amazing. Your knowledge base and how you developed your knowledge base. Well, you've absorbed the best of the best and what they're thinking and the research they've done. Lisa: Exactly. All you're doing is you're absorbing it from the best scientists, the best doctors, the best athletes, the best executives, the best business people, and then, you get to share it, teach it. This is the other thing. If I learn something in the morning, I'm teaching it in the afternoon. Usually it's to my poor husband or my mother. I'm teaching it and then, I often build into my programs, or it comes out in my webinars, or whatever. And you're basically just regurgitating stuff that you've learned, but it's powerful when you put it into the perspective of your experience and you change it. You learn it, you teach it. You learn it, you teach it. And that's a such a cool way to share, and get that information out there into the world, and actually help the world on your little corner of the earth and what you're doing. And that's what I love to do and that's the power of what your books are all about. So yeah, I commiserate with you. Getting a book out is a bloody long, hard journey. People don't realise how hard it is to write a book. Give me a bloody hundred miler any day over writing a book. In fact, give me ten hundred milers over any day because it's such a long process, isn't it? Dean: Well, I do a lot of my writing while I'm running actually. So I dictate into my phone now. Because we have some of our clearest thoughts while we're running. Before, I used to think, 'God, why didn't I write that down? How did that go again?' Now, I just dictate as I'm running and then come home, put in an earbud, and just type up my notes. Lisa: I haven't done variations of that. I do end up stopping on my runs and just writing a quick note. I haven't actually dictated. I have to start adapting that because maybe that'll make it easy because you're damn right. When I'm actually at the computer, there's distractions. There's a hundred windows open; there's notifications coming all the time, and I really find it hard to sit down and write. It is sometimes best if you could just dictate into something, so I'll have to give that a crack next time. Dean: I think motion stirs emotion. Lisa: Yeah, it does and it clears the mind. That's one thing I miss now that I'm not doing the ultras, personally, at the moment. It's that singularity of purpose. That cleanness the mind had before of this one goal. And I'm watching my husband's preparing for a hundred miler in November. And just watching everything in his whole day, and he has the luxury of doing this because we haven't got kids and stuff, but everything in his whole day is centred around his training and getting to that hundr

WAS.MEDIA
Amundsen vs. Scott. What killed the British polar expedition?

WAS.MEDIA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 9:49


In 1909, the South Pole remained the last major geographic trophy to be won. Captain Robert Scott, who led the British expedition, was not going to rush: he developed a three-year program that involved extensive scientific research and systematic preparations for the trip to the Pole. He had no idea how much the Norwegians would interfere with his plans. In this episode of ‘How It Was,' we'll tell you about one of the most dramatic confrontations in the history of geographical discoveries - the rivalry between the British and Norwegians for the title of the first conquerors of the South Pole. Who coped better with the task: strong and hardy Norwegians, dressed in animal furs, or British scientists, equipped with the latest science supplies? What mistakes can cost lives in Antarctica, and how can a literary gift turn defeat into victory? These are the topics explored in our new episode.

Bulletproof Radio
Moving Through Fear's Allure to Find Inner Peace – Akshay Nanavati : 871

