Podcasts about John Wayne

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American actor

  • 1,442PODCASTS
  • 2,108EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 28, 2021LATEST
John Wayne

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Best podcasts about John Wayne

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Latest podcast episodes about John Wayne

Les Nuits de France Culture
Une Nuit au cinéma 3/8 : Marlène Dietrich : "J'aime Paris pour la ville, pour les Français, les petits cafés, les avenues..."

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 25:02


durée : 00:25:02 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit - Audrey Hepburn, John Wayne, Gene Kelly, Gregory Peck, Gary Cooper, Fred Astaire, Joan Crawford, Humphrey Bogart, James Stewart, Marlène Dietrich, Clark Gable et Rita Hayworth : toutes ces stars sont passées un jour à Paris. "Rétro" vous propose d'écouter leurs voix dans des interviews "in french".

Death By DVD
What kills me will remain my secret

Death By DVD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 79:39


Tread Perilously
Tread Perilously: The Facts Of Life Reunion

Tread Perilously

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 135:07


Tread Perilously delivers on one more promise with The Facts of Life Reunion. The globetrotting Edna Garrett decides to spend Thanksgiving 2001 with her girls from Eastland. Of course, their lives have changed since she last minded them in the 1980s. Children, husbands, careers, and boyfriends occupy their minds. Nevertheless, they are all making an effort to travel to Blair's Peekskill inn to celebrate. But will Natalie's dueling beaus, a plumbing problem, the sudden disappearance of Jo, and their family dramas spoil the Thanksgiving spirit? Erik keeps his promise to not inflict another 7th Heaven episode on Justin, but breaks a promise to guest Paul Pakler (of Paul and Corey Cross the Streams) by forcing him to watch another TV movie. The mystery of Jo's disappearance is explained. Erik advocates for Laserdisc. John Wayne's The Conqueror becomes a discussion topic. Paul theorizes the film has an important place in post-9/11 discourse. He also points out the dynamic is off without Jo. Justin compliments the surprising attention of detail and the apparent callbacks to the original series. Mrs. Garrett gets recast as Master Splinter and the girls become another TV sitcom quartet. Paul pitches a remake of Bring Me The Head of Alfredo Garcia with Jo as the lead and the hackey Seinfeld impression makes a surprise return.

The Bulwark Podcast
Kristin Du Mez: Love Thy Neighbor Is for Wimps

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:33


Militant hyper-masculinity is the ideal of Christian manhood in the white evangelical world, and it's part and parcel of Trumpism and today's Republican Party. Author Kristen Du Mez joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Special Guest: Kristin Du Mez.

SIX-GUN JUSTICE PODCAST
SIX-GUN CONVERSATIONS—STUART ROSEBROOK / HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS

SIX-GUN JUSTICE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:56


Joining Rich for this Six-Gun Justice Conversations segment—which is especially designed with holiday gift giving in mind—is the editor of True West magazine, Stuart Rosebrook. A son of the American West, Stuart grew up in North Hollywood, California, but spent most of the summers of his youth at the Orme's Quarter Circle V-Bar Ranch Camp in northern Arizona. He has been a featured writer for Arizona Highways, Ranch and Reata, American Cowboy, and Camera & Darkroom. He was also a commentator for the John Wayne 100th Birthday DVD Edition of True Grit. Most recently, he assisted his late father, Jeb Rosebrook, publish his memoir, Junior Bonner: The Making of a Classic with Sam Peckinpah and Steve McQueen in the Summer of 1971.Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=kRf2_NuEPxu37b9-4FZKmX0UAJ4ZdKVRhAgUrm-4gBj-CkNHowjeqW7Q4bYKdoyNoNgGhKTBK-OpQSh_)

The Power Trip
HR. 2 - Whiskey Brown Teeth - The Power Trip

The Power Trip

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:14


The guys once again play the drunk John Wayne audio, Hawk plays an old parody song, Sauce shares the story about how he killed his dentist, and Mark Rosen joins the fun!

Preventing Grace Podcast – Anglican Church of the Good Shepherd
Preventing Grace Podcast: Kristin Du Mez, Disguising Ideology as History

Preventing Grace Podcast – Anglican Church of the Good Shepherd

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Matt and Anne begin a discussion of Kristin Du Mez’s (author of the popular book, Jesus and John Wayne) interview with Bishop Todd Hunter and Vanessa Sadler on their podcast “Peace Talks.” Download Audio

Red Weather Christians
E14: The Reveal

Red Weather Christians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 33:09


On this final episode of the season, Jen and Steve reveal why they named themselves Red Weather Christians. Also, they talk about cheese, again, with a tip for your thanksgiving mac & cheese. Wanna read with Steve and Jen over the next few weeks? Here's what's on their to-read list: Jesus and John Wayne, by Kristin Kobes Du Mez God and the Gay Christian, by Matthew Vines The Making of Biblical Womanhood, by Beth Allison Barr Join the conversation: Instagram & Twitter: jknapp_jk email: j4knapp1@gmail.com voice message: https://anchor.fm/redweatherchristians/message blog: https://lifeloveandsentences.wordpress.com/

Death By DVD
The Swimmer : Death By DVD's Directors Cuts

Death By DVD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 103:33


On this episode we introduce a brand new series and re-introduce an episode from the past! DEATH BY DVDS DIRECTORS CUTS : Something new made from something oldTHE SWIMMER (1968) directed by Frank Perry discussed on this episode "Well-off ad man Ned Merrill (Burt Lancaster) is visiting a friend when he notices the abundance of backyard pools that populate their upscale suburb. Ned suddenly decides that he'd like to travel the eight miles back to his own home by simply swimming across every pool in town."Be sure to check out this brief commercial all about DEATH BY DVDS DIRECTORS CUTS before listening CLICK HERE TO LISTEN HEAR THE ORIGINAL EPISODE "Here's to sugar on the strawberries" HERE The Death By DVD SENTINEL remix theme by LINUS FITNESS-CENTRE

Who The Hell Are We?
Baby John Wayne

Who The Hell Are We?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:17


Ed in Chicago, Melanie in Williamsburg, watching old movies and dishing on them! This week's movie: BABY FACE (1933) starring Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent, Theresa Harris, and baby John Wayne. Mel and Ed make book recommendations with similar themes. Send podcast comments and suggestions to Melanded@whothehellarewe.com Don't forget to subscribe to the show!

Rotten Treasure
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug with Frank Farrell

Rotten Treasure

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 120:59


This week, Frank Farrell (he/him) joins us for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. It's like the first Hobbit movie, but with a bit more Smauuuuuug. Who's responsible for John Wayne's boos? What kind of band is Barrel For Him? Will the hairy guy squeeze that mouse? “I'm a horse expert.” - Frank Farrell Frank encourages you to support live comedy! The N Crowd @phillyncrowd Crossroads Comedy Theater @xroadscomedy ComedySports @cszphilly Also check out Caitlin Corkery's Fishtown based Horror Short Stories (with Illustrations by Dan Corkery) HERE and get some spooky in your life.  linktr.ee/rottentreasure You can support the podcast to gain early access to episodes, promote yourself, or a business/organization and even get extra episodes. Who knows?! The tier system. That's who. patreon.com/rottentreasure          

El Faro
Gatopard@ | Isabel Ordaz: "Mi abuela Teresa sí que era una gataparda"

El Faro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 25:35


Isabel Ordaz, una de las actrices más emblemáticas de la televisión de este país, se ha sentado frente a los micrófonos de El Faro bajo el seudónimo de 'Dorothy' para hacer un recorrido por su trayectoria profesional. Y, tras un par de paradas en la serie 'Pepa y Pepe' y en 'La que se avecina', dos papeles que han contribuido a la fama que atesora, hemos llegado a su último proyecto: un poemario titulado 'La Geografía de tu nombre'. Isabel llegó a la actuación por convicción personal porque sus padres querían que "se casara, fuese funcionaria y tuviese un sueldo fijo", pero ella quiso estudiar interpretación. Y fue su abuela Teresa quien le trasmitió el amor por el cine: "Mi abuela era una mujer enorme que tuvo 14 hijos, todos bastardos, de un sereno asturiano que nunca fue su marido oficial. Ella, además, tenía debilidad por el cine y me llevaba los jueves a ver películas de cine americano porque amaba a John Wayne".

One Brew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Episode 94: The Harder They Fall

One Brew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 59:57


We can't say John Wayne would approve of Kevin's attempt at impersonating the Duke himself… but we do! Kevin and Doug travel back into the wild wild west, where they watch an incredible cast in Netflix's “The Harder They Fall.” This stars Idris Elba, Jonathan Majors, and Zazie Beetz and many more. Dougie fell off his horse at the language they were using and Kevin had to holster his preconceived notions that the trailer gave him. Listen to the discussion and decide for yourself.

Midnight Train Podcast
Cursed Movies

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 119:32


 In a world, where the midnight train podcast is at the top of the podcast game, one thing has the power to destroy everything they have worked for. This week their world will come crumbling down as everything they've achieved will be tested and possibly destroyed due to the madness that is (dun dun duuuuuuuunnnnn) cursed Movies!!! Tonight on the midnight train we are combining two of our favorite things…. This podcast and lots and lots of beer…YEAH! Oh wait, we do that every week… Oh, that's right, it's this podcast and….moooovies!! But… In true midnight train fashion, we can't just talk about movies…. We're gonna talk about cursed movies!!! That's right we are going to look at movies that for one reason or another have led to tragedy during and after the movies were made! Everything is on the table from health issues like cancer, accidental deaths while filming, people going crazy after filming, and just about everything else you can think of. Should be a fun and creepy ride discussing all these movies with you passengers and, in case you're wondering, yes we're still going to have a movies list at the end.    Ok so let's get into this and see what we have as far as cursed movies!   We're gonna start it with a big one since we just covered the subject matter of the film! The first cursed movie on our list is the exorcist. The filming of THE EXORCIST was done over nine months. The main set, a reproduction of the Georgetown home, was built in a warehouse in New York. During the filming, several curious incidents and accidents took place on the set and plagued those involved with the production. In addition, the budget of the film rose from $5 million to more than twice that amount. Obviously, any film production that lasts for more than a month or so will see its share of accidents and mishaps, but THE EXORCIST seems to have been particularly affected by unforeseeable calamities. Coincidence? Perhaps, but it left the cast and crew rightfully shaken.    The first incident occurred around 2:30 a.m. one Sunday morning when a fire broke out on the set. There was only one security guard at the Ceco 54th Street Studios when the McNeil house set caught fire and burned. The fire was the result of a bad electrical circuit, but it shut down filming for six weeks while the set was reconstructed from scratch. Ironically, as soon as the new set was ready, the sprinkler system broke down, causing an additional two-week delay.    Few of the actors in the film escaped personal troubles during the shoot. Just as Max Von Sydow (who played Father Merrin) touched down in New York to film his first scenes, he received a phone call saying that his brother died unexpectedly in Sweden. Von Sydow himself later became very ill during the filming. Irish actor Jack MacGowran (who played Burke Dennings) died only one week after his character was killed by the demon in the movie. Jason Miller (who played Father Karras) was stunned when his young son, Jordan, was struck down on an empty beach by a motorcyclist who appeared out of nowhere. The boy ALMOST died. THAT'S GOOD NEWS! Ellen Burstyn (who played Chris McNeill) wrenched her back badly during one scene when she was slapped by the possessed girl. The stunt went badly awry and she was laid up in bed for several weeks afterward, causing more delays in the filming. They had a rig attached to her where a guy offscreen would pull a rope that was tied to her to get that “smacked hard as shit and launched across the room” look the director wanted. Apparently, the director didn't like the first take or two and told the guy with the rope to yoke the living piss out of her. He got his shot. She screwed up her back.    In New York, one of the carpenters accidentally cut off his thumb on the set and one of the lighting technicians lost a toe. This was all over the news at the time due to the mixup at the hospital where they put the wrong appendages on the wrong patients. Yep, they switched the toe for the thumb. And if you believed that, well… I'm not sorry even a little bit. Anyway, The exorcist's location trip to Iraq was delayed from the spring, which is relatively cool, to July, the hottest part of the summer, when the temperature rose to 130 degrees and higher. Out of the eighteen-man crew that was sent there, Friedkin lost the services of nine of them, at one time or another, due to dysentery (which is super shitty) or sunstroke. To make matters worse, the bronze statue of the neo-Assyrian winged demon Pazazu, which was packed in a ten-foot crate, got lost in an air shipment from Los Angeles and ended up in Hong Kong, which caused another two-week delay.    "I don't know if it was a jinx, really," actress Ellen Burstyn later said. "But there were some really strange goings-on during the making of the film. We were dealing with some really heavy material and you don't fool around with that kind of material without it manifesting in some way. There were many deaths in the film. Linda's grandfather died, the assistant cameraman's wife had a baby that died, the man who refrigerated the set died, the janitor who took care of the building was shot and killed … I think overall there were nine deaths during the course of the film, which is an incredible amount… it was scary." Unholy shit, batman!   Things got so bad that William Friedkin took some drastic measures. Father Thomas Bermingham, S.J., from the Jesuit community at Fordham University, had been hired as a technical advisor for the film, along with Father John Nicola, who, while not a Jesuit, had been taught by Jesuit theologians at St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois. Friedkin came to Bermingham and asked him to exorcise the set. The priest was unable to perform an actual exorcism, but he did give a solemn blessing in a ceremony that was attended by everyone then on the set, from Max Von Sydow to the technicians and grips. "Nothing else happened on the set after the blessing,” Bermingham stated, "but around that time, there was a fire in the Jesuit residence set in Georgetown." And while nothing else tragic occurred on the set, strange events and odd coincidences were reported during the post-production work on the film. "There were strange images and visions that showed up on film that were never planned," Friedkin later claimed. "There are double exposures in the little girl's face at the end of one reel that are unbelievable."   As we talked about in previous episodes, The film opened on December 26, 1973, to massive crowds. Within weeks of the first public screenings of the film, stories started to make the rounds that audience members were fainting and vomiting in the theaters. There were also reports of disturbing nightmares and reportedly, several theater ushers had to be placed under a doctor's care, or quit their jobs, after experiencing successive showings of the movie. In numerous cities that were checked after THE EXORCIST had run for several weeks, reporters found that every major hospital had been forced to deal with patients who reported, after seeing the film, severe cases of vomiting and hallucinations. There were also reports of people being carried out of theaters in stretchers. What do you think, passengers? Mere publicity stunts, or was this the real thing?    The info for this cursed movie came from a great article on americanhauntingsink.com check them out!   Next up we're gonna dive into a sweet little movie about a tree, a child's toy, and REAL SKELETONS IN THE SWIMMING POOL! Yep, you guessed it, poltergeist! The curse of Poltergeist spawned many theories about why the movie and its sequels were cursed with so much tragedy, with one suggesting the use of real-life human bones in the original film caused the hauntings.   Actress JoBeth Williams - who played the mother, Diane Freeling - is seen dropping into a pool of skeletons in one spooky scene and she later reveals the bones were real. She told TVLand: "In my innocence and naiveté, I assumed that these were not real skeletons.   "I assumed that they were prop skeletons made out of plastic or rubber . . . I found out, as did the crew, that they were using real skeletons, because it's far too expensive to make fake skeletons out of rubber."   Just four months after the film's release, tragedy struck with actress Dominique Dunne, who played the family's eldest daughter Dana, who became the victim of a grisly murder. On the day before Halloween in 1982, the actress, 22, was strangled by her ex-boyfriend John Thomas Sweeney outside their home in West Hollywood. She survived the attack but was left in a coma. She never regained consciousness and died five days later. Sweeney was later convicted of voluntary manslaughter and spent three and half years of a six-year sentence behind bars for the killing. He changed his name to John Maura so if you want to let him know what a twat he is, I mean… we can't stop you.   In the years after the film's release movie bosses plowed ahead with plans for a sequel and Poltergeist II: The Other Side hit cinemas in 1986. Among the cast was Will Sampson, best known for playing Chief Bromden in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest opposite Jack Nicholson. The actor - cast as shaman Taylor in the movie - was concerned about the use of real skeletons in the first film and offered to perform a real-life exorcism. He's believed to have conducted the ceremony alone and in the middle of the night, but the cast reportedly felt relieved afterward. However, less than a year after the film's release - the curse had claimed another victim. Sampson had long-term health problems as he suffered from a degenerative condition called scleroderma, which affected his heart and lungs. He underwent a heart and lung transplant in the summer of 1987 but died of post-operative kidney failure on June 3.    Ok, this one is sad and you've probably heard of it. The most famous victim of the Poltergeist curse was Heather O'Rourke. She appeared as Carol Anne in the first two films as well as the third installment, Poltergeist III, which hit cinemas in 1988. She died just four months before the movie's release at only 12 years of age. In January 1988, Heather fell ill with what appeared to be flu-like symptoms. She collapsed at home the following day and was rushed to the hospital. She suffered a cardiac arrest but doctors were able to revive her and they diagnosed her with intestinal stenosis - a partial obstruction of the intestine. She underwent surgery, but went into cardiac arrest again in recovery and doctors were unable to save her. She passed away in February 1988, just weeks after her 12th birthday, and it was later reported she died from congenital stenosis and septic shock. Absolutely heartbreaking.   Character actor Lou Perryman became the second cast member to fall victim to murder. He played Pugsley in the original movie and suffered a brutal end in 1992 when he was hacked to death with an ax aged 67. A convict recently released from prison, Seth Christopher Tatum, confessed he had killed Perryman at his home after coming off his medication and going on a drinking binge. Tatum pleaded guilty to his murder in 2011 and was sentenced to life in prison.   Actor Richard Lawson played one of the parapsychologists, Ryan, in the original film (not the guy who ate the chicken with the maggots… you're welcome) and he came close to becoming another victim of the curse in 1992. He was involved in a terrifying plane crash in 1992 when the USAir Flight 405 crashed into New York City's Flushing Bay on route to guess where? Cleveland friggin Ohio. The crash claimed the lives of 27 of the 51 passengers, but Lawson was among the survivors. He put his lucky escape down to a last-minute seat change that saved his life. Lawson went on to be part of showbiz royalty when he married Beyonce's mother, Tina Knowles in 2015.   Info for this movie was taken from mirror.co.uk.    Next up how about… Hmm…. Oh, I know… The omen! The 2976 version of course. Obviously, Moody is a time traveler and saw the upcoming remake, 955 friggin years in the future! No! It was 1976! Of all the world's cursed film productions, The Omen is considered to have one of the worst movie curses of all time. The 1976 film tells the story of a man who accidentally adopts Damien the Antichrist as his son and the movie remains one of horror's most successful franchises. But what was so odious about the set that led producers to believe the devil was punishing them for making the movie? Is The Omen really cursed? The Omen film set haunting includes death, injury, and lots of lightning bolts: after all, the creator himself warned the cast and crew that Satan wasn't going to like what they were doing. Here's what happened behind the scenes of The Omen movie and why, despite its several sequels and a 2006 remake, it remains one of history's movies that indeed may have angered Satan himself!   In June 1975, Gregory Peck's son, Jonathan Peck, killed himself with a bullet to the head, two months before filming was to start. Several strange events then surrounded the production.   For protection on the set of "The Omen," Bernhard wore a Coptic cross. In an interview, Bernhard spoke about the production's eerie events, which included the death of an animal trainer.   Precisely one day after they shot the sequence involving the baboons at the animal center, Bernhard said that a tiger seized the animal trainer by the head, causing his death immediately. Whhhaat the fuuuuuck?   One of the most haunting stories surrounding The Omen didn't happen during the shoot, but during the production of the World War II epic A Bridge Too Far. John Richardson, who did special effects on The Omen, was involved in a head-on collision that beheaded his girlfriend, eerily mirroring the decapitation scene with David Warner. Supposedly, after the crash, Richardson saw a street sign that said, "Ommen, 66.6 km." This accident occurred after The Omen had wrapped production, but many of course linked it to the evil aura of the film.   Several planes were also set ablaze, including the plane carrying Peck and screenwriter David Seltzer. Meanwhile, Bernhard said they had to land in Nova Scotia after flying back from England. He added:   "We had the film on board... Dick [Donner] and I were very, very nervous." IRA bombs ripped through a hotel, in which executive producer Mace Neufeld and his wife stayed, and another in which prominent executives and stars, including Peck, were to have dinner.   Once word got back to Fox about all the terrible incidents that plagued production, the studio saw it as a great way to drum up a ton of publicity and add to the film's ominous aura. They also put a great tagline into the film's ad campaign:                        You have been warned. If something frightening happens to you today, think about it. It may be The Omen.   As Donner recalled in The Omen: Curse or Coincidence, "If we had been making a comedy, you would have recalled all the funny, great, ridiculous, silly moments that happened in that film. if you were doing a love story, you'd remember all the times somebody left their wife, fell in love... You're doing The Omen, anything that happens on that film, you don't tell about the jokes, you don't talk about the love stories, you don't even think about them. You think about things that coincidentally could have been something to do with The Omen. We had lots of them."   Creepy stuff right there my friends.   Next up we have one of my personal all-time favorites, the crow! The Crow began filming in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1993. Cursed Films revealed that before production got underway, a mysterious caller left a voicemail message warning the crew not to shoot the movie because bad things would happen. Eerily, two on-set electricians were involved in an accident in which their truck hit a live wire. One of the men experienced second and third-degree burns and lost both ears.   Disaster also struck the entire production when a hurricane destroyed the movie set. That is when the “curse of The Crow” rumors began circulating in Hollywood. The star of The Crow, Brandon Lee, was the son of martial arts legend, Bruce Lee. The elder Lee died during the production of his final film. Some fans speculated that the Chinese mafia had placed a hit on the actor for betraying martial arts secrets. Others suspected that he had been struck by an insidious death blow at an earlier time.   The most popular theory about The Dragon's death is that he was a victim of the Lee Family Curse. His older brother had died, and Lee's parents believed there was a demon targeting the males in the Lee family.   Like his father, Brandon Lee died before he finished filming The Crow. In a fluke accident, the performer was shot while completing an action sequence, as described in Cursed Films. The crew used what are called ‘dummy rounds,' for the scene, but there was something in the barrel of the gun that acted as a lethal projectile, killing Lee.    To complete the final photography for The Crow, the man who had been working as Lee's stunt double wore a mask in his image.   Crazy stuff!   How about some of our patented quick hitters!    The Conqueror" is a whitewashed 1956 film with John Wayne as Genghis Khan. The film was shot at a location downwind from a nuclear testing site, causing dozens of crew members to eventually die of cancer. so maybe not so much a curse as a poor choice of locations.   Apocalypse Now"   The horror! Francis Ford Coppola was tempting fate when he decided to film "Apocalypse Now" during monsoon season. Big mistake. The monsoon destroyed multiple sets, Martin Sheen suffered a heart attack during filming, and Coppola was so stressed that he suffered a seizure, according to The Independent. "Apocalypse Now" (1979) turned out to be a masterpiece anyway, but the documentary "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse" about its making is just as engrossing.    "Fitzcarraldo"    Dysentery. Injuries. Fights among the crew. Nothing seemed to go right during the filming of 1982's "Fitzcarraldo." The story concerns hauling a boat over a hill, which the crew literally accomplished, but not without the same nightmarish difficulty as is depicted in the film. And in the end, director Werner Herzog looked as mad and overly driven as its hero. Check out the documentary "Burden of Dreams" for more.   The Superman Curse    Comic book movie fans may know about the "Superman Curse," which is said to afflict multiple actors involved in Superman films. Christopher Reeve was paralyzed following a horse accident. And Margot Kidder, who played Lois opposite Reeve, suffered from bipolar disorder, according to TCM. Also, the original Superman, George Reeves, supposedly committed suicide. His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a controversial subject; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.   "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers"    Bad luck ran amok in Middle Earth during the filming of 2002's "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers." DVD interviews revealed that multiple actors and stuntmen suffered injuries while shooting the film's elaborate fight sequences. The worst was Viggo Mortensen, who broke his toe and chipped his tooth while filming.   The Exorcism of Emily rose   Dexter star Jennifer Carpenter reported that during the making of The Exorcism of Emily Rose — in which she played a big-screen version of German woman Anneliese Michel, whose poor health and subsequent death was blamed on a failed exorcism — her radio would mysteriously turn on and off. From an interview with Dread Central:   Q: A common question when making a film like this; did anything weird happen during filming?   JC: I thought about that when it happened, and two or three times when I was going to sleep my radio came on by itself. The only time it scared me was once because it was really loud and it was Pearl Jam's “Alive” (laughs). Laura's TV came on a couple of times.   Q: At 3:00 a.m.?   JC: Mine wasn't 3:00 a.m. I was born at 3:00 a.m. but it hasn't happened to me. I did check.   We'll totally do an episode on Analiese one of these days   Psycho Myra Jones (aka Myra Davis) was the uncredited body double/stand-in for Psycho star Janet Leigh during the making of Hitchcock's 1960 film. A handyman named Kenneth Dean Hunt, who was supposedly a Hitchcock “obsessive,” murdered her.   The Conjuring   Real-life ghost hunters Ed and Lorraine Warren, who aided the real-life Amityville Horror case, investigated the haunting of the Perron family home — a farmhouse plagued by generations of death, disaster, and a possessed doll. The case inspired James Wan's supernatural film, which left some audiences in the Philippines with such a fright there were priests available at screenings to bless viewers and provide counseling. On and off-set paranormal incidents — including strange claw marks on star Vera Farmiga's computer, Wan's tormented dog growling at invisible intruders, a strange wind (that apparently put Carolyn Perron in the hospital), and fire — were reported.   The Innkeepers   Filmed at the reportedly haunted hotel the Yankee Pedlar Inn in Torrington, Connecticut, The Innkeepers director Ti West was skeptical about the strange occurrences during the making of his movie. Still, creepy stories from the set became the focus in the press. From an interview with West:   I'm a skeptic so I don't really buy it. But I've definitely seen doors close by themselves; I've seen a TV turn off and on by itself; lights would always burn out in my room. Everyone on the crew has very vivid dreams every night, which is really strange.   The one story that is the most intriguing to me — In the film, the most haunted room is the Honeymoon Suite. That's where the ghost stuff started in the hotel. The only reason I picked the room that I picked to shoot in, was because it was big enough to do a dolly shot. No more thought went into it other than pure technical reasons. So when we're finishing the movie, I find out that the most haunted room in real life is the room I picked to be the haunted room in the movie. It could be a coincidence. It's weird that it happened that way. . . . [Star] Sara Paxton would wake up in the middle of the night thinking someone was in the room with her. Everyone has stories, but I was too busy saying, “Let's shoot this! We have 17 days!   Atuk"    "Atuk" is a movie so cursed that it never got made. The project, based on a 1963 Mordecai Richler novel about an Eskimo in New York, had four different men attached to play the lead while in development hell through the 1970s and '80s: John Belushi, Sam Kinison, John Candy, and Chris Farley. All four died shortly after entering negotiations to be in the film. Holy shit!    Ok how about twilight zone the movie. The 1983 film 'Twilight Zone: The Movie' directed by John Landis and Steven Spielberg gained publicity pre-release because of the deaths of lead actor Vic Morrow and two child extras during the filming of the helicopter crash scene. The children were illegally hired to play the role in this scene, as Landis would go on to reveal in the subsequent trial. It was also prohibited to make children work after a certain hour in the evening. However, Landis insisted that the scene would have to entail a late-night setting to seem more authentic. This was the last scene in the film. It also included explosions as a helicopter flew over the village while Morrow would run across the street to save the Vietnamese children from the explosion. Testing for the scene sparked concerns when the helicopter seemed to vigorously rock at the explosion but despite this, Landis' need to capture the explosion took priority. He reportedly said, "You think that was big? You ain't seen nothing yet." At the controls of this helicopter was a Vietnam War veteran named Dorcey Wingo, who had just joined the movie business. When the cameras began filming, the pyrotechnic fireball that had been fired as part of the explosion hit the helicopter, engulfing it in flames. The helicopter then crashed into the river where the actors were standing — Morrow, 6-year-old Renee Chen, and 7-year-old Myca Dinh Le. Almost a hundred people were present when the tragedy occurred. The helicopter skidded right onto Renee, crushing her to death and when it toppled over, the main blade sliced through Morrow and Myca.   Rosemary's baby is next up on the list. Over the years, the myth surrounding Roman Polanski's 1968 film Rosemary's Baby has only grown in stature. The film is based on the 1967 novel of the same name by American novelist Ira Levin. He came up with the idea for the book in 1965, drawing inspiration from his wife who was pregnant at the time, his New York apartment, and the anxiety of being a parent.   The struggling writer imagined a world where there was no God and the devil was allowed to reign freely. This is evident in the iconic ending where Rosemary finds out that her husband sold her womb to Satan and that her child is the Antichrist. Levin was catapulted into the highest echelons of the literary world due to the success of his novel and a year later, a European auteur who was looking for his own Hollywood break decided to direct the film adaptation of his novel.   However, not everyone was pleased with Levin's attacks on religion. He faced severe backlash from the Catholic Church for his “blasphemy” and his wife left him the year the film was released. He was never the same man again, growing increasingly paranoid over the years. Levin repeatedly had to make public statements denouncing Satanism and told Dick Cavett that he had become “terrified” as he grew older. 30 years after the release of the film, Levin came up with a sequel titled Son of Rosemary but it tanked.   William Castle was the man who first recognized the potential of Levin's work and secured the rights to make a film adaptation. Best known for his work on B-grade horror films, Castle wanted to direct it initially but Paramount Pictures executive Robert Evans agreed to go ahead with the project only if Castle worked as a producer. In April of 1969, Castle was hospitalized because of severe kidney stones. He was already under a lot of stress due to the sheer volume of hate mail he received, a terrible consequence of being attached to Rosemary's Baby. In his autobiography, he claimed that he began to hallucinate scenes from the film during his surgery and even shouted, “Rosemary, for God's sake drop that knife!” Although Castle recovered, he never reached that level of success again.   Producer Robert Evans was not exempt from this alleged curse either. He had risen to the top with major hits like Rosemary's Baby and The Godfather. However, he was convicted of cocaine trafficking in 1980 and got a suspended prison sentence. As a part of his plea bargain, Evans had to make an anti-drug commercial. Three years later, the producer would get caught up in the high-profile murder of Roy Radin which has come to be known as the “Cotton Club murder”. Despite two witnesses testifying that Evans was involved in the case, he was later cleared of the charges. In 1993, he told The New York Times, “I had 10 years of a horrific life, Kafkaesque. There were nights I cried myself to sleep.”   This is arguably the most renowned story that is related to Rosemary's Baby. In autumn of 1968, composer Krzysztof Komeda, who worked on the film, fell off a rocky escarpment while partying and went into a four-month coma. Coincidentally, this affliction is exactly what the witches in Levin's book subject Rosemary's suspicious friend to. Komeda never came out of the coma and died in Poland the following year.   John Lennon was assassinated outside The Dakota in 1980, the famous building where they filmed Rosemary's Baby. Producer Robert Evans claimed that the whole time he was on set at the apartment building he felt a “distinctly eerie feeling”. Lennon was gunned down by alleged “fan” Mark David Chapman who was influenced by Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye and the loneliness of protagonist Holden Caulfield. However, the fleeting association with the film has led fans of the film to link Lennon's assassination with the “curse” of the film. It can be said that the primary reason why the myth of the curse came about was the brutal murder of Polanski's wife, actress Sharon Tate. Polanski even wanted to cast Tate as Rosemary but Evans was adamant about Mia Farrow's involvement. A year after the film's release, Tate and her friends were stabbed to death by followers of cult leader Charles Manson. Tate was eight-and-a-half months pregnant at the time of her demise. The members of the Manson Family delivered around 100 stab wounds to the four victims and wrote “Helter Skelter” on the wall in blood.   After his wife and unborn son were killed, Polanski indulged in substance abuse to cope with things but he ended up exemplifying human depravity. While guest editing the French edition of Vogue in 1977, the director preyed upon a 13-year old girl and persuaded her to participate in multiple photoshoots. During the second shoot at Jack Nicholson's house, he incapacitated the minor with champagne and half a Quaalude before sexually violating her multiple times.   Although he was arrested for the felony and spent 42 days in jail, Polanski became a fugitive and fled to France to avoid facing charges. Since then, he has lived the life of a criminal and has avoided traveling to countries where he can be extradited back to the US.   Ok, let's round things out with the wizard of oz. Despite its commercial success, The Wizard of Oz is seen by some as cursed. There were so many serious accidents onset that those Oscar-nominated special effects almost cost cast members their lives, from the two actors playing winged monkeys crashing to the ground when the wires that hoisted them up in the air broke, to the Wicked Witch of the West's stunt double Betty Danko injuring her left leg when the broomstick exploded.   Buddy Ebsen was originally cast in the role of the Tin Woodman, a.k.a. the Tin Man, but he was essentially poisoned by the makeup, which was made of pure aluminum dust. Nine days after filming started he was hospitalized, sitting under an oxygen tent. When he was not getting better fast enough, the filmmakers hired Jack Haley to be the Tin Man instead. This time, instead of applying the aluminum powder, the makeup artists mixed it into a paste and painted it on him. He did develop an infection in his right eye that needed medical attention, but it ended up being treatable.   Margaret Hamilton — who played the Wicked Witch of the West and was the one tipped who Harmetz off to the turmoil on set more than three decades later for her 1977 book — got burns, and the makeup artists had to rush to remove her copper makeup so that it wouldn't seep through her wounds and become toxic. Unlike Ebsen, she didn't get fired because they could live without her on the set for several more weeks.   An actor playing one of the Wicked Witch of the West's soldiers accidentally jumped on top of Dorothy's Toto, Carl Spitz, the dog trainer on set, told Harmetz. The dog (a female Cairn terrier named Terry) sprained its foot, and Spitz had to get a canine double. Terry did recover and returned to the set a few weeks later.   In a memoir by Judy Garland's third husband, Sid Luft, published posthumously in 2017, he writes that, after bar-hopping in Culver City, the actors who played the munchkins “would make Judy's life miserable by putting their hands under her dress.” Harmetz says it's true that the actors would go drinking near the Culver City hotel where they stayed, but she says their interactions with Garland did not rise to the level of what Luft described. “Nobody on the movie ever saw her or heard of a munchkin assaulting her,” said one worker on the film. Garland did say the drinking was annoying in an interview with talk-show host Jack Paar, but experts on Garland's life say that her rant about being scarred by the rowdy behavior on set may have been a deflection from the real damage she suffered during that time, at the hands of the studio. Garland was only 16 when she made The Wizard of Oz, and her struggles with depression and disordered eating started at an early age and continued for the rest of her life. She claimed that the studio executives gave her uppers and sleeping pills so she could keep up with the demanding pace of show business. She struggled with drug addiction and attempted suicide several times before she died of an accidental overdose on June 22, 1969, at just 47 years old.   The film went through four different producers by the time it was through.   Richard Thorpe, the first director, insisted that Judy Garland wear a blonde wig and thick makeup to depict Dorothy. When Buddy Epsen got sick from his Tin Man makeup and filming shut down for two weeks, the studio fired Thorpe and replaced him with George Cukor of My Fair Lady fame. Cukor encouraged Garland to wear natural makeup and play Dorothy less cartoonish and more natural. Cukor later left the film to work on Gone with the Wind instead and Viktor Fleming took his place. However, Cukor came back a few weeks later after getting fired from Gone With the Wind by Clark Gable (supposedly he was fired when Gable found out he was homosexual).   Director King Vidor was responsible for most of the sepia sequences and also helped Mervyn LeRoy with editing in post-production.   Not only did the public think former kindergarten teacher Margaret Hamilton was really evil following the first airing of The Wizard of Oz — she also suffered physically for the role. Hamilton received second and third-degree burns all over her body when the green copper makeup she was wearing got too hot during the fire scene. Her stunt double spent months in the hospital after a prop broom exploded — they were using a double because Hamilton got injured on an earlier take.   Stage makeup and prosthetics in 1939 were nowhere near what they are today. Ray Bolger's Scarecrow makeup left deeply embedded marks in his skin that didn't disappear for more than a year after the movie wrapped up filming. Luckily, this would never happen today.   How bout that hanging munchkin… Well, sorry folks. That seems to be fake. In a scene where Dorothy, the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), and the Tin Man (Jack Haley) are skipping down the Yellow Brick Road, singing “we're off to see the wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz,” some think the dark, moving figure hanging from a tree in the background is an actor who hanged himself on set. More likely, it's one of the exotic birds that the filmmakers borrowed from the Los Angeles Zoo to create a wilderness setting. The rumor has been circulating since around 1989, the time of the 50th anniversary of the film's release. Alright, there you have it… Cursed movies!!!  Obscure 90s horror movies you need to see   https://www.ranker.com/list/obscure-1990s-horror-movies/christopher-myers

movies tv dvd new york los angeles chinese hitchcock american german bruce lee halloween god vietnamese philippines new york city world war ii richardson new york times french castle hearts dragon hollywood psycho west injuries illinois poland england european france testing nest superman irish vietnam war iraq dreams wind baby holy peck vogue apocalypse cursed north carolina judy garland wilmington connecticut crow ohio sweden wizard supposedly middle earth oz francis ford coppola thorpe sweeney jack nicholson steven spielberg jesuits alive hong kong luft evans cleveland hamilton viggo mortensen catcher rye fights john wayne ironically reeve beyonce ti west independent werner herzog john landis friedkin charles manson landis william friedkin satan unholy moody omen sharon tate clark gable godfather toto helter skelter poltergeist pearl jam nova scotia janet leigh pugsley paramount pictures george reeves catholic church levin manson family my fair lady fordham university ray bolger exorcism cuckoo sampson west hollywood exorcist coppola chris farley one flew over brandon lee mere gregory peck christopher reeve coincidence john belushi culver city john candy satanism burden cotton club genghis khan salinger innkeepers ira levin roman polanski john richardson georgetown lorraine warren antichrist cairn jason miller martin sheen wan kafkaesque sam kinison tcm tin woodman wicked witch yellow brick road bernhard gable dick cavett morrow emily rose amityville horror ellen burstyn polanski george cukor coptic perryman tin man apocalypse now david seltzer jack haley holden caulfield vera farmiga max von sydow david warner james wan poltergeist ii the other side poltergeist iii perron scarecrows assyrian mia farrow coincidentally margaret hamilton eerily los angeles zoo dominique dunne quaalude spitz anneliese michel vic morrow bermingham bridge too far jennifer carpenter robert evans mcneil ceco myca mundelein eskimos jack paar atuk krzysztof komeda komeda street studios honeymoon suite carol anne fitzcarraldo mark david chapman tina knowles ommen torrington von sydow father karras cukor mordecai richler cursed films
Movie Lovers Unite
Chatting with Independent Producer/Writer John Wayne

Movie Lovers Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 53:58


Hello Movie Lovers, for tonight's episode John is joined by independent producer/writer John Wayne S. III for his film Ebony Hustle. Follow us on Facebook at https://m.facebook.com/HouseNerdGeek/?ref=bookmarks Doing a fundraiser for St. Jude! If you like to help, please click below to raise money to go to St Jude Research Hospital. https://tlbodenhamer84.scentsy.us/party/15197126/st-judes-fundraiser?fbclid=IwAR3aUQArkoGULV3xpqP-heQIecqbJToctgH9PVZfbeMCcKApMkpzZNCKw9w If you want to donate to the show feel free to do so by going to https://www.gofundme.com/f/movie-lovers-unite-podcast?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 For all of your entertainment news make sure that you check out www.movieloversunite.com If you want to be apart of our Patron feel free by clicking the link https://www.patreon.com/join/movieloversunite Follow us on Facebook at https://m.facebook.com/HouseNerdGeek/?ref=bookmarks If you want to get in touch with Movie Lovers Unite feel free to email us at movieloversunite@gmail.com If you want to leave us a voice mail message here's the link https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/message

Pickled Peppers Hop Talk
The Hangover Prevention Ring!

Pickled Peppers Hop Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:00


What's up with Sober September? It Doesn't rhyme or flow at all!Can't even win a bet with ourselves!Pressure Fermenting is the bestCare package for X-massHawaii - ColoradoMaui Brewing 19.2oz cans? WTF?SeltzerHP FoundedWAAFLou GehrigDeadliest earthquakeStagecoach film that skyrocketed John Wayne's Career Spanish warWizard of OzGhost BustersVirgin Birds BornHangover prevention ringBear licks womanAstronauts wear diapersLinks from Monday Madness with Manda:Asexual Condors: https://allthatsinteresting.com/california-condor-asexual-reproductionHangover Ring: https://allthatsinteresting.com/yavne-winery-hangover-ringHand Licking Bear: https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2021/11/05/canada-bear-licks-womans-hand-Quesnel-British-Columbia/7981636144638/

Cross The Line 1524, The Common Man's Podcast
Episode #84---John Wayne‘s Gun Auction

Cross The Line 1524, The Common Man's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 66:30


Episode #84—John Wayne's Gun Auction... Another fun night at the Speakeasy! We are joined by our friend Mike Gardner of Batesville Liquor Co and Tebbe Liquors. We have a tasting of something a whole lot different, Alan reveals a plan in the making. Our friend Tony Roberts had a chance to bid on John Wayne's gun at an auction. We wind up talking about the new season of The Curse of Oak Island and friend of the podcast Matty Blake and his podcast, Rated P for Paranormal!   Available on all podcast apps and players including Tunein Radio! Join Jeff Montag, Ruben Hunt. Duane Bischoff and Alan Stenger for another episode of Cross The Line 1524! Recorded with a Live Audience at “The Rusted Nail Speakeasy”! Thank You for listening to Cross The Line1524 Check out our web site at: www.crosstheline1524.com Facebook: Cross The Line 15/24 You Tube: Cross The Line 1524 Email us : podcast@crosstheline1524.com Take a listen to one of America's fastest growing new podcasts! Please take time to leave us a 5 star rating to help us promote our podcast.

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Ruta Lee Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 61:30


Sometimes all that glitters is gold. Actress, dancer, philanthropist, pisser, Ruta Lee, is one bodacious, bawdy broad, absolutely gorgeous, inside and out. This was not the time to be having a bad hair day and wardrobe issues. Sitting across the virtual desk from this stunner I felt like an ill-kempt man. I couldn't take my eyes off the perfectly coiffed and made-up woman whose lipstick never lost its luster through an hour of conversation, whilst mine disappeared faster than Florence Griffith-Joyner at the starting gate. And yet, Ruta, at every turn, was warm, inclusive, and oh so kind to me. Literally giddy with her attention, I consider my ass well kissed. And, what a conversation it 'twas! From her earliest days in Montreal with her adoring Lithuanian parents who sacrificed everything to get their Ruta to Hollywood. Dance lessons, acting classes, and live theatre swiftly led to teenage Ruta being featured on The Burns and Allen Show, The Adventures Superman, to starring in the Academy Award Nominated, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. Ruta talked about Frank Sinatra and how he unknowingly led to her casting in Witness for the Prosecution, and then knowingly her starring role opposite him and the rest of the Rat Pack in Sergeants 3. Frank, Dean, Sammy, and Peter, oh my! We got stories! About meeting Marilyn, sitting across the table from Elizabeth Taylor (with whom she later co-starred in Sweet Bird of Youth), Milton Berle, and John Wayne. What a story that is! Meeting Debbie Reynolds with whom she shared 50 years of great friendship and philanthropy. The Thalians, a huge part of both of their lives which has changed more lives than can be counted. Playing charades with Lucy, getting Clint, being adored by George Burns, kissing more Hollywood stars than you can shake a stick at, and getting the reveal on who were two of her favorites. *sigh* We talked Perry Mason, High Rollers, and Alex Trebeck, Match Game, Hollywood Squares, Johnny Carson, leaving us with a tear, yet we barely scratched the Ruta surface. There's a promised Part 2 in both of our futures. As soon as I mentioned her recently dropped memoir, Consider Your Ass Kissed, https://amzn.to/3mB2ZAy she hit it back to me, giving a nod to my, Don't Jump. Generosity seeps from this woman's pores. I can't wait to dive into her juicy tome. What a life she's lived and continues to savor, and wow, can this woman tell a tale. I'll be volunteering at the Ruta Lee fan club, devouring her book, jumping to schedule another sit-down, and, I hope sharing many more moments and belly laughs with this Hollywood glamour puss. Ruta Lee defies age and gravity. I'd kill to have what she's having. Ruta Lee Live on Game Changers with Vicki Abelson Wed, 11/3/21, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/2ZPJACWv All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best dressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ Blue Microphones and Kevin Walt

Kicking the Seat
Ep721: The Michael Dante Way

Kicking the Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Ian talks with actor, athlete, author, and radio personality Michael Dante!When an injury cut short a promising Major League Baseball career in the mid-1950s, young Ralph Vitti took up drama at the University of Miami Florida. A chance encounter with bandleader Tommy Dorsey led to an MGM screen test, and a decades-spanning career in motion pictures and television.At the insistence of legendary studio head Jack Warner, Vitti changed his name and went on to star as Michael Dante in movies with the likes of Elvis Presley, Joan Collins, Randolph Scott, Rod Steiger, and countless others. Along the way, Mr. Dante built a life of charitable giving, celebrity mingling (John Wayne, Sidney Poitier, and Tony Curtis were friends), and constantly exploring new outlets for his creativity.In this super-sized interview, Mr. Dante shares some fantastic behind-the-scenes stories (including filming an episode of Star Trek in 120-degree desert heat); describes the writing of his latest book about the 12 years he spent interviewing movie stars and athletes on his Palm Springs radio show; and what the future holds for this lively jack of all trades.Plus: Ian asks about his star turn in the 1975 Western, Winterhawk; how he recalls stories at age 90 better than most people in their mid-twenties; and the craziest "singles table" in Hollywood history!Show LinksWatch the Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) trailer.Watch the Seven Thieves (1960) trailer.Watch the Winterhawk (1975) trailer.Listen to a sampling of Michael Dante's classic radio interviews at his website.You can purchase signed copies of Michael Dante's books (including My Classic Radio Interviews with The Stars, Volume One) at his website.Also, be sure to check out my interview with J.R. Jordan about his book, Robert Wise: The Motion Pictures (which planted the seeds for this episode).And you can order Robert Wise: The Motion Pictures at Amazon!Subscribe to, like, and comment on the Kicking the Seat YouTube channel!

The Common Sense Show
DEEP STATE COVERT TACTICS BRNGING USA DOWN- JOHN WAYNE

The Common Sense Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:47


What the Hell Were You Thinking
Episode 234: Dia de Gringos Redux

What the Hell Were You Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 28:00


Show Notes Episode 234: “Dia de Gringos” This week Host Dave Bledsoe honors the spirits of his ancestors by drinking an entire bottle of Irish Whiskey in one sitting. (How this is different from a normal Friday night is open to debate.) On the show this week, we engage in a little cultural appropriation and try to create a Dia de Muertos that white people won't feel guilty about. (Not that any of us feel “guilt” over such things.) Along the way we learn some sad facts about Dave and how he keeps friends. (Hint: he is very bad at it). Then we meet the cultural ancestors of White People in America, John Wayne, Howard Zinn and Fred Rogers and learn how to honor them on our special day. (Are there cigarettes? You betcha!) Finally, we teach you how to construct a culturally appropriate White Person Ofrenda and how to host your own Dia de Gringos festival! More importantly, we learn the horrible truth about Fred Rogers. Our Sponsor this week is Revenant.com, we make coming back from the dead simple. We open with Stanley Tucci's immortal performance as Muerte. (For DEATH!) and close with a Death Metal neighborhood.  Show Theme: https://www.jamendo.com/track/421668/prelude-to-common-sense The Show on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheHell_Podcast The Show on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whatthehellpodcast/ The Show on Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/david-bledsoe-4 www.whatthehellpodcast.com Give us your money on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/Whatthehellpodcast The Show Line: 347 687 9601 Closing Music: https://youtu.be/7kcMFZ9WJiw Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Common Sense Show
THE NEW CHINESE WEAPONS SYSTEMS- JOHN WAYNE

The Common Sense Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 59:02


How the West Was 'Cast
Men of the West: Ford, Wayne, Leone, Eastwood

How the West Was 'Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 52:43


If there's a quaternity of artists whose work in the Western genre continues to attract legions of fans and inspire generations of filmmakers, it's most certainly John Ford, John Wayne, Sergio Leone, and Clint Eastwood.  On this episode, co-host Andrew Patrick Nelson discusses the profound impact these four giants had on the genre, and reveals that many of the popular notions we have about them may not paint the full picture. It's a fascinating lecture that was originally delivered at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in November of 2017, and has been revised and rerecorded for this episode.For more information about the original multidisciplinary museum exhibition, titled "Once Upon a Time... The Western," visit the MMFA website. To learn more about the award-winning publication that accompanied the show (and to buy your own copy), visit Amazon.

Who ARTed
Jim Davis

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 36:57


In this episode I spoke with Lyndsey Little, the illustrator and creator of the Oni Girl comic about Jim Davis, the creator of the classic comic strip, Garfield. Davis was born July 28,1945 in Marion Indiana. He grew up on a cow farm. He actually wanted to grow up to be a farmer like his father, but he had asthma and found the outdoors wasn't for him. TV wasn't as big back then, so his mom gave him a paper and pencil to keep him occupied and that is how he developed his love of drawing.  In high school he joined the school newspaper staff and eventually became the Art Editor. This is where he published his first cartoon and later reused the same characters when making illustrations for the yearbook. Studied Art and business at Ball State University. In 2006, he returned to Ball State as a member of the faculty where he gives back to the next generation of comic artists by sharing his experience and insights into the business. In 1969, Davis started assisting with Tumbleweeds which was a very successful and long running (42 years) comic strip satirizing the American West. This was at a time when westerns, John Wayne and all that had been popular.  Davis spent about 9 years as Tom K. Ryan's assistant on Tumbleweeds and during that time, Davis also developed his own comic Gnorm Gnat. That comic ran from 1973-1975 but never really took off. The feedback Davis received was that his illustrations were good, his jokes were great, but the choice of bugs as characters made it unrelatable to audiences. Davis took time to study a bit looking particularly at Snoopy and Peanuts comics. He felt that animals would make for strong characters but the market was overly saturated with dogs and thus decided to feature a cat in his next comic. Fun fact: the modern Garfield is based on Charles Schultz's drawing. The comic had been running for 3 years when Schultz suggested giving Garfield bigger more human like feet. Schultz drew the cat standing upright and that new version made him a bit more human like and relatable to the audience. From 1976-1978, Davis published a comic strip called Jon in The Pendleton Times. Like Davis, Jon is a cartoonist who grew up on a farm and celebrates his birthday on July 28th. Garfield was his grandfather's middle name (and his grandfather was named for the president), Davis's grandfather, like the cartoon cat, had a gruff exterior but a soft heart. The comic Jon became Garfield and by 1978, it was syndicated in 41 newspapers. It has since been made into a television series (3 ran already and 1 currently in development), books, video games, movies, and the comic strip has been syndicated in over 2,500 newspapers read by 300 million people. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.whoartedpodcast.com

Break Forth Bible Church
2021 Empowered Women's Conference "V-I-C-T-O-R-Y"

Break Forth Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 87:00


Brandi Waples shares Friday morning at the 2021 Empowered Women's Conference. A.W. Tozer said, “Faith is seeing the invisible, but NOT the non-existent.” YOU NEED A BATTLE PLAN "A goal WITHOUT A PLAN is just a wish." V - Vision SIGHT is a function of the eyes - VISION is a function OF THE HEART I - Instruction Hebrews 10:25 [TPT] This is NOT THE TIME to pull away and neglect meeting together, as some HAVE FORMED THE HABIT of doing. In fact, we should come together even more frequently, eager to encourage and urge each other onward as we anticipate that day dawning.  CHURCH ATTENDANCE ISN'T AN “EXTRA” THING TO DO  Gerald Brooks said, “Never ask God to be a part of your problem, if you WON'T ALLOW Him to be part of your day.” C - Courage is NOT the absence of fear but the capacity to put one foot in front of the other and move forward. John Wayne said, “Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway.” T - Tenacity Hebrews 10:23 [God'sWord] We must continue to hold FIRMLY to our declaration of faith. The one who made the promise IS FAITHFUL. [MSG] Let's keep a firm grip on the promises that keep us going. He ALWAYS keeps His word. O - Obedience WHEN you get “INSTRUCTION” --- OBEDIENCE IS APPLYING WHAT YOU NOW KNOW R - Rest Hebrews 4:10-11 [KJV] For he that is entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works, as God did from his. 11 Let us LABOUR therefore to enter into THAT rest. Y - You NOBODY else can WIN – FIGHT FOR YOU!

Inside the Game, Peter Taglianetti, Two time Stanley Cup Champion, Pittsburgh Penguins, segment four of five

"Inside the Game" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:00


We continue with Peter's NHL career and getting traded to the Minnesota North Stars and then to the Pittsburgh Penguins. It felt like old home week with the Penguins. Knew a lot of the players and it felt great to come to a team that had a great deal of talent. He was paired with Paul Coffey on defense and was out there with Mario Lemieux. Roster was filled with great guys and amazing talent. Bob Johnson was the head coach and was a great leader for the team. Peter talks about how Badger Bob had a game plan and how everyone was to fit into the plan. He said was great about him you got to know him away from hockey. Loved talking about westerns in the movies and John Wayne. Great stories about playing with Mario and how sometimes you were in awe of what he did in practice and games. It is a great segment of what Peter was part of with the Pittsburgh Penguins. 

Veteran Founder Podcast
#111 It Took Six Companies to Figure it Out, but Now He's Got it - Keith Pape, Yellow Pike Media

Veteran Founder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:41


Growing up a self-proclaimed “old school knucklehead” who loved the spectrum from cowboy John Wayne to the see-the-world “Stripes” movie, Keith Pape went into the military not really knowing what to expect. But he know all along he was not ready for more school after high school and wanted the military badly. He convinced his parents it would save them college tuition and whether they believed him or not, they signed the papers. He joined the Army delayed entry and served through the end of the cold war and one tour in Iraq during Desert Storm. Keith was a 19 Delta Cavalry Scout, a combination of armor and reconnaissance. Keith's takeaway from the Army? “Everybody should do a little of it”. The maturity and learning to operate on your own with a fair amount of autonomy were lessons Keith feels would do every young person a world of good. He is absolutely convinced he never would have gone to college and finished, never stayed straight and would not own a business today if not for the discipline and confidence instilled in him by the military. The rough patches and the deployment were events that convinced him he could handle anything. Upon completing his duty, Keith had no idea what to study in college but he got great advice from relatives: Go to junior college first. It gave him a chance to survey a lot of subjects and it was cheap compared to a four-year degree so it did not use up all his GI Bill benefits. He got great guidance from a couple of his professors who wound up being his mentors. One in particular turned on the light for Keith. She told him the future was the fusion of business and computers. She urged him to take the business route with as much technology as he could grab along the way. Tech came easy for Keith and he loved the business side, especially the human interaction. At a consulting job where his boss got fired during the dotcom meltdown, the entrepreneurial jet kicked in. He saw the problems that people created and how short sighted they were and he knew he could do a better job. So he kept the people he had worked with together and started his own shop. Luckily, he had a supportive spouse who asked all the tough questions and that helped get his first business off on the right foot. Another dotcom stock crash put Keith out on the hunt for his next business and along the way being an employee and an owner, the lessons of success and failure have really rounded out his skills. Now with Yellow Pike Media, Keith and team deliver multiple angles of public relations, influencer introductions and production. It's a dynamic team that reflects Keith's love for people and an energy to build. Veteran Founder Podcast with your hosts Josh Carter and Cynthia Kao We record the Veteran Founder Podcast inside NedSpace in the Bigfoot Podcast Studio in beautiful downtown Portland. Audio engineer, mixer and podcast editor is Allon Beausoleil Show logo was designed by Carolyn Main Website was designed by Cameron Grimes Production assistant is Chelsea Lancaster Theme music: Artist: Tipsy Track: Kadonka Album: Buzzz Courtesy of Ipecac Records 10% of gross revenue at Startup Radio Network goes to support women entrepreneurs in developing countries thru kiva.org/lender/markgrimes

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE BLODGETT - Shocking Shriners - Human Trafficking Connection

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:27


Human Trafficking Connection - stories and mysterious fraternal organization known for its fundraising efforts on behalf of burned children and crippled children, the Shriners boast an international membership in the hundreds of thousands, including luminaries Gerald R. Ford, Buzz Aldrin and John Wayne. However, recent changes have already landed several of their esteemed member in prison. With the help of a very special guest, who has researched and helped piece together the elements of the affidavit that identified and accused several key members of human trafficking, and linked those members to a nationwide ring of corruption, our exposing of Human Trafficking and Slavery continues. This sensational case, though years in process, is poised to make national headlines, as the Supreme Court considers it for its docket. In this very special Human Trafficking and Slavery Special, the lurid details of the case including threats, retaliation, judicial corruption, tax evasion, and human trafficking will be revealed. This interview will open your eyes to just some of the power and connections of those involved in Human Trafficking and Slavery.Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE BLODGETT - Shocking Shriners - Human Trafficking Connection

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:27


Human Trafficking Connection - stories and mysterious fraternal organization known for its fundraising efforts on behalf of burned children and crippled children, the Shriners boast an international membership in the hundreds of thousands, including luminaries Gerald R. Ford, Buzz Aldrin and John Wayne. However, recent changes have already landed several of their esteemed member in prison. With the help of a very special guest, who has researched and helped piece together the elements of the affidavit that identified and accused several key members of human trafficking, and linked those members to a nationwide ring of corruption, our exposing of Human Trafficking and Slavery continues. This sensational case, though years in process, is poised to make national headlines, as the Supreme Court considers it for its docket. In this very special Human Trafficking and Slavery Special, the lurid details of the case including threats, retaliation, judicial corruption, tax evasion, and human trafficking will be revealed. This interview will open your eyes to just some of the power and connections of those involved in Human Trafficking and Slavery.Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - MIKE BLODGETT - Shocking Shriners - Human Trafficking Connection

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:28


Human Trafficking Connection - stories and mysterious fraternal organization known for its fundraising efforts on behalf of burned children and crippled children, the Shriners boast an international membership in the hundreds of thousands, including luminaries Gerald R. Ford, Buzz Aldrin and John Wayne. However, recent changes have already landed several of their esteemed member in prison. With the help of a very special guest, who has researched and helped piece together the elements of the affidavit that identified and accused several key members of human trafficking, and linked those members to a nationwide ring of corruption, our exposing of Human Trafficking and Slavery continues. This sensational case, though years in process, is poised to make national headlines, as the Supreme Court considers it for its docket. In this very special Human Trafficking and Slavery Special, the lurid details of the case including threats, retaliation, judicial corruption, tax evasion, and human trafficking will be revealed. This interview will open your eyes to just some of the power and connections of those involved in Human Trafficking and Slavery.Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The Nathan Barry Show
052: Jay Gilbert - Newsletter Insights From an Entertainment Industry Veteran

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 60:12


My guest on this episode is music industry veteran, Jay Gilbert. Jay wears a lot of hats. He's a musician, photographer, marketer, speaker, and music executive. Jay has worked as a creative consultant to many record companies and artists. He hosts The Music Biz Weekly Podcast, is a Co-founder of Label Logic, and runs the weekly music newsletter Your Morning Coffee.Label Logic helps artists, managers, and labels grow their audience and optimize their presence across all platforms. Jay's newsletter is curated to give a weekly snapshot of the new music business. It's everything you need to know, delivered to your inbox every Friday morning.I talk with Jay about his shift to being a content creator. We talk about life as a musician, working in the music industry, and being a photographer. We also talk about his management company, and his advice for creators wanting to build their audience. Jay also shares some behind the scenes stories, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: Simple hacks to grow your newsletter Defining and reaching your target audience Low-budget tricks to instantly add new subscribers Jay's #1 metric for becoming a successful creator Links & Resources ConvertKit Ben Barnes People Jeff Moscow Travis Tritt Ali Abdaal ConvertKit's Creator Sessions Music Connect (MRC) Chartmetric Viberate Soundcharts Pollstar Cherie Hu Amber Horsburgh Glenn Peoples Bobby Owsinski Bruce Houghton Hypebot Sound & Vision Music Technology Policy Nancy Wilson Roblox Jay Gilbert's Links Follow Jay on Twitter Your Morning Coffee newsletter Ben Barnes 11:11 on People.com JayGilbert.net Label Logic The Music Biz Weekly Podcast Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Jay:The harder I work, the luckier I get. You make your own luck. You see these people, and you're like, “Wow, that guy just blew up on TikTok or, Twitch, or on Spotify, or Apple Music!” Sometimes that happens. Not very often, and it usually it's a lot of hard work.[00:00:26] Nathan:In this episode, I talk to Jay Gilbert. Jay's a music industry veteran. He's been at it for a very long time. What I love is that he's also made this shift into being a content creator, as well as being a musician and a photographer. So many incredible things. He's got this newsletter about the music industry called Your Morning Coffee, and he's grown into over 15,000 subscribers.It's the thing that everyone in the music industry is reading every Friday morning. We talk about how he grew that, his passion for the music industry, how the industry has shifted, what's working, what's not. He also runs a management company called Label Logic where they're partnering with, artists and managers, and doing these album releases, and so much else.He's got all these behind the scenes stories, and a lot of advice that is not only for the music industry, but also for any creator looking to build an audience, and endure long enough to get noticed, and to build a brand and everything else. It's really good towards the end.I also sneak in some selfish questions about what would he do to grow ConvertKit; what's his advice for ConvertKit entering the music industry.Jay, welcome to the show.[00:01:39] Jay:Hey, thanks for having me, Nathan. Good morning.[00:01:41] Nathan:Good morning.We'll dive into some of your background, what you're working on now, but you actually had a pretty big project launch today.What did you launch today?[00:01:54] Jay:Well, when you launch a big project, sometimes it's like a wedding. You have all this planning, planning, planning, and then boom, there it is. It was pretty exciting this morning. We've had to keep quiet about this project. It's Ben Barnes, who is a pretty famous actor, but most people don't know he's a brilliant singer songwriter and pianist.We've recorded this really great record. We've got some amazing videos, given his relationships in that area. They're quite special. We launched a window of exclusivity this morning with People Magazine.So, if you go to People.com, you'll see. the video is debuting. It's pretty special, and we're really excited about it. It gets released tomorrow. The song's called 11:11, by Ben Barnes. It's pretty cool. I think you'll dig it.[00:02:53] Nathan:Nice. Yeah. If anyone doesn't recognize the name, Ben Barnes, he plays Prince Caspian. I've been a fan of the Narnia series and all that for a long time. I think my kids actually just rewatched Prince Caspian two weeks ago.[00:03:09] Jay:Have you seen shadow and bone yet?You got to check out shadow and bone. My, my wife and I binged watched it. And he's, he's brilliant in that, but it's a really cool series.[00:03:21] Nathan:Nice. Okay. So maybe with that, of like a snapshot of, of what you just launched, Let's talk about, a little bit about, logic[00:03:32] Jay:Sure.[00:03:33] Nathan:You know, what types of projects you do. And then we can go back to like the road to get.[00:03:38] Jay:Yeah, well, Label Logic was born out of my partner, Jeff Moscow, and I working in the major label ecosystem for years and years. And we finally got to a point where we were meeting one day for coffee and said, you know, we started our own.So we both worked at universal for a long time. He was there 20 years.I was there 18 years. I worked at Warner music, for five years managing Amazon's business for we at ADA, globally, which was fantastic. but we decided to do our own things. It's about seven years ago, give or take,[00:04:16] Nathan:Yeah.[00:04:17] Jay:We started talking to. Some clients that we had at universal and we sort of became the label infrastructure for some management companies.One of our long-term clients and friends is doc McGee, who you might know, manages kiss. And he managed, you know, Motley, Crue and Bon Jovi and Diana Ross and the Supremes. Anyway, doc is a mentor, a friend and a client. And we came in and one of our first projects was working with him and his stable of artists.And what was exciting about that is that you'd have some artists that were new developing artists. They're never played live before all the way to people filling up arenas. And so the release cycles would change out and it was very dynamic and very exciting. So. That's what Label Logic is all about. We typically are sort of the label infrastructure, for managers, some artists, you know, we also work with some labels and distributors.I think one of our most exciting projects was taking and creating this thing called resilience music Alliance, with the principals there and they signed the artists. We did, you know, the marketing and digital strategy and help them get all the planes flying in formation. And w you know, we won a Grammy last year, so it was really exciting just going from zero to 60, you know, just building something with your own two hands.[00:05:46] Nathan:Yeah. So what is the, for someone who's outside the music industry and they're like this. Just magic. Somehow you find artists and then somehow that goes all the way through to your album releases. When he grabbed me, things like that, like, what are the specific things that, that you're helping out on and playing in?What, what's your role there?[00:06:06] Jay:Yeah, good question. It really is the unsexy nuts and bolts things about setting up a release, everything from securing ISRC codes to shooting the album cover to making sure the, the album is recorded and delivered on time. It's all the creative surrounding it. You know, all of the banners and videos and press release and bio, and there's so much of this to do.That we organize it all. And then we help, excuse me with partners. You may need a publicist. You may need somebody to work sync licensing. You may need somebody for March, right? There are all these different things that you need to do. And we basically, we like to say that we're planners, but we're also problem solvers because every single project is different and has different needs.We recently launched a new album by Travis Tritt. Fantastic record. His team is button. They are experienced. So we took on really more of a, more of a planning role putting together the marketing plans. But then we have some artists that have never released music before. So it's a little more handholding, you know, all those certain things, because it's not about gaming the system today.It's really more about optimization. People always come to us and they say, well, I got to get on this plane. or I want my YouTube numbers to be up and we have t-shirts printed that say a playlist is not a marketing plan, right. Because our playlist important. Sure. They are, but that's down the road.There's so much to do before that. And really when I talk about optimization, when it comes to YouTube or DSPs like Spotify, apple music, Pandora, Deezer, it's not about gaming the system. It's about optimum. Right. And when you do that optimization, whether it's with your website, DSPs, press, any of that good things typically happen.[00:08:02] Nathan:What's an example of some of that optimization that, works rather than, you know, maybe what people are latching onto is is a magic bullet.[00:08:12] Jay:Yeah, couple of obvious ones. Let's take YouTube and Spotify, Spotify, because you can do more with Spotify than any other DSP. As far as you can change out your image, your banner image, your, your avatar, your artist image. You can add, I think 140 images. to your profile, you can put your social links, you can put your bio, there's, all these things that you can do that you can't do.Other places, not all of them.[00:08:38] Nathan:Yeah.[00:08:38] Jay:So, you know, you'd be surprised how many times we'll go look at somebody's Spotify profile and it's an old image and there's somebody in the photo that's not even in the band anymore, or it's just, it's just dated. And you look at the bio and it's, it's dated one of the first places we look, is someone's Spotify profile.Is it updated? YouTube is a really great example. Optimizing for YouTube is so easy and yet a lot of artists miss it. YouTube is not just a place to go drop your music. YouTube is something that, you know, through their community, through your, your artist page. So many things that you can do with that, the common mistakes we see is an obvious one.You know, the name of the videos should be artists titled. Artists title version, and they're mixed up and they're all over the place you want to optimize for that search, right? You want to, for example, the thumbnail, sometimes you go in and look at people's videos and there's literally a picture of somebody blinking is the cover of the video.[00:09:44] Nathan:Right. Cause this is what will, what YouTube selected randomly.[00:09:47] Jay:Yeah. And, and as you know, you can, they'll give you like three or four choices and you can pick one of those, but you can upload any image you want to be on though. And so we have actually a deck that we put together on YouTube and we show these examples of like, here's Lizzo and look at this. It's perfect.It's a beautiful photo of her. And it's, and then you look at the description, you know, is there a smart URL in there? You know, so. I don't recommend people put Spotify, apple, Pandora, Deezer, Amazon music, just put a smart URL in there. Have somebody click on that and then they can choose the platform, whether it was.Downloads, probably not physical, digital, YouTube website, all of that stuff. It's so easy to do. And then also in that description, anything that somebody might care about, who, who shot it, who produced it? Show me the lyrics, you know, give me put all that information in there. So it's, it's searchable. there that's, those are a couple of simple examples of optimization.[00:10:44] Nathan:Yeah. You know, it's interesting. one of the earlier guests that have the show, his name's Ali doll, and he's a YouTuber and he's got 2 million subscribers who's channel and he's just built this incredible, business. And I always think about YouTube as like him optimizing, you know, video like thumbnails and all of those details.Like obviously Lizzo is doing the same thing or really her team is doing that. Right. But it's, it's the exact same. game just in two different industries.[00:11:13] Jay:Yeah, it is. And another way to optimize YouTube, for example, and you can watch what you know, Justin Bieber's doing, and you can learn a lot from those things. one of my favorite writers and marketers is Amber Horsburgh and she did kind of a breakdown of. Some of these marketing campaigns, including Justin Bieber.And one of the things that you see is something we stress all the time. YouTube optimization. You don't just post your concept video or whatever your music video, you still have like five videos, six videos, meaning, you know, you want to have that concept video, but you also may want to lyric video. You may want a stripped down video.You may want a live video, right? there's so many like a pseudo video. It goes by a bunch of different names, but I know you've seen these where it's just the album art. And the audio bed. And sometimes people look at those and go, well, why that's not a video? Why is that on YouTube? Well, that's because YouTube is the number one destination to listen to music.It's not Spotify. Right? It's, it's YouTube people create playlists from those, you know? so it's really important to. Optimized for all of these platforms. And that, that means socials, you know, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, as well as the DSPs, as well as all of these. And again, it's not gaming the system.The problem we run into sometimes is people will come to us and they'll say, oh, well, you know, I, I bought these spins or I bought these lights. Well, now you're in trouble because number one, you can get pulled off of Spotify, right? in January 750,000 tracks were pulled off of Spotify for using bots and spin farms.Right. So[00:13:05] Nathan:Quickly,[00:13:06] Jay:Very careful[00:13:07] Nathan:Someone spinning up a whole bunch of computers and bots to go listen to the song on Spotify to be like, look, I now have a million plays.[00:13:17] Jay:Right?[00:13:18] Nathan:Um[00:13:18] Jay:Yeah. But they're not real, right.[00:13:20] Nathan:Yeah. Okay. I I've definitely seen that on Instagram, Twitter. But like, yeah, it makes sense that, that it exists on[00:13:28] Jay:Yeah[00:13:29] Nathan:First thing that you look at when, when I, like, when we're looking to book an artist for a creator sessions or, or some, one of our other projects, you know, you're, you're, it's that first source of credibility of like, oh, wow.That has two to 2 million plays this. Person's getting a lot of traction.[00:13:44] Jay:But what we look at instead of looking at those numbers, we look at engagement and when you look at engagement, sometimes you see the audience grow and that's going up, up, up. But if you don't see the engagement growing along with it, Then you know, that those aren't real people, because when you use bots and spin farms to Jack up these numbers, yes, it's dangerous because it can get you in trouble, but it screws with all of your, data, which is so important, right?The, what you really want. is Engagement. You want people to like, yeah, you want people to follow, but you want people to listen, share comment. That's real engagement, man. You get that. Uh that's that's the prize.[00:14:29] Nathan:Yeah. So let's go back. as you're getting into music, what, like, in the, in the early days, what was the hook for you? What, what brought you to the whole industry?[00:14:39] Jay:Oh, my gosh. Well, my, my family's musical, you know, my brother, you know, he's a Writer record producer, graphic design artists. my mom played piano. My grandfather played sax and big band. You know, I started a little high school band and ended up, you know, touring in bands and playing, writing, recording. So I kind of got to know how the sausage was made and, and I loved working in record stores.I worked for an indie record store. I worked for tower records for five years. There's so much fun.Um and[00:15:08] Nathan:Been in the industry.[00:15:09] Jay:Yeah, I've always been in music and, working at universal was just such a joy. learned so much. yeah, I've always been surrounded by, by music ever since I was little kid.[00:15:21] Nathan:What's something as a,[00:15:24] Jay:Oh[00:15:25] Nathan:If you're talking to an outsider, maybe a common misconception they have, know, someone who's a fan of music then you're like, oh, this is actually how it works that you find yourself explaining or,[00:15:37] Jay:Oh, my gosh, we could talk for days.[00:15:39] Nathan:Yeah.[00:15:40] Jay:I wish people understood that the harder I work, the luckier, I get, you make your own luck. You know, you see these people and you're like, wow, that guy just blew up on TikTok or, you know, Twitch or on Spotify or apple music. Sometimes that happens not very often.And it usually it's a lot of hard work, you know? I asked an ANR person before the. You know, how do you choose who you signed to your label today with all of this data? And he said the same way. I always do. I look for that line up around the block for people to see him play, right? So it's, it's a new music business and we can now see with all this data what's going on.But I think the common misconception is there's a similar. There isn't a silver bullet, you know, it's, it's a lot of hard work and it's a lot of finding your tribe. And I say that a lot because you need to find your audience. I talk to people all the time about finding that audience and they think they know who their audience is.If you talk to any manager, artists, they, they they'll have a sense. Like, well, my demo, my artists or my, my fan base, I mean is 25 year old. But there are three audiences, right? There's one sales streams and downloads. So the commerce side to the butts in the seats. So when you're touring, who's actually out in the crowd, right.And then three, you know, kind of the social side of it. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, those three audiences, rarely aligned completely. And there's always something to learn. I was talking to an artist recently who thought that. Their crowd was 25 year old, females, because that's who they saw in the crowd.But if you look at the other data, that's not who's quote unquote consuming their music. So there are a lot of misconceptions, but, I heard this really great line about data and analytics. It's like a lamppost. You can use it to aluminate or you can use it to lean on. And most people use it to lean on, like, see, I told you that's, that's what I thought my data is.But really, if you go in and look at all this, analytics, you'll find that there's always something you can learn in there about your audience and how to reach your audience.[00:17:57] Nathan:I like that because I catch myself doing that of like, Let me go dig for the data that proves the point thatI already my existing worldview and that they were having that debate. Yeah. See, this is what proves it. And you can go back and, and[00:18:14] Jay:Right[00:18:15] Nathan:The data say almost whatever you want.If you come at it with that[00:18:18] Jay:Yeah, absolutely. And today there's so many great places to find data like real great data. Like for example, you know, it used to be called SoundScan right now. It's called MRC connect. Same thing. You can get real numbers for sales, streams, and downloads. That is so helpful. And you can see data from previous releases and kind of get a sense of that.There are these great platforms like chart, metric and vibrate and sound charts, where you can go in and see what playlist was I added to which ones, where I dropped off of what position was I in? How many times was it skipped? You know, there's so many great data platforms out there, but it's almost like there's too much, you know, you need to kind of focus on what, what do you want to do?You know, some people want to route a tour, So that's really easy. You can kind of see what markets you're over-performing in. You can download data from Pollstar and see if you played in those markets before, you know, how did you perform? So we're really big on data, but you kind of have to look at it carefully and decide what you're trying to learn from it.If that makes sense.[00:19:30] Nathan:How do you think about the intersection, between the different platforms? Like, if you're actually say we're promoting it to her or, a new album release or something like that, what are you recommending as far as where artists build, you know, build their audience. and then, yeah. How do you think about the intersection when it actually comes time to drive?[00:19:49] Jay:Yeah. And that's, that's a great question because it's so different for every artist in every release, right? So you kind of have to look where, where is my. You know, they may, maybe they're still buying physical. Maybe you're a jazz artist and that's a, still a, an album format. So you want to look at Amazon.You want to look at places, indie retail, where people are buying the full album and they want to experience that way. then you look at maybe EDM or country, every kind of genre and mood has its own nuances. I think it's really important to find out who your audience is, what their behaviors are. And then a real simple thing is when it comes to social media, so many artists today, they have so many choices and it's not just writing and recording and touring.Now they got a post on socials and create videos and comment. I mean, it's so much, so what we tell people is take a step back. What are you killing? Yeah, right. And a lot of them it's Instagram, right? Some of them it's TikTok focus on that. You don't have to be all things to all people, you know, find out where that crowd is, where your audience is and really work that, and then kind of grow it from there.And hopefully you'll get to a point, like we were talking about Lizzo, where you have a team surrounding you that can attack all those different platforms.[00:21:16] Nathan:Yeah, think there's a tendency. I see this in founders and entrepreneurs and marketers, like all across the board. I've, we're so used to failing at things like trying things and failing. They like tried this didn't work and in order to continue to be a founder or a marketer and you have to try the next thing tried that didn't work tried that didn't work, this, it worked.[00:21:38] Jay:Yeah[00:21:39] Nathan:So then I tried this and it didn't work and this, and it didn't work. And you're like, hold on. But what about the thing that did work and, you know, we move on so quickly and we see like every case study of[00:21:49] Jay:Yeah. And it's so different per artists. So the thing that you just described as spot on, but let's say we did that for Ben Barnes. Well, our next artist, we got to start from scratch because the things that worked for Ben probably aren't going to work for Travis Tritt. There they're totally different animals.So I love trying things. I love trying new platforms and, you know, there are a handful of things that really work across everything. And so you kind of start with those in your marketing plan, like. Tools is bands in town. Now everybody knows bands in town. It's got like 55 million people have this app on their phone and it says, Hey, Nathan, you know, the accidentals are coming to your town in a couple of weeks and you're like, oh cool.And then you can buy your ticket and stuff. They look at your music library, but what a lot of people don't know is that you can go in there and look at how many people are attracting. Right. And usually it's thousands. You know, you look at these artists, they don't even know they have thousands of trackers and bands in town.Well, you can reach out to them for free and say, Hey, I've got a new release coming out. or I'm going to be in a, there's a tour and I'm going to be in your area. But what's really exciting about bands in town is that I can look at like competitive artists fan bases. So if I know that my artists. You know, then maybe there, they would appeal to the Chainsmokers crowd.I, for 5 cents an email, I can target them and say, Hey, you guys dig the chain smokers. You, you might dig this too. So there are a lot of little platforms like that, like you were talking about, which is so important. You got to try. All the time. And you know, as Paul Stanley said, the road to success, isn't from here to success.It's failure, failure, failure, failure, success.[00:23:37] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Are there any trends going on in the music industry now that concern you things where like, as, as you've watched it develop, you're like, I'm not sure where this is headed and I'm not sure that it's going to be good for the artists. Good for the fans and any of those things.[00:23:51] Jay:Not a lot. I think it's, it's changed while we've been having this conversation. The music business is evolving so quickly and you know, I do a weekly podcast and newsletter for the music industry and we break down the stories every week and it's so fascinating to me. How quickly it's evolving. And, you know, for example, you see companies like hypnosis and primary wave and BMG buying up all of these rights.And you're wondering like, well, they're paying these huge multiples what's going on here. And some of these heritage artists are getting hundreds of millions of dollars. And then in the last couple of weeks, you've really seen these stories about interpolation. Coming out, meaning that instead of using a sample, they're just using the melody of a Olivia Newton, John or Taylor swift song in a new song.And it, no one's getting sued because they're crediting the writers and they're paying the publishing and you may find two or three interpolations in one song. Olivia Rodriguez recently, there's so many. Of these things that are evolving so quickly, TikTok, it just blows my mind sometimes how fast you can gain an audience there, but it's one of the hardest platforms to gain real engagement.So you can gain those numbers, but how do you hold onto them? It reminds me of some of these artists that are on these talent shows, you know, American idol, the voice America's got talent, whatever you got to grab that audience. Once they're off that show, you have to engage them quickly or it's gone. cause you'll have huge numbers from being on those shows.But if you don't engage with that crowd and keep them interested in, you'll still have those big numbers of YouTube subscribers and followers. But the engagement just drops right off the cliff. So as far as the trends that concern me, I think the biggest thing we touched on, you know, people who try to buy likes, follows spins.I just, I think that's horrible and it's so dangerous for their career. we always tell people. We manage 20 careers. you're, you're managing one yours. You need to take that really seriously. And, we, we advise against trying to game the system. I have a friend of mine who's really big in SEO search engine optimization and, he's very good at it.And he always tells me. These people come to me and they've messed with their website, for example, to get it to come up in search. And he laughs and he says, look, Google's got, Google has like 200 highly trained engineers working on this stuff. And you think you're going to trick them with your little, you know, metadata trick, you know, maybe for 10 minutes, but it's always best to have a plan, have a marketing plan.Optimize for everything. you do that and avoid some of these pitfalls. Yeah. Those are the things that concerned me. It's just people trying to, find a shortcut.[00:26:58] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. you dropped a bunch of things in there that I, I want to talk about and dive into, but maybe starting with the music back catalogs that are being purchased, those rights, I'm always super curious about things like that, because. You know, as a creator, you're working on things that feel like they're in the moment.And I have a few friends who are successful authors who are pretty prolific, like they'll write a book year, a book every other year. one friend said like, basically like putting out annuities where you have this, this thing and add you as you add to your catalog. It just. Let's say this book is going to sell $50,000 worth copies its long tail every year.Like clockwork, time you come out with a new one, it adds that there's another 50,000 a year, plus it gives it a little bump. And so you see creators who are these big spikes, and then that's kind of it. You also see creators who are continually adding to the back.[00:27:54] Jay:Yeah.[00:27:55] Nathan:Like explain more for anyone who doesn't understand on the music side, why these catalogs are so valuable and why, you know, people are paying[00:28:04] Jay:Yeah.[00:28:04] Nathan:Of millions, hundreds of[00:28:05] Jay:Yeah Well, it's just math at this point. What's happened is with streaming. Now there's some predictable. There's some planning involved. So if you have a catalog, you know, you look at like Stevie Nicks sold hers, or at least a big portion of it. And Bob Dylan, there's a predictability now that there wasn't before on how much revenue that's going to generate on, on two sides, one the publishing, right?For the, for the songwriters and then the master, you know, so with that predictability comes, some of them are just banging. You know, they come in there and they say, okay, this catalog is worth this much money. And this is how much it makes over a year. Let's say it makes a hundred thousand dollars a year.Well, we're going to pay you for 10 years or 20 years worth and cut you a check right now. So we call those multiples and some of these companies are paying super high multiples and almost jacking up the price. It's kind of a land grab in some respects. So. It really doesn't help a new developing artist a lot right now.But if you've co-written songs with people and you've got music out there, There, there is money to be had there. If you want that big payoff, some people are selling off their publishing. Some people are selling it off for a term. Some people are selling their masters off and it makes sense for somebody let's say Stevie Nicks, cause she's in her seventies.Now it's a state planning and she can, you know, get all of that money and help her family and whatever. So I'm not necessarily against. At all. but what I really love is watching how these companies are now going to exploit that catalog. And I mean that in the best possible way, exploited, how are they going to generate the right revenue?And that interpolations that I talked about a minute ago. That is one way, you know, there was a story last week, and they talked about primary wave having, you know, these writer's camp. And using their top 40 or 50 tracks that they have the rights to, and having these writers write songs surrounding those melodies.And again, those writers will be credited those writers and the publishers and all of that, but that's kind of the new trend too. So yeah[00:30:35] Nathan:Yeah that's fascinating. it'll be interesting to see how it keeps developing Another thing that you talked about a little bit is, uh your newsletter, which I want to get into, what, like so many people consume content, what was the thing that made you switch and say Hey, I want to be to be one of the, people on the creator side, commenting on the industry and building an audience[00:30:58] Jay:Yeah[00:30:58] Nathan:That's like, it feels like you've been more of a behind the scenes guy for a long time. And now there's a little bit of at least you're going to be a front of house for all the behind the scenes people.[00:31:11] Jay:Yeah, no, that's, that's a good point. I think what happened was I had left Warner music group and I was deciding do I want to start my own company. Do I want to go back working for a major? And I got this email from Sean Rakowski who used to be the head of sales for ADA. And all it was was about a dozen of.These songs and albums that he had found that were really good. And he was sharing it with a hundred people. So I called him up and I said, this is cool, but you know, why are you doing this? And he said, well, I'm kind of between jobs. I don't know where I'm going to go right now. And I just don't want people to forget me and the light bulb went on and I went, I'm going to do that.So I did something you're not supposed to do. And that is, I created an email and just basically sent it to a couple hundred people in my. my contacts, you're typically supposed to ask for permission, but I just decided, you know what, I'm just going to do this and what do I love Well I love music and technology.So I'll just do a recap, every week and what I knew at the time. was that People don't like to read. I love reading stories on technology and music, but not everybody does, but they want to know what's going on. So I put an image and then just a two, to three sentence blurb. So even if you don't read those top dozen stories in your morning coffee, you can read that little blurb and go, oh, okay.Well, this is going on. You know, here's some changes that here's some platforms that are coming up. This is what's going on with the music modernization act or NFTs or whatever. And. All of a sudden. It started to grow. And that little newsletter to a couple hundred people is now over 15,000 people and we have advertisers and now we have a weekly podcast, we've been doing for a year where we break down the stories.So I didn't have this grand plan of, I'm going to create this newsletter for the industry. And no, I just didn't want people to forget me while I was deciding. What my next career path was going to be, and it was a happy accident. I just stumbled into it. And then next thing you know, some of my favorite artists subscribed to it.Some of my favorite managers subscribed to it and they'll send me notes. What do you think about this? And then. The last thing I'll say on it is it wasn't intended for business. It wasn't intended for me to make money from, but what's happened is people will read your morning coffee and then they'll call me up and they'll go.I think I need to hire Label Logic to be my label infrastructure for this. And so it's brought us business, but that, wasn't what it was intended for originally.[00:33:43] Nathan:Yeah, it's fascinating how that worked. Cause you, you position yourself as the expert, the person with the pulse on the industry I mean, it's not even like a deliberate thing. You don't have to say that you just. Are the[00:33:56] Jay:Cool[00:33:57] Nathan:Sent, like sending out the content and people are like great, thanks for doing that.So I didn't have to go compile it from different sources. And, and you find that you have your own platform.[00:34:07] Jay:Yeah[00:34:07] Nathan:Some, what are some of the things that worked as far as, growing it, maybe deliberate things that you put in, beyond the, organic growth and sharing[00:34:17] Jay:Yeah, I think that, the thing that really helped us is really like, if you're a wedding photographer or a real estate agent, all of your business practically is word of mouth. And a lot of the growth that we have for your morning coffee comes from people just getting it, and forwarding it to their staff, you know, I'm saying, Hey, have you seen this?And that's where we've seen that growth.I think the things that I did that really. helped Keeping it to those blurbs and not trying and having that image. People are very visual. I've seen other newsletters that are just a mountain of text.[00:34:53] Nathan:Yeah[00:34:53] Jay:Not many people are going to dig through that. So I wanted to make it.Very accessible to somebody who's really busy at an airport. They can just look at it on their device and and get a sense of what's going on. The other thing that, again, by accident, I started reaching out to some of these writers, like you had mentioned earlier, speaking with Sherry who, I reached out to Sherry, you know, I've had her on the podcast, we've had conversations.I have a great deal of respect for her in her writing people like, You know, Amber horsepower. I mentioned, Glen peoples, Bobby O Sinskey, you know, Bruce Hoten over at Hypebot. After a while I started developing these conversations in relationships and I would be on their Podcast. They would be on mine.I would write articles for Hypebot Hypebot would promote your morning coffee of the newsletter, a very symbiotic kind of relationship with all of these writers. And the level of debate and the level of communication has just enriched my life. Having these conversations with people, you know, like Amber and Glen peoples and saying, well, what do you think of this?I dunno, what do you think of this? You know, for example, I, I met this really smart young marketer, Maddie Elise, who runs her own company and she was doing some really great analysis on bots and spin farms. Like how can you tell if you've been bonded and we got into these conversations and she posted some really great articles online.I put them in your morning coffee. It's been a wild ride, but it's, it was unexpected that I would have these conversations.[00:36:36] Nathan:Well, It's amazing how Yeah. Like in any industry, Like working in sales, the music industry has all connections and relationships.[00:36:45] Jay:Yes[00:36:46] Nathan:Could spend forever people one on one Hey I'm I'm coming to your city I'm in LA I'm in Nashville I'm in Atlanta Like now we're in a you know like trying to get one connection into the next and coffee and everything else to try to build up that now. Or you can kind of take take a step back and say, all just going to start a newsletter and then get like, thousands and then people that follow it. And then[00:37:10] Jay:Yeah[00:37:11] Nathan:You would like really slowly be like working up relationships to get to the point that you've talked to is like oh, Hey, I wrote this thing.Would you mind throwing it in the newsletter And like,[00:37:22] Jay:Yeah[00:37:23] Nathan:Also come on on my podcast, let's chat. And it's just this shortcut to relationships and amazing.[00:37:27] Jay:Yes, absolutely. And I'm a big fan of networking, music business association conference, one of the best on the planet. You know, you go there. The, the great meetings are the ones, while you're waiting in line at Starbucks, you know, you meet all of these people. And it's then like at the last music business association conference, I was standing in line talking to some publicists.Well, publicists are so great because they're on the pulse of everything. There are people like, you know, over at shore fire or the great team at rock paper, scissors who matches technology and music in their publicity campaign. And now they're sending things to me. Hey, have you heard about this new platform?Hey, you might want to interview this person because they've got this new thing. And so it, it becomes this thing, but you had mentioned like sitting down and having coffee with people. That's what I did with Amber Horsburgh I've. I read some of her deep cuts, things that she has online. She has done marketing at a high level.My partner, Jeff and I have done marketing at a high level. We called her up, met at the one-on-one coffee shop and just had an amazing.Chat, as you know, when you sit down with somebody who's enthusiastic about the same things you are, whether it's music, sports, whatever, you can talk all day. Right. And I love meeting these people and that's kind of how, like the, your morning coffee Podcast.My, my cohost is Mike Etchart, who did sound envisioned radio. He and I can sit and talk for hours about. This, these stories. So every week we do the podcast, we record it Sunday morning at nine 30 and it goes live on Mondays. We talk for a half hour to an hour before we hit record. We just sit there and, oh my gosh.Did you see that documentary on 1971? No. Hey, have you heard that new record by, you know, Ben Barnes, whatever it is. And because we have such a passion for it. And I think that comes out in the newsletter. It's not a dry kind of thing. and the last thing I'll say on that is the other side, these relationships I've developed are like with attorneys who write stories.There's this one guy, Chris castle, who has a website called music technology policy. And I. You know, put some of his great articles in your morning coffee, cause they're really smart ass, you know, sassy stuff and had him on the podcast. And now I'll call him up from time to time, you know, like what do you think of this?And it's just, this whole kind of network is it's really.[00:40:02] Nathan:Yeah, that's amazing. Is there a favorite moment or something like that, where, uh or opportunity that the newsletter has created for you? Like, we talked about a lot of connections and stuff like that, but one where, you know, you're like, Oh wow, this is, this is a fantastic opportunity that wouldn't have come.If I hadn't built it.[00:40:20] Jay:Oh my gosh, so many of them, but I'll tell you, at a high level, getting to speak to people that I admire respect that that's thrilling. But one great example recently was for our one-year anniversary of the, your morning coffee Podcast. we had Nancy Wilson from heart on and did an hour long interview with her.Now I grew up in. I grew up on heart, Nancy and I shopped at the same record stores. I saw them play live many, many times, huge fan. so that was pretty cool and knowing her as well as I do her career, her music, all of that. Mike and I had an amazing, interview with her and that's something that we just wouldn't have had, without this via.[00:41:10] Nathan:Yeah, that, that kind of thing is so fun of like, almost getting to have a conversation, you know, as peers and all of that with someone that you're like[00:41:21] Jay:Yeah.[00:41:22] Nathan:However many years ago would be freaking out Right. now[00:41:25] Jay:Right. I was in the, I was in the crowd, right. Cheering along, and now we're having a conversation about things and that's probably the most thrilling part of your morning coffee. The newsletter and Podcast is the level of debate. The level of people that will call me and say, I disagreed with that piece.Or I'd like to write an op ed or, you know, Th that's pretty thrilling because look like we said, this music industry's changed while we've been on this call. So if you want to keep up with it, you can follow some of these great, writers. And, you know, you mentioned Sherry who, you know her, I subscribed to her Patrion.I love the research that she does. And I've learned so much from that. But if you don't want to read everything by all of these marketers, then there are. Vehicles like your morning coffee, where you get it for free every Friday, you just glance at it and get a sense of what's going on. And then if there's, there's something that really interests you, you click on it and you can read deeper.[00:42:28] Nathan:Yeah. Yep. I like that. Um what are some of the things that you're looking to do next for your morning coffee of how to, how to grow it further? What's sort of the milestone.[00:42:37] Jay:Yeah, we're I really want to grow it. and we're looking at, you know, networks that we could be a part of. we've got advertisers now, which is nice. you know, we're not going to get rich from it, but it's nice that we have, and we can pick and choose, you know, who those advertisers are. We're not going to advertise for baked beans.We have some really great digital music sponsors my goal. Two things. One, I really want to grow the audience. I'm thrilled with the growth that we've had. and the quality cause I use MailChimp. So I can go in there just like constant contact or any of these other great platforms. And I can see who's who's subscribing which ones they opening, you know, what are they clicking through?What device are they on? And I love it when people who I admire and respect are. And I want to grow that as well. So grow it, grow the quality of it and, you know, just continue to build that audience.[00:43:39] Nathan:Are there specific activities that you're thinking of to grow it where you're like, oh, this was working. So I'm going to do more of that, whether it's ads or promotions or, any of those things[00:43:49] Jay:Yeah, I, it sounds pedantic, but we always say you do more of what's working and less of what doesn't And I know that sounds silly, but we do that with every platform. You look at YouTube or you look at your socials and go, wow, that post really over-performed, Well do more of things like that. And I'm looking at like with your morning coffee, there are certain articles that I just know are going to get high clicks.People love lists. You know, here are the seven things that Nathan thinks you should do. People love bullet point lists, but I try not to, do the cheap applause thing, I could do the whole thing full of that, but there also has to be something in there for you to eat your vegetables.There has to be a little bit of analysis. You know, the one that comes out tomorrow, there's a breakdown of, you know, the first half of the year versus the first half of last year. Not everybody wants to dig into the data like that. So I try to make. it You know, balanced that way. the other thing I'd like to do is partner with.Other people, for example, one of the reasons I have such a high, you know, viewership is the folks over at Hypebot every week they put my newsletter and Podcast in their newsletter that goes out to a lot of people. so they're, a great partner for us. We love, we love HighSpot, but if I can get more people, you know, you're standing on the shoulders of giants, so to speak, I would love to have, the.Orchard Ingrooves ADA, you know, Warner music group, Group use your morning coffee and send that out to their artists, labels, and managers, that sort of thing. That would be the next step.[00:45:33] Nathan:Yeah, that. makes sense. like those partnerships end up being so big. And I've seen that with a lot of newsletters where they're doing cross-promotions or they're saying,[00:45:42] Jay:Yeah.[00:45:43] Nathan:Hey do a takeover Where, like,[00:45:47] Jay:Right.[00:45:48] Nathan:You know, Jay's writing the entire newsletter for us this week. If you want to follow more of what he does, you know, and you need to this newsletter swap or a bunch of things.[00:45:57] Jay:Yeah, those takeovers are really important. I did one last week with symphonic distribution, I did a little Instagram takeover and immediately had, hundreds of new subscribers to the newsletter. we always tell people there's two reasons why nobody is buying or streaming your new release.One is they've never heard. of you Two they've heard of you, but they didn't know it was out. Those are two things that you can correct with proper marketing, touring advertising, those types of things. And it's the same with the newsletter is I need to get it in front of people because, every week I get a note from somebody like, oh, I just discovered your podcast, or I just discovered your, newsletter.You know, and I don't have big budgets to advertise, you know, put it in billboard magazine or, whatever. but that's my goal.[00:46:54] Nathan:Yeah I like it. some of my favorite podcasts interviews are Witten. The host starts asking really selfish questions like[00:47:02] Jay:Okay[00:47:03] Nathan:Direct advice that they want. So I'm going to do that now. So uh ConvertKit right So we're creating a marketing platform, email marketing platform for creators where Uh like quick context We're 70 people on the team[00:47:19] Jay:Wow[00:47:19] Nathan:Year in revenue, in like mostly in the blogger podcast or newsletter space, but then the last year has been this push into, into music. So we've got a whole range of artists from Leon bridges to Tim McGraw. we bought, a platform called fan bridge, at the beginning of this year, but we're like new to the spaceAnd so coming in. What advice would you give either to, you know, ConvertKit or to any of these, you know, I'm sure there's plenty of other players who are, trying to come into the music industry, really serve artists, be good citizens of the community. Like what advice would you give as far as how to grow, How to get more artists on the platform and[00:48:02] Jay:That's a great question. I think the first thing you do is you collaborate and we tell people all the time, if, when we're taking an artist in to meet with a digital service provider or a platform you listen first and you say, How can we partner? How can we collaborate? Not what can you do for me? So some of the obvious things, right, would be, the music business association, right?Portion, her team over there are phenomenal. You have conversations with them, you sponsor their events, you get involved in their live streams and that community. Right. I think that's, that's kind of where you start, as you become. A partner, you know, you collaborate, people who, all these people that you mentioned that have these great, you know, newsletters, whether it's, you know, Sherry who, or Amber Horsburgh or, you know, Bobby, Osinski, all of these things.You, you reach out to them as you're doing you partner with them, you see, like, how can we collaborate together? How can we work together? How can I help you to grow your audience? And once you become. Part of that network, part of that community. Let me back up. my old boss used to tell me, everybody wants to give you advice.Nobody wants to give you a job. So when you go to somebody, don't ask them for something, right? And this isn't directed at you. This is at the larger audience. Don't go in and say, Hey, I need this. Can you do this? For me? People are busy, right? They've got a thousand emails that they're, they need to respond to.But if you ask somebody for their advice, they're like, well, hold on a second. What was that? You need my advice. I'll give you my advice. I found, and I speak at colleges all the time and I mentor and I have interns. And one of the things I tell college students all the time is find someone who's doing what you want to do.Whether it's be an engineer, producer, tour, agent, whatever, find the people that are doing it, reach out to them and say, Hey Nathan, I'm a college student. Can I just get 15 minutes of your time? Chat. I need your guidance. I need your advice on something nine times out of 10, they'll say. Sure, absolutely. And that's at your fingertips right now.And as a company and as a platform, you need to let this community know what problems of theirs are you going to. You know, not your capabilities, not like the business speak while we're a full service platform that, you know, these KPIs and blah, blah, blah. No, it's gotta be, we're going to help you grow your audience by doing this, we're gonna help you, spend less money on your marketing and advertising by doing this, we're going to help you put more butts in the seats by doing this.If you can solve their problems and communicate that. quickly and easily, that's a challenge. but joining all of these, like, like music business association, You know, and going to these panels, like at music tectonics and some of those, that's where those people live and breathe. And, and let me just tie it up in a bow by saying that one of the things we did over the pandemic was we formed this artist management collective and there's, I don't know, give or take 25 managers and on any given zoom call, we'll have probably half of that.We, we talk about what, what publicist are you using now? What video editor are using now, you know, do you use it? Who, who should I call for a tour agent for Americana, you know, and we, we help each other, but we also will bring somebody on from TikTok or bring somebody on from roadblocks and tell us about your platform.You know, w how can you help these artists managers? So that's a long-winded way of saying there's no silver bullet, but. Those relationships, those, those conversations, then that word of mouth will spread and that'll help you build your platform.[00:52:06] Nathan:Yeah Well, I mean, it's exactly what we've been talking about of relationships in the community That's what all of this comes down to and and you know podcasts are especially big for that right Because we have to have conversations like this, and that's what you've seen on, on your Podcast.[00:52:24] Jay:Yeah[00:52:24] Nathan:Makes me wonder, do you think If you're talking to a newsletter creator?Who doesn't have a Podcast. What's the, message that you would say to them of, you know, you're like, Yeah. the Podcast has been good because of these things. Or are you like, what are you doing? Like start[00:52:43] Jay:Yeah[00:52:44] Nathan:Newsletter, go hand in hand. He got us started both. What, what do you think?[00:52:47] Jay:It depends. I think here's the thing. I was reading this article the other day, that the average Podcast, this is average, right? There's 850,000 podcasts out there, but the average one is seven episodes long. That's it. And reaches about 175. people That's an average thing. I mean, yeah. You've got the New York times daily that has a staff of 75 people and it's crazy.And then you've got the Joe Rogans of the world that have these huge audiences, but that's the outlier. That's an anomaly. So I tell people are you really in this? Do you really want to do this? And do you enjoy doing it? So I do, two to three podcasts. every week And I love it. I absolutely love the conversations.It's something. I have a passion for most of the newsletters that I read. There is a Podcast, you know, Sherry who has a podcast, Amber Horsburgh has a podcast. Mike Warner, has a great podcast. Then you look at how often do you want to do it? You know, like your morning coffee is every single week music biz, weekly that I co-host is every single week.You may not have the time to do that. So maybe you do one every two weeks or one every month. I'm a big fan of podcasts. I think that people go for walks, they exercise, they travel, they commute. They do a lot of things where they couldn't necessarily read a newsletter. And this is kind of, you're reading the newsletter to them.So it's so easy to get syndicated. But the only thing I would suggest for somebody who's going to start that is stand on the shoulders of giants with us. We partnered with Hypebot So immediately out of the gate, we've got an audience. We didn't have to start from zero So if you can partner with a brand or partner with another outlet to grow your audience, that's the way to go.[00:54:44] Nathan:Yeah. Yep. I like that. Some of that you said to kind of touched on the idea of longevity, you know, of the average Podcast being seven episodes long. sad, but not surprising, like[00:54:56] Jay:Yeah,[00:54:57] Nathan:What's your message to, creators about longevity. And it's both the artists you're working with, you're giving advice to those college students who hit you up for the 15 minutes of advice all the way through to those building an audience online, in a newsletter type environment[00:55:14] Jay:Yeah. That's a great question. I think the bottom line is you need to find what lights you. up And I tell, not just college students, but I tell professionals this all the time. What is that thing that you wake up in the morning and you just can't wait to do, and you'd do it for free. If you could, is it photography?Is it, it engineering or being a, you know, a manager, whatever it is. There's some There're things that are Personal to you that you love to do. And I always tell people, you have to do more of that. The money will come, but you have to add value first and then the money comes. You don't go looking for the money.That's a common mistake. A lot of people make, I I started your morning coffee without any expectation of any business, money, ads, anything, and it's just been a joy. And I look forward to doing. it Every single week, I've got it, like 90% ready to go. Cause it goes out at 4:00 AM on Friday. So tomorrow, I'll be up with my coffee and I'll hit that.Send button to those lists. that's not work to me. That's I can't wait to do that. And then Sunday morning, Mike Etchart and I are going to record the podcast. I can't wait to do that. So if you can find something in your jobI love coaching. I love teaching. I love working with developing artists and showing them what's worked in the past what hasn't workedand to your point earlier, trying a lot of different things See, see what's working. and What's not, you know, I think that's key because so many people are chasing the dollars and they're miserable. You know, find what lights you up.[00:56:53] Nathan:Yeah, cause chasing the dollars, especially cause they tend to take a long time to come. Any creative business is slow going. So, if you're looking at the dollars as the metric that's going to keep you going, then you are going to end up giving up after the seven episodes.[00:57:12] Jay:Yeah.[00:57:13] Nathan:Something in that[00:57:15] Jay:Yeah.[00:57:16] Nathan:I realized, we should start to wrap up, but I didn't even ask you about photography. That's a huge part of who you are as a creator. We don't have time to get into it a lot, but I just love to hear how photography intersects with the rest of your creative work.[00:57:31] Jay:I've been shooting since I was a teenager. What happened was I went to a concert. I shot it and the images didn't turn out well at all. And that put me on this quest of “Why don't my photos look like the ones in the magazine?”[00:57:45] Nathan:Yeah.[00:57:46] Jay:I got my own darkroom, started reading books. Long story short, I've been doing photography my entire life. I have a photo studio here. I've shot album covers from the Temptations, and John Wayne, and Rick Springfield, and many, many others. I absolutely love it. It's my creative outlet. I can go in on the weekends, shut the door, turn off the phone.My partner, Chris Schmidt and I, we do these shoots and we absolutely love it. It's also intersected with the business. So, photo shoots for clients. We've done videos for clients. It's a labor of love. It's like you find what lights you up. Photography lights me up. I would do it for free if I could.I absolutely love shooting live shows. I love shooting studio shoots. If you check out JayGilbert.net, you can see some of my work over the years. You'll see photos from shooting Van Halen in 1978, all the way to shooting stuff last week with the immediate family.So, thank you for bringing that up. I certainly have a passion for it, and I hope that your viewers and listeners know what their passion is. Even if they can't do it for a living, continue to do it. Life is short.[00:58:59] Nathan:Yeah, I love it. Well, I had a great time going through your whole collection over the years.[00:59:06] Jay:Thank you.[00:59:07] Nathan:There's some that are really, really fun.[00:59:10] Jay:Thank you.[00:59:11] Nathan:Listeners should definitely check that out. Where else should people go to subscribe to the newsletter? Listen to the podcast? All of that?[00:59:17] Jay:It's the easiest URL on the planet. It's YourMorning.coffee. You can sign up for the newsletter. It's free. You can sign up for the podcast. It's free. If you ever want to dig deeper into what Label Logic's all about, it's Label-Logic.net. It might be kind of fun just to look through there.Jeff and I have been doing this for decades, so you'll see some of your favorite artists that we've done some campaigns with.[00:59:48] Nathan:Yeah that's good.Well Jay, thanks so much.[00:59:51] Jay:Yeah, it's my pleasure, Nathan. Thanks for having me.

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 48 (Guest Scott Eyman)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:42


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 48.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS In the Mix - Prohibition Cocktails at Remedy Speakeasy We return to the time of Prohibition in this week's "In the Mix", with the Mary Pickford cocktail, mixed and served by the owner of Remedy Speakeasy in downtown Bremerton, WA, Alison Crow.  Then we sat down with our Mary Pickfords and talked about, well, Mary Pickford.  Check it out on our YouTube channel. Love Letters Arrive at WWCA A. R. Gurney's “Love Letters” opens 10/15 at Western Washington Center for the Arts and runs through Oct 31st.  It is a tender, tragi-comic, and nuanced examination of the lost art of letter writing, shared nostalgia, missed opportunities, and the deep closeness of two lifelong, complicated friends.  Spanning five decades and numerous locations, Love Letters is staged simply, with two actors behind desks or sitting in cozy chairs, letting their words describe a world of emotion.  Get tickets today at wwca.us. Movies of the Decade - 2000's - Moulin Rouge (2001) Movies of the Decade at the Historic Roxy Theater presents "Moulin Rouge", Baz Luhrmans story of a poor Bohemian poet in 1890s Paris.  The film won two Oscars and stars Ewen McGregor and Nicole Kidman.  We'll hit the stage at 6:30 followed by Jeremy Arnold for his final introduction of the series.  Don't miss it.  Get your tickets at roxybremerton.org.   IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  New York Times Best Selling Author, Scott Eyman Scott Eyman is the biographer of stars like John Wayne, Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda, Earnest Lubich, John Ford, Cecille B. Demille, and he joined us back in May for Episode 28 to celebrate the release of his last book Cary Grant: A Brilliant disguise.   Scott's latest work “20th Century-Fox: Darryl F. Zanuck and the Creation of the Modern Film Studio” comes to us from Turner Classic Movies and examines one of the preeminent producers of films, filmmakers, and stars for 85 years, focusing on the man most responsible, producer and movie mogul Daryl F. Zanuck. Scott is a prolific author with three of his books New York Times bestsellers.  He has been awarded the William K. Everson Award for Film History by the National Board of Review and he teaches film history at the University of Miami.  Scott joined us from his home in West Palm Beach. Connect with Scott: Web: www.scotteyman.com Twitter: @scotteyman1 Scott Eyman Goodreads Profile Scott Eyman on Amazon Coming Up Next Week We'll be off next week preparing a special video episode featuring "CLUE" - the stage show based on the 1985 hit movie.  Keep an eye on our Facebook page and YouTube channel!  (And remember, "This is WAR, Peacock!")

RN Arts - ABC RN
Hollywood's Man in the Shadows + new Japanese talent Ryusuke Hamaguchi

RN Arts - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:08


Today's show is a preview of some of the works screening at Sydney Film Festival.....the first is about one of the most accomplished Australian film directors you've probably never heard of - John Farrow. He won an Oscar and worked with stars like Robert Mitchum and John Wayne and we meet two men who have finally brought his story to the big screen. Plus, one of Japan's great new talents Ryusuke Hamaguchi.

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence
Ep. 152: Dr. Kristin Kobes Du Mez — God, the Flag, and Sex Manuals in White Evangelical Christianity

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:41


My guest this week is Dr. Kristin Kobes Du Mez, author of a recent book called Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation. We explored the definition of an “evangelical,” which apparently I was for the first half of my life (without realizing it), and themes of a patriarchal, male-centered, even toxic masculinity that pervades many evangelical circles. We also considered how it is that evangelical Christianity became so wrapped up in notions of patriotism, military strength, and other things that don't necessarily come from the life and message of Jesus Christ. Even if a person comes to reject the teachings from their evangelical upbringing, it can be a real challenge to let go of the attitudes and assumptions that have been instilled in us from a young age, as I know from personal experience. Kristin and I shared openly about our understanding of Christ, and the sadness that I certainly feel from the realization that we so often miss the central message of the Gospel—like somehow we just lost our way. And there's a lot to grieve when we realize how much we squander when we pattern our identity as religious followers after the worldly way of doing things, and how it doesn't seem to lead to something transcendent, like it could.

Real America with Dan Ball
10/06/21 - Supporting Our Troops Takes Action!

Real America with Dan Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:01


10/06/21 - Supporting Our Troops Takes Action!

Downtown: The Podcast
Downtown: The Podcast Episode #178

Downtown: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 39:53


Guests: Lynda Day-George, Bill Mumy, Angela Cartwright Bill Mumy and Angela Cartwright share stories from their book, LOST AND FOUND IN SPACE 2: BLAST OFF INTO THe EXPANDED EDITION and actress Lynda Day George looks back at her time on “Mission: Impossible”, working with John Wayne and more.      

Quémese después de Escuchar
466. The Searchers

Quémese después de Escuchar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 31:50


En nuestro podcast sobre The Searchers, posiblemente el western más importante de la historia del cine, falta algo. ¡Adivinen qué! #Podcast #Cine #Peliculas #TheSearchers #JohnFord #JohnWayne 

Strong Women
72. Loving Women and Children Through Unplanned Pregnancy with Brittany Smith and Natasha Smith

Strong Women

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 62:50


Natasha Smith and Brittany Smith, authors of "Unplanned Grace: A Compassionate Conversation on Life and Choice", share with us the stories of women who have experienced an unplanned pregnancy. Natasha and Brittany both work for Save the Storks, an organization that supports pregnancy resource centers, and in this conversation, they show just how deeply they care for all life - whether inside or outside the womb. Natasha and Brittany help the church to see how they can live out the pro-life message practically.   Natasha Smith and Brittany Smith Show Notes:  Unplanned Grace: A Compassionate Conversation on Life and Choice by Natasha Smith and Brittany Smith: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unplanned-grace-brittany-smith/1139200169?ean=9780830782116  Unplanned Grace Videos: https://davidccook.org/unplanned-grace/  Save the Storks: https://savethestorks.com/  Summit Ministries: https://www.summit.org/  Jesus and John Wayne by Kristen Kobes Du Mez: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/jesus-and-john-wayne-kristin-kobes-du-mez/1133534052?ean=9781631499050  The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill: https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/podcasts/rise-and-fall-of-mars-hill/  Futureville: Discover Your Purpose for Today by Reimagining Tomorrow by Skye Jantani: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/futureville-skye-jethani/1115862920?ean=9781595554611  With: Reimagining the Way You Relate to God by Skye Jethani: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/with-skye-jethani/1102583538?ean=9781595553799  Power of the Blood Covenant: Uncover the Secret Strength of God's Eternal Oath by Malcolm Smith: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/power-of-the-blood-covenant-malcolm-smith/1113562046?ean=9781606832721  Gentle and Lowly Study Guide by Dane C. Ortlund: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/gentle-and-lowly-study-guide-dane-c-ortlund/1138984433?ean=9781433580130  Father ten Boom, God's Man by Corrie ten Boom: https://www.amazon.com/Father-ten-Boom-Gods-Man/dp/1942423306/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Father+Ten+Boom+by+Corrie+Ten+Boom&qid=1632782534&sr=8-2  Join Strong Women on Social Media: https://linktr.ee/strongwomencc  Erin and her husband, Brett, run Maven which “exists to help the next generation know truth, pursue goodness, and create beauty, all for the cause of Christ.” Check out more about Maven here: https://maventruth.com/   The Strong Women Podcast is a product of the Colson Center which equips Christians to live out their faith with clarity, confidence, and courage in this cultural moment. Through commentaries, podcasts, videos, and more, we help Christians better understand what's happening in the world, and champion what is true and good wherever God has called them.  Learn more about the Colson Center here: https://www.colsoncenter.org/   Visit our website and sign up for our email list so that you can stay up to date on what we are doing here and also receive our monthly book list: https://www.colsoncenter.org/strong-women 

TheThinkingAtheist
Jesus & John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation (with author Dr. Kristin Du Mez)

TheThinkingAtheist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:52


Dr. Kristin Du Mez is a Christian, yet she is also taking to task America's hard leanings into white Christian Nationalism and authoritarian "God warrior" narratives. Join us for a compelling discussion about her new book.BOOK LINK: https://amzn.to/391DTU1Dr. Du Mez's website: https://kristindumez.com/VIDEO of this discussion: https://youtu.be/aeMjEYAMsGk

Locked On Wildcats - Daily Podcast On Arizona Wildcats Football & Basketball

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Balancing the Christian Life
Becoming a Godly Man

Balancing the Christian Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 63:46


Becoming a Christian man is a challenge at all times. This week I talk to Mark Roberts, Warren Berkley and BJ Sipe, all three evangelists. They explain how to help grow men, and what challenges there are to keep men from becoming John Wayne or Mr. Rogers.How do we become like Christ? That's the challenge, and this week's conversation.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/balancingthechristianlife)

Forgotten Filmcast
Episode 154: Forgotten Filmcast Ep 154: In Harm's Way

Forgotten Filmcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 70:24


Todd is joined by DJ Valentine from the Simplistic Reviews Podcast to discuss John Wayne and Kirk Douglass in the World War II epic In Harm's Way.

Your Brain on Facts
Summer Not-busters (ep 168)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 29:46


For every Star Wars, there's a hundred middling films and outright flops. Plus, hear about movie so unlucky, they may actually have been cursed, in a sample of the Your Brain On Facts audiobook. Read the full script.   Support the show. It's been quite a while since we got a review for the YBOF book.  Can you take a sec and let us know what you thought? Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.  Music by David Fesliyan and Kevin McLeod   Making a movie is a difficult, time-consuming, and expensive propositions.  While some projects come together naturally, others seem to have tragedy, misfortune, and just plain bad luck heaped upon them.  Horror films are fertile ground for apparent curses and it a movie would be hard-pressed to seem more cursed than 1976's The Omen, the tale of an American diplomat who adopts a baby boy, ostensibly the Antichrist, and people around him begin dying.  Even Robert Munger, who came up with the concept for the film, began to feel uneasy during pre-production, telling producer Harvey Bernhard, “The devil's greatest single weapon is to be invisible, and you're going to take off his cloak of invisibility to millions of people.”  Releasing the movie on June 6, 1976, or as close as they could get to 666, probably did not help matters.   Gregory Peck has only recently agreed to take the role of the ambassador when his son shot and killed himself, leaving no suicide note.   Undeterred, or perhaps therapeutically focusing on his work, Peck flew to England to begin filming.  While flying through a storm over the Atlantic, Peck's plane was struck by lightning, causing an engine to catch fire and nearly causing them to crash into the ocean.  The film's other producer, Mace Neufeld, also had his plane struck by lightning.  Even after those long odds, that was not the end of their aerial adversity.  One of the first shots planned for the film was an aerial shot of London, to be shot from a rented plane. At the last minute, the rental company instead gave the original plane to a group of Japanese businessmen.  The curse did not seem to get that update, because that plane crashed, killing everyone on board.   One scene called for Peck to be attacked by “devil dogs,” in the form of a pack of Rottweilers.  The dogs were supposed to attack a heavily padded stuntman.  For reasons unknown, the dogs began to attack the stuntman in earnest, biting through the padding and ignoring their trainer's orders to stop.  Another animal-based scene saw the big cat wrangler mauled to death by a tiger.   As if being in a plane struck by lightning was not harrowing enough, the Hilton hotel Neufeld was staying at exploded.  Luckily, Neufeld was not there at the time.  Not to be deterred, the curse turned its sights to the restaurant were the producers and other film executives were going and it blew up, too.  Neufeld missed the explosion by minutes.  The actual perpetrator would turn out to be the Irish Republican Army and it was only Neufeld's dodgy luck that he was meant to be in both places.   Special effects consultant John Richardson created The Omen's unforgettable death scenes, including one in which a man is beheaded by a sheet of glass sailing off the top of a car.  Two weeks before the film was released, Richardson and his assistant, Liz Moore, were involved in a head-on collision.  Moore was killed, cut in half by the other vehicle's wheel.  Richardson opened his eyes after the collision a kilometer marker reading “Ommen 6,66,”  The closest town was Ommen, Netherlands, and the accident happened at kilometer 66.6.    The highest-grossing horror movie of all time (when adjusted for inflation) and the only horror movie to ever be nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture is 1973's The Exorcist.  In it, a young girl named Reagan, played by Linda Blair, is possessed by a demon and forced to commit horrible acts as two priests fight to save her.  The trouble started before filming even began, when the set caught fire, destroying everything except Regan's room.  The malefactor had talons, and black, beady eyes, and was a harbinger of disease--a pigeon had somehow gotten into a circuit box, which caused a short that caused the fire.  Reverend Thomas Bermingham, the technical advisor, was asked to exorcise the set, but he refused.   Both Blair and Ellen Burstyn, who played her mother, were badly injured during the shoot.  One scene has the demon violently throwing Reagan around on her bed.  The rig to do this broke during one take, injuring Blair's back.  Another scene called for the demon to throw Burstyn across the room and into a wall, which the crew achieved with a wire rig.  Director William Friedkin was unhappy with the first take and told the crewman operating the rig to use more force.  He did not warn Burstyn.  Her cry of alarm and pain in the film is genuine.  Colliding with the wall at speed injured her lower spine, leaving her in permanent pain.     They were comparatively lucky.  Actors Jack MacGowran and Vasiliki Maliaros, whose characters die in the movie, both died while it was in post-production.  At least four other people, including a night watchmen, died during filming.  Max Von Sydow's brother died on Sydow's first day on set.  Actress Mercedes McCambridge, who provided the voice of the demon Pazuzu, had to face her son murdering his wife and children before committing suicide.   Many believed that the physical copies of the film were cursed and that showing it was an open invitation to evil.  A church across the street from an Italian theater was struck by lightning during a showing.  One movie-goer was so frightened they passed out in the theater and broke their jaw falling into the seat in front of them.  They sued the filmmakers, claiming that subliminal messages in the film had caused them to faint.  Warner Brothers settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.  Not everything bad can be blamed on demons, though.  Regular old people sent thirteen year old Blair so many death threats that the studio had to provide her with bodyguards for six months after the movie came out.   Speaking of demonic possession, the 2012 movie The Possession centers on a young girl who falls under the control of a malevolent spirit that lives inside a cursed antique box. The story is based on an account of an allegedly haunted dybbuk box.  Even though director Sam Raimi would not let the dybbuk box's owner bring it anywhere near the set, strange and frightening things happened on set.  Lights exploded directly over people's heads, strange smells and cold air blew in from nowhere, and immediately after filming wrapped, all of the props were destroyed in a fire for which the first department could not determine the cause. Sometimes a movie's bad karma takes time to manifest and the misfortunes only crop up after the film had been released.   Horror classic Rosemary's Baby, released in the summer of 1968, was based on the premise that God is dead, but the Devil is alive and returning to earth with the aid of a cult.  The film's composer, 37 year old Krzysztof Komeda, fell off a rock ledge at a party that fall.  He lingered in a coma for four months before finally dying.  His death was quite similar to the way the witches rid themselves of a suspicious friend of the titular Rosemary.  The producer, William Castle, already suffering considerable stress from the amount of hate mail he had received about the film, was incapacitated with severe kidney stones.  While delirious in the hospital, he cried out, “Rosemary, for God's sake, drop the knife!”  Castle recovered his health, but never made a successful movie again.  Director Roman Polanski suffered no physical harm after the film.  The same could not be said for his heavily-pregnant wife, Sharon Tate.  She and four friends were brutally murdered by members of the cult known as the Manson Family, while Rosemary's Baby was still in theaters.  In his autobiography, Polanksi recalled he had had a “grotesque thought” the last time he saw his wife: “You will never see her again.” Conspiracy theorists and other non-traditional thinkers believe these events were set in motion by an elaborate Satanic plot, at the behest of the Beatles. Their White Album was written at an Indian meditation retreat, which the movie's star, Mia Farrow, attended.  The song title Helter Skelter was written in blood on a wall at the Tate murder, albeit misspelled.  A decade later, John Lennon was shot and killed across the street from the Dakota, where Rosemary's Baby had been filmed. 1982's Poltergeist tells the story of a family that is tormented by vengeful spirits because their new house was built over a graveyard with the bodies left in the ground.  When it came time for the prop department to source skeletons for the infamous scene with JoBeth Williams in the muddy pool, contrary to what one might expect, it was actually cheaper to buy real human skeletons than realistic plastic ones.  (They only told Williams about that afterwards.)  In a case of ‘life imitating art,' specifically with regards to disrespectful treatment of dead bodies, the cast seemed to be plagued by bad fortune.  The curse extended not only the original film, but to its sequels as well.  Shortly after Poltergeist was released, Dominique Dunne, who played the older sister, was strangled to death by her abusive ex-boyfriend, ending her career before it began. Heather O'Rourke, the adorable blonde girl who uttered the iconic line “They're heeere,” died during bowel obstruction surgery after suffering cardiac arrest and septic shock due to being misdiagnosed by her doctor.  She was only twelve years old.  Julian Beck of Poltergeist II: The Other Side died of stomach cancer before the film was released.  Will Sampson, also known for playing Chief in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, died the following year from complications of a heart-lung transplant.     Bonus fact: Some fans claim Poltergeist foretold O'Rourke's death.  There was a poster in the 1982 movie for Super Bowl XXII in 1988.  Heather O'Rourke was hospitalized the day of Super Bowl XXII and died the following day.  The game was played in San Diego, the city in which O'Rourke passed away.   Choosing the right location to shoot a film is a pivotal decision.  You have to take into account things like lighting conditions, availability of utilities, and proximity to noisy things such as airports.  What you should not have to consider is the radiation level, but you should not ignore it either.  The producers of the film 1956 movie The Conqueror chose an area of Utah desert a hundred miles away from the Nevada Test Site.  (They also chose to cast John Wayne as Genghis Khan.)   Throughout the 1950's, approximately 100 nuclear bombs of varying intensities were detonated at the Nevada Test Site.  The mushroom clouds could reach tens of thousands of feet high; desert winds would carry radioactive particles all the way to Utah.  The area in which The Conqueror filmed was likely blanketed in this dust.   The Conqueror, co-starring Susan Hayward, Agnes Moorehead, and Pedro Armendáriz, was a moderate box office success, but a critical failure and soon found itself on ‘worst films of all time' lists.  The true legacy of the film had yet to be revealed.  Of the 220 people who worked on the production, 92 developed some form of cancer, with 46 dying of it, including Wayne, Hayward, Moorehead, and Armendáriz.  The director, Dick Powell, died of lymphoma in 1963.  Wayne developed lung cancer and then the stomach cancer that would ultimately kill him in 1979.  Wayne would remain convinced that his chain-smoking was to blame for the cancers, even as friends tried to convince him it was from exposure to radiation.  Wayne's sons, who visited the set during filming and actually played with Geiger counters among the contaminated rocks, both developed tumors.  Susan Hayward died from brain cancer in 1975 at 57.   The authorities in 1954 had declared the area to be safe from radioactive fallout, even though abnormal levels of radiation were detected.  However, modern research has shown that the soil in some areas near the filming site would have remained radioactive for sixty years.  Howard Hughes, producer of The Conqueror, came to realize in the early 1970's that people who have been involved with the production were dying.   As the person who approved the filming location, Hughes felt culpable and paid $12 million to buy all existing copies of the film.  Though the link between the location and the cancers that cannot be definitely proven, experts argue that the preponderance of cases goes beyond mere coincidence.   MIDROLL   My grandmother had a lovely cross-stitched sampler above her fireplace with a quote that I really took to heart and have carried with me through my life, “Everything happens for a reason.  Sometimes the reason is you're stupid and make bad decisions.”  … I wish my grandma had a sense of humor like that.  Every movie that fails does so for a reason.  Several, usually, a veritable swarm of failure bees, ready to sting the audience right in the brain and the studio right in its wallet.  And sometimes, that sting is fatal.  For the studio, I mean.  I don't know of any cases where someone died because the movie they were watching was so bad it killed them.  At least that gives Tommy Wiseau something to reach for.   Like we saw with the banking crisis, there is no such thing as ‘too big to fail' in Hollywood, either.  Take Eddie Murphy, for example.  He was already established for his roles in 48 Hrs and Trading places before 1984's Beverly Hills Cop.  [sfx axel f]  I'll risk the copyright strike, I don't care.  If Hollywood were a lady, she was throwing her panties at Murphy until around, let's call it 1995's Vampire in Brooklyn.  Since then, for every Shrek, there are three Norberts, or one Pluto Nash.  Did you see this fart bomb of a movie when it came out in 2002?  Yeah, neither did anyone else.  His first foray into live-action family comedies stank like a pair of armored trousers after the Hundred Years war.  The sci-fi comedy (and we use the term loosely) didn't receive one breath of praise, with everyone lambasting the script, humour, acting and visual effects.  And they dragged poor Rasario Dawson into it.  Its 4% rating on Rotten Tomatoes says it all, though the audience gave it 19%.  One of the biggest box-office flops ever, the movie had a $100 million production budget but earned only $7.1 million at theaters worldwide, meaning it lost a whopping $92.9 million.   Sometimes the likely cause for a movie's failure is staring us all right in the face, but it feels like no one talked about, even though we *alllll talked about it, the casting of Johnny Depp in the ‘are you sure there's nothing else in the bottom of this barrel' elephant in the room, 2013's The Lone Ranger.  Depp was joined by fellow Pirates of the Caribbean alums Gore Verbinski, Jerry Bruckheimer and the House of Mouse must have felt confident this wonder trio could bring home the gold.  Yeah, no.  The production ran into trouble, costs escalated and the whole thing was nearly shut down before it was completed.  When it finally hit cinema screens, The Lone Ranger was slammed by critics and shunned by audiences. [sfx it stinks]  But it did still manage to garner two Oscar nominations, for 'Visual Effects' and 'Makeup and Hairstyling.'  Must have been a light year.  The Lone Ranger lost almost Pluto Nash's production budget, being in the red by $98 million.   If you look at film losses as the ratio of budget to loss, you've got to tip your hat to  2016's Monster Trucks.  Paramount hoped to launch a franchise, because there is literally no other way to run a movie studio, but kids can be as fickle with their entertainment options as they are with the sides on their dinner plate.  The $125m CGI romp's opening barely scraped over $10 million at the box office, meaning a loss of $115 million.  If it needed to be said, this section is about films with wide releases and big ad budgets.  Projects from smaller producers have a riskier time with it.  When my (GRRM doc, five tickets at Byrd).   If you look up the lowest-grossing film of all time, you'll find a film that was mentioned in the scam health retreat episode To Your Health (Spa) (ep. 101), but it happened on purpose, from a certain point of view.  2006's Zyzzyx Road was shown once a day, at noon, for six days at Highland Park Village Theater in Dallas, Texas, in a movie theater rented by the producers for $1,000.  The filmmakers wanted a limited release.  They didn't want to release the film domestically until it underwent foreign distribution, buuut they had to do the domestic release to fulfill the U.S. release obligation required by the Screen Actors Guild for low-budget films.  Low-budget is actually quantified as those with budgets less than $2.5 million that are not meant to be direct-to-video.  That strategy made Zyzzyx Road the lowest-grossing film in history; officially, it earned a whopping box office tally of $30, from six patrons.  Unofficially, its opening weekend netted $20, after the leading man refunded two tickets to the movie's makeup artist and the friend she brought. Lots of films fail, happens every day, but some films fail so spectacularly, they take the whole studio down with them, sometimes nearly and sometimes very actually..  Students of movie history with a penchant for disasters know all about 1963's Cleopatra, starring disserviacably diva-ish Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. The period epic had such a disjointed production that actors sometimes didn't know which scenes were being shot until they arrived on set that day.  With a budget swelling uncontrollably to $44 million, the largest at the time, equivalent to $392mil today, the movie faced a real uphill battle to break even, let alone turn a profit.  Movie tickets cost $.85 then and there was no home video market, so 20th Century Fox would have needed to have sold 56 million tickets to stay in the black.  Quick google, the population of the US was 190 million at the time, so...yeah, ain't gonna happen, Cap'n.  They were pretty much screwed.  Cleopatra holds the unique distinction of being the highest-grossing film that year that lost money.  Although the studio didn't fold, Fox was forced to sell off 300 acres of its lot and postpone other productions to avoid permanently closing its doors.  Cleopatra did eventually recoup its budget with foreign distribution, but 1964's historical epic The Fall of the Roman Empire wasn't so lucky.  Samuel Bronston Productions spent a fortune re-creating the 92,000-square meter Roman Forum that once served as the heart of the ancient city, in turn building Hollywood's largest ever outdoor set.  It had Sophia Loren in it, for gods sake.  Do you know what she looked like in 1964?!  Sadly, Fall of the Roman Empire only managed to earn back a quarter of its $19 million budget.  Just three months after its release, Bronston's own empire fell, into bankruptcy.   Speaking of big decisions at Fox, one of the people who greenlit Star Wars was Alan Ladd Jr, who left to form his own studio, Ladd Company.  For my British listeners, feel free to pause and imagine an all-lad movie studio, oi-oi, we'll wait.  The Ladd Company pursued ambitious projects like The Right Stuff, based on Tom Wolfe's book about the early days of the space program.  That was a big hit, wasn't it?  I never saw it, but it has good name recognition.  While critics sang its praises and it won four Oscars, The Right Stuff failed to find an audience at the box office.  The same thing happened with Twice Upon a Time, an animated feature executive produced by George Lucas, which did *not have good name recognition and when I do a Google image search, it doesn't look even 1% familiar.  Even though they still had Police Academy in the chute, the Ladd Company was forced to sell its assets to Warner Bros.   Speaking of name recognition, even films that are iconic these days bombed big time when they came out.  Try to imagine TV in December without every single channel running Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life at least twice.  Trivia fans, which should be every one here, already know that IAWL did not do well on release --a release in January, it's worth mentioning, which may have been part of the problem-- before lapsing into the public domain and being shown by every tv station needing content on the cheap.  Hell, there was a local station where I grew up in north-east PA that used a jingle of the phrase “IAWL” as their tagline.  The same thing ‘why would you even do that' release date misstep happened with Hocus Pocus, actually.  It was released originally in July, well before social media made loving Halloween a major personality trait, then Disney sat on the movie for over a year before putting it out on home video the next September.  Back to 1946, It's a Wonderful Life's disappointing performance was devastating for Capra, who had actually opened his own production studio, Liberty Films.  Capra and fellow filmmakers George Stevens and William Wyler were trying to free themselves from meddling from studio executives' meddling, but their professional freedom was short-lived.  With no track record, Liberty Films needed the film to get them to live up to Capra's usual standards of success.  It didn't, as we've established, and Capra was forced to sell Liberty to Paramount and work for someone else.   If you've been saying, I haven't heard of half of these people, how about Francis Ford Coppola?  Coppola shapes the landscape of 1970s cinema.  Ever hear of The Godfather, The Conversation, and Apocalypse Now?  Yeah, thought so.  The '80s, however, not so much.  His first movie of the decade, One From the Heart, spent the majority of its high budget on pioneering visual techniques and a faithful recreation of Nevada's McCarran International Airport.  He's a details guy.  But fans of his earlier, dark, gritty, hyper-masculine work were left completely baffled when they sat down for a Coppola movie and found themselves in a candy-colored Vegas musical rom-com.   The film failed to pull in even a million dollars against its budget of $27mil.  Coppola's own studio, Zoetrope, never recovered from the financial loss.   Speaking of film legends who stumble headlong into bankruptcy, we present  for the consideration of several readers, Don Bluth.  Bluth left his job as an animator at Disney in 1979 to create the animation department for 20th Century Fox.  We're talking The Secret of N.I.M.H, An American Tail, The Land Before Time, and Bluth and crew at Fox Animation put those out while Disney delivered disappointing efforts like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver and Company.   But Disney found its footing again with The Little Mermaid in 1989 and they've been unquestionably unstoppable ever since.  In 1997, Bluth released the critically acclaimed Anastasia; less than three years later, the studio was done.  In June 2000, Titan A.E. hit theaters, a lush, traditionally-animated movie with great character designs and solid casting and acting that flew through space and braved alien worlds.  It wasn't a bad movie.  For some reason, despite having a hysterically bad memory, I can still remember the chorus of the song from the big ‘let's do cool things with the ship' sequence.  Titan AE hit theaters, but not, ya know, hard.  Fox Animation spent $85 million on the film targeted at a teen audience, who are not a big enough segment of the broader animation-viewing market.  It earned $9 million on its opening weekend and the following *week, Fox announced it was closing the studio.  The writing had already been on the wall.  In December 1999, executives forced Bluth to lay off 80% of his animators after the box office bonanza that was the CGI Toy Story 2 led Fox execs to conclude that hand-drawn animation was on the way out.   Prior performance is no predictor of future success.  The Land Before Time didn't help Bluth with Titan AE, and not even the freaking Lord of the Rings trilogy, with its many Oscars, could save New Line Cinema.  From its creation in the 1970s and even after Warner Bros. bought a controlling stake, New Line Cinema was a mid-major movie studio that acted like an indie, taking chances on edgy, quirky movies like Pink Flamingos, Boogie Nights, and Mortal Kombat.  If you don't think MK belongs in those examples, the only video game movies had been Street Fighter, blargh, Double Dragon, yawn, and Super Mario Brothers, a veritable kick in the nards to be gamers and moviegoers.   Four years after The Return of the King ended the LOTR trilogy...eventually... New Line wanted another fantasy series cash cow, and it looked to The Golden Compass, Philip Pullman's first entry in the His Dark Materials trilogy.  New Line pumped $200 million on the project, more than it had spent on The Lord of the Rings.  To offset production costs, the company pre-sold the overseas rights, essentially getting an advance, meaning that when the film hit theaters outside of North America, they wouldn't see any more money.  That made profit virtually impossible... as did the film's relatively small $70 million domestic take.  Thus Warner Bros. absorbed New Line into its existing film production divisions, well, 10% of the studio.  The other 90% got sacked.   Sources: get ones from book https://www.triviagenius.com/5-movies-that-lost-the-most-money/XtY_ghx5DQAG1g4j https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/643698/movies-that-bankrupted-studios https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/86201/6-movies-ruined-their-studios https://www.digitalspy.com/movies/a843659/expensive-movie-flops-bombs-box-office-failure-justice-league/ https://chillopedia.com/15-movies-that-killed-careers/  

time movies tv horror google japanese students american speaking music star wars indian halloween special god chief utah sam raimi richardson oscars italian hughes castle north america hollywood las vegas house england british texas disney conspiracy vampires nest hell fall roman empire caribbean paramount warner bros baby pirates depp peck netherlands beatles mouse john lennon nevada reach cgi francis ford coppola secret lights cap heart bonus screen actors guild warner brothers john wayne mortal kombat shortly lord of the rings devil atlantic johnny depp hilton best picture sydow possession projects trivia san diego his dark materials shrek conversations george lucas grrm omen sharon tate tommy wiseau wonderful life hocus pocus busters godfather new line cinema street fighter don bluth bluth century fox american tail helter skelter conqueror rotten tomatoes poltergeist satanic regular frank capra tom wolfe undeterred boogie nights jerry bruckheimer gore verbinski william wyler moorehead little mermaid trading releasing richard burton manson family elizabeth taylor cuckoo exorcist lone ranger coppola capra one flew over gregory peck moxie genghis khan sophia loren philip pullman director william friedkin byrd john richardson hairstyling linda blair beverly hills cop great mouse detective mk howard hughes antichrist geiger dick powell hayward ellen burstyn police academy twice upon apocalypse now max von sydow william castle double dragon hrs poltergeist ii the other side pazuzu mia farrow new line hundred years golden compass midroll dominique dunne roman forum agnes moorehead monster trucks titan ae super mario brothers bronston land before time fox animation george stevens right stuff zoetrope neufeld your brain on facts colliding unofficially jobeth williams krzysztof komeda liz moore susan hayward pink flamingos pluto nash rottweilers nevada test site ommen burstyn mccarran international airport irish republican army armend
The Charlie Kirk Show
Why the Left Hates Cowboys

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 37:26


With 'WhipGate' still raging on the Southern Border, and Border Czar Kamala Harris circling in on an investigation into...herself (?) Charlie cuts through the muck and makes sense of the hysteria surrounding images from Del Rio Texas which purport to show mounted members of Customs and Border Patrol "whipping" Haitian migrants attempting to "seek asylum" in America. While all of this is decidedly and obviously false, it has whipped the media into a fervor the likes of which we haven't seen since the Covington Catholic scandal. Charlie walks through it all—even including a lesson in Jungian psychology and a sampling of one of John Wayne's greatest films—before diving into another historic fight being waged in our nation: ticked-off parents vs woke school board members. After walking through two examples of this from the great state of Texas, Charlie finishes with an update on the Durham Report and a roadmap on where the movement needs to go from here in order to save our republic.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mom Save America
I should've had the pasta.

Mom Save America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 48:26


Proceed with caution when dealing with teenagers and the aging process. The events and the aftermath of 9/11 mean more now than ever. What does it mean to be patriotic. Tina momtemplates Kristin Kobes's book Jesus and John Wayne, how white evangelicals corrupted a faith and fractured a nation. The girls lighten up with some recaps on the MTV music awards and they try to figure out what the hell goes on at the Met Gala. Hosts: Tina Graf and Kerry Lucas Produced by: Tina Graf

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast
131 | The Longest Walk with SEAC(R) John Wayne Troxell

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 76:46


What was the hardest walk you have ever had to make?  John had to make that walk and it ended up being the 100 meters from his office to the Secretary of Defense and share some hard news.   John Wayne Troxell is a retired United States Army senior non-commissioned officer who served as the third Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. This position made him the most senior enlisted member of the United States Armed Forces. He enlisted in the United States Army in September 1982.  Troxell's five combat tours of duty included making the combat parachute jump and service in Operation Just Cause in Panama, Operation Desert Shield/Storm, two tours in Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.   Topics Covered: The fall of Afghanistan Losing purpose after leaving  VA Benefits  Why change is so hard for DOD The longest walk  Raising Sons How to connect with guest https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-wayne-troxell/ (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/jwtrox/?hl=en (Instagram) http://veteranslendinggroup.com/seacr-john-wayne-troxell/ (Website) Thank you for Listening to the Episode! Be sure to subscribe on https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-military-veteran-dad-podcast/id1448127126 (Apple), https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9taWxpdGFyeXZldGVyYW5kYWQubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M (Google), https://open.spotify.com/show/2I1mwoZ0VaR9tLdCwwxsg2 (Spotify), or wherever you get your podcasts. And feel free to drop us a line at ben@militaryveterandad.com. Follow Ben on Social Media to stay up to date on Military Veteran Dad – https://www.facebook.com/benjamin.killoy (Facebook) | https://twitter.com/BenKilloy (Twitter) | https://www.instagram.com/militaryveterandad/?hl=en (Instagram) | https://www.linkedin.com/in/ben-killoy/ (LinkedIn) For help, resources, and community support, please join the https://www.facebook.com/groups/militaryveterandad (Military Veteran Dad) Facebook Group. Be sure to check out all the http://www.freedadcourse.com/ (free courses) available to help come home to a better tomorrow. Heads Up: My episodes may contain affiliate links! If you buy something through one of those links, you won't pay a penny more, but we'll get a small commission, which helps keep the lights on. Thanks! Support this podcast

Something You Should Know
SYSK Choice: Secrets of Self-Control & The Fascinating History of Blue Jeans

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 48:42


What could be cuter than a young child and a dog together? Yet, it could be a very dangerous situation. This episode begins with a warning about leaving young children alone with a dog even if the child and dog are familiar with each other. https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/kids-and-dogs-how-kids-should-and-should-not-interact-with-dogs/ Do you ever wish you had more willpower? It does seem that some people have a lot more of it than others. Psychologist Kelly McGonigal says you probably have more of it than you think and you can create more of it if you want to. Kelly is a lecturer at Stanford University and author of the book The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More (https://amzn.to/2JqGQ35). Listen as she explains how willpower works and how you can have more of it. Just about everyone has at least one pair of jeans - and probably more. Jeans are the iconic American garment and have been for decades. While other fashion trends have come and gone there has always been a place for jeans. So where did they come and why have they lasted? Come to think of it, what exactly is denim anyway – how is it different from other fabrics? Journalist James Sullivan, author of the book, Jeans: A Cultural History of an American Icon (https://amzn.to/2DGD45j) joins me to take you on an historical journey from Italy to the American west to a John Wayne movie set to explain the story of blue jeans. When was the last time you washed your credit cards? Probably never. Yet, your credit cards are one of many things crawling with germs you probably never think to clean. Listen to discover what else in your home might need a little disinfectant sooner than later. https://www.fitandfabliving.com/general-health/6435-seven-surprisingly-dirty-surfaces/ PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! We really enjoy The Jordan Harbinger Show and we think you will as well! Check out https://jordanharbinger.com/start OR search for The Jordan Harbinger Show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.  Get 10% off on the purchase of Magnesium Breakthrough from BiOptimizers by visiting https://magbreakthrough.com/something Follow Nine Twelve wherever you get your podcasts, or you can binge all seven episodes right now on Amazon Music or with Wondery Plus.  T-Mobile for Business the leader in 5G, #1 in customer satisfaction, and a partner who includes benefits like 5G in every plan. Visit https://T-Mobile.com/business Discover matches all the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically and is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that take credit cards! Learn more at https://discover.com/yes https://www.geico.com Bundle your policies and save! It's Geico easy! Visit https://www.remymartin.com/en-us/ to learn more about their exceptional spirits! Download the five star-rated puzzle game Best Fiends FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play! https://bestfiends.com Never try to beat a train across the tracks. Stop. Trains can't. Paid for by NHTSA Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Zero Blog Thirty
Taliban Using US Helicopters

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 88:03


4 Rounds in the magazine ... ROUND 1: We need some levity, so in this round we've got some eex crazed spiders in Ireland that will go zero to sixty(nine) in no time, bite you, and then bang each other's brains out. Which will lead us to our weekend safety brief. ROUND 2: Plain and simple, it's a FART STORY ROUND 3: Afghanistan updates ROUND 4: The saga of a congressman from Oklahoma named Markwayne Mullin. That's right, Markwayne. And he went John Wayne on everyone's ass & traveled rogue to Afghanistan… or at least he tried to. Bonus Interview with a Airforce Pilot

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Bruce Dern - Hour 3 (09-02-21)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 56:13


Rich, Chris Brockman, TJ Jefferson and Mike Del Tufo break down the AFC South with each giving a prediction on how the division will shake out this season. Two-time Academy Award-nominated actor Bruce Dern plays ‘Celebrity True or False' with Rich giving the scoop on John Wayne, Marilyn Monroe, Eleanor Roosevelt and others, why it was really THAT cold on the set of Quentin Tarantino's ‘The Hateful 8' and what all genius directors like Quentin Tarantino, Alfred Hitchcock and Francis Ford Coppola have in common, and so much more!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Classic Movie Musts
Archive: The Quiet Man (1952)

Classic Movie Musts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 27:37


Check out this episode from our archive on John Ford's The Quiet Man (1952), starring John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara.