Podcasts about TBI

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  • 1,106PODCASTS
  • 2,721EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about TBI

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Latest podcast episodes about TBI

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2 Dr. Skip Rizzo: Neuro-Leadership in the Metaverse

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 39:32


The Metaverse coming to everything near you...now! What if AI and VR are not only better but preferred?  Self-driving cars are already here, and it won't be long before fully autonomous vehicles take over all driving jobs. Taxi, Uber, and Truck drivers will soon be a thing of the past. Perhaps you might be thinking that your job is safe. But is it? Some professions might seem untouchable, but what if that's not true?  For instance, what if AI and VR doctors are not only better but preferred?  . Artificial Intelligence (AI) and virtual reality/the Metaverse is no longer the stuff of science fiction; they are already part of your life even if you don't recognize them. When you open your phone with face ID, that's AI. Valuable tools like Siri and Alexa are AI. Smart thermostats, Fridges, and lights are all uses of AI.  . But there's another level of depth known as the Metaverse. In the Metaverse, using VR, you and I can experience something "artificial" with all of our senses, as if it were a genuine real-world experience. But how does this impact leadership?  . Our guest is Dr. Skip Rizzo for the next two episodes. Dr. Rizzo is an internationally recognized thought leader in his field and was hailed by Polygon as one of the top 25 greatest innovators in virtual reality. Dr. Rizzo is a clinical psychologist and Director of Medical Virtual Reality at the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies. He is also a Research Professor with the USC Dept. of Psychiatry and at the USC Davis School of Gerontology.  . The volume and innovation of his work have also earned him many awards. His commitment is to revolutionize healthcare with the development of innovative VR products that have a positive impact on the field. Over the last 25 years, Skip has conducted research for designing, developing, and evaluating Virtual Reality systems. This work has focused on PTSD, TBI, Autism, ADHD, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and other clinical conditions.  . The common thread driving his work with digital technologies involves studying how interactive and immersive Virtual Reality simulations can be usefully applied to address human healthcare—taking us beyond what is possible with traditional 20th Century tools and methods. Dr. Skip Rizzo has been given the moniker of "The Godfather of Virtual Reality".   Website ICT MedVR:  http://medvr.ict.usc.edu YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/AlbertSkipRizzo New Book on Clinical VR: Virtual Reality for Psychological and Neurocognitive Interventions. https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9781493994809 Social Media https://www.facebook.com/skip.rizzo https://twitter.com/skiprizzovr https://www.linkedin.com/in/skiprizzovr https://www.instagram.com/skip_rizzo Part 1) The Emotions of Cognitive Leadership  Virtual Reality (VR) Leadership  Cognitive Vs. Limbic, which wins? The Success and Failure of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  The Need to Activate Emotions to Heal VR prescription for PTSD VR for Overcoming Fear of Public Speaking or Fear of Heights Why Avoidance Generates Avoidance . . Curious to discover how tapping into the Anatomy of Meaning can #actualize your #business, #culture, #Leadership and #tribe DovBaron.com "Those Who Control Meaning for The Tribe, Also Control The Movement of That Tribe" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – She Looks Fine, By Roberta Campbell Knechtly and Paige Knechtly

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 31:25


She Looks Fine, By Roberta Campbell Knechtly and Paige Knechtly Shelooksfinebook.com A Mother and Daughter's Journey Through a TBI Roberta was living her best life as an empty nester until she received a call that would change her life forever. Her daughter Paige was hit by a vehicle in a crosswalk. Paige, an independent young adult, became dependent on her mother again. Roberta reentered the world of caretaking. Both lacked the tools to understand what was happening. For years following the accident, their lives changed in ways they could never have imagined. Roberta thought Paige looked fine; Paige was wondering when she would feel normal again. Both didn't understand the invisible brain trauma that persisted. In She Looks Fine, Roberta and Paige openly share their journey through a TBI together, so that you can understand, accept and support your loved one even though they may look fine.

The NeuroNerds
Joe's 6-Year Stroke-iversary: It's Getting Better

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 61:10


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryIt's Joe's 6th stroke-iversary. On August 4, 2016, he suffered a major hemorrhagic stroke that changed his life forever. In this episode, Joe processes the anniversary of his stroke with his friend Mackenzie Lea, a chronic neuro illness survivor suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. After 6 years, Joe is realizing that every year feels different post-stroke. He talks with Mackenzie about how much connecting with other survivors, helps both of them cope with their deficits emotionally and physically. They also talk about Joe's vision moving forward and how he plans to support the brain injury survivor community even more deeply through his coaching programs and free resources including virtual support groups and events. What kind of virtual events do you want us to create for our community? We want to support YOU! So let us know what you need to support you through brain injury recovery. Let us know by tweeting @theneuronerds on Twitter.Links MentionedJoin our free virtual events and workshops - https://bit.ly/3BTS6BJFollow Mackenzie on Instagram - https://instagram.com/macdaddytheladyfaceCreditsNew to our show? Take our episode tour to get started! https://newsletter.theneuronerds.com/tourFind tools for recovery in Joe's FREE guide, 9 Must-Have Tools for Stroke & Brain Injury Recovery! This guide includes some essential tools for your recovery journey including tips for occupational and physical therapy, mindset, overstimulation, and more. Get your copy here → https://www.yousorock.coach/guideIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like to learn how to shift your mindset, create a routine, and get more support during recovery, book a call with Joe at https://newsletter.yousorock.coach/checkin-callSupport The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus Wesley - https://www.soundsignature.productionsSponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

PodcastDX
Caregiving for TBI

PodcastDX

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 55:03


This week we have the honor of speaking with  Brenda and Aaron Luter.  They have been married 23 years and live in St. Louis with their 2 sons, Josh and Alex.  Josh was in a motorcycle accident his freshman year of college at SIU Carbondale in April of 2021.  Alex just completed his freshman year at University of Arkansas.  Josh recently came home from the hospital in February of 2022. Josh has a severe traumatic brain injury, including several strokes.  Josh is unable to care for himself and is completely dependent on others for his daily care.  Brenda is a former substitute teacher and Aaron is a sales engineer.  If you would like to help this family in their recovery:  https://bit.ly/3SBrsn6

Heavy Lies the Helmet
Episode 95 - Busted Skulls and Myths

Heavy Lies the Helmet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 62:12 Very Popular


Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is always in the back of our mind when treating polytrauma patients. Unfortunately, the evidence has a controversial history. More and more, we are reminded of how a basic approach is much more important than other therapies that have little evidence to support their effectiveness. In fact, some may even cause harm. Tune in to a podcast where we debunk these common TBI myths. Also, this is the debut episode of Dr. Amanda Humphries-Ventura as an official HLTH team member. Get CE hours for our podcast episodes HERE! -------------------------------------------- Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavyliesthehelmet Instagram @heavyliesthehelmet Website heavyliesthehelmet.com Email contact@heavyliesthehelmet.com Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed on the Heavy Lies the Helmet podcast are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of their employers and their employees. Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any information available for listening on this platform. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform, but it is not a substitute for your local laws, medical direction, or sound judgment. --------------------------------------------  Crystals VIP by From The Dust | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

CUBIST
CUBIST S5E8: Implementation Strategies of TBI Clinical Care Guidelines

CUBIST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


In this episode of CUBIST, Amanda and Don discuss the article entitled "Review of implementation concepts and strategies surrounding traumatic brain injury clinical care guidelines," published in the Journal of Neurotrauma in December of 2021. Article Citation: Lumba-Brown, A., Prager, E. M., Harmon, N., McCrea, M. A., Bell, M. J., Ghajar, J., Pyne, S., & Cifu, D. X. (2021). A Review of Implementation Concepts and Strategies Surrounding Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Care Guidelines. Journal of neurotrauma, 38(23), 3195–3203. doi.org/10.1089/neu.2021.0067 Article LINK: pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34714147/ CUBIST is a podcast for health care providers produced by the Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence. We discuss the latest research on traumatic brain injury (TBI) most relevant to patient care. For more about TBI, including clinical tools, go to www.health.mil/TBICoE or email us at dha.ncr.j-9.mbx.tbicoe-info@mail.mil. The views, opinions, and/or findings in this podcast are those of the host and subject matter experts. They should not be construed as an official Department of Defense position, policy, or decision unless designated by other official documentation. Our theme song is “Upbeat-Corporate' by WhiteCat, available and was used according to the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 license.

DVBIC Presents: Picking Your Brain
CUBIST S5E8: Implementation Strategies of TBI Clinical Care Guidelines

DVBIC Presents: Picking Your Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:01


In this episode of CUBIST, Amanda and Don discuss the article entitled "Review of implementation concepts and strategies surrounding traumatic brain injury clinical care guidelines," published in the Journal of Neurotrauma in December of 2021. Article Citation: Lumba-Brown, A., Prager, E. M., Harmon, N., McCrea, M. A., Bell, M. J., Ghajar, J., Pyne, S., & Cifu, D. X. (2021). A Review of Implementation Concepts and Strategies Surrounding Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Care Guidelines. Journal of neurotrauma, 38(23), 3195–3203. https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2021.0067 Article LINK: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34714147/ CUBIST is a podcast for health care providers produced by the Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence. We discuss the latest research on traumatic brain injury (TBI) most relevant to patient care. For more about TBI, including clinical tools, go to www.health.mil/TBICoE or email us at dha.ncr.j-9.mbx.tbicoe-info@mail.mil. The views, opinions, and/or findings in this podcast are those of the host and subject matter experts. They should not be construed as an official Department of Defense position, policy, or decision unless designated by other official documentation. Our theme song is “Upbeat-Corporate' by WhiteCat, available and was used according to the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 license.

Brass & Unity
#119 - Dr. Michelle Eisenmann

Brass & Unity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:04


Dr Eisenmann is one of two incredible humans who is healing and helping people recover from TBI's at the Resiliency Brain Health Clinic. Dr. Michelle Eisenmann attended Parker University where she earned her Doctorate degree in Chiropractic, her masters degree in clinical neurology and fellowship. @thebrainfluencer @resiliency_brain_health Watch on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3opNURn - - - - - - - - - - - - SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS Good F*cking Design Advice - 10% off with code UNITY - www.gfda.co Combat Flip Flops - 25% off with code UNITY - https://combatflipflops.com Brass & Unity - 20% off with code UNITY - http://brassandunity.com Daisy May Hats Co - 15% off with code BRASS - https://daisymayhats.com Mid-Day Squares - 15% off with code KELSIE15 - https://www.middaysquares.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - SHOP B&U Jewelry & Eyewear: https://brassandunity.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - Follow #brassandunity - - - - - - - - - - - - - CHARITY Honour House - https://www.honourhouse.ca Vet Solutions - https://vetsolutions.org Heroic Hearts - https://www.heroicheartsproject.org Warrior Angels Foundation - https://warriorangelsfoundation.org All Secure Foundation - http://allsecurefoundation.org Defenders of Freedom - http://defendersoffreedom.us The Boot Campaign - https://bootcampaign.org

Team VTAC with Kyle Lamb
EP 117 Matt Lambdin

Team VTAC with Kyle Lamb

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 98:57


Stopped by to see Jennifer Lambdin in her RV on the prairie and her husband happened to be there too. Matt Lambdin, 10th Special Forces Group Warrant Officer and owner of 18SeriesBags.com . Had to have this crazy Canuck on the show so we could get a tax break, seriously I went into his very private struggles with TBI. Listen and learn, then go to 18seriesbags.com and buy something to help this old WO out. Sucking in propane fumes and unfiltered poop particles, so amazing, smells like victory or Iraq. God Bless America and those who leave Canada to come to America!!!!

Physiotutors Podcast
Episode 043: Patient's Perspective: Traumatic Brain Injury with Curtis Anderson

Physiotutors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 42:35


This months guest is Curtis Anderson, a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivor for a new area we're looking to dive deeper into on the podcast – the patient's perspective. We talk to Curtis about his 20 year journey and how he defied what was initially thought possible for the full extent of his rehab. After 3 weeks in a medically induced coma he spent a year in a rehabilitation center and he has since gone on a journey to be a motivational speaker helping other get through their own journeys as the prime example of what can happen when you don't give up, even after 20 years, when you are determined to treat every day as an opportunity to do better, be better and perform better. In his own words, it took him 8 years to learn to drive again, 8 years to use a staircase with the railing on the left side, 10 years to be able to pick up change from the counter top & 16 years to pick it up off of the ground! He's an inspiration and the personification of never giving up and I hope you enjoy hearing about his journey as much as I have!

