Podcasts about households

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Best podcasts about households

Latest podcast episodes about households

ChooseFI
407 | Kristi | Households of FI Update

ChooseFI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 53:34


In this episode: growth during the job hunt, exploring entrepreneurship, tips for career growth, and second generation FI. It's only natural that on the journey to FI you will want to pivot. Whether it is your financial outlook or even your career outlook, it's only natural to have reservations about making a change that could benefit you in the long run.  On this week's episode of  The Households of FI, we are joined by Kristi to fill us in on how her FI journey is going, as well as discuss the topic of “leveling-up”. Changing jobs or moving on to the next career chapter while on the journey to FI can seem farfetched, because often times we want to stick to what is familiar and what is more in line with our plan. However, there is no shame in expanding your network and your options in terms of finding better employment that is more aligned with your values! Don't be afraid to be “un-stuck” and see what career options you have, and make sure you are surrounded by those who are aligned with the same principles as you are!  Timestamps: 2:03 - Introduction 3:41 - An Update From Kristy 5:53 - Growth During The Job Hunt 13:03 - Tips For Career Growth 19:45 - Exploring Entrepreneurship 23:39 - The Finances Of Engagement 27:07 - Being On The Same Page Financially As Your Partner 31:48 - Where Is Your Salary Raise Going? 38:59 - Laying The Seeds For Second Generation FI 51:52 - Conclusion Resources Mentioned In Today's Episode: Kristi & Big Ern | ChooseFI Ep 259 Is My Company's Stock Overpriced | P/E Ratio Explained | ChooseFI Ep 314 Career Hacking With ESI Money | ChooseFI Ep 23 Negotiate Your Salary With Tori Dunlap | ChooseFI Ep 147 How to Negotiate Your Salary Without Burning Bridges | Financial Mechanic | ChooseFI Ep 211 Rebel Entrepreneur Alan and Katie Donegan's Free Extraordinary Life Course Money With Katie | Katie Gatti | ChooseFI Ep 399 Transition Planning from a Military Career on the Path to FI | ChooseFI Ep 296 The Simple Startup Subscribe to The FI Weekly! More Helpful Links and Resources: Earn $1,000 in cashback with ChooseFI's 3-card credit card strategy Share FI by sending a friend ChooseFI: Your Blueprint to Financial Independence Keep learning or start a new side hustle with one of our educational courses Commission-Free Investing with

New Normal Rep's Play Date
Step 9 | Episode Two: Two Households

New Normal Rep's Play Date

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 24:36


Episode Two: Two Households Emily confides in her mother, whose different approach to managing the crisis puts the two at odds. Emily begins a correspondence with Rob as he tries to make amends with his fractured family. *** Written by: Jack Canfora Directed by: Eleanor Handley Starring: Jill Eikenberry and Carol Todd

The Leading Voices in Food
E185: How and why do households waste food?