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 74:37


WE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS. CHECK THEM OUT!Measure Brain Function: Learn more and get a special discounted package at https://wavimed.com/, use code DAVESleep Better on Natural Memory Foam: https://myessentia.com, use code DAVE25 to get 25% off any mattressNon-Tobacco Nicotine Alternative: https://lucy.co, use code DAVE20 to get 20% off your first order of pouches, gums, or lozengesIN THIS EPISODE OF THE HUMAN UPGRADE...Akshay Nanavati's story of perseverance includes overcoming drug addiction, alcoholism that pushed him to the brink of suicide, depression and PTSD from fighting in Iraq with the U.S. Marines.“That's when I fell in love with the experience of adversity and the struggle because boot camp was terrifying,” Akshay says. “Everything about [it] was terrifying but it was so alluring that I started to look for other ways to confront myself—ultimately to go to war with myself.” He believes that the path to inner peace is the pursuit of a worthy inner war. He went on to build a global business, run ultramarathons, conduct humanitarian work in post-conflict zones, and explore some of the most hostile environments on the planet—from mountains to caves to polar icecaps. “Nature became my playground to explore my fears and ultimately, systematically push through them one inch at a time.”“I craved a high I believed I could only get by living on the edge of life and death,” he says in his book, “Fearvana: The Revolutionary Science of How to Turn Fear Into Health, Wealth and Happiness.” He's also spent years extensively researching neuroscience, psychology and spirituality. He combined his life experience with that research to write “Fearvana” and infused it with ways to transform fear, and its counterparts stress and anxiety, into something much more positive. His Holiness the Dalai Lama wrote in the book's foreword, “Fearvana inspires us to look beyond our own agonizing experiences and find the positive side of our lives.” Akshay now teaches people how to overcome their own fears and how to tap into their brain's superpower—neuroplasticity.Sounds good, but how do you really move through stress and attain growth? First, you have to learn to disidentify with fear and suffering by remembering you are not your thoughts, feelings or experiences, Akshay explains. “You are simply the one who experiences them. Through this process it becomes so much easier to create a life of fulfillment, It's a lifelong practice and a great pathway to growth.”You can even learn to "suffer well" in the day-to-day context of your human experience.“I couldn't care less when fear shows up,” he says. “What matters to me is what I do with it once it does. I can let go of the construct I have around the fear and accept it for what it is and then choose what I want to do outside of it.”Take a listen for more tips on how to become fearless. Akshay heads to Antarctica in early November 2021. Learn more about his South Pole journey and how to follow along here. Enjoy!Got a comment, idea or question for the podcast? Submit via this form.Be sure to follow or subscribe to The Human Upgrade with Dave Asprey on your favorite podcast platform so you don't miss an episode!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bright Side
28 Men Lost In Antarctica But What They Did to Survive Is Amazing

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 13:40


Sir Ernest Shackleton, a legend among British seamen and explorers, decided to build a crew for his famous Antarctic expedition. His new daring idea for a ‘hazardous journey' gained so much attention from newspapers, that soon Sir Shackleton had a crowd of volunteers knocking at his door. He carefully selected only 27 of them. They were men of steel knowing what a huge goal they set for themselves. With those men, Ernest Shackleton intended to reach Antarctica and cross the whole continent via the South Pole. In 1914, they left the shores of South Georgia in a ship called Endurance. This journey became one of the greatest survival stories of all time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1789: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND,Arctic exploration, the complete, forty-minute interview; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:00


Photo:  THE AIRSHIP ITALIA: A MYSTERY AT THE END OF THE GOLDEN AGE OF POLAR EXPLORATION Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND,Arctic exploration, the complete, forty-minute interview; August 28, 2021 CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow   N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527  

Woman's Hour
Hillary Rodham Clinton and Louise Penny, HPV kits, Aspire to adventure

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:33


The former presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton has a new book out, “State of Terror”, a political thriller written with the award winning author Louise Penny. The two women were already friends before deciding to pen the novel which features a President who “smells of meat” and appears to resemble Donald Trump and a British Prime Minister who's “a twit” and seems to have a more than a passing resemblance to Boris Johnson. Anita Rani talks to the duo about their collaboration and some of the uncanny parallels between “State of Terror” and global politics today. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common virus – Cancer Research UK estimates around 8 out of 10 people will be infected at some point in their lives. HPV spreads through sexual activity. In most people, it doesn't cause any problems and goes away on its own, but HPV can increase a woman's chance of developing cervical cancer. Gynaecological charity The Eve Appeal have found a ‘worrying' trend in HPV kits being sold online by private companies, advertised alongside misleading information. Tracie Miles is a gynaecologist cancer specialist nurse at The Eve Appeal. Mercedes Gleeson is someone who has been open about her own experience with HPV. Anita is joined by two guests who are trying to encourage women to get outside and go on adventures. Army Officer Preet Chandi is preparing for a solo, unsupported trek across Antarctica to the South Pole in November. She will be the first Asian woman to do this. Dr Geeta Ludhra set up a walking group in the Chilterns to encourage women from diverse backgrounds to get out on smaller scale adventures in the UK to connect with nature and feel the health benefits. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Curiously Polar
141 Polar Newsreel (WALRUS FROM SPACE!)

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 66:52


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life
Episode 195 - Ghost Girl (ft. Ally Malinenko)

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 56:46


Welcome back! Unfortunately we had to take about an unexpected month off. However, we are back just in time for a very timely Halloween-themed episode featuring the wonderfully spooky author Ally Malinenko. Joe and Ally discuss her incredible novel "Ghost Girl", her upcoming book "This Appearing House", and a few other fun Halloween items.  Enjoy! About Ally Malinenko I live in Brooklyn which is good except when it's not which is horrid. I've been writing for awhile, and have some stuff published and some stuff not. I don't like when people refer to pets as their children and I can't resist a handful of Cheez-Its when offered. I have a burning desire to go to Antarctica, specifically to the South Pole so I can see where Robert Falcon Scott died. I like to read books. I write novels and poems and stories in a secret writing closet before dawn each day. Oh and I got cancer at 37. That was a bummer. Spoiler! I'm still alive. I'm represented by the amazing Rena Rossner of the Deborah Harris Agency. About Ghost Girl Zee Puckett loves ghost stories. She just never expected to be living one. It all starts with a dark and stormy night. When the skies clear, everything is different. People are missing. There's a creepy new principal who seems to know everyone's darkest dreams. And Zee is seeing frightening things: large, scary dogs that talk and maybe even . . . a ghost. When she tells her classmates, only her best friend, Elijah, believes her. Worse, mean girl Nellie gives Zee a cruel nickname: Ghost Girl. But whatever the storm washed up isn't going away. Everyone's most selfish wishes start coming true in creepy ways. To fight for what's right, Zee will have to embrace what makes her different and what makes her Ghost Girl. And all three of them — Zee, Elijah, and Nellie — will have to work together if they want to give their ghost story a happy ending. To quickly and easily leave a rating/review for this podcast please go to:  https://ratethispodcast.com/dtalkspodcast Thanks to Snuffy for this episode of the podcast! Snuffy is a clothing brand about empowering you to show your weird - unapologetically, with bravery and confidence. 10% of profit goes to LGBTQ+ organizations led by Trans* people of color. Shop online now at snuffy.co Also, thanks to Empire Toys for this episode of the podcast! Nostalgia is something everyone loves and Empire Toys in Keller Texas is on nostalgia overload.   With toys and action figures from the 70's, 80's, 90's, and today, Empire Toys is a one-stop-shop for a trip down memory lane and a chance to reclaim what was once yours (but likely sold at a garage sale)   Check out Empire Toys on Facebook, Instagram, or at TheEmpireToys.com The DTALKS Podcast has also been ranked #9 in the "Top 40 Detox Podcast You Must Follow in 2020" according to Feedspot.com for our work in the Cultural Detox space. Thank you so much to the Feedspot team!  https://blog.feedspot.com/detox_podcasts/

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 4 - Jason Is Broken

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:21


We discuss how much of a beast Jason's dog Bogey is becoming, why Jason's broken brain is going to result in him getting abs, and another round of Are You Smarter Than Jason Dick. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiously Polar
140 Polar Explorers, pt. 3: The Real Most Interesting Man In The World

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 80:24


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Innovation Now
Kicking Up Some Dust

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Artemis astronauts are bound to kick up a little dust as they explore the Moon's South Pole.

Salish Wolf
#46 Paula Reid on Adventure Psychology, Human Capacity, and the Power of Choice