The NeuroNerds
Baking and Brain Injury Recovery with Cynthia Dyke

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 56:21


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryHaving a positive attitude post-brain injury is key to recovery. In this episode Joe is chatting with a Cynthia Dyke, a TBI survivor with infectious positivity. They talk about the importance of wearing seatbelts to prevent brain injury in an accident and dealing with bad bedside man from doctors. They also touch on connecting with the community and the gift of a second chance to live life to the fullest after brain injury. How do you live life to the fullest and appreciate each day? Share with us on by tagging @theneuronerds on TwitterLinks MentionedFollow Cynthia on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/cynthia0rawr/Follow Cynthia's baking on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sunshine_cakes.baking/ CreditsNew to our show? Take our episode tour to get started! https://newsletter.theneuronerds.com/tourFind tools for recovery in Joe's FREE guide, 9 Must-Have Tools for Stroke & Brain Injury Recovery! This guide includes some essential tools for your recovery journey including tips for occupational and physical therapy, mindset, overstimulation, and more. Get your copy here → https://www.yousorock.coach/guideIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like to learn how to shift your mindset, create a routine, and get more support during recovery, book a call with Joe at https://newsletter.yousorock.coach/checkin-callSupport The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus Wesley - https://www.soundsignature.productionsSponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

Ever Forward Radio
EFR 624: Boost Brain Performance, Get More REM Sleep, Increase Longevity, Decrease Inflammation, and Key Supplementation for Brain Health with Louisa Nicola

Ever Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 76:05


Louisa Nicola is a neurophysiologist, brain coach to elite athletes, and Founder of Neuro Athletics, a full-service neuroscience diagnostic testing company.  Back in episode #436, Louisa Nicola gave us an introduction to the brain and nervous system, setting the foundation for us to understand how neuroscience can help us get more out of life. This week, Louisa is back to dive deeper into the science behind brain performance.  In this discussion, Chase and Louisa talk about the three domains of peak brain performance: nutrition, physical exercise, and neurophysiology. Louisa breaks down how to utilize nutrients, exercise, and sleep, so you can better optimize your brain health. The pair also talk about keeping the blood-brain barrier strong, the benefits of using exogenous ketones, and why you need to be more mindful of maintaining your dopamine levels.  Plus… Can our brain cells regenerate or are the connections just getting stronger? Stick around until the end to hear Louisa's shocking answer!   Follow Louisa Nicola @louisanicola_ Learn more about NeuroAthletics Follow Chase on Instagram @chase_chewning Follow him on Twitter @chasechewning   Key Highlights Sleep: “Sleep is probably the most underrated high performance tool we have,” Louisa says. If you're an athlete who doesn't get enough quality sleep, it affects almost every aspect of your performance and increases risk for injury. Louisa goes on to describe the impacts of sleep on brain health, brain disorders, and brain aging. Nutrition: “When it comes to the brain, there are certain things that the brain favors, especially as it relates to nutrition and supplementation,” Louisa says. Listen in to learn how stress, inflammation, and supplementation of key nutrients, like EPA and DHA, can play a role in longevity and cognitive performance. Plus, Louisa explains the benefits of going on a high fat diet immediately after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion). Hydration is a key indicator of brain functioning. If we are 2% dehydrated, we can have a decrease in our cognitive performance by 30%. Exercise: “You can grow the gray matter of your brain by physical activity alone,” Louisa says. She then recaps various research studies that show the relationship between exercise, particularly resistance training, and cognitive performance as well as how exercise can prevent Alzheimer's disease. Your brain loves quality time with other humans, loving relationships, social interactions, and of course, self-love.  How will you know these practices are actually improving your brain health? Tune in to find out!   Episode resources: Save 20% on your wellness and telemedicine needs with code EVERFORWARD at https://www.WildHealth.com  Save 15% on Mello magnesium superfood drink mix with code EVERFORWARD at https://wwwHelloNed.com/everforward  Watch this video on YouTube https://youtu.be/Jk7VpS9jooM EFR #436: Neuroscience That Will Help You Perform Better, Think Faster, and Live Longer with Louisa Nicola EFR #612: Dr. Gabrielle Lyon on Plant Protein Versus Animal Protein and How to Prevent Disease and Promote Longevity Using Muscle Centric Medicine Listen to The Neuro Experience episode with Layne Norton, PhD  FITLIGHT 

Diapers and Deployments | SkillMil Podcast

Today we give you another organization helping veterans and first responders with PTS through equine therapy. We have on the show Patrick Benson, Co-Founder and Director of War Horses For Veterans. Through exceptional horsemanship, War Horses for Veterans provides combat veterans and first responders the tools for growth personally and professionally. The combat veterans come from all over the country. The new First Responders division serves the local Kansas City departments. The goal at WHFV is to help veterans and first responders who experienced life-disrupting trauma to recover from their limitations, to repurpose their talents and abilities to a successful life, and to reintegrate into their families, workplaces, and communities. Through working with horses, their tailored coaching approach provides tools and techniques that translate personally and professionally. No horsemanship experience needed! You'll learn how to interact and engage with horses from foundational sills to advanced riding. You work side by side with the team and see how every day chores can renew ones purpose and calm the mind. You will practice self care, focusing on the mind-body connection through culinary wellness, meditation and physical mobility work. www.warhorsesforveterans.org

Faces of TBI
The Miracle Child: Traumatic Brain Injury and Me w/ Mike and Kelly Lang

Faces of TBI

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 37:00


Kelly Lang, co-author of The Miracle Child: Traumatic Brain Injury and Me is a brain injury survivor and caregiver to her daughter who sustained a traumatic brain injury in 2001. Kelly is a member of the Brain Injury Association of America's Advisory Council, serves on the Virginia Brain Injury Advisory Council, is co-leader of The TBI Advisory and Leadership Group, and former faculty member of the National Center for Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems (NCAPPS) Brain Injury Learning Collaborative. Kelly has presented at several conferences and webinars including the Administration for Community Living Stakeholder Day, association conferences, universities, and many others. Michael Lang is a vice president of a national association and his work includes written and published articles, guides, and manuals in the fields of transportation and the chemical industry. Michael is a featured speaker and presenter in various associations and organizations in the areas of environment, health, safety, security, and sustainability. He also serves on the board of a financial institution. Michael and Kelly live with their daughters, Olivia and Anya in Northern Virginia, while their eldest daughter Hannah also lives in the metropolitan area. www.themiraclechild.org   Brought to you by Integrated Brain Centers Please consider supporting the podcast with a $5 Patreon membership.

The NeuroNerds
Wear A Helmet & Prevent TBIs with Christa Moritz

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 53:36


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryIn this episode, Joe is chatting with TBI survivor Christa Moritz. She shares her experience of sustaining a traumatic brain injury from a bicycle accident. They talk about the importance of protecting the brain from trauma by taking safety measures like wearing a helmet while riding a bike. Plus, Christa is a dancer so she loves everything about expressing herself through body movement so she shares how she is structuring her recovery goals around her love of self-expression through dance.Links MentionedFollow Christa on Instagram - https://instagram.com/thelillewritz CreditsNew to our show? Take our episode tour to get started! https://newsletter.theneuronerds.com/tourIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like to learn how to shift your mindset, create a routine and get more support during recovery, go to http://www.yousorock.coach/Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus Wesley - https://www.soundsignature.productionsSponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #87: Tailored LPA interventions for dementias: A Conversation with Becky Khayum

