Podcasts about california san diego

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Best podcasts about california san diego

Latest podcast episodes about california san diego

New Books Network
Automating Finance

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 57:15


Sociologist Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, a professor at University of California San Diego, talks about his book Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets with Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel. The book traces the long, largely anonymous, and in some senses boring history of how experts applied computers to financial systems since the 1970s, creating a digital infrastructure of the trading world. The conversation also touches on Pardo-Guerra's more recent work on how systems of quantitative metrics have been applied to the management of universities and what might be done about it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Trustees and Presidents- Opportunities and Challenges In Intercollegiate Athletics
"For a President, Athletics Should Be a Hand's On Endeavor"-A Conversation with Dean Jim Antony (UCSD) and President Ana Mari Cauce (U Washington)

Trustees and Presidents- Opportunities and Challenges In Intercollegiate Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 42:22


When a college leader assumes his/her presidency for the first time, I've often wondered how they begin to understand the complexities of college athletics. Nearly 90% of sitting presidents rise to the position from the academic side of the house- where do they learn about athletics? In 2023, there are so many challenges and choices for presidents to make, that it can seem daunting. How do new presidents go about learning how things work (beyond wins and losses) in the business of college sports? Do they just listen and take directives from their athletics director? Or do they work to insert the values and mission of the institution into their athletics departments? And how do presidents work to understand the Conference and national issues impacting college sports today? My guests today are two long time professional colleagues and friends. Ana Mari Cauce is the 33rd president of the University of Washington where she has been a member of the faculty since 1986. She is a member of the Pac-12 Conference executive leadership team, and was a part of the group that hired current Commissioner George Kliavkoff. She is deeply aware of the fast changing dynamics in Power 5 and Pac-12 programs. James Soto Antony is the Dean, Division of Graduate Education, and Professor, Education Studies at the University of California San Diego. Along with Ana Mari, he is a co-editor of The College President Handbook: A Sustainable and Practical Guide for Emerging Leaders, a dynamic book published in 2022 that includes relevant information for new Presidents across many of their responsibilities. Jim has closely followed the changes in college athletics in the last 20 years as a researcher, and was the founder of the University of Washington's Center for Leadership in Athletics.

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur
Matt Schlegel - Owner of Schlegel Consulting

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 31:44


In this episode of the Road to Growth podcast, we are pleased to introduce you to Matt Schlegel. Matt discovered the secret as to why some teams succeed while others fail. As a system thinker, Matt realized that successful problem solving was contingent more on effective teamwork than technical prowess. The path began with his studies in general engineering from Harvey Mudd College and electrical engineering from the University of California San Diego providing formal training in problem solving, especially in solving technical and engineering problems. As Matt worked on bigger projects and being fascinated by team dynamics, he began studying the Enneagram in 2002 and started applying it in corporate settings in 2003. Soon thereafter, he began developing the tools that Schlegel Consulting now uses to optimize team-based problem solving for innovative companies. Matt's realization that the Enneagram can be applied to teams as well as individuals led to the tools and strategies for work-team effectiveness described in his book Teamwork 9.0.   Learn more and connect with Matt Schlegel by visiting him on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattschlegel/ Website: https://evolutionaryteams.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EvoTeamMatt Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/MattSchlegel6/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/matt.schlegel.77/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLkUMHuG4HVa831s9yeoZ5Q Blog: https://evolutionaryteams.com/blog/ Survey Quiz: https://www.gmind.org/sc/index.php?object_id=3bd85ffc447acb4cdee0de6e63ca0ae8&SESSION=995a8fc0e879f0d9bd91c4e5e1912630&t=1640800873     Be sure to follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/to_growth on Facebook: facebook.com/Road2Growth   Subscribe to our podcast across the web: https://www.theenriquezgroup.com/blog Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Cdmacc iTunes: https://apple.co/2F4zAcn Castbox: http://bit.ly/2F4NfQq Google Play: http://bit.ly/2TxUYQ2 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA?view_as=subscriber   If you are looking to be a Guest on Podcasts please click below  https://kitcaster.com/rtg/  For any San Diego Real Estate Questions Please Follow Us at web: www.TheEnriquezGroup.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA or Call : 858 -345 - 7829 Recently reduced properties in San Diego County * Click **** bit.ly/3cbT65C **** Here* 

Aging-US
Epigenetic Aging, Cognitive Function and Visuospatial Processing in People With HIV

Aging-US

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 4:20


A new research paper was published in Aging (Aging-US) Volume 14, Issue 24, entitled, “Epigenetic aging is associated with aberrant neural oscillatory dynamics serving visuospatial processing in people with HIV.” Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, cognitive impairment and other aging-related comorbidities are more prevalent in people with HIV (PWH) than in the general population. Previous research examining DNA methylation has shown PWH exhibit accelerated biological aging. However, it is unclear how accelerated biological aging may affect neural oscillatory activity in virally suppressed PWH, and more broadly how such aberrant neural activity may impact neuropsychological performance. Participants (n = 134) between the ages of 23 – 72 years underwent a neuropsychological assessment, a blood draw to determine biological age via DNA methylation, and a visuospatial processing task during magnetoencephalography (MEG). Researchers Mikki Schantell, Brittany K. Taylor, Rachel K. Spooner, Pamela E. May, Jennifer O'Neill, Brenda M. Morsey, Tina Wang, Trey Ideker, Sara H. Bares, Howard S. Fox, and Tony W. Wilson from the Boys Town National Research Hospital, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Creighton University, Heinrich-Heine University, and the University of California San Diego focused their analyses on the relationship between biological age and oscillatory theta (4-8 Hz) and alpha (10 - 16 Hz) activity among PWH (n=65) and seronegative controls (n = 69). “To our knowledge, no study to date has directly linked accelerated biological aging in PWH to the neuro-functional changes that occur in cognitively impaired PWH, which include deficits in visuospatial processing, attention, working memory, and motor function networks.” PWH had significantly elevated biological age when controlling for chronological age relative to controls. Biological age was differentially associated with theta oscillations in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and with alpha oscillations in the right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) among PWH and seronegative controls. Stronger alpha oscillations in the mPFC were associated with lower CD4 nadir and lower current CD4 counts, suggesting such responses were compensatory. Participants who were on combination antiretroviral therapy for longer had weaker theta oscillations in the PCC. Full press release - https://www.aging-us.com/news_room/Aging-Epigenetic-aging-associated-with-aberrant-neural-oscillatory-dynamics-serving-visuospatial-processing-in-people-with-HIV DOI: https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.204437 Corresponding Author: Tony W. Wilson - tony.wilson@boystown.org Keywords: HIV, epigenetics, biological age, visuospatial discrimination, oscillations About Aging-US: Launched in 2009, Aging (Aging-US) publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research and age-related diseases, including cancer—and now, with a special focus on COVID-19 vulnerability as an age-dependent syndrome. Topics in Aging go beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR, among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways. Visit our website at www.Aging-US.com​​ and connect with us: SoundCloud – https://soundcloud.com/Aging-Us Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/AgingUS/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/AgingJrnl Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/agingjrnl/ YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/agingus​ LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/aging/ For media inquiries, contact media@impactjournals.com.

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -12- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 2:09


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 12, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 12 segment, Mark Henkel returned to make sure that one crucially important point was understood about UCAP, Unrelated Consenting Adult Polygamy. Marki Henkel explained that any man who wants to be a polygamist can only successfully do so as a caring, nurturing husband. After making the writer chuckle with the good logic of his argument, Mark Henkel concluded, "Dr. Joyce Brothers said in '94 [Dec. 22, 1994], ‘I would rather be the third wife of a good man than the only wife of a jerk.'" The writer positively affirmed, “No, that's just good sense right there.” The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

The Happy Diabetic Kitchen
61. Recipe for Setting Healthy Goals in the New Year

The Happy Diabetic Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 32:01


This is the Happy Diabetic Kitchen--- In this episode, we will hear from some of my very good friends in the diabetic community who will share their personal goals for the New Year! So, get ready! We are stepping into the New Year together exploring ideas for a happy healthy lifestyle way of eating! It's time to gather your thoughts, journals and goals for a New Year's refresh. As someone who's trying to live my best diabetic life, New Year's is an opportunity to reset, regroup, and revitalize. I want to have revolution of goals and ideas… not a revolt! Keep an open mind… Stay open to possibilities of trying something new. That said, it's best to get a head start on your New Year's resolutions now. It just isn't going to happen. But, if you stand firm in actually sticking to your resolutions this year. So, whether you want to get back on that fitness grind, sharpen certain skills or be more productive, we have invited some amazing folks who live in the diabetic space every day to tell you about their list of the top New Year's resolutions to give you inspiration for 2023. I think it will inspire you…   Our guests on the podcast: Guest New Year Resolutions Jana Smolinski (Episode # 53) - Raising a Child with Diabetes: An Interview With Jana Smolenski. Jana is a school teacher and mom who raised a type one diabetic. Annie, her daughter was diagnosed at age 5. Jana has a lot of wisdom to share about how to support a small child in growing up with this disease. Max Mr. Divabetic  - You know him as Mr. Divabetic, the fruit suit clad man-about-town. He is the resident master of ceremonies and happy healthcare anchor on Diva TalkRadio, a podcast channel featuring diabetes edu-tainment and information.  When he re-appears from the studio booth and sheds his pineapple and watermelon jacket, he transforms into the mild-mannered, yet passionate Max Szadek, the founder and executive director of Divabetic and WEGO Health Activist Award nominee. Inspired by his former boss, Luther Vandross, who suffered in silence with his diabetes, Max founded Divabetic to encourage women and their families to accept a diabetes diagnosis boldly, with a Glam More, Fear Less attitude. With a background in entertainment and armed with a team of diabetes health and wellness educators, fashionistas. Mr. Divabetic's enthusiasm is infectious, and you can follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and his world-famous blog for diabetes news, updates, and all things pop culture. “I'm on a mission to change attitudes in those affected by diabetes to stay healthy and upbeat about their care so they can continue to enjoy the glamorous life.” - Max Szadek Max the Divabetic   Janice Baker Janice Baker 25 - Interview With a Dietician    Kim Stewart Kimberly Stuart ABOUT KIM Kimberly Stuart, she holds degrees from St. Olaf College and the University of Iowa. She learned lots of interesting things at these fine institutions, none of which prepared her for the lethal cocktail of parenthood and writing. Stuart is the author of eight published novels, including the Heidi Elliott series, Act Two, Stretch Marks, Operation Bonnet, Sugar, and Heart Land. She is a frequent public speaker and is passionate about helping others live great stories. Kimberly lives, plays, works in Des Moines, Iowa, where she makes her home with one forgiving husband, three wily kids and a black Schnauzer named Scout.   Annie Smolinski 52 - Diabetes does not need to define you! Interview with Annie Smolenski, type 1 rock star!   Bill Polansky Bill Polansky Dr. Bill Polonsky is Associate Clinical Professor in Psychiatry at the University of California San Diego. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from Yale University and has served as Senior Psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, faculty member at Harvard Medical School and Chairman of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators.    Cindy Lewis my wife/partner of 42 years. Cindy has been what I like to call a type 3 diabetic, she has been my support, my helper my supporter my diabetic champion since my diagnosis in 1998.          