Salish Wolf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 83:57


Paula Reid is a courageous adventurer who is forging a career in applying Positive Psychology to help other adventurers and leaders optimize their performance. As someone who has experienced extremes of skiing to the South Pole with a debilitating leg injury, paddling the Mekong in a dugout canoe, and yacht racing around the world for ten months, she is no stranger to adversity and how it can impact outcomes. In this episode Paula shares many exciting stories of her global exploits, including getting arrested in Cambodia and narrowly escaping war in West Papua. She takes us inside the mind of the adventurer to better understand how adversities can plague the psyche and quickly turn a quest for triumph into a battle to merely survive. And we also talk about the post-adventure blues that can haunt people when they return to the world of routine. The believed limits of human capacity is often challenged and expanded in times of our greatest duress. With a Master's in Applied Positive Psychology, Paula has dubbed the term Adventure Psychology to help people thrive during change, challenge, and uncertainty. Through exploring the extremes, Paula has learned so much about herself and her own capacity and is able to translate that into assisting leaders of all sorts, from athletes to CEOs, in their own expansion. Please enjoy this episode of Salish Wolf with Paula Reid. Episode Links: PaulaReid.com Anchor Point Links: Men's Retreats at Anchor Point Expeditions Men's Group at Anchor Point Expeditions

No Blackout Dates
S2, Ep. 3: Living on the Bottom of the World

No Blackout Dates

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 48:51


Captain Kirk had it all wrong. The final frontier is, in fact, Antarctica -- a place explored far less than space, at least in our imaginations and fiction television programming. Today's guest is here to shine a bit of light on the furthest away place you could go while still being based “here on earth.” Joe Horneman is a Physicians' Assistant stationed on the South Pole. As one of just two medical staff at his camp of scientists, chefs, and service workers, Joe is one of the three dozen most remote people in the entire world. He's been enlightening the rest of us on his adventures via TikTok and YouTube, and at first sight of his viral content, we knew we had to get him on the show to explain how things work down there.Joe answers all your questions about Antarctica, including what the social and dating scene is like there, what the hell he does for the 23.5 hours per day when he's not treating a patient, and whether or not we should even be there in the first place. Joe also notes that your dreams of Antarctic domination could totally come true. Due to the complete lack of defense and the presence of only one doctor, laying siege to the continent would actually be a piece of cake -- as long as you're not deterred by sub-zero temps, complete darkness, howling winds, hidden glacier crevasses, and scurvy.In Hot Takes, the boys get deep on buffet etiquette. On tap is the proper way to layer your buffet plate, and Eben's lack of self-control ensures that chaos prevails when he goes through the line. Also, Tim confirms that the mall -- and the nostalgia of 90's teenage culture that it represents -- is officially dead.News of the Day gets deep this week: This rich investor plans travel using a spreadsheet of his friends' income TSA finds raw chicken circling on baggage claim carousel BONUS: Guinness is opening a new taproom in Chicago in time for St. Patrick's Day 2023 Relevant links: The ultimate guide for planning an epic trip to Antarctica How to get to Antarctica even if you're completely broke Joe's YouTube channel Joe's TikTok Joe's Instagram TSA Instagram Grand Junction Mall Tim's Instagram Eben's Instagram No Blackout Dates Back Catalog

Curiously Polar
139 From Earth to Space and Back Again

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 45:30


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Indagare Global Conversations
Alison Levine, Leadership expert, polar explorer and mountaineer: Climb Every Mountain

Indagare Global Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 49:12


How do you work through your greatest fears so you can make it to the top of the mountain (and not let your failures define you)?  Melissa Biggs Bradley talks with mountaineer Alison Levine about the incredible places she's been, completing the adventurer's grand slam: climbing the seven summits and skiing to both the North and South Poles; plus, life lessons learned along the way—and why going backward doesn't mean you're not making progress.

No Blackout Dates
Welcome To Season Two of No Blackout Dates!

No Blackout Dates

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 2:57


No Blackout Dates is back for Season 2! We've partnered with Matador Network to take the cause of irreverent and unfiltered travel talk to heights not seen your last international flight. Tune in every Tuesday morning beginning October 5 for guests including an OnlyFans star turned travel tv host, the outspoken hosts of the web's preeminent dating podcast, a Physician's Assistant living on the South Pole, and a cadre of other booming personalities from across the weird world of travel. The insight is big, and the Hot Takes are, well, as revealing as Tim and Eben's deepest thoughts allow them to get. We'll see you right here next Tuesday!

