Podcasts about Epidemiology

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  • 1,318PODCASTS
  • 2,598EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
Epidemiology

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Best podcasts about Epidemiology

Show all podcasts related to epidemiology

Latest podcast episodes about Epidemiology

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
230 - Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease Part 2: September 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:15


Back for part 2, Naila takes you through 15 papers pertaining to health conditions associated with AD and dementia. You'll hear about infections, cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, and a few miscellaneous diseases.  Sections in this episode:  Epidemiology / Multiple Factors (1:00)  Immune Conditions (8:00)  Metabolic and Cardiovascular (15:00)  Neurological Comorbidities (24:50) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pgl18mXwvDG2xZK9fijICMtfEhI7BXUG/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Naila Kuhlmann, edited by Alexandra Pavel, and reviewed by Marcia Jude and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For September 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Christy Yu, Sarah Louadi, Kate Van Pelt, Nicole Corso, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Dog Cancer Answers
Bladder Cancer in Dogs: Is It a Death Sentence? | Dr. Nancy Reese, DVM, PhD Deep Dive

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 19:47


Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common bladder cancer in dogs. While there is no cure, Dr. Nancy Reese does consider this cancer to be treatable and you can dramatically improve your dog's comfort and quality of life with medications. TCC can also be diagnosed with a special urine test, which is much easier to do and less stressful for your dog than a surgical biopsy (not to mention less expensive!). As the cancer progresses, it can become uncomfortable and may even obstruct the bladder and prevent the dog from urinating. About 50% of cases will eventually spread to other parts of the body as well. But treatment will usually keep your dog comfortable for 6 months to a year. Listen in to learn where this cancer can occur, how it is diagnosed, and options for treatment. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: CADET® BRAF and CADET® BRAF-PLUS Urine Tests for Bladder Cancer Related Links: Transitional Cell Carcinoma – What You Need to Know About Your Dog's Cancer Podcast Episode Chemotherapy for Dogs Demystified | Dr. Sue Ettinger Deep Dive Podcast Episode Metronomic Chemotherapy for Dogs with Cancer Article by Oncologist Dr. Susan Ettinger About Today's Guest, Dr. Nancy Reese: Dr. Nancy Reese is a small animal veterinarian with over 30 years of clinical experience taking care of cats and dogs and other critters in the Sierra Nevada foothills. She is also a perpetual student and researcher, as evidenced by her many degrees. In addition to her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis, she earned a Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis and then a Ph.D. in Epidemiology at UC Davis. If you string all her letters out after her name it looks like this: Nancy Reese, DVM, MPVM, PhD. In her spare time, she volunteers to help evacuate and shelter animals caught up in disasters, and she's currently training to help in human search and rescue efforts. Dr. Reese lives in a log cabin with her husband, her 13-year-old golden retriever, and her two 13-year-old cats. Her hobbies include boosting the quality of life and longevity for all animals in her care, hiking, travelling, and cross-country skiing. Oh, and lots of dog walking.  degree from the University of California at Davis before earning his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University. Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research
Epidemiology Counts – Episode 31 – Sports Injury

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 53:01


Sports is life. Fans have a deep devotion to their preferred teams from their alma maters or home towns. Fans spend shocking amounts of time discussing things like player stats and predictions of final game scores. The players are expected to be at the top of their game at all times. Regardless of the sport, players demand a lot from their bodies. The safety of players is paramount, and findings ways to minimize injury risk is key. Epidemiologists can be key players in helping identify ways to minimize risk of injury. Understanding what aspects of training are more relevant to injury risk, including specific activities and intensity, can help players avoid short term injuries. And in the long term, there are concerns for many players of lifetime consequences as a result of their sport, notably Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in football and football, or Soccer as we call it in the USA). We talk with Drs. Christina Mack and Mackenzie Herzog of IQVIA about how epidemiologists can work with players and teams to minimize sports injury.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
229 - Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease Part 1: September 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 21:58


In today's episode, Naila takes you through 10 papers on risk factors associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer's and dementia. You'll hear a little on lifestyle factors, air and noise pollutants, and hormones. Stay tuned for Part 2!  Sections in this episode:  Lifestyle & Environmental Factors (2:09)  Hormones (15:13) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BUfTeMbAC0HzYcXRieJSQdsoNKS9r2J7/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Naila Kuhlmann, edited by Ellen Koch, and reviewed by Elyn Rowe and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For September 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Christy Yu, Sarah Louadi, Kate Van Pelt, Nicole Corso, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

The Signal
Vaccinated, cured, or dead: Europe's fourth COVID wave

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 16:55


Vaccinated, cured, or dead: those are the three likely paths ahead for Germans, according to the country's Health Minister, as it prepares to plunge into pandemic winter. Many European countries are currently in the grips of a brutal fourth wave of COVID-19. It's so bad that Austria has just gone back into lockdown in an attempt to spare the country's already overwhelmed ICUs. Only two thirds of Europeans have been fully vaccinated so far, and many of those people are at a point now where their immunity is starting to fade. It's a pattern that's making health officials worried about what the next few months have in store. Today on the Signal, Europe's backsliding COVID situation. Is it a sign of things to come for Australia? Featured: Eva Schernhammer, Professor of Epidemiology, Medical University of Vienna

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd Episode 40: Suicide Epidemiology and Prevention with Dr. Juveria Zaheer

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:39


Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers suicide epidemiology, and prevention with Dr. Juveria Zaheer, a Clinician Scientist with the Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, and Education Administrator in the Gerald Sheff and Shanitha Kachan Emergency Department at CAMH in Toronto, Ontario. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. She utilizes both quantitative and qualitative methods to better understand suicide and identify areas of potential improvement.    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:   By the end of this episode, you should be able to… Develop an awareness of suicide risk and prevalence, as it pertains to the general population and psychiatric populations Incorporate additional contextual information into suicide risk assessment that goes beyond SADPERSONS and other list-based approaches  Develop a deeper understanding of how to approach and help individuals with suicidal thoughts and behaviours    Guest expert: Dr. Juveria Zaheer    Hosts: Dr. Chase Thompson (PGY4)   Episode production: Dr. Weam Sieffien, Dr. Vincent Tang, and Dr. Chase Thompson    Audio editing: Dr. Chase Thompson   Show notes: Dr. Chase Thompson   00:00 – Introduction 01:14 – Learning objectives 04:00 – Overview of suicide rates across populations 07:20 - Sex and gender differences in suicide 08:50 - Suicide following discharge from hospital 14:10 - Finding suitable dispositions for individuals dealing with suicidal thoughts and behaviors 20:50 - Meeting patients and families where they are at 23:30 - Suicide safety plans  28:30 - Evidence-based approaches to suicide prevention  32:30 - Commentary on strength of evidence for interventions in suicide prevention 38:40 - Addressing suicidality in borderline personality disorder 47:00 - Ethics of involuntary hospitalization for suicidality 50:00 - Future of suicide prevention  References: Borecky, A., Thomsen, C., & Dubov, A. (2019). Reweighing the ethical tradeoffs in the involuntary hospitalization of suicidal patients. The American Journal of Bioethics, 19(10), 71-83. Cipriani, A., Hawton, K., Stockton, S., & Geddes, J. R. (2013). Lithium in the prevention of suicide in mood disorders: updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Bmj, 346. Chung, D., Hadzi-Pavlovic, D., Wang, M., Swaraj, S., Olfson, M., & Large, M. (2019). Meta-analysis of suicide rates in the first week and the first month after psychiatric hospitalisation. BMJ open, 9(3), e023883. Chung, D. T., Ryan, C. J., Hadzi-Pavlovic, D., Singh, S. P., Stanton, C., & Large, M. M. (2017). Suicide rates after discharge from psychiatric facilities: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA psychiatry, 74(7), 694-702. Guzmán, E. M., Cha, C. B., Ribeiro, J. D., & Franklin, J. C. (2019). Suicide risk around the world: a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies. Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology, 54(12), 1459-1470. Kessler, R. C., Bossarte, R. M., Luedtke, A., Zaslavsky, A. M., & Zubizarreta, J. R. (2020). Suicide prediction models: a critical review of recent research with recommendations for the way forward. Molecular psychiatry, 25(1), 168-179. Mann, J. J., Apter, A., Bertolote, J., Beautrais, A., Currier, D., Haas, A., ... & Hendin, H. (2005). Suicide prevention strategies: a systematic review. Jama, 294(16), 2064-2074. Miller, I. W., Camargo, C. A., Arias, S. A., Sullivan, A. F., Allen, M. H., Goldstein, A. B., ... & Ed-Safe Investigators. (2017). Suicide prevention in an emergency department population: the ED-SAFE study. JAMA psychiatry, 74(6), 563-570. Sakinofsky, I. (2014). Preventing suicide among inpatients. The Canadian journal of psychiatry, 59(3), 131-140. Stanley, B., Brown, G. K., Brenner, L. A., Galfalvy, H. C., Currier, G. W., Knox, K. L., ... & Green, K. L. (2018). Comparison of the safety planning intervention with follow-up vs usual care of suicidal patients treated in the emergency department. JAMA psychiatry, 75(9), 894-900. Zaheer, J., Jacob, B., de Oliveira, C., Rudoler, D., Juda, A., & Kurdyak, P. (2018). Service utilization and suicide among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Schizophrenia research, 202, 347-353. Zaheer, J., Links, P. S., & Liu, E. (2008). Assessment and emergency management of suicidality in personality disorders. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 31(3), 527-543. CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association (CPA). For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast), Facebook (PsychEd Podcast), and Instagram (@psyched.podcast). You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. For more information, visit our website at psychedpodcast.org.