Game Changer - the game theory podcast
How to bid in an auction – with Paul Papayoanou

Game Changer - the game theory podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 22:14


In this episode, we discuss with Paul Papayoanou his real life experience as a consultant applying Game Theory. Paul has worked on over 150 engagements using his expertise. In our discussion we especially focus on Paul's experience in consulting bidders participating in auctions. Paul shares how he prepares his clients when they enter an auction and what makes a good bidding strategy.   Paul Papayoanou is a consultant for all things Game Theory and author of the book "Game Theory for Business: A Primer in Strategic Gaming". He has worked as a professor at the University of California San Diego and at Harvard University, and currently is a Senior Advisor with Decision Frameworks, a boutique consultancy based in Houston, Texas that serves clients worldwide.

WSJ What’s News
The Dangerous Downward Spiral of U.S.-China Relations

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 17:17 Very Popular


Dec. 30 edition. The economic and technological interdependence of the U.S. and China used to be seen as a foundation for peace. But now, the two countries find themselves enveloped in fear and mutual suspicion with little end in sight. Dr. Susan Shirk, chair of the 21st Century China Center at the University of California San Diego explains whether the present tensions were inevitable and what Beijing and Washington would need to do to turn around the relationship. Luke Vargas hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -11- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 3:25


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 11, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 11 segment, the writer re-phrased a re-iteration of her main question, "Why do you think that gay marriage is so much easier for people to accept than polygamy?" Henkel pulled no punches, saying, “The media.” Mark Henkel detailed how the media has taken control for the previous 30 years. "You have to use the language that they allow you, or they won't let you get published or they won't let you get heard. ...You have to use [the term] 'traditional marriage' to relate to 'one man, one woman' as opposed to [the term] 'marriage controllers.' So there is an Orwellian doublethink of language control in the media." Mark Henkel concluded that the media has "overwhelmingly pushed it and pushed it and pushed that agenda for the last 30 years to the point that there are now a generation of people that have grown up being promoted it and fully accepting it." Listeners will note that this comment about media pushing ideology and controlling language was stated in 2009, before the following decade of the next "new thing" called "social media" controlling what people are allowed to even see or hear under the misnomer of “censorship for protecting from misinformation.” The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -10- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 3:23


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 10, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 10 segment, the Mark Henkel provided insights into how difficult it is for Christians to face the reality that the "one man, one woman" (OMOW) doctrine is simply not in the Bible. Mark Henkel also explained how the internet (to that point in history, before social media took over) had made it possible for the other Christians to see that they are not alone in seeing this, and that that is how the movement was able to grow with its different forms. He concluded, "You have to define polygamy based on the paradigm, of who's doing it, and how they're doing it, and why they're doing it, and not based on stereotypical misinformation." The writer responded by exclaiming, "Yeah!" The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -9- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 4:11


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 9, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 9 segment, the writer asked who Mark Henkel thought was the strongest opposition to UCAP, Unrelated Consenting Adult Polygamy, and their goal of freedom. He began his reply by explaining how it takes liberal arguments to persuade liberals and conservative arguments to persuade conservatives - especially Christian conservatives. Citing a quote from George Orwell's book, "1984,” Mark Henkel empathetically understood the psychological challenge for Christians when they are faced with this startling dilemma of having to realize that all the great Christians they knew in their life were wrong about polygamy and the Catholic-invented OMOW (one man, one woman) doctrine. Using the metaphor from the book by Hans Christian Andersen, Mark Henkel concluded his point, especially about OMOW doctrine, "The Emperor has no clothes. It is not in the Bible." The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

Gun Sports Radio
Second Amendment Renaissance at California Universities

Gun Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 48:17


Are Marksmanship clubs making a come-back? Maximillian Nguyen visits the show to talk about University of California San Diego's Marksmanship Club. Connect with them on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/ucsd_marksmanshipclub/ Orange County and San Diego's Christmas Parties are coming up! Orange County Dec 17 @ Taps Brewery & Barrel Room Buy Tickets: https://act.orangecountygunowners.com/christmas2022 San Diego Dec 19 5:30pm @ Bali Hai FREE! What else is in this episode? Karla Talley recaps the Inland Empire Gun Owners Christmas Party Gun Violence Listening Sessions in San Diego Benitez protects ability to challenge Second Amendment infringements STUMP MY NEPHEW: What is considered the first sniper rifle? Stand up for the 2nd Amendment, make your voice heard, and join Mike at the last ‘Gun Violence' Listening Session at the Ronald Regan Community Center in El Cajon on December 15, 2022, at 6:00pm. (195 E. Douglas Ave., El Cajon) -- Like, subscribe, and share to help restore the Second Amendment in California! Make sure Big Tech can't censor your access to our content and subscribe to our email list: https://gunownersradio.com/subscribe #2a #guns #gunowners #2ndAmendment #2ACA #ca42a #gunownersradio #gunrights #gunownersrights #rkba #shallnotbeinfringed #pewpew -- The right to self-defense is a basic human right. Gun ownership is an integral part of that right. If you want to keep your Second Amendment rights, defend them by joining San Diego County Gun Owners (SDCGO), Orange County Gun Owners (OCGO), or Inland Empire Gun Owners (IEGO). Support the cause by listening to Gun Owners Radio live on Sunday afternoon or on any podcast app at your leisure. Together we will win. https://www.sandiegocountygunowners.com https://orangecountygunowners.com http://inlandempiregunowners.com https://www.firearmspolicy.org https://www.gunownersca.com https://gunowners.org Show your support for Gun Owners Radio sponsors! Get expert legal advice on any firearm-related issues: https://dillonlawgp.com Need a mortgage or VA loan? Call Chris Wiley! https://www.primeres.com/alpine Smarter web development and digital marketing help: https://www.sagetree.com Learn to FLY at SDFTI! San Diego Flight Training International: https://sdfti.com Get the training and education to keep your family safe with USCCA https://uscca.com/gor

The Colin McEnroe Show
Brainwashing: From the Korean War to cults to today

The Colin McEnroe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:00


The term “brainwashing” has been used throughout history by scientists, politicians, and journalists, as well as in movies and literature. This hour: a look at the history and science of brainwashing. GUESTS: Joel Dimsdale: Distinguished professor emeritus in the department of psychiatry at University of California San Diego and the author of Dark Persuasion: A History of Brainwashing from Pavlov to Social Media Timothy Melley: Professor of English at Miami University The Colin McEnroe Show is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Colin McEnroe, Jonathan McNicol, Cat Pastor, and Dylan Reyes contributed to this show, which originally aired April 20, 2022. Our programming is made possible thanks to listeners like you. Please consider supporting this show and Connecticut Public with a donation today.Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -8- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 4:37


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 8, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 8 segment, Mark Henkel observed that the battle between supporters of “one man, one woman” (OMOW) and same sex marriage (SSM) “is only going to get worse and worse.” Noting that neither side will stop or give up, Mark Henkel stated that that those who call themselves “conservatives” would eventually have to realize that they are being marriage controllers “for big government” and that that would bring them to embrace “The Polygamy Rights Win-Win Solution.” Mark Henkel also detailed how conservatives embracing the win-win solution would be similar to the historic statement that equally applies: “Only Nixon could go to China.” Mark Henkel noted that the win-win solution would bring “equality for all” to those who call themselves “liberals” too – noting that everyone would win; everyone would have freedom. Three times in three different ways, Mark Henkel said, “Americans will therefore thank polygamists for ending the marriage debate” with this win-win solution. The writer positively affirmed, “Ye-e-sss, Definitely!” The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

The Lonely Pipette : helping scientists do better science
TLP #17 : Brothers in arms : building a collective grant-writing community - Matthew Weitzman

The Lonely Pipette : helping scientists do better science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 66:07


This week we have a surprise treat - a conversation with Jonathan's twin brother, Matt. He discusses his energetic commitment to mentoring and grant-writing workshops. They share their genetics, but also a desire to “help scientists do better science”Matthew comments on the usefulness of healthy competition in scienceMatt compares the joy of running a lab to cooking in the kitchenHe loves the flexibility of science and constantly stimulated by interactions with colleagues and young scientists and new ideasMatt makes a strong argument for peer-to-peer mentoring, cascade mentoring and seizing constant casual mentoring opportunitiesHe comments on the advantages of going to a small lab for graduate school and he advises students to look carefully at the type of scientific questions, the environment of the lab and the chemistry of the PI/mentor relationshipMatt describes his pioneering Grant Proposal Success (GPS) grant-writing program and the importance of collective, grant-writing communities. Matt dissects the grant structure and tells us what funding committees are looking forHe suggests that staggering projects and having work at different stages can help to integrate life and manage the labHe mentioned these institutions :  University of Leeds, UK : https://www.leeds.ac.uk/University of Pennsylvania : https://www.upenn.edu/Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) : https://www.chop.edu/National Institutes of Health (NIH) : https://www.nih.gov/Salk Institute for Biological Studies : https://www.salk.edu/University of California San Diego : https://ucsd.edu/To find out more about Matt visit his website or follow him on Twitter :https://twitter.com/WeitzmanLabhttps://www.chop.edu/doctors/weitzman-matthew-dhttps://pathology.med.upenn.edu/department/people/517/matthew-d-weitzman30 Second Genetics : https://www.amazon.com/30-Second-Genetics-revolutionary-discoveries-explained/dp/1782405097To find out more about Renaud :Twitter : https://twitter.com/LePourpreLinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/renaudpourpre/To find out more about Jonathan :Twitter : https://twitter.com/EpigenetiqueLinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanweitzman/%20To learn more about the soundtrack :Music by Amaria - Lovely Swindlerhttps://soundcloud.com/amariamusique/https://twitter.com/amariamusique

Spirit Matters Talk
Paul J. Mills Interview 2

Spirit Matters Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 38:51


Paul J. Mills is Professor of Public Health and Family Medicine and the Director of the Center of Excellence for Research and Training in Integrative Health. A clinical researcher with a focus on integrative medicine and spiritual practice, his former positions include: President of the American Psychosomatic Medicine Society, Chief of Behavioral Medicine at the University of California San Diego, Director of Research at the Chopra Center for Wellbeing, and editor of several professional journals. He has more than 400 scientific publications in the fields of pharmacology, oncology, cardiology, psychoneuroimmunology, behavioral medicine, and integrative health. His work has been featured in Time magazine, The New York Times, National Public Radio, and many other sources. He has presented at hundreds of conferences and workshops around the world, including at the United Nations. And he is the author of the intriguing new book, Science, Being, & Becoming: The Spiritual Lives of Scientists. We spoke about that book, the historic tension between science and spirituality, and what he learned interviewing scientists about their spiritual experiences. Learn more about Paul Mills here: https://profiles.ucsd.edu/paul.mills

This One Time On Psychedelics
Episode 87: A Woman's Guide To Cannabis (feat. Dr. Michelle Sexton)

This One Time On Psychedelics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 59:45


For any of you who have been listening to this show for some time know by this point, I am a big fan of Cannabis & it's abilities, when used consciously & responsibly, to act as a tool for self development. From self development we can gain self awareness & from self awareness, we can gain self realization & for me, self realization is the ultimate goal of my life. This being said, I get a lot of questions about cannabis and women's health. So this week, I'm bringing you straight to the source and found the expert who's been studying cannabis and women's health for over a decade. She has 18 years of knowledge of the pharmacology and health effects of cannabis on a woman's body throughout all stages of life.  I'm happy to report she also has deep dive educational course to share called "The Green Woman's Guide” to help with any women in your life who are canna curious. You'll find a link to the course and a 25% discount code in the show notes when you use the code “Highlyoptimized” & my hope is that any women listening to this episode who are looking for a woman specific approach to Cannabis are able to do so & feel confident in their choice to connect with the plant. About Dr. Sexton Dr. Sexton is a Medical Staff Professional at the Center for Integrative Medicine at University of California San Diego, formerly Assistant Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology.  After her Naturopathic medicine degree at Bastyr University in Seattle, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington in the Departments of Pharmacology/Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. There, she studied the endocannabinoid system and its roles in neuro-inflammation and neuro-degeneration. Her NIH-funded pre-doctoral and postdoctoral research investigated cannabis use in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and impact on inflammatory markers.Dr. Sexton has presented her research internationally and published in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Sexton's clinical practice, research and teaching focus on the endocannabinoid system and potential roles for cannabis across a range of conditions and lifespan. She is a member of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, International Cannabinoid Research Society, the International Association of Cannabinoid Medicine and California Naturopathic Doctors Association.Connect with Dr. Sexton IG: @dr.michellesextonFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/msextonndWebsite: Https://www.msextonnd.comCannabis Education Website: https://www.greenwomensguide.com/Use the discount code Highlyoptimized to receive %25 off for the Green Womens Guide course!  Thank you to our podcast sponsors!Freedom Builderz - https://www.freedombuilderz.com/Building profitable online programs FOR coaches using Kajabi so they can smoothly hit 10k months!This episode was produced by Mazel Tov Media in Quincy, Massachusetts.Show Notes:(2:43)  How Michelle first got into cannabis. (10:54) The differences between men and women when it comes to cannabis. (46:21) The green women's guide.(49:43) Where you can reach Michelle.(52:19) One final question…Join the Highly Optimized Ceremony Circle on Facebook! https://www.highlyoptimized.me This episode was produced by Mazel Tov Media in Quincy, Massachusetts.

The DIGA Podcast
#18: Tips from a Resident: Auditions and what it is like at UCSD with Dr. Nicola Natsis

The DIGA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 29:35


On todays episode we are joined by Dr. Nicola Natsis, a PGY-3 at the University of California San Diego's Dermatology residency program. She talks about a day in the life at UCSD's Dermatology program, how to fit in during audition/sub-Is rotations, and how to find mentors in the field of dermatology. If you enjoyed this episode please share it with other students interested or thinking of trying to match into dermatology! Contacts: Dr. Natsis's email: nnatsis@health.ucsd.edu Nate Marroquin: @natem_33 DIGA: @derminterest Music: District Four by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3662-district-four License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/derminterest/message

New Books in Medieval History
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in Medieval History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books Network
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Ancient History
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Early Modern History
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in European Studies
Nathanael Aschenbrenner and Jake Ransohoff, "The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe" (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:02


A gulf of centuries separates the Byzantine Empire from the academic field of Byzantine studies. The Invention of Byzantium in Early Modern Europe offers a new approach to the history of Byzantine scholarship, focusing on the attraction that Byzantium held for Early Modern Europeans and challenging the stereotype that they dismissed the Byzantine Empire as an object of contempt. The authors in this book focus on how and why the Byzantine past was used in Early Modern Europe: to diagnose cultural decline, to excavate the beliefs and practices of early Christians, to defend absolutism or denounce tyranny, and to write strategic ethnography against the Ottomans. By tracing Byzantium's profound impact on everything from politics to painting, this book shows that the empire and its legacy remained relevant to generations of Western writers, artists, statesmen, and intellectuals as they grappled with the most pressing issues of their day. Refuting reductive narratives of absence or progress, this book shows how “Byzantium” underwent multiple overlapping and often discordant reinventions before the institutionalization of “Byzantine studies” as an academic discipline. As this book suggests, it was precisely Byzantium's ambiguity—as both Greek and Roman, ancient and medieval, familiar and foreign—that made it such a vibrant and vital part of the Early Modern European imagination. Nathanael Aschenbrenner is a lecturer at the University of California San Diego in the department of history. His research and publications explore empire and ideology in the medieval and early modern Mediterranean, as well as Byzantium's imperial legacy after 1453. Jake Ransohoff is a Hellenisms Past & Present, Local and Global Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies at Simon Fraser University. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago, and defended his PhD dissertation in History at Harvard University in June, 2022. His current research focuses on the intersection between power, political legitimacy, and attitudes toward the body in the Byzantine world—especially the disfigured and disabled body. Evan Zarkadas (MA) is an independent scholar of European and Medieval history and an educator. He received his master's in history from the University of Maine focusing on Medieval Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, medieval identity, and ethnicity during the late Middle Ages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -7- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 5:41


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 7, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 7 segment, the writer asked Mark Henkel if his previous replies meant that he also supported polyandry (one woman, many husbands). Mark Henkel first explained that polyandry is not supported Biblically. Using his renowned "seed and garden" soundbite analogy, Mark Henkel then explained how, anthropologically (due to the natures of most men and women, and to what he called "libido match"), most people do not make the choice of polyandry. Mark Henkel wrapped up his point by concluding what he called is "really the heart of the matter: It doesn't matter whether I support what somebody else chooses or imagines. When government is limited, everybody has freedom." The writer enthusiastically exclaimed, “Well, that makes a lot of sense!” The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

Author2Author
Author2Author Erica Miner

Author2Author

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 34:00


Bill welcomes novelist, violinist, and arts lecturer Erica Miner back to the show. Former Metropolitan Opera Orchestra violinist Erica is an award-winning author, lecturer, screenwriter, and arts journalist. Erica's debut novel, Travels with my Lovers, won the Fiction Prize in the Direct from the Author Book Awards. Her screenplays have won awards in the Santa Fe, WinFemme and Writer's Digest competitions. Erica's 3-part Julia Kogan “Opera Mystery” novel series, released by Level Best Books starting on Oct. 28, 2022, with Aria for Murder, in which young violinist Julia Kogan investigates murder and mayhem behind the Met's “Golden Curtain.” Erica's real-life experiences working with operatic superstars such as Luciano Pavarotti lend authenticity to the ale. Sequels take place at the Santa Fe and San Francisco Operas. A resident of the Pacific Northwest, Erica is a top speaker and lecturer on opera and writing. In addition to pre-concert lectures for the Seattle Symphony, Erica regularly presents for Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of California San Diego and University of Washington; Creative Retirement Institute at Edmonds College; Wagner Societies in Boston, New York, the Bay Area, Los Angeles, San Diego, North Carolina and New South Wales (Sydney, Australia). As a lecturer in writing, she has presented for the WOTS, Fields End, and Los Angeles Writer Conferences.

Empowered Conversations with Elin & Christina
47. Do teacher leave because of the Principal? A conversation with Dr. Heather Michel.

Empowered Conversations with Elin & Christina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 50:18


In this episode, Elin & Christina have a conversation with Dr. Heather Michel, creator of the Instagram account @teachersofcolor_matter. There was a post that got us talking and we wanted to have a bigger conversation about what it meant and what we can learn from it. Dr. Heather Michel, is a teacher educator, educational consultant, and instructional coach. She currently works as the Statewide Clinical Practice Coordinator at National University. Before she became faculty, she was an instructional coach for the Chula Vista Elementary School District at a dual immersion school. She was a 2nd grade teacher and was a part of Teach for America before that, teaching in Houston, TX! She has her masters in Early Childhood Literacy. She received her Doctorate in Teaching and Learning from the University of California San Diego in 2013. Her current research interests include Teachers of Color and how to keep them in the classroom past five years. Outside of education, she is happily married and a mom to three children (18, 11, and 7 years old). Fun fact, she enjoys cooking- she has even written her own cookbook and has plans of opening a café. Learn more about Dr. Heather Michel. --- Buy our Book: The Power of Reflection Book a Call with Us for 1:1 Coaching Free Vision & Mission Guide Follow us on Instagram: @elinandchristina Facebook: Empowered Conversations with Elin & Christina Check out our website at www.empoweredconversationspodcast.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/elinandchristina/support

The Lawfare Podcast
Stephan Haggard on What's Going on in North Korea

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 45:12


It's been an eventful several weeks on the Korean Peninsula, with a spree of missile tests, the sudden display of a daughter of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, and the articulation of a remarkably aggressive nuclear doctrine. To go over it all, Lawfare editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes sat down with Stephan Haggard, the Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California San Diego. They talked about how all of this relates to prior diplomacy between North Korea and the Trump administration, what message the North Koreans are trying to send with the combination of this testing and the articulation of this new doctrine, and whether there is any prospect of denuclearization at any time in the foreseeable future.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

National Polygamy Advocate
UCSD Elizabeth Ranz interviewed Mark Henkel -6- May 2009

National Polygamy Advocate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 4:10


National Polygamy Advocate ™ Mark Henkel was interviewed by Elizabeth Ranz for UCSD, on May 28, 2009, Part 6, for an essay she was writing, "Polygamy in Contradistinction to Gay Marriage." The student writer from University of California San Diego was seeking to learn how and why polygamy was not having the same level of political popularity as same sex marriage. In this Part 6 segment, the writer asked, “So you WOULD be in favor of same sex marriage?” Mark Henkel explained that they simply have a right to an imagination and to contract with whomever they choose as consenting adults. Providing further clarity, Mark Henkel detailed how it does not matter whether one personally or religiously supports or does not support same sex marriage when government has no authority to license, define, or control the contractual arrangements of consenting adults anyway. The writer enthusiastically exclaimed, “Very interesting!” The remaining parts of this interview will be aired in the next coming episodes of this podcast. http://www.NationalPolygamyAdvocate.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nationalpolygamyadvocate/support

Discover CircRes
November 2022 Discover Circ Res

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 28:13


This month on Episode 42 of Discover CircRes, host Cynthia St. Hilaire highlights four original research articles featured in the October 28 and November 11th  issues of Circulation Research. This episode also features an interview with Dr Miguel Lopez-Ramirez and undergraduate student Bliss Nelson from University of California San Diego about their study, Neuroinflammation Plays a Critical Role in Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.   Article highlights:   Jia, et al. Prohibitin2 Maintains VSMC Contractile Phenotype   Rammah, et al. PPARg and Non-Canonical NOTCH Signaling in the OFT   Wang, et al. Histone Lactylation in Myocardial Infarction   Katsuki, et al. PCSK9 Promotes Vein Graft Lesion Development   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Hi, and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's Journal, Circulation Research. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire from the Vascular Medicine Institute at the University of Pittsburgh, and today, I'm going to be highlighting articles from our October 28th and our November 11th issues of Circ Res. I'm also going to have a chat with Dr Miguel Lopez-Ramirez and undergraduate student Bliss Nelson, about their study, Neuroinflammation Plays a Critical Role in Cerebral Cavernous Malformations. But, before I get into the interviews, here are a few article highlights.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The first article is from our October 28th issue, and the title is, PHB2 Maintains the Contractile Phenotype of Smooth Muscle Cells by Counteracting PKM Splicing. The corresponding author is Wei Kong, and the first authors are Yiting Jia and Chengfeng Mao, and they are all from Peking University. Insults to blood vessels, whether in the form of atherosclerosis, physical injury, or inflammation, can trigger vascular smooth muscle cells to transition from a contractile state to a proliferative and migratory one. Accompanying this conversion is a switch in the cells' metabolism from the mitochondria to glycolysis. But what controls this switch? To investigate, this group compared the transcriptomes of contractile and proliferative smooth muscle cells.   Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 1800 were reciprocally up and down regulated. Of those, six were associated with glucose metabolism, including one called Prohibitin-2, or PHB2, which the team showed localized to the artery wall. In cultured smooth muscle cells, suppression of PHB2 reduced expression of several contractile genes. While in rat arteries, injury caused a decrease in production of PHB2 itself, and of contractile markers.   Furthermore, expression of PHB2 in proliferative smooth muscle cells could revert these cells to a contractile phenotype. Further experiments revealed PHB2 controlled the splicing of the metabolic enzyme to up-regulate the phenotypic switch. Regardless of mechanism, the results suggest that boosting PHB2 might be a way to reduce adverse smooth muscle cell overgrowth and conditions such as atherosclerosis and restenosis.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The second article I'm going to highlight is also from our October 28th issue, and the first authors are Mayassa Rammah and Magali Theveniau-Ruissy. And the corresponding authors are Francesca Rochais and Robert Kelly. And they are all from Marseille University. Abnormal development of the heart's outflow track, which ultimately forms the bases of the aorta and the pulmonary artery, accounts for more than 30% of all human congenital heart defects. To gain a better understanding of outflow tract development, and thus the origins of such defects, this group investigated the role of transcription factors thought to be involved in specifying the superior outflow tract, or SOFT, which gives rise to the subaortic myocardium, and the inferior outflow tract, which gives rise to the subpulmonary myocardium. Transcription factor S1 is over-expressed in superior outflow tract cells and the transcription factors, TBX1 and PPAR gamma, are expressed in inferior outflow tract cells.   And now this group has shown that TBX1 drives PPAR gamma expression in the inferior outflow tract, while Hess-1 surpasses PPAR gamma expression in the superior outflow tract. Indeed, in mouse embryos lacking TBX1, PPAR gamma expression was absent in the outflow tract. While in mouse embryos lacking Hess-1, PPAR gamma expression was increased and PPAR gamma positive cells were more widespread in the outflow tract.   The team also identified that signaling kinase DLK is an upstream activator of Hess-1 and a suppressor of PPAR gamma. In further detailing the molecular interplay regulating outflow tract patterning, the work will shed light on congenital heart disease etiologies, and inform potential interventions for future therapies.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The third article I want to highlight is from our November 11th issue of Circulation Research, and the title is Histone Lactylation Boosts Reparative Gene Activation Post Myocardial Infarction. The first author is Jinjin Wang and the corresponding author is Maomao Zhang, and they're from Harbin Medical University. Lactylation of histones is a recently discovered epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. In inflammation, for example, a significant increase in histone lactylation is responsible for switching on reparative genes and macrophages when pro-inflammatory processes give way to pro-resolvin ones.   The role of histone lactylation in inflammation resolution has been shown in a variety of pathologies, but has not been examined in myocardial infarction. Wang and colleagues have now done just that. They isolated monocytes from the bone marrow and the circulation of mice at various time points after induced myocardial infarctions, and examined the cells' gene expression patterns. Within a day of myocardial infarction, monocytes from both bone marrow and the blood had begun upregulating genes involved in inflammation resolution. And, concordant with this, histone lactylation was dramatically increased in the cells, specifically at genes involved in repair processes.   The team went on to show that injection of sodium lactate into mice boosted monocyte histone lactylation and improved heart function after myocardial infarction, findings that suggest further studies of lactylation's pro-resolving benefits are warranted. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The last article I want to highlight is titled, PCSK9 Promotes Macrophage Activation via LDL Receptor Independent Mechanisms. The first authors are Shunsuke Katsuki and Prabhash Kumar Jha, and the corresponding author is Masanori Aikawa, and they are from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Harvard. Statins are the go-to drug for lowering cholesterol in atherosclerosis patients. But the more recently approved PCSK9 inhibitors also lower cholesterol and can be used to augment or replace statins in patients where these drugs are insufficient.   PCSK9 is an enzyme that circulates in the blood and destroys the LDL receptor, thereby impeding the removal of bad cholesterol. The enzyme also appears to promote inflammation, thus potentially contributing to atherosclerosis in two ways. This group now confirms that PCSK9 does indeed promote pro-inflammatory macrophage activation and lesion development, and does so independent of its actions on the LDL receptor.   The team assessed PCSK9-induced lesions in animals with saphenous vein grafts, which are commonly used in bypass surgery but are prone to lesion regrowth. They found that LDL receptor lacking graft containing mice had greater graft macrophage accumulation and lesion development when PCSK9 activity was boosted than when it was not. The animal's macrophages also had higher levels of the pro-inflammatory factor expression. Together, this work shows that PCSK9 inhibitors provide a double punch against atherosclerosis and might be effective drugs for preventing the all too common failure of saphenous vein grafts.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        So, today with me I have Dr Miguel Lopez-Ramirez and undergraduate student Bliss Nelson from the University of California in San Diego, and we're going to talk about their study, Neuroinflammation Plays a Critical Role in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Disease, and this article is in our November 11th  issue of Circulation Research. Thank you both so much for joining me today. Before we talk about the science, want to just maybe tell me a little bit about yourselves?   Bliss Nelson:                My name is Bliss Nelson. I'm a member of Miguel Lopez-Ramirez's lab here at UC San Diego at the School of Medicine. I'm an undergraduate student here at UC San Diego. I'm actually a transfer student. I went to a community college here in California and I got involved in research after I transferred.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        What's your major?   Bliss Nelson:                I'm a cognitive science major.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Excellent. You might be the first undergrad on the podcast, which is exciting.   Bliss Nelson:                Wow. What an honor. Thank so much.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        And Miguel, how about you?   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Yes, thank you. Well, first thank you very much for the opportunity to present our work through this media. It's very exciting for us. My name is Miguel Alejandro Lopez-Ramirez, and I'm an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and Pharmacology here at UCSD. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Wonderful. I loved your paper, because, well, first, I don't think I've talked about cerebral cavernous malformations. So what are CCMs, and why are they so bad?   Bliss Nelson:                Cerebral cavernous malformations, or CCMs for short, are common neurovascular lesions caused by a loss of function mutation in one of three genes. These genes are KRIT1, or CCM1, CCM2 and PDCD10, or CCM3, and generally regarded as an endothelial cell autonomous disease found in the central nervous system, so the brain and the spinal cord.   The relevance of CCMs is that it affects about one in every 200 children and adults, and this causes a lifelong risk of chronic and acute hemorrhaging. CCMs can be quiescent or dynamic lesions. If they are dynamic, they can enlarge, regress, or behave progressively, producing repetitive hemorrhaging and exacerbations of the disease.   Other side effects of the disease could be chronic bleedings, focal neurological deficits, headaches, epileptic seizures and, in some cases, death. There's no pharmacological treatment for CCMs. There's only one type of option some patients may have, which would be to have surgery to cut out the lesions. But of course this depends on where the lesion or lesions are in the central nervous system, if that's even an option. So sometimes there's no option these patients have, there's no treatment, which is what propels our lab to towards finding a pharmacological treatment or uncovering some of the mechanisms behind that.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Do people who have CCM know that they have them or sometimes it not detected? And when it is detected, what are the symptoms?   Bliss Nelson:                Sometimes patients who have them may not show any symptoms either ever in their lifetime or until a certain point, so really the only way to find out if you were to have them is if you went to go get a brain scan, if you went to go see a doctor, or if you started having symptoms. But also, one of the issues with CCMs is that they're very hard to diagnose, and in the medical community there's a lack of knowledge for CCMs, so sometimes you may not get directed to the right specialist in time, or even ever, and be diagnosed.   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: I will just add a little bit. It is fabulous, what you're doing. I think this is very, very good. But yes, that's why they're considered rare disease, because it's not obvious disease, so sometimes most of the patient, they go asymptomatic even when they have one lesions, but there's still no answers of why patients that are asymptomatics can become symptomatics. And there is a lot in neuro study, this study that we will start mentioning a little bit more in detail. We try to explain these transitions from silent or, quiescent, lesion, into a more active lesion that gives the disability to the patient.   Some of the symptoms, it can start even with headaches, or, in some cases, they have more neurological deficits that could be like weakness in the arms or loss of vision. In many cases also problems with the speech or balance. So it depends where the lesion is present, in the brain or in the spinal cord, the symptoms that the patient will experience. And some of the most, I will say, severe symptoms is the hemorrhagic stroke and the vascular thrombosis and seizure that the patients can present. Those would be the most significant symptoms that the patient will experience.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        What have been some limitations in the study of CCMs? What have been limitations in trying to figure out what's going on here?   Bliss Nelson:                The limitations to the disease is that, well, one, the propensity for lesions, or the disease, to come about, isn't known, so a lot of the labs that work on it, just going down to the basic building blocks of what's even happening in the disease is a major problem, because until that's well established, it's really hard to go over to the pharmacological side of treating the disease or helping patients with the disease, without knowing what's going on at the molecular level.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        You just mentioned molecular level. Maybe let's take a step back. What's actually going on at the cellular level in CCMs? What are the major cell types that are not happy, that shift and become unhappy cells? Which are the key players?   Bliss Nelson:                That's a great question and a great part of this paper. So when we're talking about the neuroinflammation in the disease, our paper, we're reporting the interactions between the endothelium, the astrocytes, leukocytes, microglia and neutrophils, and we've actually coined this term as the CaLM interaction.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Great name, by the way.   Bliss Nelson:                Thank you. All props to Miguel. And if you look at our paper, in figure seven we actually have a great graphic that's showing this interaction in play, showing the different components happening and the different cell types involved in the CaLM interaction that's happening within or around the CCM lesions.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        What does a astrocyte normally do? I think our podcast listening base is definitely well versed in probably endothelial and smooth muscle cell and pericyte, but not many of us, not going to lie, including me, really know what a astrocyte does. So what does that cell do and why do we care about its interaction with the endothelium?   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Well, the astrocytes play a very important role. Actually, there are more astrocytes than any other cells in the central nervous system, so that can tell you how important they are. Obviously play a very important role maintaining the neurological synapses, maintaining also the hemostasis of the central nervous system by supporting not only the neurons during the neural communication, but also by supporting the blood vessels of the brain.   All this is telling us that also another important role is the inflammation, or the response to damage. So in this case, what also this study proposed, is that new signature for these reactive astrocytes during cerebral malformation disease. So understanding better how the vasculature with malformations can activate the astrocytes, and how the astrocytes can contribute back to these developing of malformations. It will teach us a lot of how new therapeutic targets can be implemented for the disease.   This is part of this work, and now we extend it to see how it can also contribute to the communication with immune cells as Bliss already mentioned.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Is it a fair analogy to say that a astrocyte is more similar to a pericyte in the periphery? Is that accurate?   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: No, actually there are pericytes in the central nervous system as well. They have different roles. The pericyte is still a neuron cell that give the shape, plays a role in the contractility and maintains the integrity of the vessels, while the astrocyte is more like part of the immune system, but also part of the supporting of growth factors or maintaining if something leaks out of the vasculature to be able to capture that.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        You used a handful of really interesting mouse models to conduct this study. Can you tell us a little bit about, I guess, the base model for CCM and then some of the unique tools that you used to study the cells specifically?   Bliss Nelson:                Yeah, of course. I do a lot of the animal work in the lab. I'd love to tell you about the mouse model. So to this study we use the animal model with CCM3 mutation. We use this one because it is the most aggressive form of CCM and it really gives us a wide range of options to study the disease super intricately. We use tamoxifen-regulated Cre recombinase under the control of brain endothelial specific promoter, driving the silencing of the gene CCM3, which we call the PDCD10 betco animal, as you can see in our manuscript. To this, the animal without the Cre system, that does not develop any lesions, that we use as a control, we call the PDCD10 plox. And these animals are injected with the tamoxifen postnatally day one, and then for brain collection to investigate, wcollected at different stages. So we do P15, which we call the acute stage, P50, which we term the progressive stage, and then P80, which is the chronocytes stage. And after enough brain collections, we use them for histology, gene expression, RNA analysis, flow cytometry, and different imaging to help us further look into CCMs.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        How similar is a murine CCM to a human CCM? Is there really good overlap or are there some differences?   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Yes. So, actually, that's a very good question, and that's part of the work that we are doing. This model definitely has advantages in which the lesions of the vascular formations are in an adult and juvenile animals, which represent an advantage for the field in which now we will be able to test pharmacological therapies in a more meaningful, way where we can test different doses, different, again, approaches. But definitely, I mean, I think I cannot say that it's only one perfect model for to mimic the human disease. It's the complementary of multiple models that give us certain advantages in another, so the integration of this knowledge is what will help us to understand better the disease.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great. I now want to hear a little bit about your findings, because they're really cool. So you took two approaches to study this, and the first was looking at the astrocytes and how they become these, what you're calling reactive astrocytes, and then you look specifically at the brain endothelium. So could you maybe just summarize those two big findings for us?   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Yeah, so, basically by doing these studies we use trangenic animal in this case that they give us the visibility to obtain the transcripts in the astrocytes. And basically this is very important because we don't need to isolate the cells, we don't need to manipulate anything, we just took all the ribosomes that were basically capturing the mRNAs and we profile those RNAs that are specifically expressed in the astrocytes.   By doing this, we actually went into looking at in depth the transcripts that were altered in the animals that developed the disease, in this case the cerebral cavernous malformation disease, and what we look at is multiple genes that were changing. Many of them were already described in our previous work, which were associated with hypoxia and angiogenesis. But what we found in this work is that now there were a lot of genes associated with inflammation and coagulation actually, which were not identified before.   What we notice is that now these astrocytes, during the initial phase of the vascular malformation, may play a more important role in angiogenesis or the degradation of the vessels. Later during the stage of the malformation, they play a more important role in the thrombosis, in the inflammation, and recruitment of leukocyte   That was a great advantage in this work by using this approach and looking in detail, these astrocytes. Also, we identified there were very important signature in these astrocytes that we refer as a reactive astrocytes with neuroinflammatory properties. In the same animals, basically, not in the same animal, but in the same basically the experimental approach, we isolated brain vasculature. And by doing the same, we actually identified not only the astrocyte but also the endothelium was quite a different pattern that we were not seeing before. And this pattern was also associated with inflammation, hypoxia and coagulation pathways.   That lead us to go into more detail of what was relevant in this vascular malformations. And one additional part that in the paper this is novel and very impactful, is that we identify inflammasome as a one important component, and particularly in those lesions that are multi-cavernous.   Now we have two different approaches. One, we see this temporality in which the lesions forms different patterns in which the initial phase maybe is more aneugenic, but as they become more progressive in chronocytes, inflammation and hypoxy pathways are more relevant for the recruitment of the inflammatory cells and also the precipitation of immunothrombosis.   But also what we notice is that inflammasome in endothelial and in the leukocytes may play an important role in the multi-cavernous formation, and that's something that we are looking in more detail, if therapeutics or also interventions in these pathways could ameliorate the transition of phases between single lesions into a more aggressive lesions.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's kind of one of the follow up questions I was thinking about too is, from looking at the data that you have, obviously to get a CCM, there's a physical issue in the vessel, right? It's not formed properly. Does that form influence the activation of the astrocyte, and then the astrocytes, I guess, secrete inflammatory factors, target more inflammation in the vessel? Or is there something coming from the CCM initially that's then activating the astrocyte? It's kind of a chicken and the egg question, but do you have a sense of secondary to the malformation, what is the initial trigger?   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: The malformations in our model, and this is important in our model, definitely start by producing changes in the brain endothelial. And as you mention it, these endothelium start secreting molecules that actually directly affect the neighboring cells.   One of the first neighboring cells that at least we have identified to be affected is the astrocytes, but clearly could be also pericytes or other cells that are in the neurovascular unit or form part of the neurovascular unit. But what we have seen now is that this interaction gets extended into more robust interactions that what you were referring as the CaLM interactions.   Definitely I think during the vascular malformations maybe is the discommunication that we identify already few of those very strong iteration that is part of the follow up manuscript that we have. But also it could be the blood brain barrier breakdown and other changes in the endothelium could also trigger the activation of the astrocytes and brain cells.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        What does your data suggest about potential future therapies of CCM? I know you have a really intriguing statement or data that showed targeting NF-kappa B isn't likely going to be a good therapeutic strategy. So maybe tell us just a little bit about that, but also, what does that imply, perhaps, of what a therapeutic strategy could be?   Bliss Nelson:                Originally we did think that the inhibition of NF-kappa B would cause an improvement potentially downstream of the CCMs. And unexpectedly, to our surprise, the partial or total loss of the brain endothelial NF-kappa B activity in the chronic model of the mice, it didn't prevent or cause any improvement in the lesion genesis or neuroinflammation, but instead it resulted in a trend to increase the number of lesions and immunothrombosis, suggesting that the inhibition of it is actually worsening the disease and shouldn't be used as a target for therapeutical approaches.   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Yes, particularly that's also part of the work that we have ongoing in which NF-kappa B may also play a role in preventing the further increase of inflammation. So that is something that it can also be very important. And this is very particular for certain cell types. It's very little known what the NF-kappa B actually is doing in the brain endothelial during malformations or inflammation per se. So now it's telling us that this is something that we have to consider for the future.   Also, our future therapeutics of what we propose are two main therapeutic targets. One is the harmful hypoxia pathway, which involves activation, again, of the population pathway inflammation, but also the inflammasomes. So these two venues are part of our ongoing work in trying to see if we have a way to target with a more safe and basically efficient way this inflammation.   However, knowing the mechanisms of how these neuroinflammation take place is what is the key for understanding the disease. And maybe even that inflammatory and inflammatory compounds may not be the direct therapeutic approach, but by understanding these mechanisms, we may come with  new approaches that will help for safe and effective therapies.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        What was the most challenging part of this study? I'm going to guess it has something to do with the mice, but in terms of collecting the data or figure out what's going on, what was the most challenging?   Bliss Nelson:                To this, I'd like to say that I think our team is very strong. We work very well together, so I think even the most challenging part of completing this paper wasn't so challenging because we have a really strong support system among ourselves, with Miguel as a great mentor. And then there's also two postdocs in the lab who are also first authors that contributed a lot to it.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Great. Well, I just want to commend both of you on an amazing, beautiful story. I loved a lot of the imaging in it, really well done, very technically challenging, I think, pulling out these specific sets of cells and investigating what's happening in them. Really well done study. And Bliss, as an undergraduate student, quite an impressive amount of work. And I congratulate both you and your team on such a wonderful story.   Bliss Nelson:                Thank you very much.   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Thank you for Bliss and also Elios and Edo and Katrine, who all contributed      enormously to the completion of this project.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        It always takes a team.   Miguel Lopez-Ramirez: Yes.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Great. Well, thank you so much, and I can't wait to see what's next for this story.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's it for the highlights from October 28th and November 11th issues of Circulation Research. Thank you so much for listening. Please check out the Circ Res Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle @circres and #discovercircres. Thank you to our guests, Dr Miguel Lopez-Ramirez and Bliss Nelson. This podcast is produced by Ashara Retniyaka, edited by Melissa Stoner, and supported by the editorial team of Circulation Research. Some of the copy text for our highlighted articles is provided by Ruth Williams. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire, and this is Discover CircRes, you're on the go source for the most exciting discoveries in basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more information, please visit ahagenerals.org.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.15.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 61:34


VIDEOS: Niall Ferguson – Woke Totalitarianism (0:19 to 18:14) How Ukraine – Not Russia – Floods Social Media With War Propaganda (0:00 to 1:20) Here's why no one trusts CNN (3:35) The Green New Deal's Bad Science (8:14) JUST IN: Matt Gaetz Says Kevin McCarthy Could Ask Democrats To Help Make Him Speaker Forbes Breaking News 1.35M subscribers Subscribe (5:19) Neil Oliver asks why we should be expected to sweep Covid hysteria under the rug? (0:36 to 5:32) Jimmy Dore – Tim Robbins Apologizes To Unvaccinated For Being Wrong On Covid Policy (0:00 to 9:13) Grape Powder Could Extend Lifespan by 4-5 Years Long Island University, November 3, 2022 In a study the authors called “remarkable,” researchers found that giving grape powder to mice reduced the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and extended lifespan. To see if grape powder could modulate the harmful effects of a high-fat diet, researchers fed mice a typical Western (high-fat) diet. Half then received 5% standardized grape powder while the other half didn't. Compared to mice not fed the grape powder, the mice given grape powder saw beneficial increases in antioxidant genes, reductions in fatty liver, and extended lifespans. The lead author estimated that when translated to humans, the extended lifespan would correspond to an additional 4-5 years in the life of a human. The grape powder used in this study was composed of fresh red, green and black grapes that were freeze-dried to retain their bioactive compounds. The researchers concluded: “These results suggest the potential of dietary grapes to modulate hepatic gene expression, prevent oxidative damage, induce fatty acid metabolism, ameliorate NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), and increase longevity when co-administered with a high-fat diet.” Study: Neuroprotective Effect of Virgin Coconut Oil Helps Relieve ALS  Katholieke University (Belgium), November 6, 2022   An animal study looked into the potential of coconut oil for preventing or reducing ALS symptoms. Coconut oil has already demonstrated safe efficacy for treating Alzheimer's disease symptoms, which is also a neurodegenerative disease for which mainstream medicine has no answer. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy is ideal for ALS treatment diagnostics and research. It is used for many animal and human studies to isolate minute molecular changes in brain and nervous system studies without having to procure tissue and blood samples. Thus, it is non-invasive.[The study results] revealed that the coconut oil supplementation together with the regular diet delayed disease symptoms, enhanced motor performance, and prolonged survival in the SOD1G93A mouse model. Furthermore, MRS data showed stable metabolic profile at day 120 in the coconut oil diet group compared to the group receiving a standard diet without coconut oil supplementation.  In addition, a positive correlation between survival and the neuronal marker NAA was found. … this is the first study that reports metabolic changes in the brainstem using in vivo MRS and effects of coconut oil supplementation as a prophylactic treatment in SOD1G93A mice.One of the major metabolites NAA (N-acetylaspartate), has been observed as an integral part of neuron loss, which is a major factor of onset ALS when it is diminished from the central nervous system.  NAA reduction was greater in the non-coconut oil fed group of rats, indicating those on coconut oil were experiencing less neurodegeneration and neuronal destruction. Aerobic activity can reduce the risk of metastatic cancer by 72% Tel Aviv University (Israel), November 14, 2022 A new study at Tel Aviv University found that aerobic exercise can reduce the risk of metastatic cancer by 72%. According to the researchers, intensity aerobic exercise increases the glucose (sugar) consumption of internal organs, thereby reducing the availability of energy to the tumor. The study was led by two researchers from TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine. Prof. Levy and Dr. Gepner said, “Studies have demonstrated that physical exercise reduces the risk for some types of cancer by up to 35%. This positive effect is similar to the impact of exercise on other conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes. In this study we added new insight, showing that high-intensity aerobic exercise, which derives its energy from sugar, can reduce the risk of metastatic cancer by as much as 72%. If so far the general message to the public has been ‘be active, be healthy,' now we can explain how aerobic activity can maximize the prevention of the most aggressive and metastatic types of cancer.” The study combined an animal model in which mice were trained under a strict exercise regimen, with data from healthy human volunteers examined before and after running. The human data, obtained from an epidemiological study that monitored 3,000 individuals for about 20 years, indicated 72% less metastatic cancer in participants who reported regular aerobic activity at high intensity, compared to those who did not engage in physical exercise. They found that aerobic activity significantly reduced the development of metastatic tumors in the lymph nodes, lungs, and liver. The researchers hypothesized that in both humans and model animals, this favorable outcome is related to the enhanced rate of glucose consumption induced by exercise. Prof. Levy stated, “Our study is the first to investigate the impact of exercise on the internal organs in which metastases usually develop, like the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes. “Consequently, if cancer develops, the fierce competition over glucose reduces the availability of energy that is critical to metastasis. Moreover, when a person exercises regularly, this condition becomes permanent: the tissues of internal organs change and become similar to muscle tissue. We all know that sports and physical exercise are good for our health. Our study, examining the internal organs, discovered that exercise changes the whole body, so that the cancer cannot spread, and the primary tumor also shrinks in size.” Dr. Gepner adds, “Our results indicate that unlike fat-burning exercise, which is relatively moderate, it is a high-intensity aerobic activity that helps in cancer prevention. If the optimal intensity range for burning fat is 65–70% of the maximum pulse rate, sugar burning requires 80–85%—even if only for brief intervals. For example: a one-minute sprint followed by walking, then another sprint.  Vegan diet best for weight loss even with carbohydrate consumption, study finds University of South Carolina, November 6, 2022 The month of November often brings about a sense of dread at the thought of food filled holiday parties and gatherings, but those who consume a plant based diet have little need for concern. A newstudy by the University of South Carolina confirms one big draw of saying no to all animal products: the ability to shed weight faster than those who consume a diet that contains meat and dairy.  The study compared the amount of weight lost by those on vegan diets to those on a mostly plant-based diet, and those eating an omnivorous diet with a mix of animal products and plant based foods. At the end of six months, individuals on the vegan diet lost more weight than the other two groups by an average of 4.3%, or 16.5 pounds. The study followed participants who were randomly assigned to one of five diets on the dietary spectrum: vegan which excludes all animal products, semi-vegetarian with occasional meat intake; pesco-vegetarian which excludes all meat except seafood; vegetarian which excludes all meat and seafood but includes animal products, and omnivorous, which excludes no foods. Participants followed their assigned dietary restrictions for six months, with all groups except the omnivorous participating in weekly group meetings. Those who stuck to the vegan diet showed the greatest weight loss at the two and six month marks. The lead authornotes that the diet consumed by vegan participants was high in carbohydrates that rate low on the glycemic index. “We've gotten somewhat carb-phobic here in the U.S. when it comes to weight loss. This study might help alleviate the fears of people who enjoy pasta, rice, and other grains but want to lose weight,” she said. Weight loss was not the only positive outcome for participants in the strictly vegan group. They also showed the greatest amount of decrease in their fat and saturated fat levels at the two and six month checks, had lower BMIs, and improved macro nutrients more than other diets. Eschewing all animal products appears to be key for these positive results.  Uterine fibroid growth activated by chemicals found in everyday products Northwestern University, November 14, 2022 For the first time, scientists at Northwestern Medicine have demonstrated a causal link between environmental phthalates (toxic chemicals found in everyday consumer products) and the increased growth of uterine fibroids, the most common tumors among women. Manufacturers use environmental phthalates in numerous industrial and consumer products, and they've also been detected in medical supplies and food. Although they are known to be toxic, they are currently unbanned in the U.S.  “These toxic pollutants are everywhere, including food packaging, hair and makeup products, and more, and their usage is not banned,” said corresponding study author Dr. Serdar Bulun, chair of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine physician. “These are more than simply environmental pollutants. They can cause specific harm to human tissues.” Up to 80% of all women may develop a fibroid tumor during their lifetime, Bulun said. One-quarter of these women become symptomatic with excessive and uncontrolled uterine bleeding, anemia, miscarriages, infertility and large abdominal tumors necessitating technically difficult surgeries. The new study found women with a high exposure to certain phthalates such as DEHP (used as a plasticizer to increase the durability of products such as shower curtains, car upholstery, lunchboxes, shoes and more) and its metabolites have a high risk for having a symptomatic fibroid. The scientists discovered exposure to DEHP may activate a hormonal pathway that activates an environmentally responsive receptor (AHR) to bind to DNA and cause increased growth of fibroid tumors. Immune cells mistake heart attacks for viral infections University of California San Diego and Harvard University, November 12, 2022  A study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks. The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease. The team, which also includes researchers from the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Massachusetts, presents the findings in Nature Medicine. Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world and it begins with a heart attack. During this process, heart cells die, prompting immune cells to enter the dead tissue, clear debris and orchestrate stabilization of the heart wall. But what is it about dying cells in the heart that stimulates the immune system? To answer this, researchers looked deep inside thousands of individual cardiac immune cells and mapped their individual transcriptomes using a method called single cell RNA-Seq. This led to the discovery that after a heart attack, DNA from dying cells masquerades as a virus and activates an ancient antiviral program called the type I interferon response in specialized immune cells. The researchers named these “interferon inducible cells (IFNICs).” When investigators blocked the interferon response, either genetically or with a neutralizing antibody given after the heart attack, there was less inflammation, less heart dysfunction, and improved survival. Specifically, blocking antiviral responses in mice improved survival from 60 percent to over 95 percent. These findings reveal a new potential therapeutic opportunity to prevent heart attacks from progressing to heart failure in patients. “We are interested to learn whether interferons contribute to adverse cardiovascular outcomes after heart attacks in humans,” said King, who did most of the work on the study while he was a cardiology fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital and at the Center for Systems Biology at MGH in Boston. Investigators found that surprisingly, the antiviral interferon response is also turned on after a heart attack despite the absence of any infection. Their results point to dying cell DNA as the cause of this confusion because the immune system interprets it as the molecular signature of a virus. Surprisingly, the immune cells participating in the interferon response were a previously unrecognized subset of cardiac macrophages. These cells could not be identified by conventional flow sorting because unique markers on the cell surface were not known. By using single cell RNA Seq, an emerging technique that combines microfluidic nanoliter droplet reactors with single cell barcoding and next generation sequencing, the researchers were able to examine expression of every gene in over 4,000 cardiac immune cells and found the specialized IFNIC population of responsible cells.

The Nazi Lies Podcast
The Nazi Lies Podcast Ep. 21: Just Like the Fall of Rome

The Nazi Lies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 36:37


Mike Isaacson: Rome gets sacked ONE TIME, and that's all these people can talk about! [Theme song] Nazi SS UFOsLizards wearing human clothesHinduism's secret codesThese are nazi lies Race and IQ are in genesWarfare keeps the nation cleanWhiteness is an AIDS vaccineThese are nazi lies Hollow earth, white genocideMuslim's rampant femicideShooting suspects named Sam HydeHiter lived and no Jews died Army, navy, and the copsSecret service, special opsThey protect us, not sweatshopsThese are nazi lies Mike: Welcome to another episode of The Nazi Lies Podcast. Today we're talking with Edward Watts, professor of history and Alkaviadis Vassiliadis Endowed Chair in Byzantine Greek History at the University of California San Diego. He's here to talk to us about his book, The Eternal Decline and Fall of Rome: The History of a Dangerous Idea. The book is an extraordinary scholarly endeavor that managed to give a detailed and engaging history of 1700 years of Roman history in under 300 pages. Welcome to the podcast, Dr. Watts. Edward Watts: Thanks so much for having me. It's exciting to be here. Mike: All right. Now, you are one of the rare guests on our show whose book was actually directed at debunking Nazi lies. Tell us what you had in mind when you were writing this book. Edward: So the thing that prompted me to write this book was a recognition that the history of Rome, and in particular the legacy of Rome as it relates to the end of Roman history, was something that was being repeatedly misused across thousands of years to justify doing all sorts of violence and horrible things to people who really in the Roman context had very little to do with the decline of Rome, and in a post-Roman context, had nothing really to do with the challenges that people using the legacy of Rome wanted to try to address. And in particular, what prompted this was the recognition after 2016 of how stories about the classical past and the Roman past were being used on the far right and the sort of fascist fringe as a way of pointing to where they saw to be challenging dynamics and changes, critical changes, in the way that society was functioning. What was happening was people were doing things like using the story of the Gothic migrations in the 4th century AD to talk about the need to do radical things in our society related to immigration. And the discussions were just misusing the Roman past in really aggressive ways as kind of proof for radical ideas that didn't really relate to anything that happened in the past and I think are generally not things that people would be willing to accept in the present. And Rome provides a kind of argument when it's misunderstood,when Roman history is misunderstood, it provides a kind of argument that people are not familiar enough with to be able to refute, that might get people who think that a certain policy is aggressive or inhumane or unnecessary to think twice about whether that policy is something that is a response to a problem that people need to consider. And that's just wrong. It's a wrong way to use Roman history. It's a wrong way to use history altogether. And it's a rhetoric that really needs to be highlighted and pointed to so that people can see how insidious these kinds of comparisons can be. Mike: Okay, so your book discusses the idea of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, which you say started before any such decline or fall in the late Republic. What was politics like in the Roman Empire before the myth of Rome's decline popped up? Edward: So this is an interesting question because the story of Roman decline actually shows up in some of the very earliest Roman literature that we have. So the very first sort of intact Latin texts that we have from the Roman period are things like the plays of Plautus. In one of the earlier plays of Plautus, he is already making fun of people for saying that Rome is in decline. And he's saying this at a time right after the Roman victory over Hannibal when there is no evidence that Rome is in decline at all. And yet we know that there are politicians who are pushing this idea that the victory over Hannibal has unleashed a kind of moral decline in Rome that is leading to the degeneration of Roman morals and Roman behaviors and Roman social structures in such a fashion that will disrupt the ability of Rome to continue. This is just not something that most people recognized to be true, but what we see when politicians in the third century and second century BC are saying things like this, they aren't particularly interested in describing an objective reality. What they're looking to do is insert ideas into popular discourse, so that people in the context of their society begin to think it might be possible that decline exists. So I think that when we look at Roman history before Roman literature, or before these pieces of Roman literature exist, we really are looking at much later reconstructions. But I think that it's fair to say that even in those reconstructions of stories about things like say, the sixth king of Rome, those stories too focus on how that particular regime was inducing a decline from the proper behaviors of Romans. So I think we could say that there is no before decline. Rome seems always to have been talking about these ideas of decline and worrying about the fact that their society was in decline, even when objectively you would look around and say there is no reason whatsoever that you should be thinking this. Mike: Okay. Now your book argues that this political framing helped politicians shape the politics of the Roman Empire in particular ways. So how did those who pushed this declensionist narrative change the Roman republic? Edward: So in the Roman republic, there are a few things that this narrative is used to do. In the second century, early second century BC, this narrative is used to attack opponents of a politician named Cato. What Cato tried to do was single out people who had been getting particularly wealthy because of the aftermath of Rome's victory in the Second Punic War over Hannibal and then its victories in the eastern Mediterranean against the Greek King, Philip V. And what Cato saw was that this wealth was something that profoundly destabilized society because now there were winners who were doing well economically in a way that the old money establishment couldn't match. And so what he's looking to do is to say that when you look around and you see prosperity of that level in the Roman state, this is a sign that things are actually bad. It's not a sign of things are good. It's a sign that things are deteriorating, and we need to take radical steps to prevent this. And the radical steps that Cato takes, and that he initially gets support for, involves very onerous taxes directed specifically against groups of people that he opposed. He also serves as the person who decides who gets to be in the Roman Senate, and he uses that position to kick out a lot of people on the basis simply of him deciding that they embody some kind of negative trajectory of the Roman State. And there's a reaction to this and Cato eventually is forced to kind of back away from this. As you move later in the second century, the narrative of decline becomes something that first is used to again justify financial policies, and then later, actual violence against officials who are seen as pushing too radical an agenda. And so this becomes a narrative that you can use to destabilize things. It doesn't matter if you're coming from what we would say is the right or the left, the kind of equal opportunity narrative that can be used to get people to question whether the structures in their society are legitimately in keeping with the way the society is supposed to function. Mike: Okay. So a lot of people have this misconception that Rome kind of snapped from being a republic to being governed by an emperor, but that's not really so. What was the imperial administration like and how did it change? Edward: The Roman republic was in many ways a very strong constitutional system that had a lot of things built into it to prevent one individual from taking over. Not only did it have a structure that was based on a kind of balance of power–and the description of that structure was something that influenced the Founding Fathers in the US to create the balances of power that we have–but in Rome, the administrative office that correlated to the presidency actually was a paired magistracy. So there were two consuls who governed together and could in theory check one another. What the decline narrative happened or allows to happen is that these structures begin to be questioned as illegitimate. And you get, starting in the later part of the second century and going all the way through the murder of Julius Caesar in 44 BC, a long set of discussions about how the Constitution is not functioning as it's supposed to, how the interests of everybody are not being represented by the representatives in the Senate and by the sorts of laws that are being put forward in assemblies. And you have a greater sense that there's an emergency, and an emergency that requires people to assent to an individual exercising more power than the structure really permits. And so this idea of decline heightens this sense of emergency and you have cycles every generation or so, where the sense of emergency gets greater and another constitutional structure snaps. Until eventually what you have is an individual in Julius Caesar, who is able to exercise complete and effective control over the direction of politics in the state. Mike: Okay. So for whatever reason, the assassination of Julius Caesar sticks strong in our cultural psyche, but reading your book it seems like assassinating emperors was kind of commonplace? Edward: It depends on the period. Yeah, there are definitely periods where the violent overthrow of emperors are somewhat common. I think with Caesar, what we have is the assassination. We're still when Caesar was assassinated in the final death throes of the Roman republic. And so it takes a while and a really brutal nearly 15-year-long sprawling Civil War for Rome to finally just accept that the republic as a governing structure is not really going to function in the way it had before. And the first emperor is Augustus. The first assassination actually occurs about 75 years after Augustus takes over. The first emperor that's assassinated is Caligula. Then you have moments of really profound peace and stability that are punctuated by these upheavals where, you know, in the year 68 the Emperor Nero commits suicide and this leads to a sprawling civil war in which four emperors take power in the course of a single year. Then things kind of calmed down. There's an assassination in 96, and no more assassinations for almost 100 years. And so you have these moments where the structures of the empire are very stable, but when they break, it breaks very seriously. It's very rare when an emperor is assassinated, that there's only one assassination and things kind of work out after that. And so generally, I think what this suggests is, if you have faith that the Imperial structure is working predictably, it's very, very hard to disrupt that. But if you have a sense that an emperor is not legitimate or is not in power or has taken power violently, there's a very serious risk that that emperor will in turn be overthrown violently, and something very serious could happen, even going so far as resulting in a civil war. Mike: Okay so one of the biggest myths surrounding the Roman Empire is that it fell in 476 AD, and that plunged Europe into the Dark Ages, but this isn't really so. What happened in 476 AD, and how did it become the legendary fall of Rome? Edward: Yes, so 476 AD is one of the greatest non-events in history. Because when we look at our history and our timeline for the fall of Rome, this is the date that stands out to us. But actually in 476, there's not a single person who seems to think that Rome fell on that day. What happens is in the middle part of the fifth century, the eastern empire and the western empire separated in 395. And in the middle part of the fifth century, the western empire has a very serious loss of territory and then a loss of stability within Italy. So that there are, in a sense, kingmakers who run the army and decide whether an emperor should be in power or not. And so you have a number of figurehead emperors, starting really in the 450s and going through 476, who are there, in a couple of cases at certain moments they do exercise real power, but much of the time they're subordinate to military commanders who don't want to be emperor, or in many cases are of barbarian descent and don't think they can make imperial power actually stick, and in 476, Odoacer who was one of these barbarian commanders overthrows an emperor in Italy and says, "We are not going to have an emperor in Italy anymore. Instead, I'm just going to serve as the agent of the eastern emperor in Italy." And for the next 50 years, there are barbarian agents–first Odoacer and then Theodoric–who serve in this constitutional way where they acknowledge the superiority and the authority of the emperor in Constantinople over Italy. And in practice, they're running Italy. But in principle, they are still affirming that they're part of the Roman Empire, the Roman senate is still meeting, Roman law is still used. It's a situation where only when the eastern empire decides that it wants to take Italy back, do you start getting these stories about well, Rome fell in 476 when these barbarians got rid of the last emperor and now it's our obligation to liberate Italians from this occupation by these barbarians. In 476, though, this is not what anyone in Constantinople or in Italy actually thought was going on. Mike: Okay. So both the east and the west of the Roman Empire eventually became Christian. How did this alter the myth of the declining Rome? Edward: So for much of Roman history, there is very much this idea that any problem that you have is a potential sign of the decline of Rome, and if you are particularly motivated, you can say that the problem requires radical solutions to prevent Rome from falling into crisis. But with Christianity, when the Roman Empire becomes Christian, there is no past that you can look back to say, "Well, we were better as a Christian empire in this time." When Constantine converts to Christianity, he's the first Christian emperor. And so it's very natural for opponents to be able to say, "Look, he made everything Christian and now things are going to hell ,and so Christianity is the problem." So what Christians instead say is what actually is going on here is we are creating a new and better Rome, a Rome where the approach to the divine is more sophisticated, it's more likely to work. And so for about 100 years, you have instead of a narrative decline, a narrative of progress where Christians are pushing a notion that by becoming Christian, the Empire is embarking on a new path that is better than it has ever been before. Not everybody accepts this. At the time of Constantine's conversion, probably 90% of the Emperor's still pagan so this would be a very strange argument to them. And by the time you get into the fifth century, you probably are in a majority Christian empire, but like a 50% majority, not like 90% majority. So there is a significant pushback against this. And in moments of crisis, and in particular after the Sack of Rome in 410, there is a very strong pagan reaction to this idea of Christian Roman progress. And Christians have to come up with evermore elaborate explanations for how what looks like decline in any kind of tangible sense that you would look at in the western empire is actually a form of progress. And the most notable production of that line of argument is Augustine's City of God, which says effectively, “Don't worry about this world. There's a better world, a Christian world that really you should be focusing on, and you're getting closer there. So the effect of what's going on in the Roman world doesn't really matter too much for you.” Mike: Okay. Now at one point, there were actually three different polities across Europe and Asia Minor all claiming the inheritance of the Roman Empire. How did this happen? Edward: There are different moments where you see different groups claiming the inheritance of Rome. In the Middle Ages, you have the rise of the Holy Roman Empire, which is a construction of Charlemagne and the papacy around the year 800. And the claim that they make is simply that there is the first empress of the Roman state who takes power all by herself in 797–this is the Empress Irene–and the claim Charlemagne makes as well that eliminates the legitimacy of the Roman Empire and Constantinople because there's no emperor. Therefore because there's no emperor, there's no empire and therefore we can just claim it. Another moment where you see this really become a source of significant conflict is during the Fourth Crusade when the Crusaders attack Constantinople and destroy the central administration of the eastern Roman Empire. After that point, you have the crusaders in Constantinople who claim that they are a Roman state. You have the remains of the Roman state that had been in Constantinople sort of re-consolidating around the city of Nicaea. You have a couple of other people who claim the inheritance of the Roman state inEpirus and Trebizond, and they all kind of fight with each other. And so ultimately, what you see is that the Roman Empire has this tremendous resonance across all of the space that was once Roman. So their empire at its greatest extent went from the Persian Gulf all the way to Scotland. And it went from Spain and the Atlantic coast of Morocco all the way down to the Red Sea. It's massive. And in a lot of those territories after Rome recedes, the legacy of Rome remains. So a lot of people who felt that they could claim the Roman legacy tried to do that, because it gave a kind of added seriousness and a more, a greater echo to these little places that are far away from the center of the world now, places like Britain or places like France or places like Northern Germany. And so you, in a sense, look like you're more important than you are if you can make a claim on the Roman imperial legacy. Mike: Okay. And so how do these would-be empires finally end up collapsing? Edward: So, each in their own way. In the case of the Holy Roman Empire, it actually lasts for very long time. It's created under Charlemagne in 800, and it lasts really until the time of Napoleon. And it collapses because it's sort of dissolved because in Germany there was a fear that Napoleon might actually use the hulk of the Holy Roman Empire and the title of Holy Roman Emperor to claim a kind of ecumenical authority that would go beyond just what he had as emperor of France. The crusader regime in Constantinople is actually reconquered by the Nicene regime in 1261. So the Crusaders take Constantinople in 1204, and then these Roman exiles who set up a kind of Roman Empire in exile in Nicaea reconquer in 1261. And they hold Constantinople for another 200 years until the Ottomans take it in 1453. The other sort of small Roman states are absorbed either by the state in Constantinople or by the Ottomans, but ultimately by the end of the 1460s, everything that had once been part of the Eastern Empire in the Middle Ages is under Ottoman control. Mike: Okay. And so despite all of the polities that could have contended for the inheritance of Rome collapsing, Rome's decline still played a large part in political considerations across what was formerly the Roman Empire but now as an instructive metaphor. How was the decline of the Roman Empire leveraged to influence politics leading into the modern era, and who were the big myth makers? Edward: Yeah, there's a couple of really important thinkers in this light. One is Montesquieu, the French thinker who uses a discussion of Roman history to launch into a much more wide and expansive and influential discussion of political philosophy that centers really on notions of representation and sets some of the groundwork for what actors in the American Revolution and French Revolution believed they were doing. Montesquieu is really, really important in understanding 18th-century political developments. And I think it's impossible really to understand what the American Revolution and the French Revolution thought they were doing without also looking at Montesquieu. But now I think the more influential figure in terms of shaping our ideas about what Roman history looked like and what Roman decline meant is Edward Gibbon. Gibbon is also an 18th-century thinker. When he started writing a history of Rome, he started writing in the 1770s when he believed that there was a firm and stable European political structure of monarchies that could work together and kind of peacefully move the continent forward. And while Gibbon is working on this, of course, you know, the American Revolution happens, and the French Revolution happens, and his whole structure that he was looking to defend and celebrate with his Roman history disappears. And so his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire becomes a book that is extracted from its historical context. And it seems like it is an objective narrative of what happens. It's not objective at all. What Gibbon is trying to do is compare the failings of one large single imperial structure and the advantages of this kind of multipolar world where everyone is balanced and cooperative. But everybody forgets that that multipolar world even existed because the book comes out after it's gone. So what you have with Gibbon is a narrative that seems to be just an account of Roman history, and a very, very evocative one. I think most of the people now who have Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire on their shelf don't read it. But they know the title. They know the concept. This means that you have a ready-made metaphor for anything that's bothering you. You know, you can talk about the decline and fall of Rome. Just about everybody in the entire world knows that Rome declined and fell. And very few of them know much about why it happened or how it happened or how long it took. And so evoking the decline and fall of Rome allows you to kind of plug in anything, as my friend Hal Drake says, anything that's bothering you at a particular moment, you can plug in and say Rome fell because of X. And if you look at the last 50 years you can see lots and lots and lots of examples of X, lots of different things that bothered people that got plugged into the story of Rome fell because of whatever's bothering me that day. Mike: I am certainly guilty of having a copy of Gibbon on my bookshelf and not having read it. [laughs] So in talking about the modern appropriation of the memory of Rome, you of course talk about Fascist Italy. You reference Claudio Fogu, whom I absolutely love, check out his book The Historic Imaginary. How did Fascists wield the memory of the Roman Empire to justify their regime? Edward: Yeah, it's so, so seductive what is done in the city of Rome in particular. And there's a sense that I think is a very real sense that creating and uncovering and memorializing the imperial center of the Roman Empire makes real the experience of walking through it, and with the right kind of curation can make it feel like you're in a contemporary environment that's linked to that ancient past. And what Mussolini and his architects tried very very hard to do was create this, in a sense, almost Roman imperial Disneyland in the area between the Colosseum and the Capital line. So when we walk there, we see a kind of disembodied and excavated giant park with a large street down the middle running from the Colosseum along the length of the Roman Forum. But that was actually neighborhoods.  Before Mussolini, there were actual houses and shops and restaurants and people living there, and very, very long-standing communities that he removed with this idea that you were in a sense restoring the past and creating a future by removing the present. And I think that's a very good metaphor for what they were up to. What they were trying to do was create an affinity for the fascist present by uncovering this Roman past and getting rid of what they saw as disorder. And the disorder, of course, was real people living their lives in their houses. But the other thing that people, you know, when tourists visit this now, they don't know that history. They don't know that when they walk on the street alongside the Forum, they're actually walking on a street that is a 20th-century street created for Fascist military parades on the ruins of modern, early modern, and medieval houses. They just see this as a way to kind of commune with this Roman past. And the Fascists very much understood that aesthetic and how seductive that aesthetic was. Mike: Okay, so let's circle back to where we started with your motivation for the book. How are people invoking the fall of Rome now, and what are they getting wrong? Edward: I think that we see, again, this temptation to take what's bothering you and attaching it to Rome. And I think even if you just look over the last 50 years, you can almost trace the sorts of things people are anxious about in a modern context based on the things that are advanced for what possibly made Rome fall. So in the 70s and early 80s, there's lots of concern about environmental contamination and the effect that this is going to have on people's lives. And we get the story of Rome fell because of lead poisoning. I mean, it didn't. It's just ridiculous that you would think Rome fell because of lead poisoning when there is no moment that it fell, the place was active and survived for well over 1500 years when it was using lead pipes. There's no evidence whatsoever that this is true. In the 70s, Phyllis Schlafly would go around and say that Rome fell because of liberated women. I think that would be a very big surprise to a lot of Roman women that they were actually liberated, definitely in the 1970's way. In the 80s, and even into the 2010s, you have people like Ben Carson talking about Rome declining because of homosexuality or gay marriage. Again, that has nothing to do with the reality of Rome. There are other places where I think people come a little bit closer to at least talking about things that Romans might acknowledge existed in their society. So when you have Colin Murphy and others in the lead up to the Iraq War talking about the overextension of military power as a factor that can lead to the decline of Rome, yeah, I mean, Rome did have at various moments problems because it was overextended militarily. But most of the time it didn't. To say that the Romans were overextended militarily because they had a large empire ignores the fact that they had that large empire for almost 400 years without losing significant amounts of territory. So comparing Roman military overextension and US military overextension could be a useful exercise, but you have to adjust the comparison for scale. And you have to adjust the comparison to understand that there are political dynamics that mean that places that in the first century BC required military garrisons, in the third century did not. And so you're not overextended because you're in the same place for 400 years. At the beginning, you might need to have an extensive military presence in a place that later you won't. So I think that what we need to do when we think about the use of the legacy of Rome, is think very critically about the kinds of things that Rome can and can't teach us, and think very clearly about the difference between history repeating itself–which I think it doesn't–and history providing us with ideas that can help us understand the present. I think that's where history is particularly useful, and Roman history in particular is useful. Because it's so long, there are so many things that that society deals with, and there are so many things that it deals with successfully as well as fails to deal with capably. All of those things offer us lessons to think with, even if they don't offer us exact parallels. Mike: Okay, so we've talked a bunch about the fabricated history of Rome and the popular memory of Rome. What does the actual history of Rome and fears of Roman decline have to teach us about the present? Edward: I think the biggest thing that we can see is if somebody is claiming that a society is in profound decline and the normal structures of that society need to be suspended so the decline can be fixed, that is a big caution flag. What that means is somebody wants to do something that you otherwise would not agree to let them do. And the justification that they provide should be looked at quite critically, but it also should be considered that, even if they identify something that might or might not be true, the solution they're proposing is not something that you absolutely need to accept. Systems are very robust. Political systems and social systems are very robust and they can deal with crises and they can deal with changes. If someone is saying that our system needs to be suspended or ignored or cast to the side because of a crisis, the first step should be considering whether the crisis is real, and then considering whether it is in fact possible to deal with that crisis and not suspend the constitutional order, and not trample on people's rights, and not take away people's property, and not imprison people. Because in all of these cases that we see Roman politicians introduced this idea of decline to justify something radical, there are other ways to deal with the problem. And sometimes they incite such panic that Romans refuse or forget or just don't consider any alternative. That has really profound and dangerous consequences because the society that suspends normal orders and rights very likely is going to lose those rights and those normal procedures. Mike: All right. Well, Dr. Watts, thank you so much for coming on The Nazi Lies Podcast to talk about the myth of the Roman Empire. The book, again, is The Eternal Decline and Fall of Rome out from Oxford University Press. Thanks again, Dr. Watts. Edward: Thanks a lot. This was great. Mike: If you enjoyed what you heard and want to help pay our guests and transcriptionist, consider subscribing to our Patreon at patreon.com/nazilies or donating to our PayPal at paypal.me/nazilies or CashApp at $nazilies [Theme song]

Thyme in the Studio
91: Unwinding Emotional Eating Patterns with Empowered Eating and Living with Sarah Emily Speers

Thyme in the Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 51:51


Sarah Emily Speers, MA is an Alternative Healing Arts Practitioner, Empowered EatingCoach & trained psychotherapist who specializes in guiding women through doing theinner work to address the root of food and eating issues.She is the host of The Empowered Eating & Living Podcast and facilitator of theInnergize Your Life Program, designed to empower you with the information and toolsto improve eating issues, reduce food cravings, find relief from emotional wounds andexperience greater inner peace and self acceptance, all within a safe community of like-hearted humans. Sarah Emily integrates several innovative energy-based coaching andself-help methods, including Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) and Reiki withattachment repair, inner child healing and mindfulness- and somatic-based practices.Formerly, Sarah Emily worked as a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist as Director ofBehavioral Health Program at Premier Fitness Camp, and ran the intensive treatmentprogram for binge eating disorder at the University of California San Diego. She holds aM.A. in Marriage & Family Therapy from The University of San Diego and a B.A. inPsychology from Syracuse University.Sarah Emily currently offers her services via 1:1 coaching, group programs and retreats. You can stay connected with Sarah Emily at:info@sarahspeers.com @sarahemilyspeerswww.sarahspeers.comFreebie for your listeners: The Empowered Eating Blueprint Quizhttps://sarahspeers.com/empowered-eating-quizThe quiz will help you uncover which of the 5 Bodies of Health are underlying youreating issues so you can take effective and empowered action to change. Thyme in the Studio links:Waitlist for the Holistic Home Herbalism Course: January 2023: https://www.aidazea.com/coursehttps://www.patreon.com/thymeinthestudiohttps://www.instagram.com/thymeinthestudiopodcast/www.thymeinthestudio.comhttps://www.aidazea.com

John Riley Project
Poway Elections Comments, California/San Diego Propositions

John Riley Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 167:33


There is one week to go until Election Day and the drama in the Poway elections is heating up! Pete Neild joined me to cover a range of issues and candidates in this Poway Elections Preview episode. Poway Elections Drama We discuss the Holly Oak community's objection to the new development along Poway Road, as well as the “solidarity press conference” that was organized and then later cancelled. We discuss the proposed housing development, housing density, architecture, street entrances, and an overall frustration with Poway city leaders on communication. Then Pete and I shared our thoughts on the recent Amit Asaravala podcast. We discussed changing voter registration demographics in Poway as well as the huge influx of outside money into this election cycle. We break down more of the specifics on the money spent by PACs, developers, and locals, including the financial data on the Democratic endorsed candidates. Amit is the President of the Poway Democratic Club. We share predictions and comments on each race. Do the challengers have enough to knock off an incumbent? Or an incumbent endorsed candidate? Will this election cycle be different? California and San Diego County Propositions Then Pete and I break down the California Propositions. So many topics there including abortion, gambling, kidney dialysis, EVs, wildfire protection, tax increases, and cigarettes. Plus, we examine the local San Diego County measures covering topics of cannabis, taxes, school bonds, childcare, trash pickup, building height limitations, and childcare. Wow, so much in this podcast. Almost 3 hours! We even had an argument amongst members of our livestream audience. Oh, the drama! Special thanks to our livestream audience for the great comments and questions. Thank you! #Poway #election2022 #CAVote #SDVote Get proven and easy-to-implement strategies to build your business and pursue your happiness. Sign up now. It is FREE! https://johnrileyproject.com/ Be sure to share this video with a friend! Sponsors Happiness76.com – your source of gear that celebrates Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. https://happiness76.com/ ☆☆    STAY CONNECTED    ☆☆ SUBSCRIBE for more reactions, upcoming shows and more! ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJJSzeIW2A-AeT7gwonglMA FACEBOOK ➡ https://www.facebook.com/johnrileyproject/ TWITTER ➡ https://twitter.com/JohnRileyPoway INSTAGRAM ➡  https://www.instagram.com/johnrileypoway/ Sponsorship Inquiries https://johnrileyproject.com/sponsorship/ Donations https://johnrileyproject.com/donations/donation-form/ Music https://www.purple-planet.com

Alchemy Podcast
Anna Symonds, Cannabis Advocate & Educator, The Etheridge Foundation

Alchemy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 18:17


Anna discusses her work with the Etheridge Foundation and the Last Prisoner Project and her involvement with the the NFL grant for cannabis research at the University of California San Diego.