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
A Landing Site Chosen for NASA's New VIPER Lunar Rover

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 28:18


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 110*A landing site chosen for NASA's new VIPER lunar roverNASA has selected the western edge of Nobile Crater at the Moon's South Pole as the landing site for its Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover or VIPER mission slated to launch in 2023.*Was Mars too small to retain waterNew research suggests a fundamental reason Mars has no water may be that it's just too small to hold onto large amounts of water.*New binary white dwarf system discoveredAstronomers have discovered a double white dwarf system located some 368 light years away.*Taikonauts return home after 90 days on China's new space stationThree Chinese taikonauts have returned safely to Earth after completing the country's longest-ever manned space mission.*The Science ReportA new study suggests that if you've already had COVID-19, it's still worth getting the vaccine.A new study shows the parents of kids with autism have less symmetrical faces than average.A quarter of Italian alpine plant species are threatened by glacier retreat.Understanding the health secrets of curcumin.Alex on Tech: Apple has finally released their new IOS-15 operating system.Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.For more SpaceTime visit https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com (mobile friendly). For enhanced Show Notes including photos to accompany this episode: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/blog/ RSS feed: https://rss.acast.com/spacetime Email: mailto:SpaceTime@bitesz.comTo receive the Astronomy Daily Newsletter free, direct to your inbox...just join our mailing list at www.bitesz.com or visit https://www.bitesz.com/p/astronomy-daily/Help support SpaceTime: The SpaceTime with Stuart Gary merchandise shop. Get your T-Shirts, Coffee Cups, badges, tote bag + more and help support the show. Check out the range: http://www.cafepress.com/spacetime Thank you. Plus: As a part of the SpaceTime family, you can get a free audiobook of your choice, plus 30 days free access from audible.com. Just visit www.audibletrial.com/spacetime or click on the banner link at www.spacetimewithstuartgary.comEmail: SpaceTime@bitesz.comhttps://bitesz.com

Aspen Ideas to Go
Conquering Fear Everywhere, from the Office to Everest

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 45:04


John Hagel, author of The Journey Beyond Fear, says there's increasing fear and uncertainty in the world and it's not just from the pandemic. Competition for jobs, mounting performance pressure, and a rapidly accelerating pace of change are escalating fears, especially in the workplace. But fear exists in other places — far-flung locales few people visit. Alison Levine is a polar explorer who made history when she skied nearly 600 miles from west Antarctica to the South Pole. She and Hagel talk about how to move beyond fear whether you're running a business, building a career, raising a family, going to school, or braving extreme environments. They speak with Aspen Ideas to Go producer Marci Krivonen.

The John Batchelor Show
1718: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND, the complete, forty-minute interview, Arctic exploration; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 41:00


Photo:  MARIA, PASSING THE DIAMONDS Image extracted from page 25 of  A Narrative of the Cruise of the Yacht Maria among the Feroe Islands in the Summer of 1854  N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1716: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND, the complete, forty-minute interview, Arctic exploration; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 41:00


Photo:  Polar bears on the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean, near the North Pole. USS Honolulu pictured.  Photo by Chief Yeoman Alphonso Braggs, US-Navy. N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527  

I Am A Champion
Champion Breakdown - Grant Korgan Adapative Athlete (SPI) & Adventurer

I Am A Champion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:08


We break apart our 60 minute interview with Grant and give you his top Tips in just 8 minutes.Grant Korgan might not be one of the typical champions we have on… with the gold medals and the accolades in the Olympics. But what he does in his life pushing his body and mind and choosing to be unlimited is really WHY we bring you the stories of champions.  He teaches people to overcome adversity and choose positivity in their everyday lives. It is human to fall down. The magic happens when we get back up. After sustaining a spinal cord injury that left him paralyzed from the waist down, world-class adventurer, nanoscientist, and professional athlete, Grant Korgan – who had never shied away from a challenge – refused to balk at his new reality because he still had a mission in store.With Belief and persistence,  Grant build and recovered and trained to become the first spinal cord-injured athlete in history to ski 80 miles to Antarctica's South Pole, setting world records kayaking around the circumference of Lake Tahoe, returning to the sports he loves, and pioneering new sports that he now shares with others in the adaptive athlete community.Find  & Connect with Grant IGhttps://www.instagram.com/grantkorgan/You Tubehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDH-udGiceKesK8suKhXZzQhttp://grantkorgan.com/The Push Teaserhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTmiGQhp2gI Watch The Pushhttps://www.amazon.com/Push-Grant-Korgan/dp/B09B3DB6XZ/ref=tmm_aiv_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1632363493&sr=8-2Ted Talkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7PFNti1ZYoThe Book: Two Feet Backhttps://www.amazon.com/Two-Feet-Back-Grant-Korgan/dp/0984915494/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=grant+korgan&qid=1632363447&sr=8-3Let's connect!To get more info and updates on the podcast @iamachampionpodcastIGhttps://instagram.com/iamachampionpodcast?utm_medium=copy_linkTikTokhttps://vm.tiktok.com/ZMd4o13PS/Follow our personal instagram accounts@doctor.aprilmhttps://instagram.com/doctor.aprilm?utm_medium=copy_link@ro_glowhttps://instagram.com/doctor.aprilm?utm_medium=copy_linkCheck out our youtube channel for videos and highlights from the episodes @iamachampionhttps://m.youtube.com/channel/UCdQxNDW9CIoosIlmes562jAShow Support:If you enjoy this podcast please Rate, Review, Subscribe and SHARE this outhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/i-am-a-champion/id1574745683Big shout out to our team that makes this show possible!If you are looking to start your own podcast hit up @upstarterpods on instagram! 

The John Batchelor Show
1711: Lunar Lander VIPER for the South Pole. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 7:55


Photo:  VIPER (Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover) is a planned robotic lunar rover by NASA, that will be tasked to prospect for natural lunar resources, especially water ice within a permanently shadowed region near the lunar south pole. The VIPER mission is part of the Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) meant to support the crewed Ar. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Lunar Lander VIPER for the South Pole. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com HFN https://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/landing-site-chosen-for-viper-lunar-rover/

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 4/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:00


Photo:  The flying ship.              Photographic reproduction of an 18th century etching showing an airship designed by Brazilian Jesuit Bartolomeu de Gusmão. Ship has a bird's head and feathers, a boat-like body in which a man stands looking through a telescope; a flag with crest is attached to the rear of the ship. Reproduction of an 18th century book illustration. 4/4    N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  @PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 3/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 13:40


Photo:  Coastal airship Norge. 3/4    N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  @PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 2/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 11:20


Photo:  Arctic explorers preparing for the long winter - historic Cape Sabine and Baffin Bay (79 deg. N. lat.) 2/4   N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  @PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

The John Batchelor Show
1694: 1/4 N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing @PorterSqBooks. Hardcover – August 31, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:30


Photo: "Inventio fortunata. Arctic exploration. With an account of Nicholas of Lynn. Read before the American Geographical Society ... May 15th, 1880. Reprinted from the Bulletin of the Society". 1/4    N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia,  by Mark Piesing  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

China Unscripted
#132 Secret Chinese Military Bases in Antarctica? | Alex Gray

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 65:23


China has 5 bases in the Antarctic, but no one except China really knows what takes place on them. The U.S. and other countries that are supposed to be monitoring the bases have been lax about checking, and there is evidence to suggest China's doing more than just scientific research down there. Joining us on this episode of China Unscripted is Alex Gray, a senior fellow in national security affairs at the American Foreign Policy Council. He served on the U.S. National Security Council staff from 2018 to 2021, including as director for Oceania and Indo-Pacific Security. 

Against The Odds
Endurance: Surviving Antarctica | Hope | 5

Against The Odds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 46:32


In a final attempt to get his men home, Ernest Shackleton and his crew have to get through the Drake Passage, the most dangerous stretch of ocean in the world. And that's just the beginning. When they reach their goal of South Georgia island, they realize the only way to reach civilization is to cross 29 miles of impassable ice and snow on foot - something no one has ever done before. Nearly a century later, Henry Worsley and his team push themselves to complete the final 97 miles to the South Pole to finish what their relatives started.Listen early and ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/againsttheodds.Support us by supporting our sponsors! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.