Podcasts about Epidemiology

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Epidemiology

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Best podcasts about Epidemiology

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Latest podcast episodes about Epidemiology

The Medical Journal of Australia
Episode 479: MJA Podcasts 2022 Episode 26: Climate, housing, energy and Indigenous health, with Dr Simon Quilty and Mr Norman Jupurrurla

The Medical Journal of Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 14:57


Vol 217, Issue 1: 4 July 2022. Dr Simon Quilty is a public health physician from the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health at ANU. Mr Norman Jupurrurla is a Warumungu Elder and Director of the Julalikari Council Aboriginal Corporation in Tennant Creek, in the Northern Territory. They talk about climate, housing, energy and their impacts on Indigenous health, to accompany their coauthored Perspective published by the MJA here. The MJA's Indigenous health issue is available here. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
Brian Sanders | Eat More Red Meat, Cows Are NOT Bad For The Environment KKP: 430

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 62:32


Today, I am blessed to have here with me Brian Sanders. He is the filmmaker behind the Food Lies documentary, host of the top 5 nutrition podcast Peak Human, and an international speaker.  He graduated from UCLA with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. He works as a Health Coach at Evolve Healthcare and co-founded the health education company Sapien. He also works to spread the awareness of regenerative agriculture and increase access to well-raised animal products through his company Nose to Tail. In this episode, Brian opens the show by explaining the inspiration behind his diet and lifestyle changes. Then, he dives into his documentary Food Lies and the new science changing everything we need to know about nutrition. Later, Brian explains why cows aren't causing a climate crisis and how the facts don't show that red meat causes cancer. Tune in as we talk about the importance of protein, why processed foods companies are behind the vegan agenda, and regenerative agriculture.  Get your tickets to KetoCon: www.ketocon.org use the coupon code ketokamp for a discount. Download my free keto grocery shopping list: http://www.ketokampblueprint.com Get Keto Flex on Audible for Free (New Customers Only): https://adbl.co/36d6A24 Get Keto Flex on Audible here for current customers: https://adbl.co/3699lBm / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use KETOKAMP15 at checkout for 15% off your order.  Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  [00:45] Why Brian Decided To Change His Diet and Lifestyle  At age 30, Brian lost both of his parents to terrible health conditions.  His parents would follow the food pyramid but ended up with Alzheimer's and cancer.  After losing his parents, Brian completely changed his diet and lifestyle.  Eventually, Brian's allergies went away, his energy improved, and he lost his dad bod.  After eating more animal products and less processed foods, Brian got healthy.  We need to redefine what aging should look like and feel like.  [10:20] Food Lies: The Ultimate Answer To All The Propaganda Films  Check out Food Lies: https://www.foodlies.org/ Brian is working on making the ultimate answer to all propaganda films. The whole goal is to get Food Lies on Netflix.  Food Lies is all about the sordid history of our dietary guidelines, what we should be eating, and how to do it sustainably.  [15:20] Are Cows Really Causing The Climate Crisis?  There's always been methane coming from ruminant animals. Methane from animals is part of the natural system.  There's a huge diversion going on. 95% of emission problems are from other industries.  The fossil fuel industry extracts carbon from deep into the ground.  Big industry is controlling the narrative around methane and cows.  [23:30] All Animals Require Protein: What Happens When You're Not Getting Enough Building Blocks  All animals acquire food to get a certain amount of protein. If animals don't have enough protein in their food, they have to eat more food to get enough protein. The protein of the population has dropped dramatically. When you drop protein, you have to eat more calories as a result.  Protein isn't the answer for everything; you also have to consider nutrient density. [31:30] How Much Protein Should You Be Eating Every Single Day?  Eat a gram per pound of body weight or lean body mass. There isn't a downside to eating this much protein.  If you have a severe kidney problem, there's a chance you'll have issues with too much protein.  You'll have a problem if you're eating high protein and highly processed foods.  If your ideal weight is 130 pounds, consume 130 grams of protein.  [37:10] Does Eating Red Meat Cause Cancer? No, The Problem Is Processed Foods  Why is there a worldwide agenda against meat? Epidemiology can't show causation; it can only show correlation.  A famous study says that red meat causes cancer. However, it has a lot more to do with eating processed foods with processed meats. If you're eating a hot dog, you're eating a bun. If you're eating a steak, you're probably not eating a bun.  [40:45] Processed Food Companies Are Behind The Vegan Agenda  A massive conglomeration of worldwide processed food companies is pushing the vegan agenda.  The countries that eat little meat have 30-40% child malnutrition and stunted growth.  There's barely any profit margin in milk, eggs, fish, and fresh foods. That's why the vegan agenda is so popular because big companies can make huge profit margins on their products.  AND MUCH MORE!   Resources from this episode:  Check out Sapien: https://www.sapien.org Food Lies: https://www.foodlies.org Nose to Tail: https://nosetotail.org/ KetoCon: https://www.ketocon.org/ketocon-2022/ (use code “KETOKAMP”) Follow Brian Sanders Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodLiesOrg/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/foodliesorg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/food.lies/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/foodlies Get Keto Flex on Audible for Free (New Customers Only): https://adbl.co/36d6A24 Get Keto Flex on Audible here for current customers: https://adbl.co/3699lBm / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use KETOKAMP15 at checkout for 15% off your order.  Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  *Some Links Are Affiliates* // F O L L O W ▸ instagram | @thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2B1NXKW ▸ facebook | /thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2BVvvW6 ▸ twitter | @thebenazadi http://bit.ly/2USE0so ▸clubhouse | @thebenazadi Disclaimer: This podcast is for information purposes only. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. This podcast including Ben Azadi disclaim responsibility from any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own, and this podcast does not accept responsibility of statements made by guests. This podcast does not make any representations or warranties about guests qualifications or credibility. Individuals on this podcast may have a direct or non-direct interest in products or services referred to herein. If you think you have a medical problem, consult a licensed physician.

That Shit is Poison!
Ep 77 - Drops of Knowledge

That Shit is Poison!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 49:32


In the late summer of 1976, a mysterious disease swept through the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Hundreds of members of the American Legion, which was holding its annual convention within the Bellevue-Stratford, and several unaffiliated civilians fell ill. The disease took 29 lives. The outbreak was an epidemiological mystery that stumped the CDC for months. What was causing these illnesses and where in the hotel was it coming from? Join us in Epidemiology 101 as Harini details the discovery of Legionnaire's Disease.  If you liked this episode please rate, review and subscribe! Follow us on Instagram: @deadlydosepod TikTok: @tilscience Email us your homegrown poison stories at deadlydosepod@gmail.com Episode Sources: Image 1: From left to right - The Bellvue Stratford Hotel, Legionella bacteria, CDC toxicology team investigating the outbreak (via PhillyMag)  Image 2: A Chest X-Ray of a patient with Legionnaire's Disease with lungs like a “brillo pad” (via Special Pathogens Lab) Image 3: A veteran in the hospital with a mysterious disease (via The Washington Post) Forensic Files Season 1 Episode 7  https://www.osha.gov/legionnaires-disease https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7619/ Medical Microbiology 4th Edition - Chapter 40 on Legionella  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

StallSide Podcast
Turning the Tide in Equine Veterinary Medicine with Dr Debbie Spike-Pierce

StallSide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 27:51


Turning the Tide in Equine Veterinary Medicine with Dr. Debbie Spike-PierceDescription:  What does the future of equine veterinary medicine hold?  Rood & Riddle CEO, Dr. Debbie Spike-Pierce, explains the current situation of the industry. She then delves into some of the changes that can make a difference for veterinarians and adding longevity to their careers as well as how we attract more students to a career in equine medicine.

The Life Scientific
Sir Martin Landray on saving over a million lives

The Life Scientific

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:37


Who could forget the beginning of 2020, when a ‘mysterious viral pneumonia' emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan. Soon, other countries were affected and deaths around the world began to climb. Perhaps most alarmingly of all, there were no proven treatments to help prevent those deaths. As the World Health Organisation declared the Covid-19 outbreak a pandemic, and the UK and the rest of the world braced itself for what was to come, doctor and drug-trial designer Martin Landray had his mind on a solution, devising the protocol, or blueprint, for the world's largest drug trial for Covid-19. As Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at Oxford University, Martin was perfectly positioned to jump, delivering what became known as the RECOVERY Trial. The trial was tasked to deliver clarity amid the predicted chaos of the pandemic and galvanised every acute NHS hospital in the UK. Within its first one hundred days, it had yielded three major discoveries and it has transformed Covid-19 treatment worldwide, already saving over a million lives. Sir Martin Landray was recently knighted for this work and RECOVERY's legacy lives on, not just for Covid. Martin plans to revolutionise drug trials for other diseases too. PRODUCER: Beth Eastwood

Better Than Ever Daily
216. No link between coffee drinking and pregnancy risks

Better Than Ever Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 0:56


Drinking coffee might not pose an increased risk for pregnancy-related complications, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. Since they couldn't ask pregnant women in the study to drink certain amounts of coffee, researchers at the University of Queensland used genetic analyses to mimic a randomized control trial analyzing the […] The post 216. No link between coffee drinking and pregnancy risks appeared first on Dr. David Geier - Feel and Perform Better Than Ever.

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Parent's guide to COVID vaccines for kids under 5: Q&A with Dr. Neal Goldstein

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 18:42


COVID-19 vaccines are now available for children six months to five years old. What do parents need to know about vaccines for kids this young? Why did it take so long to get approval for this age range? What's the difference between Pfizer and Moderna for children? We asked these questions and many more to Dr. Neal Goldstein, Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Drexel University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Public Health On Call
485 - The NBA and COVID-19

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 17:31


In 2020, scientists working on injury analytics expanded to COVID-19 epidemiology to help create and monitor the NBA bubble. Dr. Christina Mack, an epidemiologist with IQVIA Real World Solutions, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about how the team continues to monitor the health and safety of players and staff, and some of the findings with real-world implications such as how long people can shed COVID-19 virus, if people with asymptomatic infections are less likely to transmit COVID, and whether boosters really work.

Surfing the Nash Tsunami
S3-E32 - Days 1-3 of ILC 2022: The Value of FIB-4 and In-Person Meetings

Surfing the Nash Tsunami

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 61:43


The International Liver Congress (#ILC2022) is the first major hepatology Congress to be held in person since the start of the pandemic (smaller, but very valuable, meetings like NASH-TAG, LiverCONNECT and Paris HASH have taken place with an in-person component, but the International Liver Congress and The Liver Meeting have not).The conversation takes place against the backdrop of a live Congress, which means background noise, challenges finding a meeting location and more background noise than you will find during a studio episode.Once everyone had settled in, this episode covered a range of topics, the most important of which revolved around the value of FIB-4 and the need for integrated, strategic thinking about care. The FIB-4 discussion addressed both strengths and weaknesses of the test, which is inexpensive and produces a relatively high level of false-positive tests. One key point from both Zobair and Michelle: in the US, the quality and standards organizations such as NCQA and HEDIS, should include FIB-4 screening and automatic EHR inclusion as a quality criterion with a point value in the scoring criteria. The discussion allowed the group to discuss several other important issues from the day's events. There was limited discussion of drug trials since most of the major trials will be presented on Saturday. Listen to Episodes 33 and 34 for more feedback on those presentations.At the end of the session, Michelle Long announced that she is leaving academia in July to join Novo Nordisk and get involved full-time in helping her new employer develop good drugs and shape overall treatment paradigms and pathways.This episode is sponsored by DiaPharma. DiaPharma is proud to support Surfing the NASH Tsunami in its activities to raise awareness of,  and foster discussions about,  the NASH epidemic.   DiaPharma offers noninvasive mechanistic biomarkers,  like CK18, that provide early biologically plausible indications of changes in disease activity for use in NASH drug development studies.   For research use only,  In the US and Canada,  and not for use in diagnostic procedures.  

Hear Me Now Podcast
Overdoses and racial disparity

Hear Me Now Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 38:41


Host Seán Collins talks with Dr. Carlos Blanco, lead author of a perspective piece published June 16th in the New England Journal of Medicine titled, "Research to Move Policy — Using Evidence to Advance Health Equity for Substance Use Disorders."The authors note that, despite substantial efforts to address the epidemic of drug-overdose deaths in the United States, racial and ethnic disparities in treatment access and outcomes among patients with substance use disorders have widened. Rates of overdose deaths are rising faster in Black, Latinx, and American Indian and Alaska Native populations than in White populations.Dr. Blanco talks with Seán about barriers to the best care possible along with ways medicine can make that care available to all regardless of race and ethnicity...Carlos Blanco, M.D., Ph.D., MSDirector, Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention ResearchNational Institute on Drug AbuseNational Institutes of HealthRockville, Md..Link to the piece in the New England Journal of Medicine: Research to Move Policy — Using Evidence to Advance Health Equity for Substance Use Disorders.   

TNT Radio
Dr Emad Guirguis MD on Joseph Arthur & his Technicolor Dreamcast - 23 June 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 55:48


GUEST OVERVIEW: Dr. Emad Guirguis (Dr. G) graduated from McMaster University with a BA in Psychology, an MD, Family Medicine Certification, and Clinical Research and Epidemiology. He then completed his General Surgery Qualification at University of Ottawa. He practiced General Surgery in Barrie and Alliston, Ontario for 30 years.  He has published numerous academic papers in prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals. He retired from Medicine to pursue a Master of Theological Studies for Pastoral Ministry and Counselling. He is currently a Medical Investigative Reporter, an author, and a recognized speaker.  Dr. G loves playing hockey and is a loyal Toronto Maple Leaf fan!  He loves music and plays guitar, harmonica, and sings. Above all, Dr. G has a deep faith in God and is awed by His incredible and intricate design of the human body. GUEST WEBSITE: https://www.lifeinmedicine.info/ 

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Government's new campaign to 'reinvigorate' COVID fight

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 13:31


Health Minister Mark Butler has launched a new initiative to put the pandemic back on the national agenda, in a bid to bring down the alarming rates of infection and death that continues to plague the country.

Sickboy
Routine Checkup: Epidemiology To Be!

Sickboy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 36:20


Tiffany is from Tecumseh, Nebraska and works at a local, rural hospital as an infection preventionist. In May of 2021, she graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Disease and Human Health with a minor in psychology. Tiffany currently attends the University of Nebraska Medical Center, where she is studying epidemiology. She shares with the fellas how she got into the work she's passionate about and unpacks some fun stuff in her world like genomics, and UTI-giving catheters! Join the post-episode conversation over on Discord! https://discord.gg/expeUDN

Sickboy
Routine Checkup: Epidemiology To Be!

Sickboy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 36:20


Tiffany is from Tecumseh, Nebraska and works at a local, rural hospital as an infection preventionist. In May of 2021, she graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Disease and Human Health with a minor in psychology. Tiffany currently attends the University of Nebraska Medical Center, where she is studying epidemiology. She shares with the fellas how she got into the work she's passionate about and unpacks some fun stuff in her world like genomics, and UTI-giving catheters! Join the post-episode conversation over on Discord! https://discord.gg/expeUDN

!Please Remain Calm!
Epidemiology in the Pandemic

!Please Remain Calm!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 59:34


For the first time ever, we have a PhD, & a Harvard grad on our show. Dr Chelsea Shover is an epidemiologist who headed the Covid 19 Vaccination program for LA county's unhoused population. That means more Skid Row stories. Plus we get into her journey into epidemiology. What's it like to become an epidemiologist right before a global pandemic hits? How do you get some of the hardest to reach people to get vaccinated? We cover a bunch of other stuff too; getting hit by a car, a town with only one business, journalism, hosting a radio show in New Zealand, encampments, threats, gift cards, pilot programs, concussions, CBD water, & more

Microbe Magazine Podcast
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: The Silent Rise of a Superbug (AAC ed.)

Microbe Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 28:06


Infections caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia appear to be increasing in frequency among the immunocompromised population and are challenging to treat. Moreover, resistance to traditional drugs used against these organisms is now becoming more common. Antibiotic options in these circumstances are scarce and new options are needed. We discuss this important topic with experts in the field. Recorded live in Washington DC at ASM Microbe 2022. Topics • Stenotrophomas maltophilia as an opportunistic pathogen and • The intrinsic ability of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia to resist common antimicrobials • Common mechanisms of resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa • Debate on treatment approaches and rationale for these strategies. Guests: Maria Fernanda Mojica PhD Senior Instructor, Case VA Center for Antimicrobial Resistance and Epidemiology. Case Western Reserve University Samuel Aitken, PharmD. Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pharmacy, University of Michigan. This episode of Editors in Conversation is brought to you by the Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Journal and hosted by AAC Editor in Chief, Cesar Arias. AAC is available at https://asm.org/aac. Follow Cesar on twitter at https://twitter.com/SuperBugDoc for AAC updates. Subscribe to the podcast at https://asm.org/eic

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show 06.16.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 59:04


VIDEOS: 1. Klaus Schwab and  Yuval Harari speaks at the WEF  2. Agenda 2030 and the World Economic Forum Plan to Remake the World: Alex Newman (26:00) 3. Can't Hide from Vaccine Injury When It's In Your Face Every Day (1:49) 4. Bodily Autonomy is Only Supported When Coupled With The Abortion Agenda (1:00) 5. Abby Martin: ‘Coups and Regime Change Wars Define U.S.'s Naked Imperialism' (12:10) 6. German Government JAILING Journalists! – Inside Russia Report (start @ 0:58) – 8:06 7. New Rule: The Misinformation Age | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)   Acai and brain health: Has study unlocked Amazonian fruit's neuroprotective effects? University of Adelaide, June 10, 2022 The potential brain health benefits of açai may be linked to an inhibition of the aggregation of beta-amyloid proteins, says a new study from Australia. The build-up of plaque from beta-amyloid deposits is associated with an increase in brain cell damage and death from oxidative stress. This is related to a loss of cognitive function and an increased risk of Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia and currently affects over 13 million people worldwide. Researchers from the University of Adelaide have now reported that select polyphenols from the native South American palm berry may inhibit this build-up and explain the reported neuroprotective effects of açai. To-date, pulp of acai has been demonstrated to affect cell signaling, enzyme activity, maintenance of the oxidant and antioxidant balance, receptor sensitivity, gene regulation, and reduction in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while restoring or maintaining functional cellular antioxidant status. Açai extracts and berry pulp possess high levels of anti-oxidants which are generally attributed to mitigating the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species in cell culture. However, distinct neuroprotection to beta-amyloid loss of viability by açai is a novel finding.  Nuts and peanuts may protect against major causes of death Maastricht University (Netherlands), June 11, 2022 A paper published in the International Journal of Epidemiology confirms a link between peanut and nut intake and lower mortality rates, but finds no protective effect for peanut butter. Men and women who eat at least 10 grams of nuts or peanuts per day have a lower risk of dying from several major causes of death than people who don't consume nuts or peanuts. The reduction in mortality was strongest for respiratory disease, neurodegenerative disease, and diabetes, followed by cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The effects are equal in men and women. Peanuts show at least as strong reductions in mortality as tree nuts, but peanut butter is not associated with mortality, researchers from Maastricht University found. The associations between nuts and peanut intake and cardiovascular death confirm earlier results from American and Asian studies that were often focused on cardiovascular diseases. However, in this new study, it was found that mortality due to cancer, diabetes, respiratory, and neurodegenerative diseases was also lowered among users of peanuts and nuts.  Are highly processed foods bad for children?  Study finds an association between consuming more ultraprocessed foods and lower levels of physical fitness in children Sacred Heart University, June 14, 2022 A new study found that children ages 3 to 5 who consumed more ultraprocessed foods had poorer locomotor skills than children who consumed less of these foods. It also showed lower cardiovascular fitness in 12- to 15-year-olds who consumed more ultraprocessed foods. Although previous research has shown that consuming ultraprocessed foods is linked with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease in adults, this is one of the first studies to show a link between consumption of these foods and lower levels of physical fitness in children. Ultraprocessed foods were categorized in this study as including packaged snacks, breakfast cereals, candies, soda, sweetened juices and yogurts, canned soups and prepared foods like pizza, hotdogs, burgers and chicken nuggets. For children 5 years old and under, the researchers used locomotor development as a measure of physical fitness. The analysis revealed that children with the lowest locomotor development scores consumed 273 calories more per day of ultraprocessed foods than children with the highest locomotor development scores. Cardiovascular fitness was used as a physical fitness measure in the older children. The study showed that teens and preteens with good cardiovascular fitness consumed 226 fewer calories daily from ultraprocessed foods than those who did not have healthy cardiovascular fitness. Qatar Omicron-wave study shows slow decline of natural immunity, rapid decline of vaccine immunity Weill Cornell Medical College,, June 15, 2022 A recent Pfizer or Moderna mRNA-vaccine booster provided good but temporary protection against infection by the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant, according to a study from researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine—Qatar. In the study, published June 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers analyzed the Omicron wave in Qatar last winter, comparing prior infections, vaccine immunity and combinations thereof among more than 100,000 Omicron-infected and non-infected individuals. The analysis showed vaccine immunity against new infection appeared to wane rapidly, whereas people with a prior-variant infection were moderately protected from Omicron with little decline in protection even a year after their prior infection. A key finding was that a history of vaccination with the standard two doses of either the Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccine, but no history of prior infection, brought no significant protection against symptomatic omicron infection. Having a booster dose appeared to be about 60 percent protective, though most boosters were received just weeks before the Omicron wave. Overall, the analysis suggested—consistently with prior studies—that mRNA vaccines and boosters work fairly well in protecting against symptomatic omicron infection, though their protective effect wanes rapidly and disappears within six months or so. For those with no history of vaccination, SARS-CoV-2 infection during a prior-variant wave  was associated with almost the same degree of protection even a year after infection. Study links sugar-sweetened beverage consumption with liver cancer Large study of postmenopausal women suggests avoiding sweetened beverages could help reduce likelihood of developing liver cancer University of South Carolina, June 14, 2022 A study of more than 90,000 postmenopausal women found that those who consumed at least one sugar-sweetened beverage daily faced a 78% higher risk of developing liver cancer compared with people who consumed less than three servings per month of such beverages. “Our findings suggest sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is a potential modifiable risk factor for liver cancer,” said Longgang Zhao, at the University of South Carolina, the study's lead author. “If our findings are confirmed, reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption might serve as a public health strategy to reduce liver cancer burden. Replacing sugar-sweetened beverages with water, and non-sugar-sweetened coffee or tea could significantly lower liver cancer risk.” For the new study, researchers analyzed data from 90,504 postmenopausal women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative, a long-term study launched in the early 1990s. Researchers assessed sugar-sweetened beverage intake based on validated food frequency questionnaires and confirmed liver cancer diagnoses using participants' medical records. About 7% of participants reported consuming one or more 12-ounce servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day and a total of 205 women developed liver cancer. Women consuming one or more sugar-sweetened beverages daily were 78% more likely to develop liver cancer and those consuming at least one soft drink per day were 73% more likely to develop liver cancer compared with those who never consumed these beverages or  consumed less than three servings per month. Most people think their diet is healthier than it is U.S. Department of Agriculture, June 14, 2022 How healthy is your diet? It seems like a simple question, but according to a new study, it's one that most Americans struggle to get right. “We found that only a small percentage of U.S. adults can accurately assess the healthfulness of their diet, and interestingly, it's mostly those who perceive their diet as poor who are able to accurately assess their diet,” said Jessica Thomson, PhD, research epidemiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service in the Southeast Area, the study's lead author. “Additionally, most adults overrate the quality of their diet, sometimes to a substantial degree.” The study revealed significant disconnects between the researcher-calculated scores and how participants ranked their own diet. Out of over 9,700 participants, about 8,000 (roughly 85%) inaccurately assessed their diet quality. Of those, almost all (99%) overrated the healthfulness of their diet. Surprisingly, accuracy was highest among those who rated their diet as poor, among whom the researcher's score matched the participant's rating 97% of the time. The proportion of participants who accurately assessed their diet quality ranged from 1%-18% in the other four rating categories.

Equine Veterinary Journal Podcasts
EVJ in Conversation Podcast, No. 59, Rhodococcus equi foal pneumonia: Update on epidemiology, immunity, treatment and prevention

Equine Veterinary Journal Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 44:38


In this podcast, Macarena Sanz, Laura Huber & Angela Bordin discuss their article 'Rhodococcus equi foal pneumonia: Update on epidemiology, immunity, treatment and prevention'.

Signal Boost
Dr. Michael Osterholm!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 21:45


Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) Dr. Michael Osterholm joins Zerlina on the show to discuss the latest in Covid-19 news and how we can keep ourselves safe as we head into the summer. Dr. Osterholm is Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and an adjunct professor in the Medical School, all at the University of Minnesota.In November 2020, Dr. Osterholm was appointed to President-elect Joe Biden's 13-member Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board. From June 2018 through May 2019, he served as a Science Envoy for Health Security on behalf of the US Department of State. He is also on the Board of Regents at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa.He is the author of the New York Times best-selling 2017 book, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, in which he not only details the most pressing infectious disease threats of our day but lays out a nine-point strategy on how to address them, with preventing a global flu pandemic at the top of the list.In addition, Dr. Osterholm is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and the Council of Foreign Relations. In June 2005 Dr. Osterholm was appointed by Michael Leavitt, Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), to the newly established National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity. In July 2008, he was named to the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center's Academy of Excellence in Health Research. In October 2008, he was appointed to the World Economic Forum Working Group on Pandemics.From 2001 through early 2005, Dr. Osterholm, in addition to his role at CIDRAP, served as a Special Advisor to then–HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson on issues related to bioterrorism and public health preparedness. He was also appointed to the Secretary's Advisory Council on Public Health Preparedness. On April 1, 2002, Dr. Osterholm was appointed by Thompson to be his representative on the interim management team to lead the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). With the appointment of Dr. Julie Gerberding as director of the CDC on July 3, 2002, Dr. Osterholm was asked by Thompson to assist Dr. Gerberding on his behalf during the transition period. He filled that role through January 2003.Previously, Dr. Osterholm served for 24 years (1975-1999) in various roles at the Minnesota Department of Health, the last 15 as state epidemiologist. He has led numerous investigations of outbreaks of international importance, including foodborne diseases, the association of tampons and toxic shock syndrome, and hepatitis B and HIV in healthcare settings.Dr. Osterholm was the principal investigator and director of the NIH-supported Minnesota Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (2007-2014) and chaired the Executive Committee of the Centers of Excellence Influenza Research and Surveillance network.Dr. Osterholm has been an international leader on the critical concern regarding our preparedness for an influenza pandemic. His invited papers in the journals Foreign Affairs, the New England Journal of Medicine, and Nature detail the threat of an influenza pandemic before the recent pandemic and the steps we must take to better prepare for such events. Dr. Osterholm has also been an international leader on the growing concern regarding the use of biological agents as catastrophic weapons targeting civilian populations. In that role, he served as a personal advisor to the late King Hussein of Jordan. Dr. Osterholm provides a comprehensive and pointed review of America's current state of preparedness for a bioterrorism attack in his New York Times best-selling book, Living Terrors: What America Needs to Know to Survive the Coming Bioterrorist Catastrophe.The author of more than 315 papers and abstracts, including 21 book chapters, Dr. Osterholm is a frequently invited guest lecturer on the topic of epidemiology of infectious diseases. He serves on the editorial boards of nine journals, including Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology and Microbial Drug Resistance: Mechanisms, Epidemiology and Disease, and he is a reviewer for 24 additional journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the AmericanMedical Association, and Science. He is past president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) and has served on the CDC's National Center for Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors from 1992 to 1997. Dr. Osterholm served on the IOM Forum on Microbial Threats from 1994 through 2011. He has served on the IOM Committee on Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century and the IOM Committee on Food Safety, Production to Consumption, and he was a reviewer for the IOM Report on Chemical and Biological Terrorism. As a member of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Dr. Osterholm has served on the Committee on Biomedical Research of the Public and Scientific Affairs Board, the Task Force on Biological Weapons, and the Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance. He is a frequent consultant to the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Department of Defense, and the CDC. He is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).Dr. Osterholm has received numerous honors for his work, including an honorary doctorate from Luther College; the Pump Handle Award, CSTE; the Charles C. Shepard Science Award, CDC; the Harvey W. Wiley Medal, FDA; the Squibb Award, IDSA; Distinguished University Teaching Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, UMN; and the Wade Hampton Frost Leadership Award, American Public Health Association. He also has been the recipient of six major research awards from the NIH and the CDC.

Pre-Hospital Care
Monkeypox Virus with Professor Kelechi Nnoaham

Pre-Hospital Care

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 37:59


In this session we will examine the recent viral Monkeypox (MPV) outbreak with Professor Kelechi Nnoaham. We dig into the anatomy of the virus, the possibility of local transmission of the virus, the origins of the current outbreak, current prevalence, symptomatology, known transmission pathways, viral genetic adaptation, the R rate, Case Fatality Rate, containment (ring vaccination strategies), whether the MSM data is outlier data, and finally, surveillance of MPV. Professor Kelechi is the Executive Director of Public Health and lead for Research & Development, Innovation and Value-Based Health for Cwm Taf Morgannwg University Health Board, Wales. Kelechi has held Honorary Professorships in Public Health and Epidemiology at Plymouth University (since 2015) and Cardiff University (since 2021) medical schools and previously worked as the Director of Public Health for Plymouth and Bristol City Councils. He has subsequently worked throughout leadership roles in public health and healthcare leadership across the UK. Kelechi has an MPH in Global Health Science (with Distinction) at Oxford University and followed that up with a PhD in Public Health & Epidemiology at Oxford University in 2011. This podcast is brought to you in association with BHA Medical. BHA medical source, supply and implement innovative medical technology and solutions across the globe. BHA provide market leading services in covid 19 testing kits, medical products, smart technology and consultancy. BHA's latest innovation is a Monkeypox Lateral Flow Antigen Rapid Test. The product is a lateral flow detection of monkeypox virus antigen in human whole blood, serum, plasma, rash exudate, or nasal swab. The product uses a double antibody sandwich method. During the test, a specimen is dropped into the specimen hole, the specimen is superimposed under the capillary effect. If the specimen contains monkeypox virus, a colour band appears in the test area (T) indicating a positive result for monkeypox virus. If the specimen does not contain the corresponding substance, there will be no colour bands in the test area (T), and the result will be negative. The Performance Characteristics show that the positive and negative coincidence rates are 100% Please see the show notes for further details and how to order kits: https://www.bha-medical.com/monkeypox-virus-antigen-rapid-test-kit https://www.bha-medical.com Please enjoy this wide ranging episode with an insightful guest.

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research
Epidemiology Counts – Episode 35 – The Microbiome: our gut, our health

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 56:03


Did you know trillions of microorganisms such as bacteria, virus, and fungi are living inside of your body right now? The microbiome can be described as the community of microbes that reside in a particular part the human body. The past two decades has seen an exponential increase in the number of publications related to the microbiome and how it affects human health. There is growing evidence that the microbiome, in all its complexity, can impact health and disease. Some of the diseases that have been linked to the microbiome may be surprising! On this episode, we welcome Noel Mueller, associate professor of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, to give us a primer on the microbiome and how it relates to our health.

PH SPOTlight: Public health career stories, inspiration, and guidance from current-day public health heroes
The importance of volunteering and how they shape your public health career, with Christina Ricci

PH SPOTlight: Public health career stories, inspiration, and guidance from current-day public health heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 36:30


In this episode, Sujani sits down with Christina Ricci, an epidemiologist with the Public Health Agency of Canada and an avid volunteer. They discuss the importance of volunteerism and what motivates Christina to keep volunteering.You'll LearnHow Christina got into the field of public healthChristina's volunteering journey and what motivated her to continue seeking out volunteer rolesHow Christina's early volunteer experiences shaped her interest in public health and vice versaWhat some of the most rewarding volunteer positions have been for Christina and what skills she learned - both expected and unexpectedWhy it is important for Christina to continue volunteering, even after she landed a full-time public health job  How to identify and land volunteer experiences, both formally and informallyHow to integrate volunteer work into your resumeFactors to consider before taking on a volunteer roleTips on how to balance volunteer work with other work and playAdvice from Christina for students and early career professionals as it relates to public health volunteer workToday's GuestChristina is an Epidemiologist with the Public Health Agency of Canada and completed her Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology at the University of Toronto. Outside of work she volunteers with various universities doing systematic reviews, as a program manager for an NGO improving disability services access and disability inclusion stigma in West Africa as well as with the United Nations to name a few. She has also started her own program for newcomers to Canada to connect them to resources through webinars and workshops.  ResourcesRecommendations from Christina on where to look for volunteering opportunitiesUnited Nations VolunteersWe Make Change Young Diplomats of CanadaFORAApathy is BoringUnite2030Capital Integration Movement Other PH SPOT resources:Share ideas for the podcast: Fill out this formNever heard of a podcast before? Read this guide we put together to help you get set up.Be notified when new episodes come out, and receive hand-picked public health opportunities every week by joining the PH SPOT community.Contribute to the public health career blog: www.phspot.ca/contributeUpcoming course on infographics: phspot.ca/infographicsLearn more about PH Spot's 6-week training programSupport the show

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Why is New Zealand failing to control pesticide use?

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 15:17


While New Zealand's response to Covid was lauded by many, its response to another critical public health issue is being labelled 'abysmal'. New Zealand is among the highest global users of pesticides, but Kathryn's next guest argues it lags behind the rest of the world when it comes to pesticide regulation and safety. Neil Pearce is a Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He's long held an interest in the health effects of dioxin; he was part of a delegation to Vietnam in 1995 to look at the effects of Agent Orange use and has studied former workers of the Ivon Watkins-Dow chemical plant in Taranaki. His new book is Pesticides and Health: How New Zealand Fails in Environmental Protection which looks at our ongoing shortcomings in environmental and occupational health.

SERious EPI
S2E11: Case Control Studies

SERious EPI

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 44:20


In this episode of Season 2 of SERious Epidemiology, Hailey and Matt get into the humble case control study. We discuss the ins and outs of this much maligned study design that has so flummoxed so many in epidemiology. We ask the hard questions about the best way sample in a case control study, whether we spend too much or not enough time on it in our teaching, whether a case control study always has to be nested within some hypothetical cohort, whether the design is inherently more biased than cohort studies (spoiler: no, but…), why some people refer to cases and controls when they are not referring to a case control study, and, if it were on a famous TV show, which character the case control study would be (and more importantly, why Hailey has never seen said TV show). Papers referenced in this episode: Selection of Controls in Case-Control Studies: I. Principles Sholom Wacholder, Joseph K. McLaughlin, Debra T. Silverman, Jack S. Mandel American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 135, Issue 9, 1 May 1992, Pages 1019–1028, https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a116396 Selection of Controls in Case-Control Studies: II. Types of Controls Sholom Wacholder, Debra T. Silverman, Joseph K. McLaughlin, Jack S. Mandel American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 135, Issue 9, 1 May 1992, Pages 1029–1041, https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a116397 Selection of controls in case-control studies. III. Design options S Wacholder 1, D T Silverman, J K McLaughlin, J S Mandel Wacholder S, Silverman DT, McLaughlin JK, Mandel JS. Selection of controls in case-control studies. III. Design options. Am J Epidemiol. 1992 May 1;135(9):1042-50. doi: 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a116398  

Fight Back
Finding the Cause & Beating Childhood Cancer

Fight Back

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 45:29


In this Fight Back episode, we welcome our special guest, Dr. Brad Pollock, to discuss childhood and young adult cancers. Dr. Pollack is a Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology, Chairman of the Department of Public Health Sciences, and Associate Dean for Public Health Sciences at the University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Children's Oncology Group at the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) and a leading researcher on the epidemiology and control of childhood and adolescent cancers.He joins us to talk about how cancer is not just an older person's disease, the types of cancers that strike children and young adults, the research that goes into finding effective treatment options and identifying causes of cancers, the long-term health outcomes for those who have cancer at a young age, and more.

The Strenuous Life Podcast with Stephan Kesting
Covid is Airborne, Here's What to Do About It (with Epidemiologist Dr Colin Furness)

The Strenuous Life Podcast with Stephan Kesting

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 80:53


Covid is Airborne, So What Can We Do About It?   No, the answer is NOT lockdowns. In this interview University of Toronto epidemiologist Dr Colin Furness, PhD, goes into detail about Covid transmission, the debilitating (and mostly denied) effects of Long Covid, and simple mitigation measures that don't require billions of dollars.  Specific topics include… - The evidence for Covid being airborne - How common is Long Covid, what are the three types of Long Covid, which organ systems are affected, whether vaccination helps, and whether mild cases initial respiratory Covid can lead to severe long covid - Other viruses with long term effects that don't become evident for decades - The real reason that first responders should be vaccinated - Why we're seeing so many new variants - What is wastewater testing, and why is it one of the most useful leading indicators for strain on the healthcare system - What governments have done to take Covid off of everyone's mind. - Why the only lockdown that made sense was the first one, and why every lockdown since then has been the result of a failure to act earlier with less severe measures.   - Why you should put away the hand sanitiser and the plexiglass. - A simple 3 step approach to keeping public spaces safe (ventilation, filtration, and CO2 detectors) - When is masking appropriate? - How the removal of masks on planes led to many thousands of cancelled flights and a synchronisation of Covid waves across the entire USA.   - How vaccination keeps other people safe - Arguments for and against mandatory vaccination for first responders, and strategies that don't involve mandates - The death of expertise and moving forward in a post-truth world - Monkeypox - should we take it seriously? - How we might successfully deal with the next big plague Dr Furness works in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at University of Toronto. Follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/FurnessColin Cheers, Stephan Kesting P.S. You can also catch the video version of this conversation on Youtube at  https://youtu.be/fHa0akoLDPQ  

Science Rehashed
The chronic disease caused by a common virus

Science Rehashed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 36:04


Over 2.8 million people worldwide live with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease in which the body's immune system attacks the protective myelin coating around nerves in the brain and spinal cord. People with MS can experience pain, fatigue, memory problems, vision loss, and other debilitating symptoms. MS is relatively rare, but new research has found a causal link between Epstein-Barr Virus, one of the most common human viruses, and MS. In this episode, we talk to Dr. Alberto Ascherio, a Professor of Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, about the 20-year longitudinal databank that reveals Epstein-Barr Virus as a causal factor in MS.

Contain This: The Latest in Global Health Security
Discussions from the Future Funding Priorities in Health Security in the Indo-Pacific Roundtables: A conversation with Professor Jodie McVernon, The Doherty Institute

Contain This: The Latest in Global Health Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 19:38


The Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security has begun a series of roundtables across the country on Future Funding Priorities. At the recent roundtable in Melbourne Robin Davies, First Assistant Secretary of the Global Health Division at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Head of the Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security, spoke to Professor Jodie McVernon, the Director of Epidemiology at the The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity. Professor McVernon has become a leading voice on disease spread and control during the COVID-19 pandemic. The conversation follows her work at The Doherty Institute and the Institute's ongoing partnerships with DFAT. Professor McVernon talks about how DFAT and the Doherty Institute worked together to help governments in the Indo-Pacific track and respond to COVID.Professor McVernon explains how DFAT and the Doherty Institute's data for decision making partnership helped strengthen systems and inform clinical decision making, such as where in PNG the government needed to deploy its limited supply of oxygen. It's an important conversation as we look to the next stage of our work in the region.  Learn more about Professor McVernon's work on the Doherty Institute's website and the SPARK investment page.

Full Scope
Alcohol Withdrawal, Part 2

Full Scope

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 33:20


Alcohol Withdrawal, Part 2SummaryDrinking alcohol (specifically ethanol) on a regular basis leads to alcohol dependence. When alcohol dependent persons stop drinking, they experience withdrawal. Withdrawal from alcohol is very dangerous and should be managed aggressively in order to prevent long term complications and death. This podcast will teach you the ins and outs of recognizing and managing alcohol withdrawal both in the inpatient and outpatient setting.Morbidity and MortalityAlmost 100,000 people die every year from ETOH abuse in the United States alone. It is not known how many people die a year from alcohol withdrawal. If delirium tremons develops, it is estimated that about 25% of people will die without treatment.StoryEver drink too much at night and then wake up suddenly at 5am feeling wide awake? Ever feel inner tension, agitation, or heart palpitations after a long party weekend with friends? If so, you have experienced symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.Key Points1. Tachycardia, tachypnea, hypertension, hyperthermia, tremors, anxiety, and GI upset are the hallmarks of alcohol withdrawal.2. Severe symptoms may include hallucinations, delirium, seizures, and death3. Vitamin and electrolyte repletion are critical for sick alcohol dependent patients.4. Aggressively treating withdrawal by slowly coming off alcohol or using medications like barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and other CNS depressants can be lifesaving. Use medication liberally in this setting!References-Saitz M, Mayo-Smith MF, Redmond HA, Bernard DR, Calkins DR. Individualized treatment for alcohol withdrawal. A randomized double-blind controlled trial. JAMA 1994- Grant BF, Goldstein RB, Saha TD, et al. Epidemiology of DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015- https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/alcohol- Newman RK, Stobart Gallagher MA, Gomez AE. Alcohol Withdrawal. - In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK441882/- Nisavic M, Nejad SH, Isenberg BM, Bajwa EK, Currier P, Wallace PM, Velmahos G, Wilens T. Use of Phenobarbital in Alcohol Withdrawal Management - A Retrospective Comparison Study of Phenobarbital and Benzodiazepines for Acute Alcohol Withdrawal Management in General Medical Patients. Psychosomatics. 2019 - Wikipedia, alcohol withdrawal syndrome- Personal experience treating ETOH withdrawal in the inpatient and outpatient setting  

Out Of The Blank
#1116 - Joseph M. Braun

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 57:27


Dr. Braun is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Brown University School of Public Health. He was formerly a school nurse in Milwaukee, WI before receiving his master's and doctoral degrees in Epidemiology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Dr. Braun's research foci includes endocrine disrupting chemicals, toxic metals, obesity, cardiometabolic health, and pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders. His research group applies advanced biostatistical techniques to longitudinal cohort studies in order to quantify the health effects of chemical mixtures and identify periods of heightened susceptibility to chemical exposures. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/out-of-the-blank-podcast/support

Science Night
The Ballad of the Nine Inch Snails with Bea Ramiro

Science Night

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 56:04


This week, we have the triumphant return of those marvelous mollusks, the cone snails! We're talking to Bea Ramiro from the Safavi Lab at the University of Copenhagen, who is looking at a potential medical use for cone snail venom. In the news, we hop aboard the de-hype train, talk about fusion fuel, sing a black hole song, and explore a secret garden. Plus a new line of cone snail merch at our website, scinight.com/merch! Your Hosts] James Reed (https://twitter.com/James_Reed3) Steffi Diem (https://twitter.com/SteffiDiem) Jason Organ (https://twitter.com/OrganJM) Our Guest Bea (https://mobile.twitter.com/irisbeara) is a graduate student at the University of Copenhagen and member of the Safavi Lab (https://mobile.twitter.com/SafaviLab). Her work on the biomolecular properties of cone snail venom has taken her around the world to learn and work on potential hidden uses in its chemical makeup. She's also a great science communicator and teacher, especially when she gets to teach children about her work with these marvelous mollusks. Credits Editing-James Reed Mastering- James Reed Music: - Intro and Outro- Wolf Moon by Unicorn Heads | https://unicornheads.com/ | Standard YouTube License - Additional Sounds- Inside a Computer Chip by Doug Maxwell |https://www.mediarightproductions.com/ | Standard YouTube License - 5,000 Exoplanets: Listen to the Sounds of Discovery (NASA Data Sonification) by NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. Russo, A. Santaguida (SYSTEM Sounds) - Data Sonification: Black Hole at the Center of the Perseus Galaxy Cluster (X-ray) by NASA/CXC/SAO/K.Arcand, SYSTEM Sounds (M. Russo, A. Santaguida) The Science Night Podcast is a member of the Riverpower Podcast Mill (https://riverpower.xyz/) family

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd Episode 44: Reproductive Psychiatry with Dr. Tuong Vi Nguyen

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 33:25


Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers perinatal psychiatry with Dr. Tuong Vi Nguyen, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, McGill University and Scientist, RI-MUHC, Brain Repair and Integrative Neuroscience (BRaIN) Program, Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation.    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:   By the end of this episode, you should be able to… Define the field of reproductive psychiatry Discuss the possible neurobiological pathways impacting mood and cognition during the reproductive cycle of women.  Discuss the influence of sociocultural gender roles on psychopathology.    List the DSM-V diagnostic criteria of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Recall the epidemiology of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Describe the steps in the diagnostic evaluation for premenstrual dysphoric disorder. List lifestyle and psychopharmacologic interventions for premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Discuss common mental health concerns during the perimenopausal period. Guest: Dr. Tuong Vi Nguyen   Hosts: Nima Nahiddi (PGY4), Audrey Le (PGY1), and Arielle Geist (PGY2)    Audio editing by: Audrey Le   Show notes by: Arielle Geist    Interview content: Introduction - 00:00 Learning objectives - 01:00 Defining the field of perinatal psychiatry - 01:50 Discussing neurobiological pathways impacting mood and cognition during the reproductive cycle - 02:47 The influence of sociocultural gender roles on psychopathology -05:28 DSM-V criteria of premenstrual dysphoric disorder - 11:18 Epidemiology of premenstrual dysphoric disorder - 13:40 Diagnostic evaluation of premenstrual dysphoric disorder - 14:38 Management of premenstrual dysphoric disorder  Pharmacologic - 17:45 Lifestyle - 24:15 Perimenopausal period - 24:45 Closing comments - 31:39   Resources: Brzezinski, A., Brzezinski-Sinai, N.A., & Seeman, M.V. (2017). Treating schizophrenia during menopause. Menopause, 24(5), 582-588. doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000000772. Epperson, C.N., Steiner, M., Hartlage, A., Eriksson, E., Schmidt, P.J., Jones, I., & Yonkers, K.A. (2012). Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: evidence for a new category for DSM-5. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(5), 465-475. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.11081302 Marsh, W.K., Gershenson, B., & Rothschild, A.J. (2015). Symptom severity of bipolar disorder during the menopausal transition. International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 3(1), 35. DOI: 10.1186/s40345-015-0035-z Soares, C.N., Almeida, O.P.,  Joffe, H., & Cohen, L.S. (2001). Efficacy of estradiol for the treatment of depressive disorders in perimenopausal women a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 58(6), 529-534. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.58.6.529 Weber, M.T., Maki, P.M., & McDermott, M.P. (2013). Cognition and mood in perimenopause: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 142, 90-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2013.06.001   References: Kornstein S.G., & Clayton, A.H. (2004). Sex differenes in neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter systems. In Women's mental health: A comprehensive textbook (pp.3-30). Guilford Press.  Chrisler, J. C., & Johnston-Robledo, I. (2002). Raging hormones?: Feminist perspectives on premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. In M. Ballou & L. S. Brown (Eds.), Rethinking mental health and disorder: Feminist perspectives (pp. 174–197). Guilford Press. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Depressive disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.   CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association.   For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast), Facebook (PsychEd Podcast), and Instagram (@psyched.podcast). You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. For more information, visit our website at psychedpodcast.org.

Bloomberg Businessweek
Broadcom to Buy VMware for $61 Billion

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 28:05


Bloomberg News Seattle Bureau Chief Dina Bass reports on Broadcom buying VMware for $61 billion in a record tech deal. Dr. Caleb Alexander, Professor of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, discusses developing the Opioid Industry Document Archive. Bloomberg Businessweek Editor Joel Weber and Businessweek Senior Features Editor Jeff Muskus talk about the Businessweek Magazine cover story The Tech Rout Isn't Just Cyclical—It's Well-Earned, and Overdue. And we Drive to the Close with Max Wasserman, Founder and Senior Portfolio Manager at Miramar Capital. Hosts: Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec. Producer: Paul Brennan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stats + Stories
The Aging American Workforce | Stats + Stories Episode 233

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 25:58


In the United States, like many countries, middle-aged and older workers are increasingly a larger proportion of the workforce. The needs of these workers is different than those you are younger and can run the gamut from educational to health needs. That's the focus of this episode of Stats+Stories with guests Takashi‌ ‌Yamashita‌ and Phyllis A. Cummins Takashi‌ ‌Yamashita‌ ‌‌is‌ ‌an‌ ‌associate‌ ‌professor‌ ‌of‌ ‌sociology,‌ ‌and‌ ‌a‌ ‌faculty‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌Gerontology‌ ‌Ph.D.‌ ‌program‌ ‌and‌ ‌the‌ ‌Center‌ ‌for‌ ‌Aging‌ ‌Studies‌ ‌at‌ ‌University‌ ‌of‌ ‌Maryland,‌ ‌Baltimore‌ ‌County (UMBC).‌ ‌He‌ ‌also‌ ‌has‌ ‌a‌ ‌secondary‌ ‌appointment‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌Department‌ ‌of‌ ‌Epidemiology‌ ‌and‌ ‌Public‌ ‌Health‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌School‌ ‌of‌ ‌Medicine,‌ ‌and‌ ‌serves‌ ‌as‌ ‌an‌ ‌affiliate‌ ‌member‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Center‌ ‌for‌ ‌Research‌ ‌on‌ ‌Aging‌ ‌at‌ ‌the‌ ‌University‌ ‌of‌ ‌Maryland,‌ ‌Baltimore‌ ‌(UMB).‌ ‌His‌ ‌areas‌ ‌of‌ ‌research‌ ‌are‌ ‌social‌ ‌determinants‌ ‌of‌ ‌health‌ ‌and‌ ‌well-being‌ ‌over‌ ‌the‌ ‌life‌ ‌course,‌ ‌health‌ ‌literacy,‌ ‌wider‌ ‌benefits‌ ‌of‌ ‌lifelong‌ ‌learning,‌ ‌gerontology‌ ‌education‌ ‌and‌ ‌social‌ ‌statistics‌ ‌education.‌ ‌ Phyllis A. Cummins is a Senior Research Scholar Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Gerontology at the Scripps Gerontology Center here at Miami University. Her research interests include work and retirement transitions, education and training for older workers, publicly sponsored employment and training programs, the role community colleges play in education and training for older adult

The Quicky
Why You Don't Need To Panic About Monkeypox

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 13:42


It's fair to say there's been a lot of panic about the new spread of Monkeypox in Europe, North America and now Australia, but as we're still dealing with Covid-19 it's understandable as no-one wants to live through another pandemic. You might be particularly concerned because it seems very hard to pin down accurate information about why Monkeypox is suddenly being transmitted around the world, and what it actually is or does to our health? That is why in this episode The Quicky speaks to an expert in infectious diseases to break down what exactly this disease is, and why we need to be informed, but not alarmed. Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to: Associate Professor Sanjaya Senanayake - Expert in infectious diseases based at the Australian National University Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Jacob Round Subscribe to The Quicky at...https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Harvard Data Science Review Podcast
Is It a Good Idea to Legalize Marijuana? What Can Data Tell Us?

Harvard Data Science Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 35:17


In this episode we discuss the hotly debated topic of marijuana legalization. While 18 states have legalized recreational marijuana and the United States House of Representatives just passed a landmark marijuana legalization bill, cannabis is still an illegal substance under federal law in the United States.  With the help of two experts, we dive into the data behind the arguments for and against the legalization of marijauna. Our guests: Dr. Silvia Martins, MD, PhD, Director of the Substance Use Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology at Columbia University. Lt. Diane Goldstein, Executive Director of Law Enforcement Action Partnership (LEAP) and law enforcement veteran having worked in investigations, crisis negotiation, and gang enforcement for 21 years.

University of Iowa College of Public Health
Cancer surveillance, epidemiology, advice for students, and much more with Dr. Charles Lynch

University of Iowa College of Public Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 45:43


Dr. Charles Lynch is an influential, long-time faculty member and epidemiologist at the University of Iowa, perhaps best known as the Medical Director and Principal Investigator of the State Health Registry of Iowa/Iowa Cancer Registry. This week's episode is a terrific wide-ranging conversation with Dr. Lynch, hosted by Alex and Radha. They chat about his career, the many projects he's been involved in, his impending retirement, and advice for current students. A transcript of this episode is available at https://www.public-health.uiowa.edu/news-items/from-the-front-row-cancer-surveillance-epidemiology-and-more-with-dr-charles-lynch/ Have an idea for a show? Questions or comments for our hosts? Send email to cph-gradambassador@uiowa.edu

The Baroo
Talking Osteoarthritis with Dr. Heather Oxford

The Baroo

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 41:32


Did you know 1 in 5 dogs as young as 1 year old are estimated to have osteoarthritis? In this episode I chat with integrative veterinarian  Dr. Heather Oxford about how to identify whether your pup is struggling with mobility issues, and discuss some integrative approaches to pain management that can improve their quality of life. Dr. Heather Oxford received her Master's of Public Health in Epidemiology from Emory University in 2000 and worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the Foodborne & Diarrheal Diseases Branch, and also in the Viral and Rickettsial Diseases Branch. She attended the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, where she received her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine degree in 2005.  Upon completion of a small animal veterinary internship at California Animal Hospital in 2006, she practiced conventional small animal medicine in Los Angeles for 2 years before becoming certified in acupuncture at the Chi Institute, and rehabilitation medicine at the Canine Rehabilitation Institute in 2008.  Dr. Oxford has been integrating Western and Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine with Animal Rehabilitation to optimize pets' quality of life for over 13 years. Useful links from this episode:https://heatheroxford.comhttps://www.ellevetsciences.com/cbd-science/Lick Mat -https://amzn.to/38MAFa9Pet Step- https://amzn.to/3MzKYNw*some of these links are affiliate links 

Rising
Monkeypox Panic Sets In, Elon Musk Faces #MeToo Allegation, Biden's Poll Numbers Tank, And More: Rising 5.23.22

Rising

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 77:55


Today on Rising, Biden mixed on monkeypox messaging, #BillGatesBioTerrorist trends (00:00)Elon Musk faces #MeToo allegation, MSM calls it ‘credible'... but is it?: Robby Soave (11:56)Pfizer CEO talks INGESTIBLE microchip Schizophrenia pills in VIRAL unearthed 2018 clip (24:00)Biden polls TANK as voters say he is SLOW TO ACT on economy (34:01)Hillary Clinton lawyer planned 'October SURPRISE,' SCHEMED to INJECT FBI into '16 campaign: Feds (46:01)Bill de Blasio running for CONGRESS in Manhattan amid NY Dem IMPLOSION over redistricting (56:33)Mitt Romney OPENLY calls for NUCLEAR RETALIATION against Russia in HAWKISH NYT op-ed: Ryan & Robby (01:05:11)Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillMore about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers.

Viewpoints
Masking Up Past COVID

Viewpoints

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 11:53


Wondering what to do with all those face masks you've accumulated over the past two years? Well, these face coverings are good for more than just protecting against COVID-19. Long before the pandemic, millions of people in countries across East Asia were accustomed to wearing a mask when they had a cold, it was peak flu season or just in a crowded space. We speak with two experts about the future of face masks in the U.S. Learn more at: viewpointsradio.org/masking-up-past-covid/

Cardionerds
208. Atrial Fibrillation: Epidemiology, Health Equity, & The Double Paradox with Dr. Larry Jackson

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 38:36


Atrial fibrillation may reach pandemic proportions in the next 2-3 decades. Factors that drive this phenomenon have been studied in predominantly White populations, leading to a significant underrepresentation of certain racial/ethnic groups in atrial fibrillation epidemiological studies. Most atrial fibrillation epidemiology studies suggest that the non-Hispanic Black population has a lower incidence/prevalence of atrial fibrillation, despite a higher risk factor burden (“Afib paradox”). At the same time, non-Hispanic Blacks have worse outcomes compared to the White population and underrepresented populations and women are less likely than White men to receive optimal guideline-based therapies for atrial fibrillation. In this episode, CardioNerds Dr. Kelly Arps (Co-Chair Atrial Fibrillation series, Cardiology fellow at Duke University), Dr. Colin Blumenthal (Co-Chair Atrial Fibrillation series, CardioNerds Academy House Faculty Leader for House Jones, Cardiology fellow at the University of Pennsylvania), and Dr. Dinu-Valentin Balanescu (CardioNerds Academy Faculty for House Jones, rising internal medicine chief resident at Beaumont Hospital), discuss with Dr. Larry Jackson (cardiac electrophysiologist and Vice Chief of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Division of Cardiology at Duke University) about atrial fibrillation epidemiology and health equity, challenges and possible solutions to improving diversity in clinical trials, and race/ethnicity/sex/gender differences in the detection, management, and outcomes of atrial fibrillation. Audio editing by CardioNerds Academy Intern, student doctor Akiva Rosenzveig. This CardioNerds Atrial Fibrillation series is a multi-institutional collaboration made possible by contributions of stellar fellow leads and expert faculty from several programs, led by series co-chairs, Dr. Kelly Arps and Dr. Colin Blumenthal. This series is supported by an educational grant from the Bristol Myers Squibb and Pfizer Alliance. All CardioNerds content is planned, produced, and reviewed solely by CardioNerds. We have collaborated with VCU Health to provide CME. Claim free CME here! Disclosure: Larry R. Jackson II, MD, MHs, has the following relevant financial relationships:Advisor or consultant for: Biosense Webster Inc.Speaker or a member of a speakers bureau for: Biotronik Inc.; Medtronic Inc. Pearls • Notes • References • Guest Profiles • Production Team CardioNerds Atrial Fibrillation PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Pearls and Quotes - Atrial Fibrillation: Epidemiology, Health Equity, & The Double Paradox Atrial fibrillation confers an enormous public health burden. It is estimated that it will reach pandemic proportions over the next 30 years, with potentially 100-180 million people worldwide suffering from this condition.Large epidemiological atrial fibrillation registries have very small populations of underrepresented groups. More diverse enrollment in clinical trials is essential and may be obtained by increasing diversity among research staff, principal investigators, and steering committees, and use of mobile/telehealth technologies to remove bias related to differences in presentation. The CardioNerds Clinical Trials Network specifically aims pair equitable trial enrollment with trainee personal and professional development.Most atrial fibrillation epidemiology studies suggest that the non-Hispanic Black population has lower incidence/prevalence of atrial fibrillation, despite higher risk factor burden. This “paradox” is likely due to a multifactorial process, with clinical differences, socioeconomic factors, and genetic factors contributing.Underrepresented populations are less likely than White patients to receive optimal guideline-based management of atrial fibrillation.

Lupus: The Expert Series
The Expert Series S5E5: Self care and self management for people with lupus

Lupus: The Expert Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 25:59


In this month's episode, we talk about self-care/self-management with Dr. May Choi. Dr. Choi is a rheumatologist, clinician scientist, and Assistant Professor at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary. She has a background and training that include Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology at Harvard University and a lupus fellowship. Dr. Choi is also the Associate Director of MitogenDx Laboratory for novel autoantibody and biomarker testing for autoimmune diseases and the Associate Director of Research for the University of Calgary Lupus Centre of Excellence. Resources Here is a resource and worksheet to help find support near you. If you want a list of program and services the Lupus Foundation of America provides, you can find information here. Read about lupus and depression, and a coping with lupus strategies worksheet. Depending on where you are in your lupus journey, consider signing up for Strategies to Embracing Living with Lupus Fearlessly, or SELF. This program is self-paced program and can guide someone to reach milestones that can help improve quality of life.

The Gary Bisbee Show
64: What Will Variant Sigma Look Like?, with Michael T. Osterholm, Ph.D., Regents Professor, Division of Environmental Health Science; Director, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) University of Minnesota

The Gary Bisbee Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 52:02


Meet Michael Osterholm, Ph.D.:Michael Osterholm, Ph.D. is a Regents Professor, the Director of the Center for Infectious Diseases Research and Policy (CIDRAP), and McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Osterholm was appointed to President Biden's Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board. He is author of “Deadliest Enemy” and hosts “The Osterholm Update: COVID-19” podcast. Dr. Osterholm received a Ph.D. and MS in Environmental Health and an MPH in Epidemiology from the University of Minnesota. Key Insights:Dr. Osterholm is a distinguished leader in a variety of areas including as a scientist, public health official, author, professor, and advisor. The State of the Pandemic. Pre-existing immunity from vaccines and prior infections clearly reduce severe illness and deaths. However, Dr. Osterholm questions, what's after Omicron? What will variant Pi and Sigma look like? Viral evolution indicates that upcoming variants will be more infectious and have more immune system evasion. We must be prepared. (13:16)Lessons from Pandemics. There are sociological lessons to learn from previous disease outbreaks. The duration of the 1918 pandemic was around three years. However, after about a year, the public gave up on public health recommendations, and stopped acting on or accepting protections. (28:41)Vaccine Technology. Dr. Osterholm predicts we will see new vaccine technologies that are more immune enhancing. COVID-19 mRNA vaccines provide a rapid antibody response, which wanes in a matter of months. Adenovirus vaccines initially seemed less effective, but result in a stronger T-cell response, which is a more durable immunity. New vaccine technology will need to produce a complex immune response, rather than focusing on just the antibody response. (30:49) Relevant Links: Check out his podcast “The Osterholm Update: COVID-19”Check out Dr. Osterholm'd book “Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs”Watch “American public 'done' with pandemic, even if it's not done with us: Osterholm | ABC News”