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 20:24


Did you know that each year the average American family of four loses $1,500 to uneaten food? What's more, consumer food waste is the largest category of waste sent to landfills. When food is wasted, so is the land, water, labor, and energy that were used in producing, processing, transporting, preparing, storing and disposing of the discarded food. So why does household food waste and plate waste happen? We have two guests today to help us explore this topic. First, Dr. Roni Neff from Johns Hopkins University. Roni studies wasted food, food system resilience, and climate change through a public health lens. Second, we have Dr. Brian Roe from the Ohio State University. Brian focuses on food waste and behavioral and consumer economics. Interview Summary   This podcast is co-sponsored by the Recipes Food Waste Research Network Project, led by American University, and funded by the National Science Foundation (2115405).   Norbert: So our first question is to you, Roni. Could you help us understand why food goes uneaten, and why do you avoid using the term food waste.   Roni: Great questions. So I'd like to give a simple answer, but the reality is that waste of food is caused by a whole mess of reasons, all intersecting and reinforcing each other. It's become part of the fabric of how we operate as a society. It's part of the functioning of our food system, and it's our way of life. That makes it challenging to address, and it's also what makes it very interesting. So Brian and I were on a National Academy of Sciences panel recently that closely reviewed the literature on consumer waste of food. We actually identified 11 distinct factors that shape it. Let me summarize it in two main buckets. First, our food system pushes us to waste through upstream policy and marketing factors that provide us with an overabundance of food. They encourage us to buy or take more than we need, and they leave us with misperceptions about what food is good quality and safe to eat. The second is that even as we don't like wasting food, with everything else that we care about, it doesn't necessarily rise to the top of our minds or priorities. So we waste because we forget, we change our plans. We choose not to eat foods we don't want. We take the path of convenience. I don't say that to blame or shame us, because we all do it, and our society and our norms push us there. And if you think you don't, try tracking what you throw out for a week and you'll see it. But also, shame isn't productive. The trick is to put in place strategies to help us.   I want to say one other thing about drivers from a public health perspective. In consumer surveys that we've done, the top two reasons that people give for throwing out food are concern about food safety and concern about eating food that's good quality. Of course we don't want anyone eating unsafe food, but actually the food is often perfectly safe. And sometimes the problem is a lack of knowledge of how to tell it is okay or risk aversion. Date labels play an important role, and we need a national standardization. But also its messages. We in public health have pushed this idea that freshness is the way to convince people to eat healthfully. That's a disservice. When it's cooked into a meal, you often can't tell the difference if it was frozen, if it was a little wilted, it tastes just as good and it saves us money. Let me also answer your question about why I avoid using the term food waste. I prefer the term wasted food because it puts the emphasis on the idea that this is food, it's not waste. If we catch it before it's too late, we or someone else could eat it. And especially as we get to talking about recovering food that's good for people to eat, it's food, and using the word waste can be harmful.   Norbert: I really do appreciate that definition. That helps us reframe how we think about this challenge that we face and how we can do something differently.   Brenna: Brian, let's transition to you for a minute. Can you tell us about the economic decision people make when food is wasted?   Brian: It's not actually just one decision, right. If we think just even at the household level, it's a whole bunch of decisions. There is this great article a few years back by Laura Block and some of her co-authors, and she talked about the squander sequence, which I think is a very apt description of what's going on, even in small segments of the food supply chain like the household. We're thinking about our own situation. We're thinking about the first economic decision, how much food do I bring in to the home at any given point. And you know, there's a big fixed cost. You're getting yourself organized. Maybe you're taking yourself to the store, you're setting up your online food delivery. So you're making decisions and tradeoffs about do I buy a few more items, a few larger sized items, et cetera. You have to make tradeoffs about how much to acquire and bring into the home. Sometimes we lean to the side of safety and buy a little bit more food than we need. And then we're in our homes, we have all this food there, and we're thinking about how much do I prepare, and who's going to be at the table in a particular situation. And again, we're making tradeoffs about what types of food do I want to prepare, how much do I prepare, is that item, like Roni was saying, is it on the cusp of having a date on its label that's getting close, do I add that or not. So there's decisions being made there about how much to actually put onto the plate. And then there decisions about do I finish my plate or I'm trying to lose weight as well. So maybe I don't eat all the food on my plate, particularly if I'm at a restaurant, and they serve me very large portions. Then I have to make decisions about do I want to wrap that up and bringing that home with me. Or if I'm at home, is there enough there to actually put into the refrigerator. And then of course we're sitting there, it's Thursday night, and maybe friends stop over and want to go out to dinner with us. But yet we had food there sitting in the fridge that we were planning to prepare. And we have to make those decisions about tradeoffs, about the spontaneity of the moment, and kind of the perceived fun of that versus what do we do with the food that we've already have that might then go unused in our refrigerator.   So there's this whole sequence of decisions that have to be made, and we're always being tugged by risk aversion, whether we want to make sure there's enough food, it's safe enough, whether we want to not embarrass ourselves socially by not having enough food on hand. Then there's the convenience of, rather than dealing with all those small bits of leftover in the fridge and whether we can do something clever with them to make those interesting, or just pack it in and order a pizza instead. So there's just all this whole sequence of decisions that have to be made.   Brenna: That's really interesting, Brian. I know in our house there are lots of layers of questions in terms of how we go through our food, so thank you for saying that in a bit more detail so people understand deciding to waste is not typically a simple decision on the part of consumers, but it's one hopefully we can impact. That brings me to my next question. There have been a number of interventions suggested to reduce food waste. Which ones do you think would be most effective?   Brian That's a good question, and I don't think there's overwhelming evidence yet, as we've talked about amongst ourselves, and we know there's just limited good data out there upon which to make these decisions, and even less data to help us evaluate past interventions. But as I've thought about this, and I kind of think about that whole squander sequence that we just talked about, and I kind of reflect on some modeling that economists have done in the past thinking about sequential decision processes. There's this idea of a weakest link technology, where it's the weakest link that reduces the ability for us to do well. So in the case of food waste, you have to not only do one decision appropriately, but every point in that process of bringing the food into the back of the house until it gets into somebody's stomach you have to execute in order for that food to actually be ingested and therefore not wasted. In those models, what's shown is that those last steps are sometimes the most crucial and the most valuable to making sure that the end goal - that is getting the food eaten rather than wasted - takes place. I think focusing on helping consumers at the very end of that process is very critical. And I've seen this very clever intervention that was put out there by, of all people, Hellmans. They're a Unilever company and they make the mayonnaise. They have this very clever kind of gamification where they do a “fridge night.” They kind of challenge people to go into their fridge and make one more meal with the food in their refrigerator each week. They've got an app that supports it, and it helps build confidence among consumers to be able to go boldly into the refrigerator and create a recipe that they think will be used and useful and enjoyed by their family. So I think being at the very end of that process is important - so you can make mistakes earlier in that big squander sequence, but there you can kind of play catch up at the end and put together something that will be used and reduce waste at that front. So that's the one that's really struck me recently as being very intriguing and I'd love to see even more evaluation of that intervention and how it works out in the field.   Brenna: Absolutely, I'm very curious to know how many people are using that app. It's an interesting concept.   Roni: Yes!   Brenna: Roni, what perspectives would you like to add in terms of effective food waste reduction interventions?   Roni: Sure, so I would echo all the things that Brian said, and I'll take it from the opposite end. On the one hand, there are things that are very kind of simple and direct. The flip side of that is that there's a lot of evidence from a lot of domains of behavior change for a very multifaceted type of intervention and hitting it from as many angles as possible at once. So a lot of the countries where they have been having really good success, often there's consumer education combined with policy change, and people are hearing about it in schools and they're hearing about it in communities. So as big and as broad as we can get in terms of how we intervene, it seems like we might be most likely to help shift the lever at a broad perspective as well.   Norbert: Thank you for this conversation on interventions, the ways that policy makers, organizations, communities can actually make a change. So Brian, I have a question for you. You have talked about this example of the gamified app, of sort of like a "Chopped" version online, but I'm wondering how do researchers evaluate if these interventions actually work, and what kind of measurement is really needed?   Brian: Yeah, and just for our listeners who don't know, Norbert and Brenna do awesome research in this area as well, and are very good experts on measurement as well. So you'll be familiar with a lot of these approaches, and Roni as well, but yeah, measurement is always a trick. Because people really don't like to mess around with the things that they no longer want. So measuring waste is always a tricky endeavor and there are different ways to go about it. You can do the very kind of nitty gritty, and try to collect it maybe at the curbside, or maybe convince consumers or processors to collect it in their own buildings, and then have you and your research team go out and dig through it and measure it and weigh it in all sorts of ways. That can be very effective. In the household setting, sometimes, though you don't get everything because things go down the sink or into your pet's bowl, or maybe into a compost bin that goes someplace else, so sometimes you miss things there. You can also beg people to measure their waste blow-by-blow, day-by-day through some type of diary. We can try to do things to help them ease the burden of doing this, maybe with a photo-based app or something like that. Or you can do what a lot of people do, and I do some of this myself, which is to ask people to remember types of food and the amounts of food that they wasted over a particular period, perhaps over the course of a week. That can be very effective. But typically, people are forgetful or might be a bit shy about reporting things that they've wasted. So a lot of studies suggest that typically people underestimate the amount of waste that they create when using that approach. So there's probably no perfect approach to doing this, but just understanding the pros and the cons, the strengths and weaknesses of each of those measurement approaches is kind of critical for the researcher to understand what's the best way that they can go in and evaluate an intervention or get a baseline or understand trends over time.   Norbert: Thanks Brian. I have got to say this sounds so messy. And yes, I mean literally messy, going in through people's trash, but you really made a really compelling point about how difficult this is, and that there are an array of ways that researchers have tried to measure this. Where do you think concerns for how people want to be perceived fits into this difficulty of measuring, when asking people or trying to even measure physical waste, when people know that they're being evaluated?   Brian: Yeah, there can be what's known as reactivity to a measurement approach. The sociological Heisenberg effect, if you will. And so that's where some of the passive measurement approaches, such as doing curbside audits of an entire neighborhood for example. So you don't have to worry about privacy concerns because you've mixed 40 different households together in one collection of garbage gives you a baseline so that then when you go to the household level, you can kind of estimate the amount of underreporting or reactivity that might be there. There's some tricks of the trade to be able to back out how much under reporting there might be.   Norbert: Roni, I want to shift gears a little bit, and I want to understand how is wasted food a critical question at the intersection of nutrition, climate change and household economics?   Roni: Great question. So climate change and food security, including nutrition security, are at the top of our list of our most pressing global challenges. As food prices keep rising, households are feeling this strain. So we care more and more about what we can do to stretch the food dollar. The beauty of focusing on wasted food is that it's one single lever that moves the needle on these multiple issues. It's not the solution to any of them, and there can be trade offs, but let's look at the potential impacts.   From a climate perspective, the International Governmental Panel on Climate Change estimated last year that about eight to 10% of our total global human-caused greenhouse gas emissions are coming out of wasted food alone. Not only is it impactful, but wasted food supports the urgency of rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Experts have focused particularly on methane, which is one greenhouse gas, and it's short-lived and it's powerful, and it's key in wasted food, because it comes both from our food production and from food that's decaying in landfills. So cutting waste of food has been recognized as a key climate strategy because it helps us get to that rapid reduction.   When it comes to nutrition and food security, there's this intersection because the same strategy, in many cases, can address waste of food and improve food security. So for example, some shared risk factors for poor nutrition and waste would include large portion size and oversupply. Then, when you think about like efforts to bring in healthier food like in school meals, unless the food tastes good enough, the kids won't eat it. So you lose on both nutrition and waste. Then as we turn to household economics, as was mentioned in the introduction, we're spending about $1,500 a year for a household of four on food that we're not eating. So preventing that waste extends our food dollar. Also knowledge that we might, waste of food could also, it does also lead some households to not purchase healthy or perishable foods, especially if they have lower incomes. So it advances nutrition to have strategies to reduce that waste. So one other reason why wasted food is a critical question at the intersection of all these issues is that many of the solutions that advance change on these issues are politically fraught. Generally speaking, wasted food is not. Left or right, like none of us like waste. Everyone is a fan of saving money. So I see where working on wasted food is an opportunity to address these issues with less of those kinds of political challenges and many collateral benefits.   Norbert: Roni, thank you so much for that commentary on the political nature of addressing this. I mean, that is something that lots of people can get behind, and I appreciate how politically fraught our moment is, and I appreciate the way you framed this, and I'm really grateful for you raising the concern of families from low income households and the challenge of food waste and nutrition access and food security. Thank you so much for bringing those together, because I think that's an under-discussed topic. So Brian, I want to hear your impression or thoughts about the intersection of nutrition, climate change and household economics. So how do you see wasted food as critical to that question around that intersection?   Brian: Yeah, Roni touched on so many great points there. Some others I'll amplify are that, yeah, really, it's an accessible topic that people can connect with on many different levels, whether it be the nutrition, whether it be on the environment, climate change, whether it be on municipal issues. Nobody likes to build more landfills. Nobody wants to be by a landfill, and what is 20% of most landfills, it's typically wasted food. So even at the municipal level it can be something of a rallying point, and something that provides meaningful benefits at that level. At the system level, I think another thing that goes unappreciated is we talk about nutrition, and most people want to focus on, for example, food recovery that is taking food, that might have not found an immediate home in the food system, recovering that, and then redirecting it to others in the food system that might need it. More fundamentally, if we can right size the food system, if we reduce our wasted food from say the one third that we see now down to even 20%, that means we can also push down food prices at an aggregate level. That really helps nutrition, because we know families in need who have difficulties finding the food they need, oftentimes it is a financial issue. Bringing down food prices through reduction of waste can have large positive implications for everybody, including those who are really struggling to meet their financial needs and get stressed by their food budgets. So I think those systematic issues are really something we have to appreciate as well.   Bios   Roni Neff is an Associate Professor in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's department of Environmental Health & Engineering and Center for a Livable Future. She received her AB from Brown University, ScM from Harvard, and PhD from Johns Hopkins. Previously she worked for 10 years in public health practice and policy at the community, municipal and national levels. She edited the widely-used textbook, Introduction to the U.S. Food System: Public Health, Environment, Equity. Her team has just published the guidebook, Food System Resilience: A Planning Guide for Local Governments, developed in partnership with 5 U.S. cities.   Brian Roe is the Van Buren Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics at Ohio State University. Roe attended the University of Wisconsin – Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in Agricultural Economics. Roe went on to receive a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland. Prior to his employment at Ohio State, Roe worked on policy issues surrounding food safety and health information disclosure as a Staff Fellow at the US Food and Drug Administration in Washington, DC.  

Dave and Dujanovic
40% of households will pay no federal income tax this year.

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 8:32


According to MarketWatch and the Tax Policy Center, 40% of households will pay no federal income tax this year. The percentage declined from 60% during the pre-pandemic times two years ago. Is this good news? Susan Spiers, a Utah Association Certified Public Accountant, joins the show to explain how this works, what changed, and why.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ChooseFI
405 | Matt & Meg | Households of FI Update

ChooseFI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 70:49


The Erotic Philosopher
How We Bond, Relationship Satisfaction & Raising Children In Polyamorous Households

The Erotic Philosopher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 67:52


Welcome back to Season 4 of The Erotic Philosopher. In this episode we talk with Dr Eli Sheff, one of the world's foremost relationships researchers. Dr. Elisabeth “Eli” Sheff is a researcher, expert witness, coach and educator. With a PhD in Sociology and certification as a Sexuality Educator from AASECT, Dr. Eli specializes in gender and sexual minority families, consensual non-monogamy, and kink/BDSM. Sheff is the foremost academic expert on polyamorous families with children, and her 25+ year Polyamorous Family Study is the only longitudinal study of poly families with children to date. Dr. Eli has served as faculty at seven universities and currently chairs the CNM Legal Issues Team for the American Psychological Association, Division 44 Committee on CNM. Sheff has published four books and over 25 journal articles and chapters and is currently editing a series of books on relationship and sexual diversity. In this episode we explore all things relationships with a particular focus on polyamorous families with kids, legal issues for sex and gender minorities & different forms of bonding Find out more about The Erotic Philosopher  and more about Dr Eli Sheff

RNZ: Checkpoint
Low unemployment figures get pessimistic response from economists

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 4:05


Households and businesses are bracing for more pain on the horizon in the form of higher interest rates, as the central bank continues to wage war on inflation. The Reserve Bank has warned the cost of borrowing will continue to rise, as the cost of living continues to bite. Persisently low unemployment has been hailed as good news by the government. But there's a more pessimistic response from some economists who say that's putting more pressure on inflation. Here's our political editor, Jane Patterson.

Resolve's Gestalt University
ReSolve Riffs with Cem Karsan on Regime Change and Strategies to Navigate an Inflationary Decade

Resolve's Gestalt University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 104:23


It was our great pleasure to welcome back Cem Karsan (also known as @jam_croissant on Twitter), Founder and Sr. Managing Partner at Kai Volatility Advisors. This deeply insightful conversation included topics such as: A recap of the last few months in equity markets Volume-weighted time and why seasonality matters more than most people know The acceleration of gamma, vanna and charm – a dangerous time to be short equities Dealer positioning as a major gravitational force in markets, often overlooked The ‘game of chicken' played between speculators, hedgers and market makers Less ‘put hedging' begets the currently very low skew observed Why the first and last two weeks of a year are so important The large impact of retail speculative activity and challenges to market makers Households still sitting on very large excess savings, which is often making its way into equity markets Buy the dip – investors' conditioning over the last 40 years The risk of another lost decade for equity investors Millennials vs Boomers – a generational tussle Why the American dream has become increasingly unattainable to most And much more This is “ReSolve's Riffs” – live on YouTube every Friday afternoon to debate the most relevant investment topics of the day, hosted by Adam Butler, Mike Philbrick and Rodrigo Gordillo of ReSolve Global* and Richard Laterman of ReSolve Asset Management Inc.   *ReSolve Global Inc. refers to ReSolve Asset Management SEZC (Cayman) which is registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a commodity trading advisor and commodity pool operator. This registration is administered through the National Futures Association (“NFA”). Further, ReSolve Global Inc. is a registered person with the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority.

The Porch
Bolo & Darnell Talk NFL, HBCU's, and Why Men Are The Head of The Households.

The Porch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 56:56


What's up Porch family! You're in for another great show. In this episode, we start off discussing our favorite NFL teams (Colts & Bears), Jackson St. being on College Gameday, the Kanye West controversy, and why men should be the head of the household. Grab you a drink, grab a chair and pull up to the Porch! SUBSCRIBE: https://youtu.be/pvi7VoGr31o Thanks so much for listening. If you vibe with the podcast, please Rate it 5 Stars ⭐️ on Apple Podcasts & whatever other platform that you listen to podcasts! We appreciate the support!!! ✊

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: 20 Million American Households Are Behind On Their Power Bills

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 13:55


In what can only be classified as a disturbing report, there are over 20 million Americans who are behind on their power bills and who are in jeopardy of having their power shut off as winter approaches. As Americans continue to struggle with sky high inflation, insanely high rent and food prices, the last thing they need is another issue thrown on their already bent backs. Yet here we are.(commercial at 9:06)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/record-20-million-americans-are-behind-on-their-power-bills-and-face-cutoffs/ar-AA116LmE?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=bc3f47965b9a13153e755236d06ce3f8

Thoughts on the Market
Seth Carpenter: The Next Steps for the Bank of England

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 3:35 Very Popular


As the U.K. attempts stabilize its debt to GDP ratio, as well as curb inflation, the question becomes, to what extent will the Bank of England continue to tighten monetary policy?----- Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Seth Carpenter, Global Chief Economist for Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about recent developments in the U.K. and what the implications might be for other economies. It's Wednesday, October 26th, at 10 a.m. in New York.The political environment in the U.K. is fluid, to say the least. For markets, the most important shift was the fiscal policy U-turn. The tax cuts proposed by former Chancellor Kwarteng have been withdrawn apart from two measures related to the National Health Service and property taxes. In total, the reversal of the mini budget tax cuts brings in £32 billion of revenue for the Treasury. Media reports suggested that Chancellor Hunt was told by the fiscal watchdog, the OBR, that medium term stability of the debt to GDP ratio would require about £72 billion of higher revenue. There's a gap of about £40 billion implying tighter fiscal policy to come. The clearest market impact came from the swings in gilt yields following the original fiscal announcement. The 80 basis point sell off in 30 year gilts prompted the Bank of England to announce an intervention to restore financial stability for a central bank about to start actively selling bonds to change course and begin buying anew was a delicate proposition. But so far, the needle appears to have been threaded. And yet, despite the recent calm, the majority of client conversations over the past month have included concern about other possible market disruptions. Part of the proposed fiscal plan was meant to address surging energy prices. Inflation in the UK is 10.1% of which only 6.5% is core inflation. The large share of inflation from food and energy prices works like a tax. From a household perspective, the average British household has a disposable income of approximately £31,000 a year and went from paying just over £1,000 a year for electricity and gas to roughly £4,000. Households lost 10% of their disposable income. Of course, the inflation dynamics in the U.K. resemble those in the euro area, in the latter headline inflation is 10%, but core inflation constitutes just under half of that. The hit to discretionary income is even larger for the continent. Our Europe growth forecasts have been below consensus for this reason. We look for more fiscal measures there, but our basic view is that fiscal support can only mitigate the depth of the recession, not avoid it entirely. Central banks are tightening monetary policy to restrain demand and thereby bring down inflation. The necessary outcome, then, is a shortfall in economic activity. For the U.K. the structural frictions from Brexit exacerbate the issue and the Bank of England, like our U.K. team, expect the labor force itself to remain inert. Consequently, after the recession, even when growth resumes, we expect the level of GDP to be about one and a half percent below the pre-COVID trend at the end of 2023. For the Bank of England, we are looking for the bank rate to rise to 4%, below market expectations. The shift in the fiscal stance tipped the balance for our U.K. economist Bruna Skarica. She revised her call for the next meeting down to 75 basis points from 100 basis points. And so while the next meeting may be a close call, in the bigger picture we think there will be less tightening than markets are pricing in because of the tighter fiscal outlook. Thanks for listening. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and share Thoughts on the Market with a friend or colleague today.

RSA Events
After the summer of discontent: where next and what's needed now?

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 42:13


Households, businesses and even essential services are feeling the pressure, with the poorest in our society most harshly affected.To add to the burden, wages and salaries have failed to rise in line with inflation. The past summer saw several sectors push back on this, as train operators, posties, barristers, dock workers and more went out on strike. Some success was achieved, but for many, their battle is ongoing. With cost of living pressures expected to worsen over the winter, what kind of support is needed now from employers and from the government? And what can the ‘summer of discontent' teach us about the power of collective action and how people can best make their voice heard in the workplace and wider society?Hear representatives from Citizens Advice, the Living Wage Foundation and the Trades Union Congress as they explore these urgent questions and their potential solutions.  #RSAdiscontentBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficial 

ChooseFI
402 | Vivian | Households of FI Update

ChooseFI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 42:12 Very Popular


In this episode: the beauty of community, misleading expectations, doing what's best for your situation, and stress reduction. The Journey to FI is hardly linear and is full of ebbs and flows. While it may seem easier to share your wins/successes within this community, we know it can be even harder to share the moments of this journey that feel like setbacks. On this week's installment of the Households of FI series, we are joined again by Vivian to fill us in on how her FI journey is going, and the importance of finding support within this community. Everyone's FI journey is unique to them, but it doesn't mean that you are alone! The beauty of FI is that it offers you a community to share your successes, as well as share your struggles. By being vocal and unafraid to admit that you are having a hard time, you are not only sure to garner support from others facing similar battles, but can find a renewed sense of motivation to make you feel more accountable and present on this journey!  Timestamps: 1:57 - Introduction 4:14 - The Beauty of Community 7:56 - Expectations Are Misleading 13:37 - It's Not Black and White, Do What's Best For You 18:30 - Ask For What You Deserve 22:10 - Reducing Stress and Addressing Your Situation 28:51 - Life Is Not A Straight Path 31:02 - Retirement Withdrawals and The Market 38:33 - You Are Not Alone 40:14 - Conclusion Resources Mentioned In Today's Episode:  Introducing Our Households of FI!! Part 1 | Ep 221 If People Can Do It I Can Do It Too | Vivian Connects With Leslie Tayne | Households Of Fi | Ep 255 Navigating a Multigenerational Household | The Financial Tortoise | EP 302 Brian Feroldi JL Collins "Just Keep Buying: Proven Ways to Save Money And Build Your Wealth" By Nick Maggiulli Mega Backdoor Roths: How They Work More Helpful Links and Resources:  Earn $1,000 in cashback with ChooseFI's 3-card credit card strategy Share FI by sending a friend ChooseFI: Your Blueprint to Financial Independence Track your personal finances with Personal Capital Keep learning or start a new side hustle with one of our educational courses Slash your cell phone bill without sacrificing service with Mint Mobile

Business daily
UK inflation back at 40-year high as households struggle

Business daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 5:29


Inflation in the UK has spiked back to its 40-year high of 10.1% as households and businesses continue to struggle with soaring food and energy prices. The data come "despite the Bank of England trying to turn down the heat on this bubbling pot of prices", says Susannah Streeter, Senior Markets Analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown. The figures will add more pressure to the struggling government of Prime Minister Liz Truss.

The Dana & Parks Podcast
Dana & Parks discuss more Atomic Households Hr 4

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 37:01


ChooseFI
400 | Zach & Marilyn | Households of FI Update

ChooseFI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 58:48 Very Popular


In this episode: house hacking, benefits and compensation packages, earning extra income and side hustles, and not setting perfection as your goal. We know achieving FI doesn't happen overnight, and rarely does it happen perfectly according to plan. Life happens, changes happen, and uncertainty usually finds a way to throw you off your planned path. This shouldn't be something to fear! Today in the Households of FI series we are joined again by Zach to fill us in on how his FI journey has progressed over the last couple years, as well as to discuss the importance of re-adjustment! While failure is never an easy thing to accept, the fear of failing may deprive you of some excellent learning opportunities. By remaining intentional with your FI plan rather than striving for perfection, you will allow yourself to overcome uncomfortable lulls and expand your journey to places you might not have thought were possible!  Timestamps: 1:51 - Introductions 4:45 - Zach and Marilyn Update 7:16 - House Hacking and Limiting Expenses 13:30 - Life is Lumpy, Perfection Isn't The Goal 21:39 - Examining The Whole Compensation Package 31:40 - Earning Extra Income 40:15 - Zach's 6 Year Path To FI 46:21 - If You Weren't Afraid, What Would You Do? 53:15 - Being Open to Exploring 56:53 - Conclusion Resources Mentioned In Today's Episode: Households of FI-Zach and Marilyn Talk Real Estate Investing With Paula Pant | ChooseFI Ep 247 Discovering the Power of FU Money | ChooseFI Ep 321 Side Hustle Nation "$1,000 100 Ways: How Real People Make Real Money on the Side (and how you can too)" by Nick Loper The Unfair (FI) Advantage Of Teachers | 457b | ChooseFI Ep. 13 Early Retirement Now "The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich" by Tim Ferriss Subscribe To The FI Weekly! More Helpful Links and Resources: Earn $1,000 in cashback with ChooseFI's 3-card credit card strategy Share FI by sending a friend ChooseFI: Your Blueprint to Financial Independence Track your personal finances with Personal Capital Keep learning or start a new side hustle with one of our educational courses Slash your cell phone bill without sacrificing service with Mint Mobile

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1907: Florida Hurricane Shakes up Real Estate Markets & Lady Landlords: Self Managing from Abroad, Becky Nova

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 46:28


Welcome to The Creating Wealth Show, Episode 1907! Join Jason Hartman today as he takes you through recent natural disasters and how they affect you as homeowners, investors, and how they affect the overall supply and demand dynamic of the real estate markets. Jason discusses Joseph Schumpeter and creative destruction, and breaks down some statistics on households formed vs homes built.  Today's guest Becky Nova, founder of Lady Landlords, helps others invest in properties and actually self manage them from a distance. She successfully operates in cyclical urban markets, so tune in for an interesting real estate success story and some great tips for self managing from abroad. Register today for Empowered Investor Live, taking place in beautiful Scottsdale on January 27-29! VIP tickets are selling out fast, so don't miss your chance! EmpoweredInvestor.com/Live Key Takeaways: Jason's editorial 0:00 Welcome to The Creating Wealth Show, Episode 1907 2:03 Increased demand for housing as natural disasters lessen the supply 5:49 Today's construction codes are much better 7:51 Benefiting from a disaster - insurance claims, government aid & mortgage moratorium 9:13 Joseph Schumpeter and creative destruction 11:05 Households formed vs homes built 12:45 Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University housing projections 14:50 Second wave feminism, decreased marriage rate & men going their own way 17:00 Housing inventory from Altos Research 20:00 Some great opportunities in new construction homes 21:48 Register for our Scottsdale event - tickets are going fast! EmpoweredInvestor.com/Live Becky Nova interview 22:52 Welcome Becky Nova, founder of Lady Landlords 24:34 Becky started with buying a multifamily and renting out another unit 26:05 Mission to provide sustainable housing to those in the Dominican Republic 28:30 Self managing rental properties 30:00 Tools and tricks for self managing your properties from a distance - having the right people and the right systems in place 32:20 Property management software 33:00 Check out Jason's RENT (Real Estate News & Tech) YouTube channel for software demos  34:12 Laying out rules for requests and maintenance 38:50 City living vs multifamilies 41:55 Interest rate hikes and rent increases 44:39 Learn more at Lady-Landlords.com   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit: https://www.jasonhartman.com/ Free Class:  Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else: http://JasonHartman.com/Fund CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free Course: https://www.jasonhartman.com/deals Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: https://JasonHartman.com/Ron Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com

Women Investing Network's Podcast
112: Florida Hurricane Shakes up Real Estate Markets & Lady Landlords: Self Managing from Abroad, Becky Nova

Women Investing Network's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 45:19


Welcome to Women Investing Network Podcast, Episode 112! Join Jason Hartman today as he takes you through recent natural disasters and how they affect you as homeowners, investors, and how they affect the overall supply and demand dynamic of the real estate markets. Jason discusses Joseph Schumpeter and creative destruction, and breaks down some statistics on households formed vs homes built.  Today's guest Becky Nova, founder of Lady Landlords, helps others invest in properties and actually self manage them from a distance. She successfully operates in cyclical urban markets, so tune in for an interesting real estate success story and some great tips for self managing from abroad. Register today for Empowered Investor Live, taking place in beautiful Scottsdale on January 27-29! VIP tickets are selling out fast, so don't miss your chance! EmpoweredInvestor.com/Live Key Takeaways: Jason's editorial 0:00 Welcome to The Creating Wealth Show, Episode 1907 1:50 Increased demand for housing as natural disasters lessen the supply 5:36 Today's construction codes are much better 7:38 Benefiting from a disaster - insurance claims, government aid & mortgage moratorium 9:00 Joseph Schumpeter and creative destruction 10:52 Households formed vs homes built 12:32 Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University housing projections 14:37 Second wave feminism, decreased marriage rate & men going their own way 16:47 Housing inventory from Altos Research 19:47 Some great opportunities in new construction homes 21:35 Register for our Scottsdale event - tickets are going fast! EmpoweredInvestor.com/Live Becky Nova interview 22:39 Welcome Becky Nova, founder of Lady Landlords 24:21 Becky started with buying a multifamily and renting out another unit 25:52 Mission to provide sustainable housing to those in the Dominican Republic 28:17 Self managing rental properties 29:47 Tools and tricks for self managing your properties from a distance - having the right people and the right systems in place 32:07 Property management software 32:47 Check out Jason's RENT (Real Estate News & Tech) YouTube channel for software demos  33:59 Laying out rules for requests and maintenance 38:37 City living vs multifamilies 41:42 Interest rate hikes and rent increases 44:26 Learn more at Lady-Landlords.com   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit: https://www.jasonhartman.com/ Free Class:  Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else: http://JasonHartman.com/Fund CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free Course: https://www.jasonhartman.com/deals Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: https://JasonHartman.com/Ron Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com

Tacos of Texas
Las Jefecitas: using comida to sustain immigrant households.

Tacos of Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 46:10


Many immigrants have leveraged the delicious cuisines of their países as a means of income and work when they first arrive in the United States. Even before setting up a taco truck or even a brick and mortar, we see vendedoras earning their income by selling tacos out of their hieleritas in grocery store parking […]

Salt and Light Hour - Catholic Podcast
All-new SLHour: Catholic Households on Mission

Salt and Light Hour - Catholic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 57:00


How do we support the family? This week we get learn all about a new online community designed to support Catholic households in their mission; Jermaine has some good suggestions for reading; Billy has a question about war and we meet the Hillbilly Thomists.

ChooseFI
398 | Troy & Lindsay | Households of FI Update

ChooseFI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 59:23 Very Popular


In this episode: career changes, up-skilling, re-prioritizing, accruing debt for value, childcare, and emergency funds. The journey to FI is never linear. Sometimes we can find ourselves thinking the only way to meet our goals is to follow a strict plan, which can make adjusting said plan feel like a daunting set back. Well, our returning Households of FI guests Troy and Lindsay believe that flexibility during ones journey to FI can provide you with tremendous value! Making changes in your life, whether it's accruing temporary debt or changing careers, can actually lead to big time payoffs! While it may feel more secure to have a set trajectory with your financial goals, we know life gets in the way! So instead of sticking with a plan that isn't making you happy, try to stay flexible and evaluate all your options!  Timestamps: 1:34 - Introductions 4:55 - Troy and Lindsay Update 12:10 - Avoiding Over Optimization 18:49 - Up-Skilling & Career Changes 27:56 - Upgrading Income and Re-evaluating Priorities 36:15 - Accruing Debt for True Value 40:20 - Emergency Funds 42:58 - Going On Autopilot 46:00 - Expenses and Childcare 50:34 - Evaluating Your Work and Worth 53:14 Raising FI Children 58:54 - Conclusion Resources Mentioned In Today's Episode: Introducing Our Households of FI!! Part 1 | ChooseFI Ep 221 Households of FI-Troy & Lindsay and Brad Calculate Their FI Number | ChooseFI Ep 241 Mr Money Mustache The Mad Fientist The Great Man Within Level Up In Tech Udemy A Cloud Guru TalentStacker's Salesforce Career Development Program The BiggerPockets Money Podcast 1500 Days to Freedom Should I Refinance My Mortgage? | Ep 167R New Retirement Negotiate Your Salary With Tori Dunlap | Ep 147 How to Negotiate Your Salary Without Burning Bridges | Financial Mechanic | Ep 211 "Raising Your Money-Savvy Family For Next Generation Financial Independence" By Carol Pittner and Doug Nordman Subscribe to The FI Weekly! More Helpful Links and Resources: Earn $1,000 in cashback with ChooseFI's 3-card credit card strategy Share FI by sending a friend ChooseFI: Your Blueprint to Financial Independence Track your personal finances with Personal Capital Keep learning or start a new side hustle with one of our educational courses Slash your cell phone bill without sacrificing service with Mint Mobile

Bringing Intimacy Back with Dr. April
We Stand With Our Community! Hurricane Ian!

Bringing Intimacy Back with Dr. April

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 42:58


Hurricane Ian has devastated SWFL, leaving mass destruction in its wake. Households completely washed away by the water, families unaware of where their loved ones are, and pure anguish in everyone's hearts. Bringing Intimacy Back and Cape Coral Therapists stands with its community. You are not alone, our hearts go out to all those affected by Hurricane Ian. This week on Bringing Intimacy Back, we are sharing stories of people's experiences during and after the traumatic event. With a storm of this magnitude, Florida will rebuild! We are Florida Strong! The Bringing Intimacy Back Podcast is dedicated to inspire, enlighten, and encourage intimate connections. This podcast provides an engaging atmosphere to discuss ways to enhance intimacy in one's personal relationships with significant others, families, friends, Spirit, and oneself. Interested in Sponsoring the show or being featured in a review or giveaway? More information about partnerships can be found at bringingintimacyback.com/sponsorship Bringing Intimacy Back is a non-profit organization committed to inspire, enlighten and encourage intimate connections. We provide an engaging atmosphere to discuss and demonstrate ways to enhance intimacy in one's personal relationships with significant others, families, friends, spirit and self. Dr. April and Coach Kay discuss exciting topics including emotional and physical health, dating, spirituality, romance, communication and, of course, intimacy. Dr. April Brown is a Licensed Mental Health Christian Counselor in Florida, Wisconsin, New York and New Jersey. In addition, she is Certified Relationship and Sex Therapist, Board Certified TeleMental Health Counselor, National Certified Counselor, and a Qualified Clinical Supervisor. She holds a Masters and a Specialist degree in Counseling and Human Systems and a Doctoral degree in Counseling Psychology. Kanya Ford, best known as Coach Kay, is the owner of Love & Intimacy 101, a life, love, and intimacy coaching practice based out of Richmond, VA. She is a life coach and certified sexologist.

City Life Org
HPD, FDNY Fire Safety Campaign Reaches Thousands of NYC Households & Property Owners

City Life Org

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 8:31


This episode is also available as a blog post: https://thecitylife.org/2022/10/07/hpd-fdny-fire-safety-campaign-reaches-thousands-of-nyc-households-property-owners/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/citylifeorg/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/citylifeorg/support

The Brian Lehrer Show
"Skipped-Generation" Households

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 16:48


Inspired by The New York Times article "Grand-mates: Generations Sharing a Special Bond (and Sometimes the Rent)," listeners call in to discuss the joys and struggles of belonging to a "skipped-generation" household

Catholic Answers Live
#10835 Households on Mission - Gregory Popcak

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022


Questions Covered: 16:37 – When is the proper time to take kids at mass to the back and the right time to let it go and stay in the pews? Is there a right or wrong way to approach this?  29:50 – Are there any Catholic educational programs for children outside of school? My kids go to public school, but it seems like there's so much for Protestants and not much for Catholics.  47:49 – How do I draw my adult children, who have all fallen away from the church, and my husband, who has always been protestant, to the Church?  49:00 – What activities and formation would you recommend for children under the age of 5 to teach them about the faith outside of daily prayer and mass?  …

Bittersweet Podcast
Abusive households & mother-daughter dynamics

Bittersweet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 60:08


This week we unpack the complexity that is mother-daughter relationships. We decided to do this episode after hearing about iCarly star Jennette Mccurdy recent memoir ‘I'm Glad My Mom Died' where she discusses the horrible abuse she faced at the hands of her own mother. We also give our thoughts on a Reddit post ‘AITA for telling my friend that I can't pay for her bridal shower as her matron of honor?' Join the conversation and community on social media  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bittersweet.podcast/  TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@bittersweetpodcast Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCwpliyXw12NuoTazAhBsJg Email us at podcastbittersweet@gmail.com 

Jarvis Kingston
Episode 425 - Jarvis Kingston : Those Who Do The Will Of God Is Your Family | Spiritual Family | Broken Households | Family Divisions | Pray

Jarvis Kingston

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 27:01


The family you was born into is not your real family. Blood is not thicker in most cases. Many people have come from broken, abusive, traumatic, manipulative, etc. households. Your family can still carry around generational curses that they are not willing to break or cut off. Do the Will of The Father and you will find your spiritual family along the way. Peace and love y'all !

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
McGrath dismisses claims lower income households will be worse off as a result of Budget

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 14:34


Public Expenditure and Reform Minister, Michael McGrath joined Kieran on The Hard Shoulder to discuss Budget 2023...

Bright Hearth
Productive Households Against the Empire: Interview with Jason Matyas

Bright Hearth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 59:19


Welcome to Bright Hearth, a podcast devoted to recovering the lost arts of homemaking and the productive Christian household with Brian and Lexy Sauvé.In this first season, we're walking through the various rooms of the house with the question: "What are the essential arts and duties of this room? How does this room serve Christ and his Kingdom?"  In this episode, we sit down with Jason Matyas of Seeds for Generations to talk about his experience in building a family business out of his own productive household.Visit https://seedsforgenerations.com/brighthearth for all of the great resources we discussed in the episode—and support a great Christian family and company!Be sure to subscribe to the show, and leave us a 5-Star review wherever you get your podcasts! Buy an item from our Feed the Patriarchy line and support the show at the same time at briansauve.com/bright-hearth.Become a monthly patron at patreon.com/brighthearth and gain access to In the Kitchen, a special bonus show with each main episode!Support the show

Vermont Dog Trainer Show
Multiple Dog Households - Talking Dogs Radio Show

Vermont Dog Trainer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 9:02 Very Popular


There are a TON of families that have more than 1 dog and if that's you, this is the episode you won't want to miss. Takeaways: Patterns are formed by observation What if the patterns aren't positive? How to handle rough play between 2 dogs Listener Question: Every time I call my dog to come back to me, she just ignores me.  How should I handle that? Courtesy 93.9 WLVB

The Mental Health and Wealth Show
Why We're Seeing a Drop in the Financial Health of American Households and How We Can Improve It: An Interview with Angela Fontes

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 37:36


What is the difference between surviving and thriving? It's all a matter of financial health. In today's episode, I chat with Angela Fontes of the Financial Health Network about their Financial Health Pulse report. Find out how income, race, gender, and more all impact financial health and what we can do to improve our financial health.  "I think we want to sort of think about financial health as both an individual responsibility and certainly as part of a macro-environment." - Angela Fontes  "So many different identities are getting left out of the conversation and it's like we all have to deal with money so why are some people getting more of the conversation when this is something we all have to deal with."- Melanie Lockert “Check your credit, pull your credit report on a regular basis and just make sure that what you think is happening with your debt and credit accounts is what is being reported and if you do see errors, make sure that you're addressing those so you do have the good credit score that is an important part of financial health.” - Angela Fontes What You Will Learn From This Episode Why we're seeing a drop in the financial health of American households How financial health increases and decreases based on income Four financial health metrics - how you can determine if you're financially healthy Why Black and LatinX communities experience less financial health Ways to improve financial health from an individual consumer perspective On the financial health gap between men and women and how we can decrease that gap What we can do to boost our financial health About Angela Fontes: As Vice President of the Policy and Research team, Angela oversees policy and measurement research for the Financial Health Network, including the Financial Health Pulse and FinHealth Spend initiatives. Using cutting-edge data and methodologies, Angela elevates important insights for policy-makers and the academic community to advance financial health for all.  Resources: annualcreditreport.com Financial Health Network  Connect with Angela:  finhealthnetwork.org Connect with Melanie mentalhealthandwealth.com melanielockert.com Instagram Support the podcast through Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/melanielockert Buy Melanie's book “Dear Debt” Contact: mentalhealthandwealthshow@gmail.com Want more content and support? Sign up for the Mental Hump Newsletter and get our free Mental Health and Money inventory worksheet. You can sign up at MentalHealthandWealth.com. Also, we host a Mental Health and Wealth Hangout every other Thursday over Zoom at 5 pm PT to chat about all things money and mental health. Join here! Follow us on Apple Podcast or Libsyn! Love the podcast? Leave a review on iTunes!

Just Say Maybe
Josh: Fat-Shaming in Asian Households, Intergenerational Trauma, and Forced Gratitude

Just Say Maybe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 70:41


TW: This episode contains mentions of childhood abuse, fat-shaming, and homophobia. Thanks for tuning in to Episode 8! In this episode, I chat with my friend Josh. We talk about growing up in Asian-American households,  being fat-shamed by Asian aunties, being ghosted, and growing out of old ideals, and more. Disclaimer: This show is not meant to be a replacement for therapy. Please seek a licensed clinician for help.If you'd like to support the show, consider leaving a one-time tip/donation here: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JustSayMaybeIf you enjoyed this show, please leave a review and follow us on Instagram! :)instagram.com/justsaymaybepodcast

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
How Your Spending May Save Your Retirement With Mark Biller

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 25:19


Countless believers have gone to Jeremiah 29 for comfort over the centuries, including about their finances. We'll talk with Mark Biller today about a more hopeful future for your retirement savings. For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. Jeremiah 29:11 Mark Biller is executive editor at Sound Mind Investing where they watch and read financial forecasts so you don't have to. If you read enough retirement headlines, you might get the impression that you'll never be able to retire. A couple of recent ones we mentioned in the article came from Fidelity. The first said a 40-year-old with household income of $100,000 should have 3 times that amount already saved for retirementat age 40. By age 60, they said the multiple should be 8 times income. A second scary sounding Fidelity study said a 65-year old couple retiring today should expect to spend $315,000 for healthcare over the course of their retirement, not including the potential need for nursing home or other long-term care. As you know Rob, SMI is all about prudent planning and preparing. And I'm not even saying these studies are flawed or inaccurate. But the problem is these types of numbers can sound so unattainable that it can make some people give up even trying to save for retirement. What assumptions did Fidelity make in coming up with its conclusions? The framing of the results are often intended to deliver a psychological blow to the reader. For example, that $315,000 retirement health care number if you break that down to a monthly figure over a 20-year retirement, it's about thirteen-hundred dollars a month. Between health-insurance premiums, contributions to a Health Savings Account, and various out-of-pocket costs, that may be less than many pre-retirees are already spending for healthcare. One of the most important factors missing from a lot of retirement-planning discussions is the fact that your expenses are likely to be less in your later years than they are now. And they'll likely decline further as the decades pass during your retirement. That's a big issue if you're taking the approach a lot of people use, which is to say I need to replace a certain percent of my income when I retire, and then just increase that number by 4% or some other inflation figure every year until I die. WHY EXPENSES MAY DECREASE WHEN YOU RETIRE Many expenses that people have during their working years don't continue, either at all, or at least to the same degree, after retirement. That's why financial advisors often use some percentage of your current budget as a starting point for determining an appropriate retirement budget. But the actual change in fixed expenses can vary quite a bit from one retiree to the next, so it's important to consider how your specific expenses are likely to change. Here are a few of the big examples of expenses that tend to decrease in retirement: ● Employment Costs. Once you retire, you no longer pay payroll taxes, and you may save on other work-related costs like commuting, work-related clothing, and so on. ● Saving. After you retire, you won't be saving for retirement anymore; you'll be spending the money you've already saved. So think about how much you're currently contributing to a workplace retirement plan or IRA you can subtract that amount from your retirement budget. ● Then there's Kid Costs. Are you still saving for your kids' college expenses? Assuming they'll be done with college by the time you retire, take those costs out of your monthly retirement budget as well. Also, if you still have children at home, think of all the money you're spending for their clothing, activities, healthcare, food, insurance, cell phones, and so on. Most, if not all, of those expenses are likely to disappear in retirement. ● And finally, Housing. One key pillar of wise retirement planning is to enter retirement with your mortgage paid-off. If you're on track to pay off your home by retirement, you can subtract your mortgage and interest payments from your retirement budget. And of course, some retirees downsize, which can lead to lower costs for taxes, insurance, maintenance, and utilities. How much we'll spend on various things will change during the course of our retirement. That's because there are different seasons of retirement. In the book, The Prosperous Retirement, financial advisor Michael Stein describes three phases of retirement: he calls them the go-go, the slow-go, and, a little more ominously, the no-go years. In the first phase, roughly age 65 to 75, retirees tend to be active, they're spending on travel, dining out, and other activities. This is the high-spending phase of retirement. The slow-go years, roughly age 75 to 85, are marked by decreased spending to the point that household expenses don't even keep pace with inflation. And in the final no-go phase, from age 85 on up, there is typically little travel and generally modest discretionary spending. Recent government statistics support this rough framework as well. Households headed by 65 to 74 year-olds spend 19% less than those headed by someone age 55 to 64. And those headed by someone age 75 or older spend 22% less than those with a head-of-household age 65 to 74. So from those go go retirement years to the slow go period, spending dropped roughly 22%. SPENDING INCREASES IN RETIREMENT But some expenses will increase in retirement. Out of the 14 broad spending categories analyzed in the government stats I just mentioned, most showed decreases in average spending by the oldest households. However, a few, such as cash contributions (which would include charitable giving and support for other family members), reading, and not surprisingly healthcare, showed increases. Healthcare IS the main wildcard when it comes to later-life spending - it can increase a little or a lot. To prepare, once you turn 65 and qualify for Medicare, it's important to understand what that plan covers and doesn't cover. For many listeners, it may be wise to add a Medicare Supplemental (Medigap) plan or consider a Medicare Advantage plan, which may cover some expensive items, like hearing aids, that aren't covered by traditional Medicare or Medigap plans. A prescription drug plan may also make sense. One thing current workers can do to prepare for this is if you're covered by a high-deductible health-insurance policy, try to max out your annual contributions to a health-savings account. That balance can be carried into retirement to help cover future medical costs. And of course there's always the question of long-term care insurance, especially if you have a family history of dementia. KEY POINTS TO REMEMBER It's easy to believe that you need to replace your entire current income to live comfortably in retirement. And even for those who try to account for lower expenses in their later years, there can be a danger in relying too much on general rules of thumb, like the need to replace a certain percentage of your working age income and so forth. We think It's much better to take a thorough look at your own actual current spending. Look at what categories may disappear entirely or at least decrease, as well as any that may increase, and develop your own retirement budget based on that. Here's a hopeful expert quote to end on: from Wade Pfau, who is a Professor of Retirement Income and author of the Retirement Researcher blog - he says: Suggesting that retirees should plan for constant inflation-adjusted spending may overestimate the required retirement savings that many households will require for a successful retirement. Learn more about Sound Mind Investing at SoundMindInvesting.org. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● Are bonds the safest form of investment in the current economy? ● Do you have to pay off a loan from your 401k before retirement? ● What is the best way to invest $2,000? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
How Your Spending May Save Your Retirement With Mark Biller

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 25:19


Countless believers have gone to Jeremiah 29 for comfort over the centuries, including about their finances. We'll talk with Mark Biller today about a more hopeful future for your retirement savings. For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. Jeremiah 29:11 Mark Biller is executive editor at Sound Mind Investing where they watch and read financial forecasts so you don't have to. If you read enough retirement headlines, you might get the impression that you'll never be able to retire. A couple of recent ones we mentioned in the article came from Fidelity. The first said a 40-year-old with household income of $100,000 should have 3 times that amount already saved for retirementat age 40. By age 60, they said the multiple should be 8 times income. A second scary sounding Fidelity study said a 65-year old couple retiring today should expect to spend $315,000 for healthcare over the course of their retirement, not including the potential need for nursing home or other long-term care. As you know Rob, SMI is all about prudent planning and preparing. And I'm not even saying these studies are flawed or inaccurate. But the problem is these types of numbers can sound so unattainable that it can make some people give up even trying to save for retirement. What assumptions did Fidelity make in coming up with its conclusions? The framing of the results are often intended to deliver a psychological blow to the reader. For example, that $315,000 retirement health care number if you break that down to a monthly figure over a 20-year retirement, it's about thirteen-hundred dollars a month. Between health-insurance premiums, contributions to a Health Savings Account, and various out-of-pocket costs, that may be less than many pre-retirees are already spending for healthcare. One of the most important factors missing from a lot of retirement-planning discussions is the fact that your expenses are likely to be less in your later years than they are now. And they'll likely decline further as the decades pass during your retirement. That's a big issue if you're taking the approach a lot of people use, which is to say I need to replace a certain percent of my income when I retire, and then just increase that number by 4% or some other inflation figure every year until I die. WHY EXPENSES MAY DECREASE WHEN YOU RETIRE Many expenses that people have during their working years don't continue, either at all, or at least to the same degree, after retirement. That's why financial advisors often use some percentage of your current budget as a starting point for determining an appropriate retirement budget. But the actual change in fixed expenses can vary quite a bit from one retiree to the next, so it's important to consider how your specific expenses are likely to change. Here are a few of the big examples of expenses that tend to decrease in retirement: ● Employment Costs. Once you retire, you no longer pay payroll taxes, and you may save on other work-related costs like commuting, work-related clothing, and so on. ● Saving. After you retire, you won't be saving for retirement anymore; you'll be spending the money you've already saved. So think about how much you're currently contributing to a workplace retirement plan or IRA you can subtract that amount from your retirement budget. ● Then there's Kid Costs. Are you still saving for your kids' college expenses? Assuming they'll be done with college by the time you retire, take those costs out of your monthly retirement budget as well. Also, if you still have children at home, think of all the money you're spending for their clothing, activities, healthcare, food, insurance, cell phones, and so on. Most, if not all, of those expenses are likely to disappear in retirement. ● And finally, Housing. One key pillar of wise retirement planning is to enter retirement with your mortgage paid-off. If you're on track to pay off your home by retirement, you can subtract your mortgage and interest payments from your retirement budget. And of course, some retirees downsize, which can lead to lower costs for taxes, insurance, maintenance, and utilities. How much we'll spend on various things will change during the course of our retirement. That's because there are different seasons of retirement. In the book, The Prosperous Retirement, financial advisor Michael Stein describes three phases of retirement: he calls them the go-go, the slow-go, and, a little more ominously, the no-go years. In the first phase, roughly age 65 to 75, retirees tend to be active, they're spending on travel, dining out, and other activities. This is the high-spending phase of retirement. The slow-go years, roughly age 75 to 85, are marked by decreased spending to the point that household expenses don't even keep pace with inflation. And in the final no-go phase, from age 85 on up, there is typically little travel and generally modest discretionary spending. Recent government statistics support this rough framework as well. Households headed by 65 to 74 year-olds spend 19% less than those headed by someone age 55 to 64. And those headed by someone age 75 or older spend 22% less than those with a head-of-household age 65 to 74. So from those go go retirement years to the slow go period, spending dropped roughly 22%. SPENDING INCREASES IN RETIREMENT But some expenses will increase in retirement. Out of the 14 broad spending categories analyzed in the government stats I just mentioned, most showed decreases in average spending by the oldest households. However, a few, such as cash contributions (which would include charitable giving and support for other family members), reading, and not surprisingly healthcare, showed increases. Healthcare IS the main wildcard when it comes to later-life spending - it can increase a little or a lot. To prepare, once you turn 65 and qualify for Medicare, it's important to understand what that plan covers and doesn't cover. For many listeners, it may be wise to add a Medicare Supplemental (Medigap) plan or consider a Medicare Advantage plan, which may cover some expensive items, like hearing aids, that aren't covered by traditional Medicare or Medigap plans. A prescription drug plan may also make sense. One thing current workers can do to prepare for this is if you're covered by a high-deductible health-insurance policy, try to max out your annual contributions to a health-savings account. That balance can be carried into retirement to help cover future medical costs. And of course there's always the question of long-term care insurance, especially if you have a family history of dementia. KEY POINTS TO REMEMBER It's easy to believe that you need to replace your entire current income to live comfortably in retirement. And even for those who try to account for lower expenses in their later years, there can be a danger in relying too much on general rules of thumb, like the need to replace a certain percentage of your working age income and so forth. We think It's much better to take a thorough look at your own actual current spending. Look at what categories may disappear entirely or at least decrease, as well as any that may increase, and develop your own retirement budget based on that. Here's a hopeful expert quote to end on: from Wade Pfau, who is a Professor of Retirement Income and author of the Retirement Researcher blog - he says: Suggesting that retirees should plan for constant inflation-adjusted spending may overestimate the required retirement savings that many households will require for a successful retirement. Learn more about Sound Mind Investing at SoundMindInvesting.org. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● Are bonds the safest form of investment in the current economy? ● Do you have to pay off a loan from your 401k before retirement? ● What is the best way to invest $2,000? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

MPR News with Angela Davis
The rise of multi-generational households

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 47:53


During the pandemic, it became more common for adults to live with other adult members of their family. Adult children returned to live with their parents and elderly parents moved in with their adult kids.  But even before COVID-19 hit, more people were choosing to live with relatives.  Sharing a home has practical benefits. It saves money and helps people through unemployment, divorce and other life changes. It makes it easier to care for young children and elderly adults. And it can be emotionally rewarding. More than half of adults who live with adult family members say it's a positive experience most or all the time, according to a survey last year by Pew Research Center. MPR News host Angela Davis talks about the rise in multigenerational living, benefits and challenges and why it's here to stay.  Guests: Chris Farrell is senior economics contributor at Minnesota Public Radio and at Marketplace, American Public Media's nationally syndicated public radio business and economic programs.  Bo Thao-Urabe is a founder and former executive director at the Coalition of Asian American Leaders (CAAL) and serves on the University of Minnesota Board of Regents.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS. Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation.

Daily Devotions from Lutheran Hour Ministries

September 17, 2022 Daily Devotion from Lutheran Hour Ministries

KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed
Native American households in Nevada more likely to face ‘plumbing poverty'

KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 1:07


A new study shows that a large number of Native American households in the Mountain West lack indoor plumbing.

RNZ: Checkpoint
EMA against one-off public holiday for Queen Elizabeth

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 3:48


A one-off public holiday on September 26 to mark the death Queen Elizabeth does not have universal support. In announcing a Queen Elizabeth II memorial day, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said it is appropriate given the sovereign's 70 years of dedicated public service. A state memorial service will be held the same day. Also from midnight tonight the government is ending the Covid traffic light system, meaning the only places people have to wear masks are in health and aged care facilities. Households contacts of Covid cases no longer need to isolate. Alan McDonald from The Employer and Manufacturers Association talks to Lisa Owen. [embed] https://players.brightcove.net/6093072280001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6312193153112

Black Dads Club Podcast
The Attack on Two Parent Households | Black Dads Club

Black Dads Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 63:29


JOIN THE BLACK DADS CLUB SPACE: https://www.facebook.com/groups/blackdadclubspace 00:14 NFL Season is Here - 4:00 Gen X v. Millennial - 9:00 Married Single Mom Fall Out - 16:50 Cynthia G and Black Men Preferences - 30:15 TI Explaining His Parenting - 38:30 Two Parent Households are Losing - 47:00 Men Views on Women - 58:00 Prayers to 600Breezy ORDER A BLACK DADS CLUB TEE: https://black-dads-club-podcast.creator-spring.com/listing/black-dad-club-only --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackdadsclub/support

Columbia View Wesleyan Sermons
8. Households (Ephesians 5:21-6:9)

Columbia View Wesleyan Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 56:04


How does Paul's words to the historic church of Ephesus inspire and instruct us in terms of family and home life in the modern world? Join us today as we dive into the complexities and compelling vision that God has for homes today.

Home Girls Unite
Cost of Living & Escaping Abusive Households

Home Girls Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 16:20


The cost of living crisis and financial abuse has made it hard for many eldest daughters to move out of abusive homes. Here are some resources on how they can help you in the journey to move out. To read more on the available support, head over to Surviving Economic Abuse. Extras Book a RANT session here Email us at hello@homegirlsunite.com Find us on Twitter, Instagram and TikTok

VPR News Podcast
Scott administration announces abrupt halt in rental assistance for more than 8,000 Vermont households

VPR News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 7:36


Federal housing subsidies that have helped thousands of low-income Vermonters pay rent during the pandemic will come to an abrupt halt this fall, and some housing advocates are worried about a spike in homelessness as winter arrives.

The Heresy Financial Podcast
The Fed Wants to Bankrupt Households and Crash the Markets

The Heresy Financial Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 11:53


Federal Reserve Jerome Powell spoke at today at Jackson Hole during their annual retreat. By the way, it is so nice for them that they get a nice retreat in Jackson Hole Wyoming every single year despite the economic hardships that other Americans are going through, good for them right!? He gave a speech that gave strong indications of the near future concerning monetary policy. If we look at directly what he said while looking in between the lines, we can see clearly what they plan to do. Bankrupting households and crashing the market!

The CJ Bronson Show
#132 | 20 Million US Households Behind on Their Utility Bills!?

The CJ Bronson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 20:05


Consider what's happening in this country! I'm legit surprised that the number isn't higher! But if my suspicions are correct. They might be much higher much sooner then I originally thought. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-cj-bronson-show/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-cj-bronson-show/support

Kate Dalley Radio
081722 UT Romney Checks Out Our Weather 31K Households IrS Civil Wr

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 44:59


081722 UT Romney Checks Out Our Weather 31K Households IrS Civil Wr by Kate Dalley

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer
Connecting Faith and Family With Dr. Greg and Lisa Popcak

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 15:31


Catholic families are always looking for ways to connect their kids to faith. Dr. Greg and Lisa Popcak are ready to help with their recently-launched app CatholicHÔM, which stands for Households on Mission. It's a comprehensive digital platform dedicated to helping Catholic families encounter Christ in their homes.

Wake Up to Money
How much help for households?

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 52:13


As Labour calls for a price cap freeze and charities call for urgent action, Sean looks at the cost of energy support. More supply chain disruption could be on the way as water levels drop in Germany's Rhine. And how long can companies afford pay rises to attract staff?

National Day Calendar
August 6, 2022 - National Mustard Day | National Root Beer Float Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 3:30


Welcome to August 6th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate an age old condiment and the quest for perfect flavor. On this day we celebrate one of the oldest condiments in the history of the world. No, it's not that long-forgotten bottle of ketchup in the back of your fridge. It's mustard. The ancient Romans ground mustard seeds into a powder which they combined with vinegar to make a paste. As the Roman Empire spread across Europe, so did the love of this condiment. Households during the Middle Ages used a lot of mustard, as did 17th century England, where the modern version was created. And that's how mustard made its way from ancient Rome to the top of that hotdog you're about to eat. On National Mustard Day enjoy a classic flavor that never goes out of style.   How far would you go to find perfect flavor? For 12 year old Scott Dunton it all began at the 1962 Seattle World's Fair. With one sip of Triple X Root Beer, Scott tasted heaven and his quest to recreate it began. For the next three decades he chased this dream. Tracking down Mutual Flavors in California, he asked for a recipe that would taste like cream. It took a few tries, but when Scott added caramel he struck gold. The rich, smooth taste has been bottled since 1992. Today Scott's Old Fashioned Creamy Caramel Root Beer is served at Mr. D'z Diner on Route 66 in a bottomless root beer float. On National Root Beer Float Day, celebrate one boy's dream to serve up the Holy Grail of perfect flavor. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast
Damn the Recession, Rate Hikes Ahead – Ep 831

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 40:07 Very Popular


· Treasury yields surge. · Fed forgets about inflation averaging. · Households take on all time record debt. · Nominal wages are going up, but real wages are collapsing. · China can do more damage to our economy without harming Nancy Pelosi. · Buy gold before the Chinese beat you to it. Go to https://bambee.com/gold to schedule your FREE HR audit. Join my Locals community to get The Peter Schiff Show ad-free and a day early! Plus get access to special live reports and Q&As. Visit https://schiffradio.com/premium to become a member. Invest like me: https://schiffradio.com/invest RATE AND REVIEW on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PeterSchiff/reviews/ SIGN UP FOR MY FREE NEWSLETTER: https://www.europac.com/ Schiff Gold News: http://www.SchiffGold.com/news Buy my newest book at http://www.tinyurl.com/RealCrash Follow me on Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Instagram: https://Instagram.com/PeterSchiff