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 44:00


Welcome to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I'm Jerry Hoepner, a faculty member in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire. Today, I'm joined by Becky Khayum.  Biosketch: Becky is a speech-language pathologist and specializes in providing person-centered care for people living with different dementia syndromes. Over the past 15 years, she has held leadership positions in rehabilitation centers, assisted living communities, memory care communities and home health environments. In 2009, Becky co-founded MemoryCare Corporation, a therapy company specializing in providing care for families coping with dementia. Becky currently serves as the President of MemoryCare. In 2020, she co-founded Cognitive Concierge, which provides digital services and programs for people living with cognitive challenges. She has been involved in research initiatives in Primary Progressive Aphasia at the Northwestern Mesulam Center for Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer's Disease. Becky speaks nationally to train healthcare providers and families on how to creatively apply the life participation approach for people living with dementia. Take aways: Learn about applications of the LPAA framework to individuals with dementias, including primary progressive aphasia (PPA).  Learn about tools you can use to implement LPAA interventions with individuals with Alzheimer's disease and PPA.  Learn about several key authors/researchers/clinicians in the areas of dementia interventions that should serve as starting points for learning about person-centered care in dementias.  Learn how to frame person-centered, LPAA goals for persons with dementias, including PPA.  Learn how to document so that LPAA interventions are reimbursable for Medicare and other insurance providers.  Interview Transcript:  Jerry Hoepner: Hi Becky so glad to have you with me today and really looking forward to this conversation. Becky Khayum: Well, thanks for having me Jerry I'm looking forward as well to our discussion. Jerry Hoepner: You know, I was mentioning to our listeners that if they weren't familiar with your work, they really need to explore your work, because there's just so many important connections about the life participation approach applied to individuals with progressive diseases like dementias and so forth. We know that, at least in the Aphasia Access circles you're well known for your person-centered life participation approach for individuals with dementia, including the individuals with primary progressive aphasia. Can you share just a little bit about how you got connected with Aphasia Access and the life participation approach? Becky Khayum: So, so I'm sure others have the same story, but I was going about my ordinary day and I get a call from Audrey Holland and she's so excited and says there is this summit, and you have to go and begins to tell me all about it, and you know, of course, said Aphasia Access you know this is new and I had you know, the summit is new and I had actually hadn't heard of Aphasia Access at that point, which was surprising considering I tried to you know base my clinical work on person centered care and I was so sad because I actually couldn't make of the first [Aphasia Access Leadership] Summit but of course, I went to the Aphasia Access website at that point and signed up, and it was startling and I was so delighted because, “Oh, my goodness, everything that I am trying to think about as the clinician and train other you know speech language pathologist on is completely captured and this one group with so many leaders in our field,” so that is how I first got connected. Jerry Hoepner: Oh that's fantastic I didn't know that story but I kind of figured that was one of the connections, I know that I had spoken to Audrey I don't know if it was that the first or the second Aphasia Access Leadership Summit and she just spoke so she raved about you and the great work that you were doing and was just so excited that you were a part of the organization so that's fantastic and like you said a lot of people have that connection. So it was fabulous that a few weeks back to have a conversation with her again on a podcast and recognize her lifetime of just brilliant work so she's been a mentor and an encourager for so many of us so fantastic. Becky Khayum: Absolutely 100% yep. Jerry Hoepner: Well, you found a perfect fit and a perfect home in Aphasia Access and I, as someone who loves working with individuals with aphasia my passion is really with people with cognitive disorders, with traumatic brain injuries and so forth, as well, and I just think the life participation approach has so many applications that are much broader than aphasia and certainly we're excited to talk with you today about those applications as they're made to individuals with dementia and including your work on primary progressive aphasia as well. Becky Khayum: sure. Jerry Hoepner: Absolutely you you've done some great interdisciplinary work with a team of professionals about dementias I'm really interested, I have been reading your work on the care D model and just want to get your thoughts on the relevance of that model to dementia care and maybe talk us through some of the different types of dementia syndromes and their typical symptoms and the way that they present themselves I guess. Becky Khayum: Sorry, Sir absolutely so I'm during my you know collaboration in research at the Northwest Western Mesulaum Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's disease, I had some amazing mentors there who developed this care pathway model: Darby Morhardt, you know Sandy Weintraub, Dr. Mesulaum, and Emily Rogalski. Really learned everything there that from them that I now know about the different types of dementia syndromes you know, and so they developed the care pathway model, you know for people living with dementia and really the model highlights that there are different types of dementia syndromes with very specific symptoms depending on where that neurodegenerative disease starts in the brain and it was really trying to promote awareness that you know Alzheimer's dementia, with the memory loss isn't the only type of dementia syndrome and therefore there really needs to be tailored care and interventions for the different types of dementia syndromes and really, how do you adapt those interventions over time. How, you know just that huge need for psychosocial you know, support and so anyways that's the basis for the care pathway model so they you know in that paper they describe. Some of the different dimension syndromes that have very distinct symptoms, so of course we know you know Alzheimer's dementia, with the hallmark you know deficit of that short term episodic memory loss that you first see but then, you know you may have language reading and writing symptoms that first appear and get worse over time and, as in primary progressive aphasia. Another example would be for those neurodegenerative diseases that more cause deficits in behavior and personality changes, as in the behavioral variant of frontal temporal dementia and then also another syndrome, that I don't think is as well known, is where the neurodegenerative disease starts in the occipital lobes so you have you know vision difficulties that's caused by you know cortical deficit and so that is posterior cortical atrophy so you know this, the care pathway model then describes and I know we'll talk about more of this podcast. Okay, how do you can tailor the interventions given those different types of symptoms right? Jerry Hoepner: Right and that's a big part of that that care model right that tailoring not only to the type of dementia, but to the individual that you're working with, and as I read the article I think the word tailor comes up about 100 times. Becky Khayum: Absolutely right and that's such a good point it's not just to the symptoms. It is to that actual individual and the way their symptoms impact their daily life so completely corresponding with the LIFE participation approach yeah. Jerry Hoepner: Absolutely, well that's actually a really good lead into my next question. We have a lot of information out there about the LIFE participation approach for aphasia but are there differences in the way that an LP might apply the LIFE participation approach for people living with a progressive condition. Becky Khayum: Sure, absolutely you know, so I think in terms of how you might evaluate and write goals for someone with a progressive condition. The overall philosophy, with the LIFE participation approach you know, in my experience that doesn't change too much you know you're really doing that motivational interview you're learning. How their whether it's aphasia or memory loss or behavior you know behavioral changes. How was that preventing them from participating in the activities and conversations, they want to participate in, so I feel like that that part isn't you know. Really distinctly different. What is different? One thing is in terms of how people develop these symptoms, over time, so it's obviously for many people very gradual. That their first noticing the symptoms and then they're getting worse over time, so they do have the ability to already developed some different compensatory strategies that they find or helpful too. Their care partners also find that are helpful to manage some of these symptoms so compared to having a stroke, where it's just suddenly everything it has changed so that's important to consider as you're forming your goals, but what goes along with, that is, the risk of social withdrawal, so you know it's kind of the opposite usually have someone with a stroke, you know, we have all this social withdrawal and in the beginning, but then as they're going. Through the rehabilitation process and then long term the goal is to reintegrate them, you know into the Community with those social interactions with different dimensions syndromes it's quite the opposite, you know at first there perhaps staying pretty connected and then, as things get worse. Then we're starting to see that withdrawal So how do we help to prevent that? Um I think another difference in terms of therapy is that you really need to anticipate that they are going to progress in their symptoms. And how do we anticipate those future needs, so we may or you know actually need to introduce strategies, especially compensatory strategies? Before they're actually needed and then also knowing over time that we have to be realistic in the goals that we're setting and knowing. That you know, increasing care partners support, increasing the use of visual aids and whatnot those will likely be needed for them to meet that life participation goal. The goal should not be getting them more independent, it should be understanding that they're going to need some more support so Those are some of the key differences, I think, with a progressive condition. Jerry Hoepner: And I think that makes sense, and I know you talk a lot in your work, about the importance of counseling and education, as you know, to let people know not just the individual with dementia, or whatever the progressive condition is, but their partners that are care partners as well. Becky Khayum: Right absolutely. Jerry Hoepner: You know, as you as you think about those differences and I, like the way that you said from your standpoint it's not a whole lot different, right? I know that you've written a little bit about the focus on debilitation versus rehabilitation and I'm thinking about how that might apply more broadly to even stroke-based aphasia right. So, I know Michelle Bourgeois writes about the flip the rehab model, and it seems like a lot of those principles of you know, focusing on the positives and keeping people engaged are really pretty shared I don't know if you have thoughts about that. Becky Khayum: I know, and certainly with the flip the rehab model, you know, Dr. Bourgeois has been my mentor you know I remember first attending one of her talks at ASA and of course Audrey had already told me, you know you need to connect with Michelle and I was just so energized you know and it completely changed the way that I thought about assessment in terms of really yes flipping that around and how that goes right along with the from you know live participation model because we're having more of a client directed assessment and goal formation, rather than yeah the clinician doing that yeah absolutely. Jerry Hoepner: Well you're really natural with transitions between questions because I was just gonna talk to a little bit about goal setting, I know that you've written about this in a couple of really nice papers and one of the things I value about them is that they are so practical and so easy to digest for everyday clinicians and all of us, to be honest and you wrote a paper in 2015 with me Emily Rogalski and then he wrote another in 2015 with Rachel Wynn and talked a lot about goals for individuals with dementia or primary progressive aphasia from an LPAA standpoint and just really interested in your suggestions and thoughts about that goal writing process. Becky Khayum: Oh, absolutely and I, we certainly already touched upon this and the last question where you know I tell us if you aren't using a person-centered kind of the flip the rehab model assessment. Overly for anyone with any type of cognitive deficit, but particularly for those living with dementia syndrome. If you're not doing the right type of assessment then you're not going to be able to formulate the right types of life participation goals. So, certainly, I think, in some graduate training and externship you know, say, a fly training I think some clinicians are very used to having to give a standardized test and a score and certainly that's where Dr. Bourgeois really says well that should come last you know really develop. You know, what are their needs? What are their goals? and then investigate what specific impairments. Auditory comprehension memory loss might be impacting their ability to meet those goals. So, the first you know suggestion is it's that purpose product mismatch if you're diagnosing someone that's great you know use your impairment, a standardized test, but you will not be able to form a life participation goal.  If you're using an impairment based standardized tests and then the other barrier, I think that we've talked about recently on an Aphasia Access panel on documentation. Was the electronic health record systems are designed for it and impairment based goal writing? I mean you just click, click, click. Okay, they have aphasia well great here's generative naming you know and whatnot if they have memory loss will are they oriented, and so it leads clinicians to automatically form and pyramid vehicles so that's where we'll talk, maybe. Later in the podcast about how can you secure reimbursement, you know for people living with a progressive condition, but as far as goal writing you know. Certainly, again very similar to anyone with TBI or stroke and just aphasia what are their goals, how did they want to increase participation in life activities? Writing out those goals with them, and a lot of times I use, who are the people you want to talk with you know, following a from where are the environments that you want to talk with people. Or that you can't participate in because of your memory loss, because your behavioral or visual deficits. And then, what are you know what specific topics or activities, you know, do you want to talk about our participate in so.  Really, I use those prompts to help write the goals and then the only real difference than is making sure that the level of care partners support and the accuracy and the use of aids and supports that it's realistic that we're not trying to say 90% accurate in Japan it so that would be the biggest tip about goal writing you gotta be realistic, especially over time. Jerry Hoepner: Absolutely, and I appreciate carrying that through that idea of the flip the rehab model into the goal writing in I know you're a big proponent of motivational interviewing as am I, and one of the things that William Miller always says is don't ever do an impairment based assessment on your first interaction with someone and that's what we in so many times that's what people do right they begin with that and it's like. The biggest killer of relationship build building that you could you know, and when you're trying to find out what does this person want and need to do and what kinds of things will help support that yeah so beginning with those questions as a better place, then. Becky Khayum: Yes, for sure Jerry Hoepner: yeah absolutely. So, how would you apply the life participation approach for someone living in long term care with behavioral challenges things like that? Becky Khayum: Certainly, yeah and I think that's a tough one, you know, and certainly one where you absolutely need collaboration with occupational therapists, social workers, counselors you know that are also involved in the individuals care and certainly also you, it is sometimes difficult to directly in you know intervene with the person, you know, in terms of this is an intro you know intervention that directly changes the person in their behaviors. It's really more we're changing the environment around them and we're educating staff members in more you know memory care communities or Assisted Living and family members to provide the environmental supports and communication strategies visual supports and certainly that's difficult, you know. Dr. Natalie Douglas, as you know, done a lot of research on caregiver support in long term care. And so that's certainly another topic, but yeah for someone with behavioral challenges in terms of utilizing the life participation approach I think Jennifer Brush. You know just another lady, you know expert in long term care, using the Montessori approach um she always says, you know a lot of times whether it's Alzheimer's dementia or behavioral difficulties. People have a lack of a role, you know, and in some you know you have to get to the root of what's causing the behavioral challenges but oftentimes they don't feel like they have a role anymore, and a purpose in life, so I always like to start there and then also certainly do the environmental assessments, working with OT. Really training family members and staff members keep a behavior log you know let's actually see what the triggers might be so we can better think about interventions. But then again holistically will what sorts of activities and passions did they have prior to coming to the long term care community, and how can we figure out a way to modify that activity and if we allow them to participate in that? And you know, certainly, we often will see a reduction and those behaviors we don't need pharmacological management, which is so often what you know places do and just a quick example of that you know one. I met a professor, who had just been moved to a memory care community separated from his wife and was just so confused about why he was there, and you know incredibly respected expert in in so many different areas, people and so he was hitting you know people at the front desk asking to call his wife, you know every five minutes. And so, when I came in, you know they said always an artist we've been trying to get them involved in art activities and whatnot but he doesn't want to. Um so talking with the family, you know, I was able to quickly learn know people address them is Dr., you know, a professor, first of all, second of all he realizes how his art isn't the same and the quality of what he used to do so, he doesn't want to participate in that he loves to teach. That's what he wants to do. And so we were able to create a PowerPoint with him on topics art and travel that he loved to talk about, and you know he had memory loss. Actually, Alzheimer's dementia with behavioral you know challenges related to this lack of a role and we had signs, you know that Professor so and so is our guest lecturer today, we had a letter inviting him to be the guest lecturer at the community and then he gave his lecture I think three days a week, and so it didn't completely solve all of the challenges that came up but it drastically reduced you know his behavioral challenges, because we use that light participation approach for him. Jerry Hoepner: I love that story for a few reasons, one that you know they identified that he was an artist, but that he went beyond that recognizing that. That was even a challenge for him, because it was not the same art that he was able to produce before and just reengaging him in a meaningful way giving him purpose and that, like you said that role. That's the LIFE participation approach in terms of engaging in something meaningful and scaffolding, the environment and the people around him so that could be accomplished yeah that's fantastic. Becky Khayum: Yes, absolutely. Jerry Hoepner: Terrific, I'm so glad you mentioned Jennifer Brushes name, too, because she and Natalie Douglas because they've contributed so much to that context. Becky Khayum: I learned so much from them. Jerry Hoepner: Absolutely yeah, yeah. Okay um so I know that one of the common things that comes up in discussions and Aphasia Access panels and when we're talking about return to group kinds of context is how a person with primary progressive aphasia might best participate in and aphasia Center and or a group over time, as we know that you know symptoms are going to continue to worsen and more cognitive challenges arise, and what are your thoughts on that and how to make that work. Becky Khayum: Yes, that that is certainly a tricky, tricky topic, you know, and again I think one that probably doesn't have one answer. Becky Khayum: In every person may be different, you know just talking about tailored approaches it's likely going to be the case in this situation. On the first question, you know will, should they should they participate in groups or centers that are predominantly made up of people living with stroke and aphasia. Knowing that they're going to get worse over time for some people, the psychological impact of that watching themselves get worse, you know, during the groups, you know people with PPA. Most tend to be very cognizant you know of their deficits of their predicament and so psychologically, how are they doing? And I've worked with some people who they don't they don't, mind you know they they're just so happy to be talking with other people who have aphasia and that social interaction is so meaningful to them that they don't really think too much about the fact that maybe they're getting a little you know worse over time, but that's different you know, certainly for everyone, others, you know, certainly will get very anxious. I think, from the beginning it's good to have a good relationship with their family members as well, and just having that talk, you know from the get go, you know we just want to be open with you, this is a group that's predominantly people living, you know with stroke and just aphasia. Just knowing with PPA you know conversation can get a little more challenging over time, it might be, you know emotionally difficult for them. If we ever find that we think that they're not enjoying the group or it's challenging for them, they don't seem to be getting. The social interaction out of it that they need, and maybe documenting that you know and kind of a systematic way over time being open with the family and saying we just don't think they're getting out of this, the meaning that they did before, but the critical thing is to have other programs or groups to refer them to so it's because that's the meaning that's behind the groups who want to continue that role for them, and so that's where, if you have a local aphasia center, day programs, or whatnot that may hopefully have activities and whatnot that are stimulating and then certainly with coven I think the number of virtual groups for just people living with PPA has really grown, I found and so it's allowed people to participate in an efficient group and I certainly in the ones that I lead, I found a broad range of people with different abilities and those who have more difficulties you know their care partners help jump in so you know those certainly there's no one answer to that, but those are just some. And lastly, I guess, I forgot to mention we're so great at thinking of different types of compensatory strategies and so certainly before. Making that decision, you know that Okay, they just can't participate in the group anymore trialing a lot of different interventions, you know that we might use with someone who has memory loss or whatnot I'm trying those first before we decide that maybe they're not the best fit. Jerry Hoepner: Right so as long as it's working keep going with it is what I'm hearing you say, but when that no longer becomes a viable option looking for other options, where they can participate, and where they have the scaffolding and support to do that. Becky Khayum: Yes, that's usually what I would typically recommend for this situation yeah. Jerry Hoepner: And one thing I'm thinking about the people with primary progressive aphasia that are tend to our groups here and also our aphasia camp that connection that's established for the care partners becomes really a close bond to so thinking about what the next step is for them, maybe. Becky Khayum: that's you know that's such a good point. In the other in the PPA chats that I run a lot of them, we have a whole separate breakout room just for care partners and yeah, there doesn't even need to be a facilitator in that room, I mean they I've been told, over and over again, the benefit that they get from just having a chance to connect with other care partners and I'm so glad you brought that up because I do think for them meeting with care partners of people who had stroke induced aphasia would probably not, and this is just me again my personal opinion, I don't think it would be very helpful because a lot of the discussion is about the fear as things get worse, not knowing what's down the road and then for those who are further down the road what they've learned what they've tried and sharing information about that so I'm so glad you brought that point up about care partner support yeah. Jerry Hoepner: yeah equally as important as those connections for the person with primary progressive aphasia for sure. I mean, what are the common threads that we've been talking about in this conversation, you know, are the things that you're engaging people with our real-life meaningful engagement figuring out creatively how to accomplish that, like the exam the example you gave of the teacher and so forth. I'm wondering if you can walk us through an example of applying life participation to someone with living with Alzheimer's dementia and how that might be a little bit different for someone who, at least initially starts with more of a language focus and PPA. Becky Khayum: Sorry sure yeah so again, you know with Alzheimer's dementia now we're thinking about with that memory loss the short-term memory loss. How, you know again we're going to identify an activity that's important to them so just give me one example of a woman who really love birdwatching and that was something that she said over and over again, you know I am would repetitively asked her spouse, you know. I want to go look at the birds because it's been something that they've done for a long time, but just forgetting that they've already just earlier in the day, maybe gone and seen the birds, you know and not knowing whether they're going to go do that next and then having difficulty telling others about the experience, because she didn't remember what they saw what verse she saw and whatnot. So, thinking about you know really documenting from her perspective, what she wants to do and it's mainly you know would love to see the birds would love to share that with others. And then from the communication partner standpoint, just as important, was interviewing them about what is their experience what are their frustrations, you know, and for them, it was these repetitive questions all the time figuring out how to talk about you know, allowing her to talk about birdwatching with other people, so they aren't dominating that whole conversation, you know that she can remember with you know with supports and do that herself. So, really, in that case it's again, you see a lot of Dr bourgeoise work, you know it versus thinking about Okay, how do we use visual aids to help her come up with more of a routine and schedule and the answers to her repetitive questions in a memory station and a memory wallet you know so in the hall, and we created a little memory station, you know with the dry eraser, it clearly has the dates and when they're you know going birdwatching that day, where if they're going in the backyard if they're going somewhere, but then, also in that memory station really having collecting pictures and experiences to put in a memory book also I love the bird watching walks where you can just stated, and put Okay, these are the birds, I saw today, this is where they were. And then being able to use those visual aids to communicate with others. Certainly, care partner, helping to take videos and pictures, you know so they can scroll through the phone and show others and then Lastly, you know for people who are more impaired, you know and would benefit from simple bird Montessori activities, you know, and so it might be bird matching and they have so many on Amazon, like so many neat bird large picture books and Bingo and matching cards and whatnot so really kind of maybe sorting feathers or whatnot you know there's so many different activities, you could do with birds and showing them videos online pretending like you're going bird watching online they have all these virtual bird feeders now, so I think again it's thinking about here's the memory loss here is what they and their care partner once for the school and then, using the appropriate supports and carrot partner training to get there. Jerry Hoepner: yeah, that's fantastic I, you know as you were talking through that I was just kind of anticipating thinking. You know, in some of the papers that you've written you talk about the use of photo stream and how easy, that is to flip through post photos, but that is just the kind of the antidote to you know the behavioral challenges that come about when someone isn't engaged in something meaningful. And in these are ways and you have such creative and practical ways to accomplish that like you said as a person is progressing, to be able to use the video resources that are out there to keep that person engaged. The same videos that I have my cat watch right? that's right same kind of thing like a rare bird at my birth feeder today, so that one occasionally, yeah I mean I just think that's so powerful and such a such a stark contrast to an approach, where you do decontextualize things that you know I  said I would get this in there at some point, you know the “throw out the memory books” paper that you wrote for the ASHA Leader and I just think as a mantra that's a pretty good mantra right throughout that. Becky Khayum: Throw out the workbooks. Jerry Hoepner: Excuse me that's what I meant, “throw out the workbooks” because right meaningful engagement is what's going to change that. So, I really just you know appreciate your perspective on that and I do encourage our readers to go to those resources that will have linked to the show notes. There are a couple of articles that really have some good, practical suggestions for exactly that kind of stuff so I'm excited for people to check that out. So, you said you wanted to return to this topic, a little bit earlier and I think I got off track, but is LPAA treatment for people with dementia reimbursed by Medicare and other insurances and, if so, how do you document that so that, how do you document status for someone who has a progressive disorder. Becky Khayum: Sure, sure, and I think this is one of the biggest barriers, you know in across the rehab settings you know whether it's outpatient or home health or in a sub-acute you know rehabilitation facility is the way the productivity, you know expectations, you know some places, you don't get paid for an evaluation, you know some in sub-acute care whatnot and so or it's you know, compared to the treatment portion they you know want you to do a very, very quick evaluation and then more focus on the treatment. And so, really, you have to think about how to get around some of these restrictions, you have to do a standardized tests, you only have this long to do the evaluation okay well how do we get around this you know so I think the first thought is that dispelling some myths, you know Medicare doesn't require a standardized test that's a myth most companies require that but they really don't they're looking for more what's in all the electronic health record systems and narrative so there's a whole section for a narrative where you can write that motivational interview what you discovered what their goals are where they're at right now and then. There, instead of using this standard, you know goals that they have that you just click you can create your own kind of gold bank with more LPAA  goals just done a template and just copy and paste those. So, if you had a bird watching you know goal, you could easily then insert okay gardening you know instead or cooking into that and so there is a way to cut and paste goals meaningful goals into the electronic health, you know evaluation. And if you then make those realistic goals and can show progress because you're not going to be able to show progress for that long you know for someone with PPA. Okay generative naming, you know I always say you know you're working on generative naming with animals well unless they're a veterinarian or a zookeeper. You know that that may, they may not make the most progress on that goal and that may not generalize to other contexts. Rather, if you're working on words related to birdwatching and they love that you know you can then document improvement, you know with script training and whatnot. So, I getting off topic, but you know so that's how you would write the goals you can show the progress on a standardized impairment based test, if you think about it, if someone with a progressive dementia just got the same score over time, that would actually indicate improvement because they should be getting worse over time. So, and certainly using more functional tests, like the CADL (Communication Activities of Daily Living), you know, like the ALA (Assessment for Living with Aphasia) also go a long way, you have to use a test, you have to use self-test go to those you know more functionally based test um so that the answer is absolutely Medicare other insurances. Certainly, some you know united signal, or some of those you do have to get preapproval or whatnot that that can be more challenging but Medicare, BlueCross, and many of those it's all about your documentation and knowing how to write that narrative and use that goal bank of functional goals, so, in short, yes. Absolutely, you can get reimbursement. Jerry Hoepner: So that I mean it all comes back to those goals and like I said before, you've got a couple of really good resources on goals and, as you were talking It made me think of the addition that you have on your goals in order to do whatever right that is having that in mind, is connecting the LPAA to the goal right that in order to do what I do whatever happens. Becky Khayum: yeah, yeah exactly what, if you have a goal and it doesn't have that at the end you know, in order to participate in conversations about what birdwatching you know leisure activities, exactly is that helps it to directly target that life participation activity yeah. Jerry Hoepner: It comes down to just documenting that right and knowing that you're not bound to any of those other specific impairment-based measures yeah agreed. Well Becky, this has been a fabulous conversation, and I hope we get to have more conversations, but just to close things out today you've talked about some really strong influences and mentors like Michelle Bourgeois and influences of Jennifer Brush and obviously Audrey and Natalie Douglas but are there any kind of go to resources that you want to let our listeners know would be a good place to start if they're thinking about LPAA with progressive conditions. Becky Khayum: yeah, no. That's such a good question and you know off the top of my head certainly any articles, you know that any of the people that you just mentioned. Their articles just contain a wealth of information, you know about everything that we've talked about today, but much more you know and examples of therapy. You know Ellen Hickey as well, has published a lot I also forgot to mention earlier, I think the counseling component, you know to Audrey's counseling book. Counseling for people with a progressive diagnosis is also very different than someone who may be getting better over time so having that training and counseling is also critical so any resources on counseling. Certainly, just knowing for people who come to you, and they may be, or just diagnosed with a dementia syndrome. Being aware of where accurate information is because, when they get onto the web they're doing a Google search they're joining a Facebook group for PPA, they're getting all their information from other care partners, perhaps are people living with PPA and so um yeah we recently, I've done, you know surveys and one of the top ones is Oh, you know is we want one place where we can go or at least a list of accurate places, so you know going to giving them the links to Alzheimer's disease centers like Northwestern where you know, on their website that's accurate information I think those are also go to resources in terms of disease education for families and at the same time providing counseling and helping to explain their diagnosis and in an aphasia friendly way that's also a problem you know that I see come up quite a bit yeah. Jerry Hoepner: yeah, that's a really fantastic point in a in a great way to round things out anything else that we missed or you want to add just before we close things out today. Becky Khayum: Right. No Jerry, I think you've been very comprehensive, you know in in the range of topics we talked about today and yeah I mean my last thoughts would be, you know any speech language pathologist or other health professional you know, listening to this podcast today now hopefully learned a little bit about taking this beautiful model, you know LPAA and how it is so transferable to different types of dementia syndromes and it's certainly with knowing that especially with Alzheimer's dementia, the prevalence is only getting higher every year of people living with these progressive conditions it's critical that our field really steps up and says we can treat help work with these individuals we're trying and then provide that the interventions that are based upon LPAA philosophy. So yes, thank you for having me. Jerry Hoepner: Wonderful, it's been really my pleasure just a fun conversation, again, I look forward to catching up with you at other conferences and so forth, so thank you again Becky and we'll close things out for today. Becky Khayum: sounds great Jerry thanks so much. Jerry Hoepner: On behalf of Aphasia Access, thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. If you have an idea for a future podcast series or topic, email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access. Articles & Resources: Rogalski, E. J., & Khayum, B. (2018, July). A life participation approach to primary progressive aphasia intervention. In Seminars in speech and language (Vol. 39, No. 03, pp. 284-296). Thieme Medical Publishers. Morhardt, D., Weintraub, S., Khayum, B., Robinson, J., Medina, J., O'Hara, M., ... & Rogalski, E. J. (2015). The CARE pathway model for dementia: psychosocial and rehabilitative strategies for care in young-onset dementias. Psychiatric Clinics, 38(2), 333-352. Rogalski, E. J., Saxon, M., McKenna, H., Wieneke, C., Rademaker, A., Corden, M. E., ... & Khayum, B. (2016). Communication Bridge: A pilot feasibility study of Internet-based speech–language therapy for individuals with progressive aphasia. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, 2(4), 213-221. Rogalski, E., Roberts, A., Salley, E., Saxon, M., Fought, A., Esparza, M., ... & Rademaker, A. (2022). Communication Partner Engagement: A Relevant Factor for Functional Outcomes in Speech–Language Therapy for Aphasic Dementia. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, 77(6), 1017-1025. Wynn, R., & Khayum, B. (2015, August). Developing personally relevant goals for people with moderate to severe dementia. In Seminars in Speech and Language (Vol. 36, No. 03, pp. 199-208). Thieme Medical Publishers. Khayum, B., & Rogalski, E. (2018). Toss the Workbooks! Choose treatment strategies for clients with dementia that address their specific life-participation goals. The ASHA Leader, 23(4), 40-42.