Behind the Microscope
Michael Mina, MD-PhD - Leaders are Communicators

Behind the Microscope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:09


Dr. Michael Mina is the newly appointed Chief Science Officer at eMed and a former Assistant Professor of Epidemiology as well as Immunology and Infectious disease at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Mina earned his MD and PhD from Emory University, with postdoctoral fellowships at Princeton University and Harvard Medical school. He completed his residency training in clinical pathology at Brigham and Women's Hospital before joining the faculty of Harvard. Today, Dr. Mina shares his incredible journey from undergrad to Buddhist monk to MD-PhD student to Assistant professor, with stops in Sri Lanka, Nicaragua, and South Africa. Credits: Our deepest thanks to Dr. Mina for joining us today! Dr. Mina's Faculty Page: https://www.emed.com/michael-mina?hsLang=en Follow Dr. Mina on Twitter: @michaelmina_lab Host: Bejan Saeedi Co-Host and Audio Engineer – Joe Behnke Executive Producer and Social Media Coordinator – Carey Jansen Executive Producer – Michael Sayegh Faculty Advisor – Dr. Brian Robinson Twitter: @behindthescope_ Instagram: @behindthemicroscopepod Facebook: @behindthemicroscope1 Website: behindthemicroscope.com

Casual Inference
A Casual Look at Causal Inference History | Season 3 Episode 6

Casual Inference

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 72:06


In this episode Lucy D'Agostino McGowan and Ellie Murray chat about the history of causal inference, tracing the origins across disciplines from statistics to economics, epidemiology, and computer science, discussing contributions from Rubin, Robins, Pearl, and more! Follow along on Twitter: The American Journal of Epidemiology: @AmJEpi Ellie: @EpiEllie Lucy: @LucyStats

The Incubator
#031 - Dr. Kristyn Beam MD & Dr. Andrew Beam - Artificial intelligence in the neonatal ICU

The Incubator

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 66:44


Join us this week for a fascinating discussion about artificial intelligence in neonatology with doctors Kristyn and Andrew Beam. Dr. Kristyn Beam is an attending neonatologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA. She is also an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on machine learning applications for neonatal data with a focus on improving our decision-making in the NICU at the point of care and ultimately improving neonatal outcomes.Dr. Andrew Beam is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, with secondary appointments in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School and the Department of Newborn Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital. His research develops and applies machine-learning methods to extract meaningful insights from clinical and biological datasets, with a special focus on neonatal medicine.Check out the show notes at: https://the-incubator-podcast.ghost.io/031-dr-kristyn-beam-md-mph-dr-andrew-beam-phd/________________________________________________________________________________________As always, feel free to send us questions, comments or suggestions to our email: nicupodcast@gmail.com. You can also contact the show through instagram or twitter, @nicupodcast. Or contact Ben and Daphna directly via their twitter profiles: @drnicu and @doctordaphnamd. enjoy!This podcast is proudly sponsored by Chiesi.

The Medical Journal of Australia
Episode 449: MJA Podcasts 2021 Episode 48: Impact of opening international borders on influenza cases, with A/Prof Sheena Sullivan

The Medical Journal of Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 16:22


 Vol 215, Issue 11: 22 November 2021. Associate Professor Sheena Sullivan is Head of Epidemiology at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, at the Peter Doherty Institute. She talks about the impact of opening the international borders on influenza cases and severity this coming summer. To accompany her editorial at https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2021/216/1/preparing-out-season-influenza-epidemics-when-international-travel-resumes, and research by Marsh et al, at https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2021/216/1/drivers-summer-influenza-epidemic-new-south-wales-2018-19 ... with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.

Shiny Epi People
Brandon Marshall, PhD on letting staff lead and 90 little Christmas houses

Shiny Epi People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 33:03


If you know my guest today, you probably know what a rock star researcher is, but you may not know much of anything personal about him. Today, Brandon Marshall, PhD, Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Brown University, gives me a glimpse into his life: acting, snowboarding, home decorating, caring for 2 pugs, and stubbornly refusing to leave Celsius back in Canada. Of course, Brandon shares how he successfully manages a very large research team, cross-training staff and letting them lead, and avoiding overwhelm. Enjoy!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/shinyepipeople)

The Accad and Koka Report
Ep. 184 Vinay Prasad

The Accad and Koka Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 81:10


Our guest is Vinay Prasad, hematologist-oncologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California San Francisco. He is the author of over 300 academic articles, and the books https://www.amazon.com/Ending-Medical-Reversal-Improving-Outcomes/dp/1421417723/ (Ending Medical Reversal) (2015), and https://www.amazon.com/Malignant-Policy-Evidence-People-Cancer/dp/1421437635/ (Malignant) (2020). We have a wide-ranging conversation covering public health, the politicization of science, and the future of the established institutions of knowledge. GUEST: Vinay Prasad: https://twitter.com/VPrasadMDMPH (Twitter), https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUibd0E2kdF9N9e-EmIbUew (YouTube), and http://www.vinayakkprasad.com/ (Website) PRIOR APPEARANCE ON THE SHOW: https://accadandkoka.com/episodes/episode153/ (Ep. 153) Vinay Prasad: Making Conversations About Medicine Great Again. WATCH ON YOUTUBE: https://youtu.be/Nm_koZ_NWfg (Watch the episode) on our YouTube channel SUPPORT THE SHOW: https://www.patreon.com/accadandkoka (Make a small donation) on our Patreon page Support this podcast

HealthMatters
E72: Understanding Global Epidemiology

HealthMatters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 25:52


In this episode, we welcome Malwina (Maja) Carrion (maja@bu.edu), a lecturer at the Department of Health Sciences, Sargent College. She introduced the three courses she teaches, from Global Environmental Public Health, Epidemiology, to Neglected Tropical Diseases. She also discussed her latest research on Chagas Disease. About Maja : Professor Maja Carrion has led and managed public health projects and research in Asia, Africa, South America, Europe, and the US. Her primary research interests are innovative infectious disease surveillance, screening and treatment programs, disease and vector control, and neglected tropical diseases. The moderator of the podcast is Dr. Karen Jacobs (kjacobs@bu.edu), who is the Associate Dean, Digital Learning and Innovation, a Clinical Professor and the Program Director for the online post-professional doctorate in the occupational therapy program at Sargent College. Marial Williams (marialw@bu.edu), a Boston University entry-level occupational therapy doctoral student, composed the music for the podcast.