Evidence To Excellence: News In Neuroplasticity and Rehab
Episode 11: Collaborative Approach to Orthotic Management with Nikki Warner, MPT, Seth Cochrill, CO and Tiffany Crowe

Evidence To Excellence: News In Neuroplasticity and Rehab

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 32:19


Listen in to learn more about a collaborative team approach to orthotic management for individuals with locomotion and mobility challenges. Our host, Polly Swingle, discusses the importance of proper evaluation, prescription, and implementation of orthotics for individuals with neurological conditions and is joined by a panel who know all about this! Orthotist Seth Cochrill, CO, Physical Therapist Nikki Warner, MPT and Tiffany Crowe, a brain cancer survivor living with hemiplegia, all sit down with Polly to discuss the impact of a collaborative approach to orthotics.Nikki Warner is a graduate of the class of 2000 University of Michigan-Flint Master's of Physical Therapy program. She has dedicated her career to  neuro field for the last 22 years. Her specialties include working with populations such as amputees, TBI, CVA, SCI and PD. She has been an expert trainer for Mobility Research's LiteGait for the last 16 years. She is currently the Lead PT for residential and community-based rehab program at The Recovery Project.Seth is a Certified Orthotist with Wright & Filippis providing care for patients from the Madison Heights location.   He began his career in the Orthotic & Prosthetic Field in 2006 as an assistant at Wright & Filippis RIM office. Seth attended Northwestern University receiving a certificate in Orthotics. He enjoys working with children and also people with neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Seth values relationships with patients, therapists, and physicians to achieve a team approach for orthotic care. This team approach allows for successful outcomes and patients able to achieve personal goals.     Tiffany Crowe is a 16 year survivor of brain cancer after being diagnosed when she was a senior in high school. Since her diagnosis, Tiffany has undergone twelve brain surgeries, which resulted in left hemiplegia with limited mobility in her left arm and leg. She has a great deal of experience with physical and occupational therapy, and with the use of various orthotics to help improve her functional mobility and safety. Tiffany shares her story and experiences to help shed light on what it's like for those living with disabilities, and how important a team approach is to her overall care.  Show Notes: The Recovery Project: www.therecoveryproject.net @recoveryproject www.facebook.com/TheRecoveryProjectLLC/Wright & Filippis:  www.firsttoserve.com  or call 1.800.482.0222Trend-Able:https://www.trend-able.com@trend.able 

Veterans Corner Radio
Mental health care for Veterans at no cost and not dependent on discharge status.

Veterans Corner Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 16:59


Emory Health Care Veterans Program treats conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), military sexual trauma (MST), anxiety, and depression related to military service. Treatment is free and confidential for eligible post-9/11 veterans and service members living anywhere in the United States regardless of discharge status, deployment history, or length of service. Both our traditional outpatient treatment as well as our two-week Intensive Outpatient Program are offered in person at our clinic or via telehealth in eligible states. 

Portable Practical Pediatrics
Dr. M's SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 28

Portable Practical Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 22:37


Concussions: otherwise known as TBI or traumatic brain injury Concussion is an injury that is a trauma to the head where the skull stops rapidly and the inner brain gets rotationally or linearly moved beyond its normal confines leading to microscopic nerve injury and subsequent inflammation. The traumatic process occurs suddenly and can have unconsciousness as a consequence. Whether the patient is unconscious or not for a period of time, a full work up is necessary to understand the gravity of the injury and the subsequent therapy. This week we go deep into the pathophysiology of the head injury and Omega 3 fatty acids. Enjoy, Dr. M

Monarch Human Performance Podcast
Dr Shawn Eagle (University of Pittsburgh): Traumatic Brain Injury

Monarch Human Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 42:36


Shawn R. Eagle, PhD, joined the faculty of the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh in January of 2022 as a Research Assistant Professor. Dr. Eagle has collaborated on Department of Defense (DoD) funded research through the University of Pittsburgh since 2013. He began focusing on TBI in 2015 when he began his doctoral studies at the University of Pittsburgh's Neuromuscular Research Laboratory. Dr. Eagle extended his studies as a postdoctoral fellow in the UPMC Sports Medicine Concussion Clinic from 2019 to 2021. His research interests are currently focused on mitigating risk for long-term sequelae following traumatic brain injury, with a specific focus on mental health issues. Dr. Eagle has published over 80 papers in refereed journals and presented his research at local, national and international scientific conferences. In this episode Shawn talks about: Where is research into TBI came from. How research is impacting TBI rehab. Key biomarkers in TBI patients for long-term health. Mental health in TBI patients. Resources discussed Advice for a young investigator by Santiago Research paper: Exploration of Race and Ethnicity, Sex, Sport-Related Concussion, Depression History, and Suicide Attempts in US Youth You can follow Shawn through social media at: Twitter: @shawn_eagle LinkedIn: Shawn Eagle Website: www.neurosurgery.pitt.edu/people/shawn-eagle Research Gate: Shawn Eagle Or you can contact Shawn directly via email - eaglesr2@upmc.edu

Money Making Conversations
Full Episode: Diverse methods of improving Mental Health. Daniel Carcillo | Schellie Fanfan

Money Making Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 57:04


Mental health is something that's often swept under the rug. But it's important to talk about it and understand how it can affect our lives. In this episode, Schellie Fanfan, and I discuss the effects of childhood trauma on mental health, stress management, and offer some tips for overcoming negativity. Also, Daniel Carcillo, former NHL player and Stanley Cup Champion, opens up about his struggles with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how psychedelics have helped him heal. In a raw and emotional interview, Carcillo discusses how psycho-assisted therapy using psychedelics has changed his life for the better. He introduces the motivation behind founding Wesana, his biotechnology company Wesana Health.Topics CoveredOvercoming life obstaclesCounteracting emotional disturbancesConflict resolutionStress managementSymptom management (anxiety, depression, fear, self esteem, trauma)Daniel's journey leaving the NHL and his own personal struggle as a survivor of TBI (traumatic brain injury)Daniel's path to psychedelic-assisted therapy and his ultimate success with the treatment Founding Wesana (including the vision behind the company, the years of research that went into it–– as well as the pioneering work that the company is now doing in the mental health care space)His work as an advocate for others afflicted by TBIThe future of psychedelic-assisted therapy in treating traumatic brain injuries and mental illnesses More on Shellie Fan FanSchellie Fanfan is a Haitian American female, born in Manhattan and raised in Queens Village, New York. She is the daughter of two strong parents who raised her with the values of honesty, ambition, kindness, family first and spiritual centeredness. Her father is a retired attorney and registered record administrator while her mother is a fashion designer and seamstress. She is the youngest of two daughters and a member of an extremely large extended family. Ms. Fanfan is the proud mother of Etana (18 years of age) and Philippe (16 years of age). She has earned a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from the University of Central Florida in addition to two Master's degrees from Florida State University in Mental Health Counseling and Human Services and Systems. Ms. Fanfan is a Florida State Licensed Mental Health Counselor since March of 2005. She is currently the Chief Executive Officer of Harmony Mental Health and Behavioral Services which in an outpatient interdisciplinary agency for children, adolescents and adults. Schellie is also the founder and sole owner of Ask Schellie Consulting, LLC where she consults with individuals, businesses, ministries and organizations to maximize performance and productivity. She is an ordained Minister who uses spiritual and psychological evidenced based interventions to transform lives, businesses and organizations.More on Daniel CarcilloDaniel Carcillo is founder and Chief Executive Officer of Wesana Health, a biotechnology company focused on developing the novel therapies of tomorrow and delivering new care paradigms today. A well-known speaker and advocate on behalf of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) survivors and people dealing with mental health challenges, Mr. Carcillo spent nearly a decade researching different treatment regimens and consulting experts to find effective care for his mental health conditions. In 2019, Mr. Carcillo founded Wesana, bringing together leaders in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries to move forward his vision to deliver novel pharmaceuticals that help optimize treatment outcomes for patients with mental health disorders.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The NeuroNerds
Dancing Through Recovery Morena Fornaciari

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 67:10


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryIn this episode, Joe is chatting with Morena Fornaciari, a stroke survivor from Brazil. Morena is all about positivity and they talk about how important it is to keep an optimistic mindset throughout the ups and downs of recovery. She shares her journey of going from learning to walk again to dancing again! Her ability to utilize dance and her love of applying makeup as a means of physical and occupational therapy is a true inspiration. What are some passions you have and use to help with your brain injury recovery? Please share on our socials!Links MentionedFollow Morena on Instagram - https://instagram.com/derepenteavcFollow Morena on Tiktok - https://www.tiktok.com/t/ZTRh7efmoCreditsNew to our show? Take our episode tour to get started! https://newsletter.theneuronerds.com/tourIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like to learn how to shift your mindset, create a routine and get more support during recovery, go to http://www.yousorock.coach/Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus Wesley - https://www.soundsignature.productionsSponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

Money Making Conversations
How Psychedelics Helped Heal My Traumatic Brain Injury. 2x Stanley Cup Winner (Daniel Carcillo Interview)

Money Making Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 26:52


Daniel Carcillo, former NHL player and Stanley Cup Champion, opens up about his struggles with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how psychedelics have helped him heal. In a raw and emotional interview, Carcillo discusses how psycho-assisted therapy using psychedelics has changed his life for the better. He introduces the motivation behind founding Wesana, his biotechnology company Wesana Health.Topics CoveredDaniel's journey leaving the NHL and his own personal struggle as a survivor of TBI (traumatic brain injury)Daniel's path to psychedelic-assisted therapy and his ultimate success with the treatment Founding Wesana (including the vision behind the company, the years of research that went into it–– as well as the pioneering work that the company is now doing in the mental health care space)His work as an advocate for others afflicted by TBIThe future of psychedelic-assisted therapy in treating traumatic brain injuries and mental illnesses More on Daniel CarcilloDaniel Carcillo is founder and Chief Executive Officer of Wesana Health, a biotechnology company focused on developing the novel therapies of tomorrow and delivering new care paradigms today. A well-known speaker and advocate on behalf of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) survivors and people dealing with mental health challenges, Mr. Carcillo spent nearly a decade researching different treatment regimens and consulting experts to find effective care for his mental health conditions. In 2019, Mr. Carcillo founded Wesana, bringing together leaders in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries to move forward his vision to deliver novel pharmaceuticals that help optimize treatment outcomes for patients with mental health disorders.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Out of the Fog with Karen Hager
Out of the Fog: Coping After Trauma with Jennifer Berk Weisman

Out of the Fog with Karen Hager

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 31:00


Everyone handles the stress of major trauma differently. Jennifer Berk Weisman knows that to promote recovery, it's essential to learn how to manage daily stress, practice mindfulness, and discover how to handle life's challenges. PTSD can be crippling and prevent you from progressing. Jennifer's here to share her journey and help you find your own resilience in the face of life-changing events. In a split second, a car speeding through a crosswalk jeopardized everything Jennifer Berk Weisman had built. Battling life-altering trauma, PTSD, a traumatic brain injury, and the cutthroat fashion industry, Just Bones Boardwear founder Jennifer Berk Weisman refused to let the accident define her and steal her identity. On her journey from stay-at-home mom to innovative entrepreneur surviving unexpected adversity, Jennifer conquered every obstacle with a fierce determination to succeed. Her new book, Sink or Swimwear, shares her true story of recovery, hope, and resilience. Find out more at https://jenniferberkweisman.com.

The Pituitary World News Podcast
S8E17: Pituitary dysfunction after Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI)

The Pituitary World News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 67:38


In this podcast, Dr. Lewis Blevins discusses traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hypopituitarism with Dr. Tamara Wexler, a nationally recognized neuroendocrinologist and expert in pituitary dysfunction after a brain injury. They focus on the many aspects of assessing pituitary function in people with traumatic brain injuries. Dr. Wexler's research efforts focus on pituitary dysfunction after brain injury. Don't miss this fascinating discussion. Click here for more PWN articles on TBI.

Behind The Shield
Sheena Sharapata - Episode 642

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 75:56


Sheena Sharapata is a former High School soccer athlete, TBI survivor and advocate. We discuss her athletic journey, the concussions that cut her soccer career short, her migraine misdiagnoses, Trigeminal Neuralgia aka "The Suicide Disease", how surgery is saving lives and so much more.

DVBIC Presents: Picking Your Brain
Picking Your Brain: Interview with the SEAC - TBI from a joint staff perspective (Ep. 11)

DVBIC Presents: Picking Your Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 50:44


In this episode of Picking Your Brain, TBICoE Branch Chief, Capt. Scott Cota and clinical moderator Amanda Gano interview the Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (SEAC), Ramón Colón-López. The discussion covered the health impacts of TBI and blast-related concussion stemming from the demands of combat and training. The SEAC also addresses the importance of maintaining medical readiness through education and military leadership.

The Mark White Show
Windchime Wishes Limited with Leslie Gafford

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 34:41


Windchime Wishes Limited exists to bring patients AND families living with disabilities caused by, but not limited to, ALS, PLS, MS, CP, MD, TBI and spinal cord injuries to a peaceful, fully and extremely accessible vacation home at no cost to them. I hope you will listen at Leslie Gafford shares about this labor of love. Please share.

Personal Injury Primer
Ep 164 How Do You Prove Traumatic Brain Injury?

Personal Injury Primer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 3:44


How Do You Prove Traumatic Brain Injury? I’m David Holub, an attorney focusing on personal injury law in northwest Indiana. Welcome to Personal Injury Primer, where we break down the law into simple terms, provide legal tips, and discuss personal injury law topics. This episode again addresses traumatic brain injury (TBI). One of the tasks […] The post Ep 164 How Do You Prove Traumatic Brain Injury? first appeared on Personal Injury Primer.

The Mark White Show
Make A Difference Minute: Windchime Wishes Limited

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 2:44


On this MADM, Leslie Gafford is sharing about her passion for Windchime Wishes Limited in Andalusia, Alabama, and her vision for helping patients AND families living with disabilities caused by, but not limited to, ALS, PLS, MS, CP, MD, TBI and spinal cord injuries to a peaceful, fully and extremely accessible vacation home at no cost to them. Sponsor: Green's Dependable Hardware Russellville, AL

Concussion Talk Podcast
"Being your own personal best"

Concussion Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 48:44


Jamie MoCrazy is a former X-Games athlete who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, putting her in a 10-day coma, while competing in free skiing in Whistler. We talk about her journey and her involvement in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) research. Jamie hopes to educate and raise awareness about Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). For this reason she founded MoCrazy Strong, "a non-profit organization that raises awareness for TBI and offers retreats and keynote programs that inspire others to regain control of their lives after traumatic events." You can follow Jamie's remarkable journey on:Instagram @jamiemocrazy #MoCrazyStrongFacebook https://www.facebook.com/MoCrazyYouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjyKEdazb1G7BGJTcSCw20g/featuredLinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/%F0%9F%8F%94-jamie-mocrazy-07b58131/Twitter https://twitter.com/JamieMocrazy Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/concussion-talk-podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 116: Tango Alpha Lima: Actress and comedian Ashley Gutermuth

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 54:39


IN THE NEWS In honor of the start of a new Legion membership year, Jeff and Ashely share membership stories and invite the Alphas to share their own membership stories. THIS WEEK'S GUEST We're doubling down on our Ashlies this week with our guest, New Jersey-based actress, voice-over artist and stand-up comedian Ashley Gutermuth. Ashley is married to a career Air Force reservist, and she's rapidly building an online following with her unique take on spouse and military humor, and she's quickly carving out a name for herself with her inside-military jokes. RAPID FIRE June American Legion Impact Report highlights career events and legislative wins on Capitol Hill. Army backpedals on policy dropping High School diploma requirement WWII Medal of Honor recipient Herschel "Woody" Williams lies in honor at U.S. Capitol Special Guest: Ashley Gutermuth.

Strokecast
Life Coach Survived 2 Strokes and a TBI

Strokecast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 82:09


Julie Kuch had her first stroke in 2009 when she was 30. No one believed her at the time, and she had to convince a neurologist to order an MRI before the medical system began to take her seriously. And once they did take her seriously, the system still didn't offer Julie rehab or even education about how to live life as a stroke survivor. Several years later, Julie had a do-over -- her second stroke. Oh, and she through in a TBI in between. Between her strokes, Julie created the services she wished she had for her own stroke. She became a life coach for brain injury survivors. To learn just what a life coach does, how their services help, and how Julie built this life, listen to this episode. If you don't see the audio player below, visit http://Strokecast.com/Julie to listen to the conversation.   Click here for a machine-generated transcript Who is Julie Kuch? Julie is a concussion and stroke survivor. She is a Life Coach for people who have had a brain injury. She has helped 100's of people find joy and purpose in life again. Julie has survived to strokes and a TBI. Her second stroke was in January 2022. She is currently recovering (very well) from this, her third brain injury. The experience has Julie feeling more passionate than ever that part of her mission in this life is to help as many people as possible recover and feel better than before their brain injury. Julie is grateful for her brain injuries and the valuable lessons they have given her. Julie wants everyone that has experienced a TBI to feel the same, and she know they can. Julie says, "So much of the suffering we go through recovering from brain injuries is not necessary. I teach my clients how to transform from feeling resentful, frustrated, angry, shameful and depressed about the state of their life to feeling accepting, loving, and at peace about themselves and their capacity after a brain injury." Julie certified as a Life Coach through The Life Coach School. A Go Getter Gets Depression Depression is a topic we don't talk about often enough. It's a common stroke deficit, like hemiparesis and aphasia. It interferes with recovery and exercise routines. And it's not just feeling sad or mourning the end of your previous life. It's a genuine problem that burns energy and can make it even harder to get out of bed and do PT. Or do the basics of taking care of ourselves. Last year, I talked with Dr. Laura Stein from Mount Sanai in New York. She talked about new research showing that stroke itself causes major depression, and not just the impacts of stroke. In 2009, no one told Julie she might encounter depression. We also had less overall public awareness about depression. And when it did hit Julie, she was not prepared to deal with it. She had to deal with her own limiting beliefs about antidepressant medication and about people with depression. Julie talks about the shame and embarrassment she had around her treatment. By 2022, she was better prepared to deal with it. Depression, like stroke, can happen to anyone. It can be a deadly condition. And like any other stroke deficit, it's nothing to be ashamed of. We can know that, but that doesn't guarantee we'll believe that. Why drive during a stroke? Julie had her stroke while she was driving to the doctor's office. But she didn't pull over and call an ambulance. Jo Ann Glim had her stroke in a deli while trying to fix an office sandwich crisis. Misha Montana drove back to Reno while having a stroke. James Horton drove home while having a stroke, Driving while experiencing a stroke is a terrible idea. It's dangerous. It's difficult. The problem is that we rely on our brains to evaluate every situation of every minute of every day. In a stroke, though, the brain is under attack. Millions of brain cells are dying every minute. Various parts are scrambling in panic mode to figure out what is happening, what no longer works, and what to do next. The part that should tell us what common sense is has become the part that is broken. So, what can we do? We talk about neuroplasticity as how we recover after stroke. The core principle is, "Cells that fire together, wire together."  It's not just recovery, though. Neuroplasticity governs how we learn. We say things like "Practice makes perfect" because doing something repeatedly is often how we learn it. Practice IS the firing together of neuroplasticity. The more we repeat a thing, the more resilient the connections in our brains become. The bigger they become. The more permanent they become. If you grew up in the US and I say, "I pledge allegiance…" you probably immediately want to say, "to the flag." If you grew up Catholic and I say, "In the name of the father," you probably felt the urge to touch your forehead. These are patterns we developed over years of repetition. Here's how this impacts driving. By repeating BE FAST early and often, we internalize not only the most common symptoms of stroke, but also the action. T = Time to call an ambulance. B – a sudden loss of or change in balance E – a sudden change in or loss of eyesight or vision F – single side face droop A – in ability to hold both arms up S – loss of or change in speech, vocabulary, or ability to process language T – Any of this means it is time to call an ambulance BE FAST = Balance, Eyes, Face, Arms, Speech, Time to call an ambulance. Repeat it until "Time to call an ambulance" is as ingrained as the sign of the cross or the pledge of allegiance. In a crisis, that may then be the course of action the dying brain grabs on to. Helmets Save Lives Julie told the story of her concussion during the conversation. This is a picture of the helmet she was wearing at the time. Yes, she still suffered a traumatic brain injury in the accident, but the helmet took the brunt of it. When you look at the dent in that image, it might not look too dramatic, but if you take another look and then imagine what that would look like on someone's head. Now that's terrifying. What is a Life coach? Julie is a Life Coach for brain injury survivors. But what does that mean? As Julie describes it, she helps live their best life. In some respects, it's similar to what a mental health professional does, but to a lesser degree. A life coach helps a client develop practical skills for life within the context of the coach's expertise. A big part of Julies work is helping folks understand the difference between facts and thoughts. Often, we assume that our thoughts are facts, and that causes problems. Saying it's 73 degrees is a fact. Saying it's too warm to do PT is an opinion or a thought. When we act on thoughts like that, we can limit our recovery. Many of us have limiting beliefs about our abilities, relationships, money, and more. Those limiting beliefs are things that we have convinced ourselves are facts when in reality they are not. And yet they have become part of the way our brain interprets the world due to neuro plasticity. A life coach like Julie helps clients unpack those limiting beliefs and jettison the ones that don't work. Freeing yourself from your limiting beliefs allows you to achieve more. While a life coach is not a replacement for a psychologist, they can still help people live better lives. Hack of the Week There are three tools that helped Julie with the mindset of recovery that she uses with her clients, First, mourn the life that could have been. After a brain injury, life will be different. We are different. Some disabilities may be short term while others are long term. It's okay to be sad and disappointed. Getting stuck in sadness and disappointment won't undo the injury, though. It will only delay your entry in a new and possibly amazing life. Taking time to mourn the life that could have been can help you move on to the life yet to be. Second, receive the gift of rest. Rest and sleep are important, yet many of us flee from them (myself included too many times). That's where much of the work of healing happens though. A brain focused on just getting to the next big thing isn't taking the time it needs to prepare for the next big thing. Take the time to rest and recover. Third, manage your thoughts. The key principle behind Julie's coaching is that thoughts and opinions direct our actions and beliefs. We think they are immutable, but they are not. We can change them. We can decide which ones to dwell on. The core idea of neuroplasticity is that "nerves that fire together, wire together." PT, OT, and Speech Therapy are governed by this theory. It's why we have to do thousands of repetitions to rediscover our limbs and build new pathways in our brains. And it's why dwelling and revisiting unhelpful thoughts is not helpful. The more often we think something or repeat a belief, the more the nerves will wire that thought or belief, giving the brain a shortcut to that thought or belief. Make sure you leverage the power of neuroplasticity to bring good things into your life. Better year for Geek Movies: 1982 or 1989? I was just on the Caffeinated Comics Podcast where we discussed this question along with the trends that transformed movies through the 80s. From Bladerunner to Batman, and Tron to the Little Mermaid, a lot of amazing movies came out in those years. You can hear us discuss it on the podcast here: https://radiomisfits.com/cc286/ Or you can listen and watch on YouTube right here: https://youtu.be/b4gY3KD17i4 Links Where do we go from here? To learn more about Julie's coaching programs visit http://JulieKuchCoaching.com. Follow Julie on Instagram to stay on top of her recovery and see her videos. Share this episode with someone you know by giving them the link http://Strokecast.com/Julie Subscribe to the Strokecast newsletter at http://Strokecast.com/news Don't get best…get better

The NeuroNerds
Joe's Birthday and Stroke-iversary Reflections

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 42:00


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryIt's that time of year for our host Joe - the period between his birthday and stroke-iversary (the anniversary of his stroke). It's been 6 years since he suffered a hemorrhagic stroke and in this special solo episode, Joe is reflecting on what he's learned about living, how he lives each day in gratitude and his hopes and dreams for the future. This episode is for anyone who has gone through a traumatic health crisis like a stroke. There is hope on the other side. If you're a brain injury survivor or have someone in your life who is, please connect with us on our socials. The NeuroNerds are here to help!CreditsNew to our show? Take our episode tour to get started! https://newsletter.theneuronerds.com/tourIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like to learn how to shift your mindset, create a routine and get more support during recovery, go to http://www.yousorock.coach/Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus Wesley - https://www.soundsignature.productionsSponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

What's work got to do with it?
Brain Cleansing Technology: Better Sleep For A Better Tomorrow?

What's work got to do with it?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 34:00


Dr. Miranda Lim is a neurologist with board certification in Sleep Medicine. She is an Associate Professor in Neurology with secondary appointments in Behavioral Neuroscience and Medicine in the OHSU School of Medicine, as well as an Affiliate faculty for our Institute, Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences. Miranda also has a joint appointment as a Staff Physician and Research Investigator at the Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System. Dr. Lim's research program, Sleep & Health Applied Research Program (SHARP), focuses on understanding the function of sleep in neurological disorders across the lifespan. Some examples include autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury (TBI), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and aging/neurodegenerative disease. As a translational neuroscientist, her research program is known for its bidirectional, translational research spanning preclinical (rodent) and human studies. Methods used include conducting sleep studies (such as sleep manipulations and sleep interventions), quantitative analyses of sleep, implementing non-obtrusive long-term wearables (e.g., actigraphy, mattress sensors), and using machine learning to quantify sleep. Over the years, Miranda's research has been published in high-impact journals Nature, Journal of Clinical Investigation, Science Translational Medicine, and Science Advances, as well as support from many federal and foundation sources, such as the National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, American Sleep Foundation, Center for Aging and Technology, Portland VA Research Foundation, and more! Learn more about Dr. Lim's research: Dr. Lim's Research featured on GeekWire: https://www.geekwire.com/2021/neurosciences-startup-gets-defense-dept-funds-test-headband-improve-sleep-clean-brain OPB: https://www.opb.org/article/2022/06/01/the-science-of-sleep-pacific-northwest-researchers-explore-secrets-of-a-good-nights-rest OHSU News: Physician-scientist focuses on a good night's sleep https://news.ohsu.edu/2019/05/13/ohsu-physician-scientist-focuses-on-a-good-nights-sleep OHSU News: Rare sleep disorder common among veterans with PTSD https://news.ohsu.edu/2019/10/10/rare-sleep-disorder-common-among-veterans-with-ptsd VA Career Development Awardee Profiles, Miranda Lim, M.D., Ph.D. https://www.research.va.gov/about/awards/cda/default.cfm A Local Neurologist Thinks a Baby's Dream State May Affect Their Adult Life https://www.pdxmonthly.com/health-and-wellness/2019/12/a-local-neurologist-thinks-a-baby-s-dream-state-may-affect-their-adult-life OHSU doctor says we're starved for sleep but hope isn't lost https://www.columbian.com/news/2021/jan/10/ohsu-doctor-says-were-starved-for-sleep-but-hope-isnt-lost VA Blog: Studying sleep problems that affect Veterans https://blogs.va.gov/VAntage/84912/studying-sleep-problems-affect-veterans Save-the-date for Oregon Healthy Workforce Center's 2022 Summer Institute on Tuesday, July 19, 2022 on "Total Worker Health® approaches in industry and academia: Key elements and implementation." Learn more here: https://www.ohsu.edu/oregon-healthy-workforce-center/summer-institute-occupational-health-psychology-total-worker --- Episode information: What's Work Got to Do With Brain Cleansing Technology? Guest: Dr. Miranda Lim, M.D., Ph.D. Hosted and Edited by: Helen Schuckers, MPH Produced by: Helen Schuckers, MPH and Anjali Rameshbabu, PhD Music by: Sam Greenspan, MPH Connect with us Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences and Oregon Healthy Workforce Center on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/OHSUOccHealth Facebook: www.facebook.com/occhealthsci.ohsu LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/occhealthsci Blog: blogs.ohsu.edu/occupational-health-sciences Community feedback is important to us. If you love our podcast and want to further support our podcast, please consider leaving us a 5-star review. Thank you!

P.S.A Podcast
Knowing When to Take a Mental Break Feat. Vincent Lanci

P.S.A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 46:34


Track 3 brings out the big boys with Vincent A. Lanci (author, writer, podcast host, & educator) who is a survivor of TBI (traumatic brain injury) when he was 21. He recalls having to learn how to walk and talk again and reveals that this incident opened up the creative side of his mind. In the episode, both Izzy and Vincent recall stories where they experienced burnout, being an educator in today's society, the importance of taking a mental break, and how a mental breakdown and a nervous breakdown are the same thing.Vincent Lanci's social mediaInstagram: @vincentlanciTikTok: @vincentlanciYouTube: @VincentALanci

The NeuroNerds
Stroke Recovery and Creativity with Mimi Hayes

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 31:52


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryThis episode is all about creativity and brain injury recovery. Mimi Hayes is back on the show chatting with Joe about how having comedy as a creative outlet has helped her through her stroke recovery. As she gets ready to head to Scotland for her second appearance at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, she reminisces about her first experience at Fringe as a brain injury survivor including falling off the stage! Joe and Mimi also chat about building opportunities to connect with other survivors through sharing their stories.Do you have a creative outlet that helps you through brain injury recovery? Please share on our socials!Links MentionedHelp Mimi go to Edinburgh Festival Fringe! Support her Kickstarter here - https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/getmimitofringe/20-nothing-at-fringe-festivalFollow Mimi on IG - https://instagram.com/mimihayesbrainMimi's website - http://mimihayes.comCreditsNew to our show? Take our episode tour to get started! https://newsletter.theneuronerds.com/tourIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like to learn how to shift your mindset, create a routine and get more support during recovery, go to http://www.yousorock.coach/Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus Wesley - https://www.soundsignature.productionsSponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

DTD PODCAST
Episode 107: Chris Van Sant “The Full Story”

DTD PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 188:37


This week in the studio, a man with 20 years of service in the US Army. He served in such units as the 75th Ranger regiment, the 3rd Infantry Division, the 82nd Airborne, and the famed 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (Delta Force). He has undergone 11 combat deployments in places like Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Horn of Africa. He has hunted the likes of Hussein, Zarkawi, and other notable deck of cards players. This has not been an easy life as most would understand, but in this one we have to go deeper to the root causes of the problems suffered by far to many veterans. Numerous concussions, blasts, breaches, TBI, and don't forget a generous dose of PTS. My guest has overcome those demons of his past and is now a shining example to other veterans, he teaches that at any point you can reinvent yourself to be anything that you need or want to be, and that there are brighter days ahead when you look in the right places. He now enjoys the outdoors, volunteer work, and making sure that those that surround him live their absolute best life. He's a board member of the All Secure Foundation and the President of VanSant Consulting. He's here in the studio to talk about the highs and lows, chasing the unicorn of adrenaline, and ultimately how to be happy in your life. It is my honor to introduce you to Chris VanSant.

Association of Academic Physiatrists
Episode 47: TBI, Part 2

Association of Academic Physiatrists

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 32:35


To help prepare you for your PM&R Board Exams, we're bringing you a podcast series dedicated to current practices and core knowledge. Main Learning Objectives: - Describe disorders of consciousness and posturing - Describe acute management in TBI including ICP monitoring, brain herniation, VTE prophylaxis - Review the management of elevated ICP - Review the surgical indication and management of TBIs Credits: Episode was written and hosted by: Joseph Tessler, DO, MS; Kari Rezac, DO This episode was reviewed for accuracy by: Lawrence Horn, MD; Rebecca Dutton, MD This podcast series is directed by: Benjamin Gill, DO, MBA; Rosie Conic, MD, PhD; Sre Gorukanti, MD Please send feedback to aapdigitaloutreach@gmail.com so we can best suit your learning needs! Content for this series is based off of current PM&R learning materials and is created by residents for residents. It is not an official board review study guide.

UMSO
Rebecca Rusch (@rebeccarusch) - Dealing with Injury as an Elite Athlete - NDY | EP02

UMSO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 82:55


Instagram: ndy_podcast  Best Shorts to Ride In: https://www.thehviii.com/collections/goat-training-shorts Video of Podcast:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLz-3Al1WFD9-ZVYsWL0k8B2MceAqCesRX Rebecca Rusch I have had Rebecca on the UMSO podcast and she is fascinating. She is a true adventurer, a true explorer, a 7x mountain bike world champ, a white water rafting world champ, and just does the gnarliest eco challenges. She lives a life I find very inspiring and full of adventure. It's chasing a thing that is different than the normal path. I hope you enjoy the second episode of the new and improved NDY podcast. Let's blast oooffff!!! Sponsors: HVIII - Code NDY 10% off Habit - Code NDY 10% off Onnit - Onnit.com/mattvincent 10% off Oregon Originals - Code NDY 10% off Stay Classy Meats - Code NDY 10% off Nutrition Solutions - Code NDY $20 off Cold Plunge - Code NDY to save Daily Destroyer - team training and programming https://marketplace.trainheroic.com/brand/Matt%20Vincent?attrib=445833-pod Core Medical Group - http://coremedicalgrp.com/matt Sunlighten Saunas - https://www.sunlighten.com/?leadsource=Matt-Vincent&utm_source=Matt-Vincent&utm_medium=partner&utm_campaign=Matt-Vincent

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast
How light that you cannot see is silently ruining your health with one of the world's top biochemists - Ian Mitchell

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 83:39 Very Popular


This episode is sponsored by Optimal Carnivore “CarnivoreY” to receive 10% off all products- Brain Nourish - https://amzn.to/3liaNFN Grassfed Organ Meat Complex https://amzn.to/3Dp1R9e Grassfed Beef liver https://amzn.to/3clgONz This episode is sponsored by Upgraded Formulas - Get your HTMA with Upgraded Formulas - use my code YOGI12 or YOGI for a discount! - https://www.upgradedformulas.com/?rfsn=4637317.2071db5&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4637317.2071db5 Ian Mitchell is one of the world's top biochemists & has worked with NASA - top Olympic athletes, Dave Asprey, David Sinclair & some of the top professionals in the health and wellness space. Today we talk about C60 - deuterium - deuterium depletion, anti aging - the harms of NNEMF and so much more! Sign up for my newsletter to get special offers in the future! - https://sarah-kleiner.mykajabi.com/contact Want to understand deuterium & how to deplete deuterium? Check out this mini course I created! https://sarah-kleiner.mykajabi.com/offers/29LEyGnD Check out all my courses to understand how to improve your mitochondrial health & experience long lasting health! https://sarah-kleiner.mykajabi.com/store Find Ian's products here: https://wizardsciences.com TIME STAMPS: 0:00 Beginning 3:00 Ian's background 3:47 Ian's thoughts on processed foods 5:42 NNEMF in the 80's vs now & how this affects our health 6:34 What NNEMF actually does to your body on a cellular level 8:00 GMOs vs nature 10:00 Quantum physics vs allergies 12:10 How histamine reaction actually occurs on a cellular level 13:05 How science changes and evolves & why we should be more open minded 14:39 Dispelling the emotion around NNEMF & how it dehydrates the body 17:50 How 5 G affects

The NeuroNerds
Celebrating Pride with Michael Shutt

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 59:14


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com. Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds.SummaryIt's Pride Month and we are celebrating LGBTQ+ brain injury survivors. In this episode, Joe is chatting with Michael Shutt, a stroke survivor, playwright, actor and gay man from Los Angeles. Michael shares what it was like growing up gay from when he realized he was gay at a young age. They talk about the lack of representation he experienced when he was younger and how that affected him. He also shares the immense support he received from the gay community after his stroke and how that has helped him through recovery.Links MentionedFollow Michael on IG - https://instagram.com/whmikeMichael's one-man show - https://www.alessoninswimming.comCreditsIf you're a brain injury survivor who would like help embracing your new normal and get more support through recovery, go to www.YouSoRock.coachSupport The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerdsCheck out The NeuroNerds Amazon Shop at amazon.com/shop/theneuronerdsPlus get a free Audible trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/theneuronerds!Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren ManzanoFind Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/InstagramSubmit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-storyFind Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on TwitterProduced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/InstagramEdited by Marcellus WesleySponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

Rebel Therapist
Lessons From Rebellious Entrepreneurs, Part 1

Rebel Therapist

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 20:33


Show Notes: I briefly mentioned some really incredible entrepreneurs in episode 164: The Best Niches Beyond Private Practice. My friend Podge listened and then said something like: Are we going to have a chance to hear more about all of these people? I want to hire ALL of them! That is a fantastic idea. Even better, I want you to get to hear FROM a lot of these people. This is a series sharing the voices of people who have been through Rebel Therapist programs recently. They have created some phenomenal programs. I want you to hear from them because It will inspire you to realize you can create something amazing too. You will get to hear a bit about what they learned in creating these programs and that will help normalize the process entrepreneurs go through. You may fall in love with them. I know I have. So for this series, you'll be hearing from these incredible folks. They are giving us such a gift and I can't thank them enough. Hear about the programs each of these entrepreneurs has created and the lessons they've learned so far in leveling up. Judy Hu is a trauma informed therapist in Cambridge, MA. She does not want to help you just cope in this dysfunctional world, but to thrive in it by actively unlearning toxic belief systems that you learned in your childhood. She created Boundaries For BIPOC: Breaking Free From Oppression. https://judyhucounseling.com/ Dr. Jen Blanchette is the host of the TBI Therapist podcast. She is a licensed psychologist and coach for people who have experienced a concussion or TBI. https://www.tbitherapist.com Liz Dube, a Certified Sex Therapist, Coach and Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist, loves working with people who want to better understand themselves sexually and feel sexually empowered. She's helped thousands of men, women, and couples feeling stuck sexually and is working her ass off to save the world one bedroom at a time. https://talksexwithliz.com/ Kelly Guthrie, Ph.D. is a therapist and coach who has been helping people strengthen their partner relationships for the past 20 years. Her specialty is working with couples who feel more like roommates than soulmates since children came into their lives; she is especially fond of working with these couples because she vividly remembers just how tough those early years of parenting were on her own marriage. https://www.childproofyourrelationship.com/program Show notes at http://rebeltherapist.me/podcast/179

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #85: Navigating the "Slow Road to Better": A Conversation with Melissa Richman and the Podcast Team from the Stroke Comeback Center

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 38:03


For today's episode, Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist and Past Director for the Aphasia Treatment Program in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Cal State East Bay, speaks with Melissa Richmond and members of the Slow Road To Better (SRTB) podcast group from the Stroke Comeback Center (SCC). This show celebrates Aphasia Awareness Month and is honored to feature 5 individuals with aphasia who are consumer advocates through their work on the Slow Road to Better podcast. Guests: Melissa Sigwart Richman, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist with 30 years of experience working in rehabilitation with stroke and brain trauma survivors.  She holds degrees from James Madison University and the University of Maryland, College Park.  Her career has included inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, long-term care, home care, community-based and virtual settings.  Melissa served as a Senior SLP on the inpatient Stroke Recovery Team for Medstar National Rehabilitation Hospital for over ten years and in 2006 became the Program Director for the Stroke Comeback Center in Vienna, Virginia.  During her tenure, the organization grew to three locations starting with a handful of groups to well over 50 classes per week utilizing a life participation approach. In 2019, Melissa moved to the Outer Banks of North Carolina and started the Virtual Stroke Comeback Center which has continued to grow and thrive.  She continues to focus her energy on improving the lives of survivors and families living with aphasia, with the primary focus of helping them get back to the business of living.   Slow Road to Better Podcast Team Members:  Kitti Tong: At the age of 27, Kitti Tong earned the CEO's Exceptional Performance Award at Choice Hotels – the highest recognition in the company. A data analyst, growth strategist, and event facilitator, she founded a Toastmasters Chapter in Maryland and co-chaired several committees for women's leadership and human rights. Kitti's life was changed forever when she was struck by a car walking home from work, sustaining a severe traumatic brain injury. With determination and grit, she relearned to walk, talk and participate in life. She has founded S.A.Y. Younger Aphasia on YouTube to help create awareness of this isolating condition. Kitti's YouTube channel is: S.A.Y -- Younger Aphasia Group - YouTube Pat Horan: My name is Pat Horan, I was a Captain in the Army. In 2007 I was wounded in combat serving in Iraq. After my injury I couldn't talk, read or write. Over the past 10 years the Stroke Comeback Center has helped me improve my writing, reading and speech more than I could have ever thought possible. Today I am a proud father of a new son and an adopted nephew. My continued recovery will help me be a better father and husband.  Erin Adelekum: Erin's Instagram is: stroke.mama Chris Vincent Dante Thomas Listener Take-aways In today's episode you will: Learn how interprofessional education with physical therapists led to the launch of this member-focused aphasia podcast. Find out how the members prepare for the podcast by embracing spontaneous conversation Listen to members share insights on the benefits of being part of the SRTB podcast Hear the podcast team share the insight that even though aphasia is not “leaving it, but we'd like to crush it a little bit.” Crush it, they do!       Edited show notes Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  00:54 Welcome to the Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm Ellen Bernstein Ellis, Program Specialist with the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences and a member of the Aphasia access podcast Working Group. Aphasia Access strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources.  In recognition of June being Aphasia Awareness Month, I'm excited and honored to be today's host for an episode that features the five members of the podcast team from the Stroke Comeback Center located in Vienna, Virginia. They are joining me today along with Melissa Richmond, the speech pathologist who produces the show. The Slow Road to Better has launched over 100 episodes that offer authentic and engaging discussions about how to adapt and live well following brain injury or stroke. They share what keeps them all on the “slow road to better”.  Welcome everybody! And I'm going to start with Melissa's introduction. And then I'll ask the podcast members to introduce themselves.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:21 Melissa, thanks for joining us today. And now I want to get the rest of this show on the road. But in this case, it's actually The Slow Road to Better. I want to have the team introduce themselves. I'm excited to have the podcast team here today. I was wondering who wants to jump in first with the introduction? Because we got five of you. Any volunteers? So Chris, let's start with you. And could you share with our listeners, what was the cause of your aphasia? Chris  03:48 So I was on the motorcycle on the way to a fire meeting. And some guy didn't see me and ran into me. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:58 So traumatic brain injury.  Chris  04:01 Yeah, absolutely. So 10 years, and I only said, “yes”, “no” and four or five curse words, which is important for firefighter, and military and everything. And then obviously I am talking, walking everything.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:19 Thank you, Chris. And how old were you when you had this brain injury?  Chris Twenty seven  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   And how long have you been living with aphasia? How long ago was that?  Chris 10 years. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:31 10 years? Okay, and Chris, one more question. How long have you been a podcast team member? Chris  04:36 Since the beginning? So six, seven years? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:40 Six or seven years? I saw Melissa holding up six too, so 6-7 years. All right. So you're an original team member? Chris  04:47 That's correct. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:48 That is fantastic. Okay, and who goes next? Kitti, are you calling out somebody? Oh, Kitti is volunteering. Kitti  04:56 Kitti, I'm Kitti and three years ago I was hit by the car. But Chris and I, and I was 27. Yeah. And Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  05:10 That was three years ago. And how long have you been the podcast team member, Kitti? Kitti  05:15 Two years, two years and now. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  05:18 Okay. All right. Well, thank you for starting off. And do you want to call somebody next for me?  Kitti  05:27 Oh, wait, wait, wait.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis What else? Kitti Yeah. I was silent. But now I'm better. Okay. Let's call Pat. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  05:32 Thank you, Kitti, Pat, what was the cause of your brain injury? You've shared that with us that you're a veteran. Pat  05:42 Yep. I'm Pat Horan. I got hurt when I was in Iraq. I had been there for a year and for no good reason, I got a shot in the head. And that was 15 years ago. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  05:56 And how long have you been a podcast member? Pat  05:58 I think I've been doing it the whole time also. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:00 So two original members, right? Kitti is a new kid on the block, I guess for podcasting. Okay, Pat, thank you so much. And I see Erin waving her hand. So you are next. Erin. Welcome. And what's the cause of your aphasia? How did that happen? Erin  06:19 So, I'm Erin. And IG (Instagram) knows me as strokemama.mama. I was 39 When I gave birth to my daughter. And nine days later, I had a stroke.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:37 How long ago was that again?  Erin   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Okay, so you have a two year old. Erin  06:42 One and a half. She turns two in July. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:46 Beautiful. Okay. And Erin, how long have you been part of the podcast team? Erin  06:50 I'm going to come on my year in, maybe, October or August? Or September? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  07:01 All right, close enough. Close enough. So you're kind of new like Kitti. Okay, thank you so much. Thank you, Erin. And last, but certainly not least, is Dante then. So Dante? What was the cause of your aphasia? Can you share that with our listeners? Dante  07:17 It's a long time, but I got my pills and stroke. And about five years and I'm improving and words and is really good. So yeah.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  07:33 Thank you for sharing that. And how long have you been a member of this podcast team? Oh, one Dante  07:40 Oh, one year. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  07:41 About one year? Okay.  Well, I want to thank all of you. I am honored to be here. I am a huge fan. I have been listening to your episodes. And I am just so impressed. I'm just so impressed with what you've accomplished. And we want to talk about that today. Before we jump into your experience, I'm going to circle back to Melissa, just for a minute. And Melissa would you share with our listeners? What inspired you to do this? How did this happen? Melissa  08:09 We were actually inspired by a physical therapy student. I was asked to give a lecture at Marymount University to help the physical therapy students understand what speech pathology was and what their role is, as part of a rehab team. And I brought some members from the Stroke Comeback Center with me to tell their story about living with aphasia. The person, his name was Jimmy McVeigh, said I think you all should do a podcast. And he had podcasting and radio in his background. And he said, I will help you, which he did for a few months. And we first had our podcast out on his feed, which was called the PT podcast. Then, you know what happens with students. They graduate and get jobs and real lives. So he didn't really have the ability to help us anymore. And so the members really enjoyed the podcast and wanted to keep it going. So we just picked up where we were, and use what we had, and started our own feed with the help of some friends. And so in 2017, I guess we officially kicked off The Slow Road to Better on our own RSS feed. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  09:39 Wow, you kind of just rolled up your sleeves and did it, I think. Melissa  09:43 We did. I always tell people, like file it under things they did not teach me in grad school. Okay, Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  09:50 Okay, share with our listeners who might be thinking “maybe we can do this too” what do you do to set up an episode? Melissa  09:58 Really, what I do is support a conversation among members of The Stroke Comeback Center. The way that I see it, my job is to manage the logistics.  We record on Zoom. I get us all together. And most of our conversations are really just authentic conversations-- things that come up with the members who are really doing their best to live well with aphasia. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  10:30 I was just going to ask what really makes a good show topic. I think that's what you're kind of referring to here. Melissa  10:36 Yeah, authentic conversations feel like stuff. And some of it is serious. Some of it is people dealing with loss of independence, or they feel like their relationships are different, power is different, financial issues. And sometimes it's, I really want to wear my cute shoes and I have this stupid brace. Or, oh my gosh, I'm trying to wear my contacts and I have to put them in with my weak hand. We had a long conversation about how do I shave my armpit on my weak side? You know, so? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  11:12 Wow, the real stuff or Yeah, stuff. Melissa  11:14 The stuff that friends talk about when they get together? Those make the best conversations. We don't plan. We don't fret. I don't give out the questions. I pretty much turn it over to the members, and they take control. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  11:29 Sometimes you have guests and the podcast team asks questions. I listened to the episode this week with a physical therapist, and that was fabulous. Hearing people share their questions about their experiences and, and really very empowering. I mean, just being in charge of your own life and your own rehab. That's, that was my takeaway.  Can I ask who is a good candidate to be a podcast team member? What are your thoughts about that? Melissa  11:56 From my perspective, any survivor with aphasia, who is willing to put out their honest, authentic self---the good, the bad, and the ugly, I don't think it's fair for podcasters to come out and say all the good stuff like I'm doing so great. Even though I had a stroke, life is great. It's not. There are a lot of days that really suck. And there are a lot of days where we shed some tears during this podcast, and we've had a lot of failure. I think it takes a lot of courage and a lot of grit to be willing to come on to this podcast and put your true self out there that I really wanted this, but it was a fail. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:45 I'm just gonna say that that honesty, that grit, that resilience has shined through every episode I've listened to so far. That's why I become such a big fan.  And one more question, Melissa, then let's open it up to the whole team. And that is, what benefits have you seen for the members from being part of this podcast? What are the benefits of this podcast? I'm going to be asking the members that in a moment. Melissa  13:11 I think some of the best outcomes have been the survivors being able to share their story with other survivors. Being able to give back to a community. Being willing to put themselves out there and say, “If I can do it, you can do it.” Building a bridge of hope. Which is what we say in our intro, and that's really what our members want. I think they understand that not everybody has a Stroke Comeback Center. And I think they understand what this center and the impact of having friends with aphasia has done for them. And they want to do that for someone else. So I think that's probably the biggest outcome.  And really, it's a great way for the members to track their communication progress. And I say it all the time. Go back to when you started listening, and listen to your communication. And then listen now. Because when I edit, which is really what I would say is my most significant role is, I am the editor and the uploader of all podcasts, is that it's a record of their progress. And it's amazing. It's really a way for our listeners to go “Well they sound great now, you know, they clearly didn't have that much aphasia.” Go back and listen six years ago and see what it sounds like, because I don't try to make people sound like they don't have aphasia. What would be the point of that? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  14:54 You just mentioned your opener, and the first time I heard the show, I was completely reeled in by that opener. It just hooked me because, first of all, it starts with someone saying, “Come in, come on in, come on in.” And that's exactly right. You are welcoming people into your lives with aphasia, and you're saying, “I'm here. And I'm going to share.” I mean, that was just so empowering. I'm going to play that clip. It's engaging. It's collaborative. Right away that that opening captures everything. So let me play it for the listeners. And then we'll come back again. OPENING ROLL OF SLTB PODCAST PLAYS Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  16:40 I hope the listeners enjoyed that clip as much as I have. I just want to say it's fabulous, every part, every line, but maybe I have a favorite piece. And that's when Pat* says something like, you know, aphasia isn't going to go away. But we want to crush it. And I think that's what happens with every episode, that determination, just to crush it.  (Note: original recording says “Chris” instead of “Pat”, but the correction is noted later in the recording.) So with that, let me throw out a question to this fabulous team. And that is what do you all think is one public benefit? What do you think listeners can take away from this? And what's a personal benefit of the show? So if you could just to speak to either a public benefit or a personal benefit that you you have experienced? Do I have a volunteer? Is Kitti going to call on somebody for us?  Erin  17:37 It's Erin. I think the public benefit is seeing how funny, or sarcastic, or you know, kind, or the troubles that aphasia survivors go through and realizing that they are just as funny, or even more funny, than when they didn't have aphasia. And then I think the personal benefit is having a group that I think, the personal benefit for me is having a group of aphasia people to talk with. And I know that I am so much better, you know, the aphasia is so much better than when I first started the podcast. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:43 That's beautiful. So it's really the sense of camaraderie. And it's also the sense of sharing with others. You're not alone, just normalizing this whole thing. Erin, thank you, and who else wants to share any response to this first question? I see Kitti raising your hand. Kitti  19:03 Hi, I'm Kitti.  In my podcast, I'm full funny, half philosophy, I'm half joking, I'm half serious.  And now, before I was still me, and now I'm still me. Just mindset you know, just mindset. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  19:24 So being yourself is part of the maybe public benefit because you can let people see who you are. You're a person you're still you. What's been a personal benefit for you Kitti? Kitti  19:35 I'm still me like before and after I'm still me, you know what? Change, I have aphasia but I am still me. Before I was speaking convention. Now, I am still convention. You know? Pat  19:51 I think it's really, like Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Is this Pat? Pat Oh, sorry, I am Pat. Yeah. I was also Pat, the one that said--I'm sorry, I'm thinking right now, I shouldn't think—It wasn't Chris that said it. I said I was the one who said, “I'm the one, I would crush.”  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:09 Oh, I got that wrong.  Pat  20:11 Yeah, even you it happens to you. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:14 Absolutely, oh heaven's, yes.  So Pat, thank you for that. So we'll put the tribute where tribute's due. Sorry, Chris. I'm gonna toss that one over to Pat. So Pat, what's your, Pat  20:23 I just think it's like, like Kitti was saying, like how she's doing the YouTube and stuff. But like, she went last year--I think, she went down--she went to Vegas to go talk with some other people, you know. And I've been, you know because I got hurt so many years ago, but I've got to go to other colleges around here. I used to have a working dog and I, (unclear) dog, they asked me a couple times to go and we'd go and talk to--I can't remember where we went, somewhere in Maryland. And there was like, over two or three thousand people there that I had to talk with about my dog, Wilson. And it was funny because Wilson was perfect. Like one time, it was really great. We went to, Chris what was that name of that college we went to? Marymount…. Erin  21:22 Chris and you… went to Marymount? Pat  21:24 So we were there, was that for PT maybe? And we did—that, that was, sorry Chris, her name was Kim. And then me. I don't know, there's a bunch of students there. And Melissa was there, but  she told us that we weren't allowed to talk, or she wasn't gonna talk, no matter what.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  21:49 Oh, so it was all on you guys. So Pat, are you telling me that part of the benefit from this podcast is that you've really gained kind of the confidence to go out into public and share these messages? Do you think that's been one of the benefits of working on this podcast? Or are you just saying that it's a sense of advocacy that you've really become even a stronger advocate? Pat  22:11 So that's the problem for me is, I don't know big words. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  22:15 Absolutely. So you stand up for yourself, you're empowered. Pat, I think you're very empowered. Pat  22:21 Or, just like the movie, I'm just “living the dream”, you know. (laughter) I want to go out and have fun. I want to enjoy—I don't want to get into this whole thing with me, but I'm excited that I lived, you know. And so I'm just, like to get out there, you know, when I can talk with people and talk and stuff. And I'm not perfect. I'm not, I'm not the king of the world. I'm not the best, but I just want to help other people. That's what we started years ago. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  22:47 So that's one of your motivations, then. You're just here to help others too, so a real sense of altruism, and just having that role of a mentor and a helper. That's great. Thank you.  Dante or Chris, do you want to jump in on this question at all? What's the public benefit or a personal benefit of this podcast? Dante  23:09 Dante. The beginning talk, and very little, but then more and more. Sentences and just driving and more and more and more. Like, the mall and talk, and just nothing, and I gain and more and more. So yeah, it's definitely improving. And just more and more and more and group and, and yeah, just flew in and just really talk, and is leaps and bounds and expressing and laughing and….  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   That's beautiful, Dante. Dante Definitely not sound it out, but just expression and reading and on YouTube. Just more and more and more expressive. Just talk and let me know, and it's definitely getting much better. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  24:12 And that's an important message for listeners to hear. I think that people continue getting better. There is just a better. I think that's so important. In your last episode, you guys talked about that whole, I call it the “P word”. When people are told there's a plateau, is the “P word”. You know when you. are told that you're gonna get better for six months and stop. And you guys kind of blow that through the roof and say, “No, we keep getting better year after year, because we're working at it.” So, Chris, is there something you want to add to this part of the discussion about a public benefit or a personal benefit of the show? Chris  24:52 Yeah, I mean, so in the world, you have aphasia or TBI. And a lot of people don't have what we have. It kinda--Melissa shows us what the USA and then all over the world. I mean, there's a lot of people that have aphasia or not, and just listening and.. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  25:28 Right, your show has had over 50,000 downloads. And we know there are over 2 million people with Aphasia just in the US, and that doesn't  even touch the rest of the world. So, Chris, you're saying it gets the message out there. And as Melissa said earlier, there's not --not everybody has access to an aphasia center like you guys all have. Access to your fabulous Stroke Comeback Center. So thank you, Chris, way to kick this off-- your discussion.  And I was wondering if you'd be willing to share any important lessons with the listeners about your podcast experience? You know, what, what type of insights or good lessons or hard lessons have you had with being a podcaster? Your humor is definitely been a good lesson for me, you guys can just let it roll. And that's a part of the magic, I think, is the humor you share with each other. And you call each other out? That's for sure. Chris  26:22 Yeah. laughing And then there's some days that are not happy. It's sad. And it's just… and I think there's laughable moment on each episode. Some are very touchy. But you know, I think that is podcast. And that's what the benefit of listeners. We are not happy all the time. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  27:03 Yeah, that's very real. And it sounds like this is really storytelling. It's sharing your life. It's the lived experience here. And that's what you're bringing to the listeners. Any other important lessons that you guys can share with us? Kitti? Kitti  27:19 Hi, I'm Kitti. For someone say that I was crying, or I was joking, or I just didn't make sense. And I said, “Do you know what I mean?” And then Melissa said, “I don't (know) what I mean. (Laughter) You know, just okay. One second. Okay. I'm feeling like that we are podcast. Feel like that, what is aphasia? What is different? And what is my benefit? Not me. Not Chris. Not Dante. Not Ellen. Not Pat. But what is most me? Do you know what I mean?  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Help me with this. Melissa  28:09 This is where I have to say no, I don't know what you mean. Pat  28:12 I think this is what you might say, Kitti, just let, if I'm totally wrong, you tell me. But like when you go to see any PT, OT, or speech or whatever. And I've had some of these people that are for speech, were like, you know, this and that, you got to do this. And then, just like, but wait, you're doing the same thing with all the, what the people that have a, you know, a stroke or a TBI. And you're like, wait, you can't tell everybody the same? We're all different people, all of us, you know. So? Is that what you're trying to tell Kitti at all? Or am I totally wrong? Kitti Yes. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  28:54 And nice job, Pat. And Kitti. Are you also saying that sometimes because it's not about any one story or any one person, but it's the bigger piece of everybody helping each other that you… Kitti  29:13 Yeah, like we are human. The normal people is human. We are human. We are both human, not like disability, but different ability, you know?  in-Ellis  29:26 So each of you are telling your story in your own way.  Any other important lessons that you would want the listeners to understand about this podcast experience? And if not, I have other questions, not to worry, I don't run out of questions. Melissa  29:40 I would throws this out there that occasionally, members get a little blowback, primarily from their family. As I said, we do have the ability to edit. We will have conversations that we get to the end of and somebody says, “You know what? You can't put that out there.” And I'm okay with that. And I don't. But sometimes people do share things that they don't think their families or anyone's going to really respond to. But they do. And sometimes, a lot of times, it's just really positive. I think their families hear them have a conversation just amongst friends. And they're like, “Oh, my gosh, I didn't even know it could sound like that.” Sometimes, families get their knickers in a knot a little bit about someone's perception of a situation. And then I get an email that says, “That is not how that happened.” Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  30:42 Okay, so that's an important lesson. That's something that could happen as a podcast team. Okay. All right. Thank you, Melissa. Erin, you look like you want to say something or you. Erin  30:52 So when we have a guest speaker, Melissa tells us, you know, if the guest speaker wants us to ask questions, or the group have questions for them, I will ask. But I think it's just, you know, what did Dante say? “A free for all?” No. Chris  31:21 So honestly, that is 99.9%. (Laughter) Free-for-all. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:28 All right, everybody seems to respond resoundly to free for all. Yes! In the best sense of the word. So it's spontaneous and it's authentic. And it seems to me that you are learning from each other, as well. And that you kind of call each other out to be your best. I mean, that's what I'm seeing. Do you guys agree that you learn from each other in this situation? Chris  31:54 Absolutely. Dante  31:56 No Filter? (Laughter) Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:59 What was that? Dante? Dante  32:00 No Filter. No, no plan, nothing. Just, I'm sorry, I'm Dante. Just the plan, the question, just wing it. And expressions, and what did he say? Or just different groups, and just no filter? And you say it, and it gets better, but still more and more and more, just wing it. Chris  32:32 And so the funny thing. I'm sorry, Chris, by the way. So Melissa will tell us, “Hey, this is what we are discussing.” And then 30 minutes later, that is not at all (laughter) what is the topic. Now it is so different from the topic. And then 30 minutes later, you are talking about, “What are you doing for lunch?” Or you know, or the tying the shoes or something like that. But that's one on my part anyway. But it's so random. That, that's what we love, because it is whatever I feel that day. That's it. Erin Yeah! Pat  33:35 I don't think it's 30 minutes. I think it's about two or three minutes. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:39 It goes so fast. It feels like the conversation goes so fast. Erin  33:42 Melissa will get us back on target. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:45 Target. Uh, Melissa, we'll get you back on target sometime.  Group: (Laughter; “eh” verbalization meaning “not so much”.) Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Okay. We have just a few minutes left, talking about two or three minutes, it feels like it's been two or three minutes. But this is June, which is Aphasia Awareness month. And I was wondering if any of you have any messages you want to put out there as we celebrate June as Aphasia Awareness Month? Any message for the listener about that? Chris  34:13 So, Do More 24…  Dante Slide in...slide in. (Laughter) Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:18 Oh my gosh, I think that was quite a transition. Everybody's endorsing that. And that is…? Group (laughter) Chris Oh yeah, Pat It's too late. Melissa  34:24 It's gonna be in May, Chris. It's gonna be too late. But, good try.  Chris Damn it!  (Group laughter and some good natured pandemonium.) Pat Different math. It's different math. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:38 I've never had swearing on the show before, but that's okay. It'll be the first. Pat  34:43 Different math. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:43 Chris, I think you're saying it's never too late to support the Stroke Comeback Center. And that's just a great example of seizing the opportunity for advocacy. And I thank you for that. What else for Aphasia Awareness Month? What other messages can we share? Kitti  35:01 Maybe, if your friend just say, “Hey, do you know what is aphasia mean?” Just teach people, one friend, or five friends… Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:17 One person at a time, if that's what it takes.  Kitti Yes. Erin  35:20 And this is Erin, stroke.mama here. M-A-M-A Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Excellent. Kitti  35:27 Is SAYyoungaphasia channel. YouTube. Check it out. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:31 You guys are getting it out there! Erin  35:34 I want to say, if you have a friend with aphasia, and you go to dinner, or a group, you know, party with them, don't let them---include them in the conversation. I take a long time to speak. But I have something to say, you know, and I just want to be included. Well, I don't have a problem, because I will stop the conversation if I'm not included. (Laughter) Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  36:18 I just want to say this is an amazing, amazing team. I am so honored that I got to have conversations with you. And I am so appreciative, as a speech language pathologist, of how you are helping other people with aphasia. Not only people with aphasia, but I think the family, the community, and I hope other speech language pathologists who listen to this and get a sense of how important it is to give voice, to allow people with aphasia to tell their story, and to tell it in a real way. And I want to thank you for that. And I really treasure, you have something special here--your relationship with each other, and your positive belief in yourself and each other. So thank you. Thank you again, thank you for sharing your expertise with Aphasia access, and with all our members.  So on behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm going to tell Melissa that if she wants to collect any of these handles that have been shared today, I'll put them in the show notes. For more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. And if you have an idea for a future podcast series topic, email us at info at aphasiaaccess.org And thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access. References and Resources  For more info on the Stroke Comeback Center (SCC) use our website: Home - Stroke Comeback Center Follow SCC on FaceBook at: Stroke Comeback Center | Facebook For access to episodes of the SCC podcast, Slow Road to Better: The Slow Road to Better on Apple Podcasts Erin's Instagram: stroke.mama (https://www.instagram.com/stroke.mama)   Kitti's social media handles:   S.A.Y -- Younger Aphasia Group - YouTube   https://www.instagram.com/say.younger.aphasia/ or https://www.facebook.com/groups/say.younger.aphasia