History Extra podcast
How slavery & empire shaped epidemiology

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 36:06


Jim Downs speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book Maladies of Empire, which reveals how the conditions created by colonialism, war and slavery affected the study of disease and its spread in the 18th and 19th centuries. (Ad) Jim Downs is the author of Maladies of Empire: How Slavery, Imperialism, and War Transformed Medicine (Belknap Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=maladies+of+empire&adgrpid=130572957750&gclid=CjwKCAiA1aiMBhAUEiwACw25MVXIayiB36t6Q37ItDISGlC8aLKZyWNwGh6rUPr8g_WnL2PKKC-y3xoC2IAQAvD_BwE&hvadid=543075455219&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=12263352264959276216&hvtargid=kwd-1262783386938&hydadcr=24404_1748884&tag=googhydr-21&ref=pd_sl_2iezca746i_e&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dog Cancer Answers
How to Stop Dog Bleeding | Dr. Nancy Reese Deep Dive

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 18:15


Bleeding can be a minor inconvenience or a medical emergency. Dr. Nancy Reese recommends methods to stop minor bleeding at home as well as how to bandage a more serious wound to control bleeding on your way to the veterinary hospital. Most bleeding in dogs is due to trauma, from cutting a paw on a rock to being hit by a car. The easiest way to stop bleeding is to prevent it from happening in the first place! Keep your dog on a leash when outside near roads or in the woods, and limit interactions with wildlife and unfamiliar dogs. If hiking with your dog, bring a first aid kit and consider protective booties when traveling over rough terrain. Some types of cancer and other health conditions can cause bleeding as well. Superficial tumors might get damaged when your dog is playing, and nasal tumors often cause nosebleeds. Hemangiosarcoma, cancer of the blood vessels, is famous for causing bleeding. External bleeding can often be controlled with first aid care, while internal bleeding will require veterinary care. Learn about basic first aid, products to stop bleeding, and the herb Yunnan baiyao. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: Herbal Treatment for Bleeding Tumors in Dogs podcast episode on Yunnan baiyao HemaBlock Related Links: Hemangiosarcoma- What You Need to Know About Your Dog's Cancer Nasal Tumors – What You Need to Know About Your Dog's Cancer About Today's Guest, Dr. Nancy Reese: Dr. Nancy Reese is a small animal veterinarian with over 30 years of clinical experience taking care of cats and dogs and other critters in the Sierra Nevada foothills. She is also a perpetual student and researcher, as evidenced by her many degrees. In addition to her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis, she earned a Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis and then a Ph.D. in Epidemiology at UC Davis. If you string all her letters out after her name it looks like this: Nancy Reese, DVM, MPVM, PhD. In her spare time, she volunteers to help evacuate and shelter animals caught up in disasters, and she's currently training to help in human search and rescue efforts. Dr. Reese lives in a log cabin with her husband, her 13-year-old golden retriever, and her two 13-year-old cats. Her hobbies include boosting the quality of life and longevity for all animals in her care, hiking, travelling, and cross-country skiing. Oh, and lots of dog walking.  degree from the University of California at Davis before earning his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University. Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com

The Hop-Ons Podcast: An Arrested Development/Twin Peaks/Community Podcast
Community S2E6: Epidemiology (w/special guest co-host Meghan Groves)

The Hop-Ons Podcast: An Arrested Development/Twin Peaks/Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 58:19


The Hop-Ons Podcast is an Arrested Development/Twin Peaks/Community review show.  Please consider supporting the podcast by becoming a patron through Patreon.  The Hop-Ons Podcast is produced by Nice Marmot Productions with assistance from The Cluttered Desk Podcast. If you have thoughts on this episode, we'd love to hear them! Email us at hoponspod@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @HopOnsPodcast. Jon's production company, Nice Marmot Productions, has an amazing YouTube Page and he's on Twitter @marmotjon. Jon's podcast, Big Arms Podcast, is available here through Apple Podcasts. Jon's new podcast, Ride Along, is available here through Apple Podcasts. The Cluttered Desk Podcast is available here through Apple Podcasts, on Twitter @TheCDPodcast, and on Facebook. Colin is also on Twitter @ColinAshleyCox. We would like to thank Poppy & Persimmon for making shirts and stickers for our Patreon supporters.  We would like to thank Perry Ritter for creating the new Hop-Ons logo for this season. You can find Perry on Twitter @pritter1492 and you can email him at thisismybourbonshop@gmail.com. Finally, we would like to thank Test Dream for providing The Hop-Ons Podcast's theme music. You can find Test Dream at their website, testdream.bandcamp.com, on Facebook, and on Twitter @testdream.

Don't Look Now
143 - Typhoid Mary

Don't Look Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 51:56


Mary Mallon was an Irish born cook in early 20th century New York.  She was the first know case of a healthy, non-symptomatic carrier of Typhoid in the United States and has since become known far and wide as Typhoid Mary.  What hides behind the trope is a story that begs the question of just how much authority should public health officials have when it comes to forcible quarantine and detention.  A topic very timely in today's pandemic backdrop. 

Natural Medicine Journal Podcast
Thinking About Expanding Your Clinic? Listen to This First.

Natural Medicine Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 23:16


Expanding a medical practice is both exciting and challenging. In this interview, Dugald Seely, ND, FABNO, describes why and how he expanded his highly specialized oncology clinic to create The Center for Health Innovation in Ottawa, Canada. There are many aspects to consider when expanding a clinical focus and it's always helpful to learn those valuable lessons from someone who has done it successfully. About the Expert Dugald Seely, ND, MSc, FABNO, runs a clinical practice with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare practitioners at the Centre for Health Innovation (home of the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre). Seely is the executive director for the Patterson Institute for Integrative Oncology Research at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine as well as serving as an affiliate investigator for the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and adjunct professor with the School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa. Seely completed his master of science in cancer research at the University of Toronto and has been awarded over 11 million dollars in grant research funding. Past-president for the Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians and recipient of the 2017 Rogers Prize, Seely aims to build on the evidence for naturopathic oncology and the practice of integrative oncology as a whole.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.04.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:33


Zinc might help to stave off respiratory infection symptoms and cut illness duration Western Sydney University (Australia), November 2, 2021   A zinc supplement might help stave off the symptoms of respiratory tract infections, such as coughing, congestion, and sore throat, and cut illness duration, suggests a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published in the open access journal BMJ Open. But the quality of the evidence on which these findings are based is variable, and it's not clear what an optimal formulation or dose of this nutrient might be, caution the researchers. Respiratory tract infections include colds, flu, sinusitis, pneumonia and COVID-19. Most infections clear up by themselves, but not all. And they often prove costly in terms of their impact on health services and time taken in sick leave. Zinc has a key role in immunity, inflammation, tissue injury, blood pressure and in tissue responses to lack of oxygen. As a result, it has generated considerable interest during the current pandemic for the possible prevention and treatment of COVID-19 infection. In response to calls for rapid evidence appraisals to inform self-care and clinical practice, the researchers evaluated zinc for the prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, and other viral respiratory tract infections. When that review was published, the results of several relevant clinical trials weren't yet available, so this current review brings the available evidence up to date.  The review includes 28 clinical trials involving 5446 adults, published in 17 English and Chinese research databases up to August 2020. None of the trials specifically looked at the use of zinc for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The most common zinc formulations used were lozenges followed by nasal spraysand gels containing either zinc acetate or gluconate salts. Doses varied substantially, depending on the formulation and whether zinc was used for prevention or treatment. Pooled analysis of the results of 25 trials showed that compared with dummy treatment (placebo), zinc lozenges or nasal spray prevented 5 respiratory tract infections in 100 people a month. These effects were strongest for curbing the risk of developing more severe symptoms, such as fever and influenza-like illnesses. But this is based on only three studies. On average, symptoms cleared up 2 days earlier with the use of either a zinc spray or liquid formulation taken under the tongue (sublingual) than when a placebo was used. During the first week of illness, participants who used sublingual or nasal spray zinc were nearly twice as likely to recover as those who used placebo: 19 more adults out of 100 were likely to still have symptoms a week later if they didn't use zinc supplements.  While zinc wasn't associated with an easing in average daily symptom severity, it was associated with a clinically significant reduction in symptom severity on day 3.  Side effects, including nausea and mouth/nose irritation, were around 40% more likely among those using zinc, but no serious side effects were reported in the 25 trials that monitored them.  However, compared with placebo, sublingual zinc didn't reduce the risk of developing an infection or cold symptoms after inoculation with human rhinovirus, nor were there any differences in illness duration between those who used zinc supplements and those who didn't. Nor was the comparative effectiveness of different zinc formulations and doses clear. And the quality, size, and design of the included studies varied considerably. "The marginal benefits, strain specificity, drug resistance and potential risks of other over-the-counter and prescription medications makes zinc a viable 'natural' alternative for the self-management of non-specific [respiratory tract infections], the researchers write.  "[Zinc] also provides clinicians with a management option for patients who are desperate for faster recovery times and might be seeking an unnecessary antibiotic prescription," they add. "However, clinicians and consumers need to be aware that considerable uncertainty remains regarding the clinical efficacy of different zinc formulations, doses and administration routes, and the extent to which efficacy might be influenced by the ever changing epidemiology of the viruses that cause [respiratory tract infections]," they caution. And how exactly zinc might exert its therapeutic effects on respiratory infections, including COVID-19, warrants further research, they conclude.     Drinking alcohol to stay healthy? That might not work, says new study Ulrich John of University Medicine (Germany), November 2, 2021 Increased mortality risk among current alcohol abstainers might largely be explained by other factors, including previous alcohol or drug problems, daily smoking, and overall poor health, according to a new study publishing November 2nd in PLOS Medicine by Ulrich John of University Medicine Greifswald, Germany, and colleagues. Previous studies have suggested that people who abstain from alcohol have a higher mortality rate than those who drink low to moderate amounts of alcohol. In the new study, researchers used data on a random sample of 4,028 German adults who had participated in a standardized interview conducted between 1996 and 1997, when participants were 18 to 64 years old. Baseline data were available on alcohol drinking in the 12 months prior to the interview, as well as other information on health, alcohol and drug use. Mortality data were available from follow-up 20 years later. Among the study participants, 447 (11.10%) had not drunk any alcohol in the 12 months prior to the baseline interview. Of these abstainers, 405 (90.60%) were former alcohol consumers and 322 (72.04%) had one or more other risk factor for higher mortality rates, including a former alcohol-use disorder or risky alcohol consumption (35.40%), daily smoking (50.00%), or fair to poor self-rated health (10.51%). The 125 alcohol abstinent persons without these risk factors did not show a statistically significantly difference in total, cardiovascular or cancer mortality compared to low to moderate alcohol consumers, and those who had stayed alcohol abstinent throughout their life had a hazard ratio of 1.64 (95% CI 0.72-3.77) compared to low to moderate alcohol consumers after adjustment for age, sex and tobacco smoking. "The results support the view that people in the general population who currently are abstinent from alcohol do not necessarily have a shorter survival time than the population with low to moderate alcohol consumption," the authors say. "The findings speak against recommendations to drink alcohol for health reasons." John adds, "It has long been assumed that low to moderate alcohol consumption might have positive effects on health based on the finding that alcohol abstainers seemed to die earlier than low to moderate drinkers. We found that the majority of the abstainers had alcohol or drug problems, risky alcohol consumption, daily tobacco smoking or fair to poor health in their history, i.e., factors that predict early death."   Quercetin helps to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer Univ. of Hawaii and Univ. of Southern California, November 1, 2021 Quercetin, which is found naturally in apples and onions, has been identified as one of the most beneficial flavonols in preventing and reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer. Although the overall risk was reduced among the study participants, smokers who consumed foods rich in flavonols had a significantly greater risk reduction. This study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, is the first of its kind to evaluate the effect of flavonols – compounds found specifically in plants – on developing pancreatic cancer. According to the research paper, “only a few prospective studies have investigated flavonols as risk factors for cancer, none of which has included pancreatic cancer. “ Researchers from Germany, the Univ. of Hawaii and Univ. of Southern California tracked food intake and health outcomes of 183,518 participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study for eight years. The study evaluated the participants' food consumption and calculated the intake of the three flavonols quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin. The analyses determined that flavonol intake does have an impact on the risk for developing pancreatic cancer. The most significant finding was among smokers. Smokers with the lowest intake of flavonols presented with the most pancreatic cancer. Smoking is an established risk factor for the often fatal pancreatic cancer, notes the research. Among the other findings were that women had the highest intake of total flavonols and seventy percent of the flavonol intake came from quercetin, linked to apple and onion consumption. It is believed that these compounds may have anticancer effects due to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and alter other cellular functions related to cancer development. “Unlike many of the dietary components, flavonols are concentrated in specific foods rather than in broader food groups, for example, in apples rather than in all fruit,” notes the research study. Previously, the most consistent inverse association was found between flavonols, especially quercetin in apples and lung cancer, as pointed out in this study. No other epidemiological flavonol studies have included evaluation of pancreatic cancer. While found in many plants, flavonols are found in high concentrations in apples, onions, tea, berries, kale, and broccoli. Quercetin is most plentiful in apples and onions.   Researcher explains the psychology of successful aging University of California at Los Angeles, November 2, 2021 Successful aging can be the norm, says UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel in his new book, "Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging" (Oxford University Press). Castel sees many inspiring role models of aging. French Impressionist Claude Monet, he notes, began his beloved water lily paintings at age 73. Castel cites hundreds of research studies, including his own, combined with personal accounts from older Americans, including Maya Angelou, Warren Buffett, John Wooden, Bob Newhart, Frank Gehry, David Letterman, Jack LaLanne, Jared Diamond, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, John Glenn and Vin Scully. Castel notes that architect Gehry designed conventional buildings and shopping malls early in his career, and decades later designed the creative buildings he would only dream about when he was younger. Others who did much of their best work when they were older include Mark Twain, Paul Cezanne, Frank Lloyd Wright, Robert Frost and Virginia Woolf, he writes. "There are a lot of myths about aging, and people often have negative stereotypes of what it means to get old," Castel said. "I have studied aging for two decades, and have seen many impressive role models of aging, as well as people who struggle in older age. This book provides both science behind what we can to do age well and role models of successful aging. While some books focus on how to try to prevent or delay aging, 'Better with Age' shows how we can age successfully and enjoy the benefits of old age. I have combined the lessons the psychology of aging teaches us with insights from some of the people who have succeeded in aging well." Castel cites a 1979 study by Harvard University social psychologist Ellen Langer in which men in their 70s and 80s went to a week-long retreat at a motel that was re-designed to reflect the décor and music from 1959. The men, who were all dependent on family members for their care, were more independent by the end of the week, and had significant improvements in their hearing, memory, strength and scores on intelligence tests. Some played catch with a football. One group of the men, who were told to behave like they were 20 years younger, showed greater flexibility, and even looked younger, according to observers who saw photos of them at the start and end of the week. In another study, researchers analyzed Catholic nuns' diary entries made in the 1930s and 1940s, when the nuns were in their 20s, and determined their level of happiness from these diaries. More than 50 years later, 75 percent of the most cheerful nuns survived to age 80, while only 40 percent of the least happy nuns survived to 80. The happiest nuns lived 10 years longer than the least happy nuns. Happiness increases our lives by four to 10 years, a recent research review suggested. "As an added bonus," Castel writes, "those additional years are likely to be happy ones." Successful aging involves being productive, mentally fit, and, most importantly, leading a meaningful life, Castel writes. What are the ingredients of staying sharp and aging successfully, a process which Castel says can start at any age? He has several recommendations. Tips for longevity Walking or other physical exercise is likely the best method to ensure brain and body health, Castel writes. In a large 2011 study, older adults were randomly assigned to a group that walked for 40 minutes three times a week or a stretching group for the same amount of time. After six months and again after one year, the walking group outperformed the stretching group on memory and cognitive functioning tests. Too much running, on the other hand, can lead to joint pain and injuries. In addition, after one year, those who walked 40 minutes a day three times a week showed a 2 percent increase in the volume of the hippocampus—an important brain region involved in memory. Typically, Castel notes, the hippocampus declines about 1 percent a year after age 50. "Walking actually appears to reverse the effects of aging," Castel says in the book. Balance exercises are proven to prevent falls, can keep us walking and may be the most essential training activity for older adults, Castel writes. Each year, more than two million older Americans go to the emergency room because of fall-related injuries. A 2014 British study found that people who could get up from a chair and sit back down more than 30 times in a minute were less likely to develop dementia and more likely to live longer than those who could not. A good balance exercise is standing on one leg with your eyes open for 60 seconds or more, and then on the other leg. Those who did poorly on this were found in a study to be at greater risk for stroke and dementia. Like walking, sleep is valuable free medicine. Studies have shown a connection between insomnia and the onset of dementia. People who speak more than one language are at reduced risk for developing dementia, research has shown; there is some evidence being bilingual or multilingual can offset dementia by five years, Castel writes. One study found that among people between 75 and 85, those who engaged in reading, playing board games, playing musical instruments and dancing had less dementia than those who did none of those activities. "Lifelong reading, especially in older age, may be one of the secrets to preserving mental ability," Castel writes. Set specific goals. Telling yourself to "eat healthy" is not very likely to cause a change; setting a goal of "eating fewer cookies after 7 p.m." is better. Similarly, "walk four days a week with a friend" is a more useful goal than "get more exercise" and "call a friend or family member every Friday morning" is better than "maintain friendships." How can we improve our memory? When Douglas Hegdahl was a 20-year-old prisoner of war in North Vietnam, he wanted to learn the names of other American prisoners. He memorized their names, capture dates, methods of capture and personal information of more than 250 prisoners to the tune of the nursey rhyme, "Old MacDonald Had a Farm." Today, more than four decades later, he can still recall all of their names, Castel writes. Social connections are also important. Rates of loneliness among older adults are increasing and chronic loneliness "poses as large a risk to long-term health and longevity as smoking cigarettes and may be twice as harmful for retirees as obesity," Castel writes. The number of Americans who say they have no close friends has roughly tripled in the last few decades. There is evidence that people with more social support tend to live longer than those who are more isolated, and that older adults who lead active social lives with others are less likely to develop dementia and have stronger immune systems to fight off diseases. "Staying sharp," Castel writes, "involves staying connected—and not to the Internet." A 2016 study focused on "super-agers"—people in their 70s whose memories are like those of people 40 years younger. Many of them said they worked hard at their jobs and their hobbies. The hard work was challenging, and not always pleasurable, leaving people sometimes feeling tired and frustrated. Some researchers believe this discomfort and frustration means you are challenging yourself in ways that will pay off in future brain and other health benefits. Research has shown that simply telling older adults they are taking a "wisdom test" rather than a "memory test" or "dementia screening" actually leads to better results on the identical memory test, Castel writes. If you are concerned about your memory, or that of a loved one, it may be wise to see a neurologist, Castel advises. Castel, 42, said he is struck by how many older adults vividly recall what is most important to them. As Castel quotes the Roman philosopher and statesman Cicero: "No old man forgets where he has hidden his treasure."     Researchers find phthalates in wide variety of fast foods George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, October 29, 2021 A team of researchers from The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, the Southwest Research Institute and the Chan School of Public Health, has found phthalates in a wide variety of fast foods. In their paper published in Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, the group describes how they collected samples of fast food from several restaurants and tested them for phthalates and other chemicals meant to replace them—and what they found. Phthalates are esters of phthalic acid and are commonly used to make plastic substances more flexible. Prior research has shown that they can also increase durability and longevity making them popular for plastics makers. Researchers have found that consumption of phthalates can disrupt the endocrine system and by extension levels of hormones in the body. Research has also shown that they can lead to asthma in children and increased obesity.  In this new effort, the researchers built on prior work they conducted looking at urine samples of volunteers where they found that those who ate more fast food, tended to have more phthalates in their system. To learn more about the link between fast food and phthalate levels, the researchers visited six fast food restaurants in and around San Antonio, Texas, and collected 64 food items to be used as test samples. They also asked for a pair of the plastic gloves that were used by food preparers at the same establishments and obtained three of them. In studying the food samples, the researchers found DnBP in 81% of the samples and DEHP in 70% of them. They also noted that the foods with the highest concentrations of phthalates were meat-based, such as cheeseburgers or burritos. The team also found DINCH, DEHT and DEHA, chemicals that have begun replacing phthalates in many of the samples they collected. They note that it is not known if such replacements are harmful to humans if ingested. The researchers did not attempt to find out how the phthalates were making their way into the fast foods but suspect it is likely from residue on rubber gloves used by cooks who prepare them. It is also possible, they note, that they are coming from plastic packaging.   Removing digital devices from the bedroom can improve sleep for children, teens Penn State University, November 2, 2021 Removing electronic media from the bedroom and encouraging a calming bedtime routine are among recommendations Penn State researchers outline in a recent manuscript on digital media and sleep in childhood and adolescence. The manuscript appears in the first-ever special supplement on this topic in Pediatricsa nd is based on previous studies that suggest the use of digital devices before bedtime leads to insufficient sleep. The recommendations, for clinicians and parents, are:   1. Make sleep a priority by talking with family members about the importance of sleep and healthy sleep expectations; 2. Encourage a bedtime routine that includes calming activities and avoids electronic media use; 3. Encourage families to remove all electronic devices from their child or teen's bedroom, including TVs, video games, computers, tablets and cell phones; 4. Talk with family members about the negative consequences of bright light in the evening on sleep; and 5. If a child or adolescent is exhibiting mood or behavioral problems, consider insufficient sleep as a contributing factor. "Recent reviews of scientific literature reveal that the vast majority of studies find evidence for an adverse association between screen-based media consumption and sleep health, primarily delayed bedtimes and reduced total sleep duration," said Orfeu Buxton, associate professor of biobehavioral health at Penn State and an author on the manuscript. The reasons behind this adverse association likely include time spent on screens replacing time spent sleeping; mental stimulation from media content; and the effects of light interrupting sleep cycles, according to the researchers. Buxton and other researchers are further exploring this topic. They are working to understand if media use affects the timing and duration of sleep among children and adolescents; the role of parenting and family practices; the links between screen time and sleep quality and tiredness; and the influence of light on circadian physiology and sleep health among children and adolescents.

Curiosity Daily
Jungles' Impact on Climate Change and a Music-Epidemic Link

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 14:47


Learn about the link between music download trends and epidemics; and how losing jungles contributes to climate change.  Music download patterns found to resemble infectious disease epidemic curves by Cameron Duke Rosati, D., Woolhouse, M., Bolker, B., & Earn, D. (2021). Modelling song popularity as a contagious process | Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. Proceedings of the Royal Society A. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspa.2021.0457 Smith, D., & Moore, L. (2020). The SIR Model for Spread of Disease - The Differential Equation Model | Mathematical Association of America. Maa.org. https://www.maa.org/press/periodicals/loci/joma/the-sir-model-for-spread-of-disease-the-differential-equation-model Yirka, B. (2021, September 22). Music download patterns found to resemble infectious disease epidemic curves. Phys.org; Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-09-music-download-patterns-resemble-infectious.html More from archaeologist Patrick Roberts: Pick up "Jungle: How Tropical Forests Shaped the World — and Us": https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/patrick-roberts/jungle/9781541600096/  Website: https://www.patrickjroberts.com/   Follow @palaeotropics on Twitter: https://twitter.com/palaeotropics  Cheyenne Mountain Zoo Sustainable Palm Oil Shopping Guide app: https://www.cmzoo.org/conservation/orangutans-palm-oil/sustainable-palm-oil-shopping-app/  WWF Palm Oil Buyers Scorecard: http://palmoilscorecard.panda.org/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast
Entrapment, Epidemiology, Election Day

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:04


Today, Rich reacts to a middle school trip to a risque bar that some speculate was a setup to potentially entrap parents who challenged it. Then, some trivia on America's so-called top epidemiologist, and an update on how mandates are affecting first responders. Plus, some musings on Election Day.Comment and follow on Facebook, Twitter, and Parler or visit us at RichValdes.com.Portions of today's program are brought to you by Noom.com/ThisIsAmerica and JustFacts.com/Rich.

Greendale Human Podcasters
Epidemiology

Greendale Human Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 109:24


The boys are joined by Stephen Walker of The Guys Review podcast! Our Pod Lord is without Power at home and has scrambled to make this week's episode come out on the spookiest of days and as usual, our Halloween episode is hosted by the cuddly Suga Bear!Greendale is forced to fend for themselves when the Dean cheaps out on the party snacks and causes a small zombie apocalypse and the Greendale 7 are forced to try and save the school and the planet.....This episode is brought to you by our sponsor DG Pop Customs!Simply search “DG Pop Customs” on your favorite social media platform, to explore the hundreds of figures Dennis has made, or find inspiration for your own. He may be stateside, but he's always on YOUR side when it comes to making your Pop! dreams come true.And be sure to mention GHP, so he knows who sent ya!

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
All Eyes on Virginia as Biden Agenda Weighs on Governor's Race

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 41:50


Townhall Review - October 30, 2021 Hugh Hewitt talks with Virginia gubernatorial hopeful Glenn Youngkin about his campaign against former Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe. Dennis Prager and Dr. Harvey Risch, Yale professor of epidemiology, talk about the efficacy of mask mandates, especially among children. Hugh Hewitt talks with Iowa Senator Joni Ernst about the Democrats preparing legislation in the dead of night keeping the Republicans and the American people in the dark and Dennis Prager and economist Stephen Moore talk about the Democrat's attempts at Marxist redistribution in the U.S. that is going to make everyone poor. Mike Gallagher examines the Vanity Fair article in which the National Institutes of Health now admits funding gain-of-function research in Wuhan, China, and providing a grant to a lab in Tunisia where beagle puppies are tortured and killed in the name of scientific research. Dennis Prager talks with Mollie Hemingway about her book, “Rigged: How the Media, Big Tech, and the Democrats Seized Our Elections.” Mike Gallagher talks about the irony of the World Series between the Atlanta Braves and the Houston Astros being played in Atlanta and Houston after Major League Baseball earlier stripped Atlanta of the All-Star game because of Georgia's voter integrity law. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kidney360
Article Summary by Gillian Divard and Valentin Goutaudier

Kidney360

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 5:23


This podcast is a summary of article "Global Perspective on Kidney Transplantation: France" by Gillian Divard and Valentin Goutaudier.

The Greenlight Bookstore Podcast
Episode QS71: Geoff Manaugh + Nicola Twilley + Mary Roach (October 28, 2021)

The Greenlight Bookstore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 60:57


On the heels of an unprecedented, unforgettable year of quarantine, Geoff Manaugh (A Burglar's Guide to the City) and science journalist Nicola Twilley launched their new book, Until Proven Safe. Tracing the history and future of quarantine  around the globe, Manaugh and Twilley unfold the connections between emergency isolation and freedom, governance, and mutual responsibility. Mary Roach (Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law) joined for a conversation that roamed through space pathogens, the problem of nuclear waste, and the difference between isolation and quarantine. (Recorded July 20, 2021)

Nuance of Impact
S2. Ep6 | The Stories that Live Behind Data | Rachael Weiss Riley | Director, Two Sigma Data Clinic

Nuance of Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:14


This episode is for you if you're someone who believes in the impact of the stories that live behind statistics and data. Rachael Weiss Riley is the Director of Data Clinic, the data, and tech for good initiative of New York City-based hedge fund, Two Sigma. Rachael oversees the translation of data science and technology to support the scaling and growth of impact-driven organizations. Rachael holds a DrPH in Epidemiology from the CUNY School of Public Health, an MPH from Hunter College, a BS from Brown University and serves on the inaugural NYC Open Data Advisory Council. Learn about Two Sigma here. Follow Rachael Weiss Riley on LinkedIn. Season 2 is proudly supported by the Social Innovation Summit -- The Social Innovation Summit is an annual event that represents a global convening of black swans and wayward thinkers. Where most bring together luminaries to explore the next big idea, we bring together those hungry not just to talk about the next big thing, but to build it.

The West Live Podcast
We must change the conversation around COVID deaths. Here's how

The West Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 12:06


Professor Catherine Bennett, Chair in Epidemiology at Deakin University on the psychology behind hearing deaths in the news everyday following Victoria's 25 deaths today. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Time to change the Covid conversation

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 21:58


All over the world COVID has created an epidemic of tribalism and virtue signaling says Dr Vinay Prasad, an Associate Professor in the Epidemiology department at the University of California in San Francisco. 

Dennis Prager podcasts
The Dennis Prager Show 20211026 – 1 Spooky

Dennis Prager podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 35:42


Can't use the word “spooky” in Scotland's theatres anymore. It could be a racial slur. Is there a word one can't attach a racist link to?... There is so little racism, the Left has to make it up. That's what this destructive nonsense is all about… Dennis talks Dr. Harvey Risch, professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale School of Public Health. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research
Epidemiology Counts – Episode 30 – The Built Environment: walking and biking

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:23


Our health is very much shaped by the structure of the spaces around us, what we often refer to as our built environment. The concept of the built environment was developed for fields of urban planning and architecture, and includes any aspects of our spaces that influence human activity, from density of homes and buildings, access to transportation options and community spaces, and the streets and sidewalks, or the lack thereof. The built environment is also highly relevant to public health. The structure of spaces around us will impact whether or not we elect to commute by automobile, public transit, or walking or riding a bicycle; it can impact selection of the foods we eat, proximity to health services, and, thereby, has greater impacts on equity, by driving housing prices and access to resources. Hosts Bryan James and Ghassan Hamra chat with Steve Mooney, assistant professor at University of Washington – Seattle about how our built environment shapes our transportation and pedestrian decisions.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 600 (10-25-21): The Wide Reach of Viruses, Including Through Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology.  We start this week with three mystery sounds, all related to a very numerous group of disease-causing, or pathogenic, microbes that have enormous impacts on human health.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if know this microbial group.  And here's a hint: big hits on social media are said to spread like this group. SOUNDS – ~19 sec If you guessed viruses, you're right!  You heard a person coughing due to a viral disease; handwashing, an important method of reducing viral transmission; and a spray bottle of isopropyl alcohol, an effective disinfectant against many kinds of viruses.  With attention focused this fall both on the COVID-19 coronavirus and the annual influenza virus season, we explore in this episode some basic information about viruses and some viral connections to water.  Here are 10 key points about viruses. 1.  Viruses are one of four groups of microbes responsible for human disease, along with bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, which are single-celled animals.  As a group, viruses are the smallest of these microbes, although some are larger than some bacteria. 2.  Viruses aren't made up of cells, but instead exist as particles composed primarily of molecules of protein and nucleic acids, that is, DNA or RNA.  They require a cellular host for reproduction, called replication. 3.  Viruses are more abundant than all of the cellular-based living things on earth. 4.  All living things are infected by viruses. 5.  Viruses don't always cause disease in infected hosts, but many kinds do cause significant diseases in humans, other animals, and plants. 6.  Viral disease can result from viruses taking over or inhibiting their host's cellular biochemical processes, or by cell destruction as new virus particles exit cells after replication. 7.  Depending on their type, viruses can be spread through air, in water, from surfaces, by animal vectors, or through exchange of blood or other body substances. 8.  Water-related spread of viruses can occur through water contaminated with human waste, and through animal vectors connected to water, particularly mosquitoes. 9.  Significant human diseases from water-borne viruses include intestinal disease, particularly diarrhea; hepatitis, or liver inflammation; inflammations of the brain, spinal cord, or heart; and possibly cancer.  Viral diseases spread by mosquitoes include Yellow Fever, Dengue, West Nile, and others. And last, but not least, handwashing with clean water and soap is important for reducing the spread of viruses through objects and surfaces—collectively called fomites—with which humans come into contact. Thanks to Freesound.org user n__audioman for making the coughing sound available for public use.  Here's hoping we all hear less of that sound and more of the handwashing and other preventative measures that keep viruses—water-borne and otherwise—somewhat at bay. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thanks to Dr. Sally Paulson, Virginia Tech Department of Entomology, for her help with this article. The coughing sound was recorded by user n__audioman (dated December 14, 2015), and made available for public use by Freesound.org, online at https://freesound.org/people/n_audioman/sounds/331068/, under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0  For more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. The handwashing and alcohol spraying sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio on October 21, 2021. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Female Aedes japonicus mosquito (also known as Ochlerotatus japonicas), photographed from a colony at Notre Dame University.  Photo by Frank Collins, accessed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Public Health Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/default.aspx; specific URL for this photo was https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=7886, as of 10-25-21.  According to CDC caption for this photo, this Asian mosquito, first collected in the United States in New York and New Jersey in 1998, is a suspected transmitter for West Nile virus. “Wash Your Hands in 24 Languages” poster from the Minnesota Department of Health, online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/people/handhygiene/wash/washyourhands.html. SOURCES Used for Audio John B. Carter and Venetia A. Saunders, Virology: Principles and Applications, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, United Kingdom, 2013. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Tracking the COVID-19 Economy's Effects on Food, Housing, and Employment Hardships,” updated October 13, 2021, online at https://www.cbpp.org/research/poverty-and-inequality/tracking-the-covid-19-economys-effects-on-food-housing-and. Dorothy H. Crawford, Viruses: A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2018. Aimee M. Gall et al., “Waterborne Viruses: A Barrier to Safe Drinking Water,” PLOS Pathogens Vol. 11, No. 6 (June 25, 2015), online at https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article/authors?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1004867. Johns Hopkins University & Medicine/Coronavirus Resource Center, “Global Map,” online at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html. Microbiology Society, “Microbes and Disease,” online at https://microbiologysociety.org/why-microbiology-matters/what-is-microbiology/microbes-and-the-human-body/microbes-and-disease.html. Minnesota Department of Health, “Waterborne Illness,” online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/waterborne/index.html. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), “Global economic recovery continues but remains uneven, says OECD,” News Release, September 21, 2021. University of New Hampshire/Casey School of Public Policy, “COVID-19 Economic Crisis: By State,” by Michael Ettlinger and Jordan Hensley, October 1, 2021, online at https://carsey.unh.edu/publication/COVID-19-Economic-Impact-By-State. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html. U.S. CDC, “Mosquito-Borne Diseases,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/outdoor/mosquito-borne/default.html.  U.S. CDC, Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice, Third Edition: An Introduction to Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics, November 2011, “Glossary,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/glossary.html. U.S. CDC, “Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Public Water Systems,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Waterborne Hazards Control Programs,” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/waterborne-hazards-control/. Water Quality Association, “Bacteria and Virus Issues,” online at https://www.wqa.org/learn-about-water/common-contaminants/bacteria-viruses. World Health Organization (WHO), “Waterborne Pathogens and Their Significance in Water Supplies” (table), online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/gdwqrevision/watpathogens.pdf. WHO, “Emerging Issues in Water and Infectious Disease,” 2003, online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/emerging/emerging.pdf. WHO, “Microbial Fact Sheets,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/GDW11rev1and2.pdf. For More Information about Water and the Human Body Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 598, 10-11-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21,Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment, including that water is important for agriculture, power generation, and public health.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment, including that major health and safety issues are associated with air and water quality, Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory, including that cell structure and organelles support life processes.LS.3     – There are levels of structural organization in living things, including that similar characteristics determine the classification of organisms.LS.10 – Organisms reproduce and transmit genetic information to new generations. BiologyBIO.4 – Bacteria and viruses have an effect on living systems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government CourseGOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th gradeEpisode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).

new york food health science bay housing humans university agency asian female photo principles natural earth political state saunders audio college accent dark tech water web index organisation rain united states pond research global ocean government education economy budget public vol new jersey chesapeake snow reach environment dna viral organisms images skeleton johns hopkins university disease public policy crawford domestic depending languages freesound effects viruses msonormal stream oxford normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens bacteria arial united kingdom environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology cdc entomology wide civics gall grade nutrients colorful tracking microbes chichester signature bio rna scales govt human body watershed transcript wg centers disease control significant virginia tech epidemiology neurological ls atlantic ocean glossary natural resources grades k oxford university press name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes applications water supplies wash your hands prevention cdc biostatistics msohyperlink dengue world health organization who oecd sections life sciences john wiley second edition public health practice stormwater infectious diseases yellow fever policymakers bmp john b emerging issues new standard acknowledgment minnesota department west nile policy priorities muscular microbiology society virginia department economic co notre dame university cripple creek cumberland gap news release sols aedes tmdl development oecd geological survey mayo clinic health system united states history vus circulatory living systems virginia standards water center contaminants audio notes covid-19
The Signal
Is the worst of COVID behind us?

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 19:42


Australia is clipping through its COVID vaccination milestones at breakneck speed. In Melbourne, Canberra and Sydney, lockdowns are over and restrictions are easing. Meanwhile, from Tasmania to Queensland, governments are finalising reopening plans, with a vision of a "normal" summer with interstate visitors coming into view. So are we through the worst of the pandemic? Today on The Signal, we're taking stock of Australia's progress on the path back to normality. Are there risks ahead? And if there are, then what's our plan? Featured: Professor Catherine Bennett, Chair in Epidemiology, Deakin University, Melbourne

Casual Inference
Metascience with Noah Haber | Season 3 Episode 4

Casual Inference

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 68:13


In this episode Lucy D'Agostino McGowan and Ellie Murray chat with Noah Haber about metascience, causal language in the literature, and more!

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:44


Make yourself comfortable, because we cover a lot of ground in today's episode. Naila will guide you through 24 papers from August 2021, all pertaining to epidemiological studies on the risk and protective factors related to AD. You'll hear about some basic epidemiology, environmental and socioeconomic risk factors, lifestyle factors, and health conditions related to AD. Sections in this episode: Epidemiology & Social Factors (1.52) Diet (16.53) Sleep (24.19) Comorbidities (28.00) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1VofighHxFUKtBBcd0w0AHLZmEV9DM-_L/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Naila Kuhlmann, edited by Anusha Kamesh, and reviewed by Elyn Rowe and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, Dana Clausen and Elyn Rowe. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Israel News Talk Radio
What You Are NOT Being Told About Big Pharma & the Medical Establishment - The Tamar Yonah Show

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 43:04


How free are doctors in prescribing drugs and advising patients regarding vaccines? Does Big Pharma give MDs 'incentives' to push their drugs and/or vaccines? Are doctors afraid to go against the status quo of the medical establishment? If so, why? What is vaccine 'shedding'? How dangerous is it? Can you believe what you read in medical journals? Tamar speaks with Dr. Harvey Risch, Professor of Epidemiology at Yale School of Public Health, on what happens behind the scenes in many cases, in the pharmaceutical & medical establishment. An eye-opening show! Visit his website at: www.EarlyCovidCare.org The Tamar Yonah Show 18OCT2021 - PODCAST

The Pat Oney Show
Will The Real Evan McMullin Please Stand Up?

The Pat Oney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:59


Pat extends an open invitation to Former 2016 Presidential Candidate Evan McMullin. McMullin is running against Senator Mike Lee in the state of Utah for his Senate seat in 2022. And Pat has some questions for Evan about his very questionable record.Also, Pat talks about a study from the European Journal of Epidemiology that says there is no link between vaccination rates and lower Covid-19 rates.

The Fire Escape
Help Wanted

The Fire Escape

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 45:04


The U.K.'s Delta Surge is Collapsing. Will Ours? - Intelligencer

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
The dangers of COVID on pregnancy and the impact of vaccination.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:51


Guest: Dr Dvora Joseph Davey John is joined by Dr. Dvora Joseph Davey to discuss recent progress in the study of the COVID virus in relation to the effects that it may have on a pregnant woman and her unborn child. She will also address the vaccination concerns that are often expressed by parents-to-be in their decision whether to be vaccinated or not vaccinated.  Callers often phone in with concern as to whether vaccination is a wise choice for a pregnant mother. Western Cape medicine continues to study and compare and Dr. Dvora Joseph Davey will express an important understanding that should motivate decision.     Dr. Dvora Joseph Davey is an Honorary Senior Lecturer in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Cape Town. Dr. Davey received her Master's Degree in Public Health from Columbia University and her PhD in Epidemiology from the University of California, Los Angeles.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I AM GPH
EP101 Heart Health and Ultra-processed foods with Dr. Niyati Parekh and Dr. Filippa Juul

I AM GPH

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:06


In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Niyati Parekh, an Associate Professor of Public Health Nutrition here at NYU GPH and the Executive Director of Doctoral Studies, along with Dr. Filippa Juul a current Assistant Professor Faculty/Fellow who obtained her Ph.D. in Public Health from GPH with a concentration in Epidemiology in 2020.  Both Niyati and Filippa worked on a widely-circulated study on the harmful effects of Ultra-Processed Foods and their association with health risks, especially cardiovascular disease. The study, which had media coverage across several media outlets and was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, identifies as a modifiable risk factor in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and found that higher consumption of ultra-processed foods is associated with an increased risk of CVD incidence and mortality. Dr. Parekh and Dr. Juul also provide insight into the global perspective of this issue and what other countries are doing to address concerns of health and nutrition, along with what types of foods are considered “ultra-processed”  and what ways we can best preserve our health. To learn more about the NYU School of Global Public Health, and how our innovative programs are training the next generation of public health leaders, visit publichealth.nyu.edu.

The European Heart Journal Podcast
Volume 42, Issue 40

The European Heart Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:42


Focus Issue on Epidemiology and Prevention

Sigma Nutrition Radio
#408: Mario Kratz, PhD – Is Eating Full-fat Dairy, Low-fat Dairy, or No Dairy Better for Cardiometabolic Health?

Sigma Nutrition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 71:39


Dr. Mario Kratz is a clinical researcher in the areas of nutrition, obesity, and cardiometabolic disease, with more than 20 years of experience running clinical studies in a variety of populations. He is a former research associate professor at the University of Washington in the departments of Medicine and Epidemiology. And is also formerly an Associate Professor at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Washington state. You can find the show notes at sigmanutrition.com/episode408/ or you can support the show on patreon.com/sigmanutrition/

MedConversations
Depression overview – definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology

MedConversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:37


This episode is a bit of new thing we're trying – interviews with our friends! As we've progressed in our careers, we've all started specializing and become increasingly unqualified to talk about large swathes of medicine. On the flipside, our … Continue reading →

Post Show Recaps: LIVE TV & Movie Podcasts with Rob Cesternino
Community Building | Season 2 Episode 6: ‘Epidemiology'

Post Show Recaps: LIVE TV & Movie Podcasts with Rob Cesternino

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 70:15


This week on community Building, Josh and Jess take on Season 2 Episode 6, "Epidemiology" with Cameron Liner. The post Community Building | Season 2 Episode 6: ‘Epidemiology' appeared first on PostShowRecaps.com.

Community Building
Community Building | Season 2 Episode 6: ‘Epidemiology’

Community Building

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 70:15


This week on community Building, Josh and Jess take on Season 2 Episode 6, "Epidemiology" with Cameron Liner. The post Community Building | Season 2 Episode 6: ‘Epidemiology' appeared first on PostShowRecaps.com.

Arts & Ideas
Green Thinking: Health

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:16


Climate change presents new challenges to human health. As temperatures rise, tropical and sub-tropical diseases are already becoming more widespread. While climate change has consequences on human health, engaging with the natural world can also have benefits for physical and mental health. But, how do we best communicate and explain these issues and the choices we face. Des Fitzgerald talks to Samantha Walton and Christopher Sanders about their research and discuss the challenges the climate and nature emergency presents to human health, and how we might respond. Dr Christopher Sanders is a Fellow in Entomology, Epidemiology and Virology at the Pirbright Institute funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), which is part of UK Research and Innovation. His research focuses on the physiological and behavioural attributes that enable an insect species to transmit a pathogen. Since 2006, his work has explored the behaviour of Culicoides biting midges, a type of small insect which has the potential to be transported over long distances on prevailing winds, carrying viruses with it. https://www.pirbright.ac.uk/users/dr-christopher-sanders Dr Samantha Walton is a poet and Reader in Modern Literature at Bath Spa University. Her research explores psychology and environmentalism; experimental poetics, fiction of the 1920s-30s; and the Scottish novelist and nature writer, Nan Shepherd. Walton is the author of The Living World: Nan Shepherd and Environmental Thought, and the forthcoming Everybody Needs Beauty: In Search of the Nature Cure. Between 2016-2018, Walton was an Early Career Leadership Fellow working on the AHRC-funded project, Cultures of Nature and Wellbeing: Connecting Health and the Environment through Literature. This project involved working with environment and health policymakers and wellbeing practitioners, and original research into what literature tells us about our emotional and ethical entanglements with the living world. You can read more about the project here: https://culturenaturewellbeing.wordpress.com Professor Des Fitzgerald is a New Generation Thinker based at the University of Exeter. You can find a new podcast series Green Thinking: 26 episodes 26 minutes long in the run up to COP26 made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI, exploring the latest research and ideas around understanding and tackling the climate and nature emergency. New Generation Thinkers Des Fitzgerald and Eleanor Barraclough will be in conversation with researchers on a wide-range of subjects from cryptocurrencies and finance to soil and sustainable transport. The podcasts are all available from the Arts & Ideas podcast feed - and collected on the Free Thinking website under Green Thinking where you can also find programmes on festivals, rivers, eco-criticism and the weather. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 For more information about the research the AHRC's supports around climate change and the natural world you can visit: https://www.ukri.org/our-work/responding-to-climate-change/ or follow @ahrcpress on twitter. To join the discussion about the research covered in this podcast and the series please use the hashtag #GreenThinkingPodcast. Producer: Ruth Watts

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health
October 6, Coronavirus (COVID-19) Press Conference with Michael Mina

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:40


Press conference from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with Michael Mina, assistant professor of epidemiology and a faculty member in the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics. This call was recorded at 4 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, October 6th.

Peak Human - Unbiased Nutrition Info for Optimum Health, Fitness & Living
Part 139 - Chris Irvin & Brian Sanders on Making Sense of Calories, Hunger, Diets, Bad Epidemiology, Vegan Propaganda, and True Human Health

Peak Human - Unbiased Nutrition Info for Optimum Health, Fitness & Living

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 90:25


This is an interesting episode that features Chris Irvin, M.S. who actually interviewed me on his podcast: Keto Answers. Chris is a health researcher, writer, and educator focusing on the impact of low carb and keto diets on health and human performance. Chris has a master's degree in exercise and nutrition science and spent his time in graduate school studying and conducting ketogenic research. Chris is the creator of the brand The Ketologist, which is known for producing social media infographics and educational health content. He is the author of Keto Answers, Mommy Do I Have to Eat This?, and is the education manager at Perfect Keto. Check out his website: https://www.theketologist.com/  In the episode, we discuss what happened over a 40-year period that changed our food industry to this day, the problem with nutrition epidemiological studies, why a plant-based diet bias exists and how that's negatively affecting us, why counting calories is ineffective and what to focus on instead, satiety signals, and so much more. You'll also hear more about my story, Food Lies and how this differs from other nutritional documentaries out there. SHOW NOTES (4:40) Brian's background (7:35) Where Brian likes to eat in Austin, TX (9:04) How Brian came up with his tagline for Food Lies (10:04) Brian's approach in Food Lies (10:52) The science on ancestral nutrition principles and how it applies today (12:51) What happened during a 40-year period in our history that's still impacting us today (14:40) Gary Taubes' thoughts on what went wrong (17:48) Vitamin K activating vitamin D (18:15) The inherent problems with epidemiological studies (19:53) An interesting nutrition study on kids and obesity rates (21:20) The plant-based diet bias and why this exists and how it's still being perpetuated today (24:17) Why are people continuing to use epidemiological studies if they have problems? (24:55) The impact of Big Food getting involved in our food system (27:35) How bad hospital food is nutritionally and why it's like this (30:33) Why we're in this mess (32:29) What can we do to fix this problem? (40:22) What's the story with calories? (44:42) The satiety levels in food and why this should be more of a focus (49:59) Is it true that obese people have poor appetite signaling hormones? (53:21) The problem with counting calories (54:38) Protein satiety signaling (56:58) The difference between carbs and fats for satiety (59:31) Does the glycemic response and blood sugar play a role in satiety? (1:06:07) Why high omega-6 and seed oil consumption are the biggest problem (1:11:30) The problems with seed oils (1:12:20) Metabolic status and taking daily habits into consideration (1:16:59) More about Brian's documentary Food Lies, including why he started this project, what he hopes to achieve with it, and more (1:19:25) What would success look like for his documentary? (1:24:46) Brian also shares whether he's been censored on social media for his work on his documentary (1:29:32) How you can support Brian's work and his documentary Food Lies   GET THE MEAT! http://NosetoTail.org  GET THE FREE SAPIEN FOOD GUIDE! http://Sapien.org    Follow along: http://twitter.com/FoodLiesOrg  http://instagram.com/food.lies  http://facebook.com/FoodLiesOrg 

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research
Epidemiology Counts – Episode 29 – Residential Segregation & Redlining

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 62:48


Health in America is closely tied to where we live. Higher rates of preventable health conditions are concentrated in high-poverty neighborhoods that are more likely to be home to a higher proportion of Americans of color. Despite modern anti-discrimination laws that make people legally free to move wherever they like, the reality is that our cities and communities remain largely racially segregated. This segregation is not a result of chance, but rather the direct result of business practices and government housing policy that date back to almost a century ago. One notorious example is redlining, in which services such as home loans or insurance were denied to Black and Brown Americans by characterizing the communities that the lived in as “too risky”. In this episode of Epidemiology Counts, we discuss the legacy of racial segregation and practices such as redlining that have shaped our communities, and the lasting effect of segregation on health disparities in America. Host Bryan James and Ghassan Hamra, assistant professor in Epidemiology and Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, talk to Dr. Sharrelle Barber a social epidemiologist at the Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Heath and leader of the new Ubuntu Center on Racism, Global Movements and Population Health Equity.

Public Health On Call
378 - What Might the Next Six Months of COVID-19 Look Like in the US?

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 16:52


Dr. Shaun Truelove, an infectious disease epidemiologist, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the COVID-19 Scenario Modeling Hub's models for the next six months into early 2022. Researchers projected what could happen under four scenarios of vaccination rates, including authorizing vaccines for children, and the possibility for new variants. Spoiler alert: It's not all bad news. Learn more: https://covid19scenariomodelinghub.org/

Honestly with Bari Weiss
Vaccine Hesitant? A Doctor Responds

Honestly with Bari Weiss

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 93:37


So much of the conversation about Covid-19 is angry and full of finger-pointing. Dr. Vinay Prasad has consistently been able to cut through the noise, the confusion, and the endless bickering. He does this by consistently avoiding the blame game and following the data wherever it leads. Dr. Prasad is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California San Francisco. His writing, videos and tweets have been among my most reliable sources for information throughout the pandemic. His positions are nuanced, well-considered, and show exactly the kind of level-headedness and evidence-based decision-making that you want from someone you're trusting your health to.  The conversation covers what the pandemic has revealed about the state of scientific research; policy questions like masking, vaccinating children, and vaccine passports. And, most importantly, vaccine hesitancy. Dr. Prasad explains why shaming, blaming, and censoring the unvaccinated is a losing strategy -- and what might be a better one. Follow Vinay on Twitter, if you like: https://twitter.com/VPrasadMDMPH?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices