Podcasts about disparities

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  • 691PODCASTS
  • 1,135EPISODES
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  • Jan 10, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about disparities

Show all podcasts related to disparities

Latest podcast episodes about disparities

Mayo Clinic Q&A
The link between racial disparities and cervical cancer

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 8:33


While the rate of cervical cancer has been declining for decades in the U.S., health disparities persist. Hispanic women have the highest incidence rate of cervical cancer, followed by non-Hispanic Black women, according to the American Cancer Society. And Black women are more likely to die from the disease than women of any other race or ethnicity. "Race is a social construct. There really isn't a genetic difference that is causing Black women to, unfortunately, die at higher rates of cervical cancer," explains Dr. Olivia Cardenas-Trowers, a Mayo Clinic urogynecologic surgeon and women's health provider. "It really has to do more with the historical background of racism and systemic racism. These disparities have infiltrated the health care system and have affected these women's access to resources, and therefore some of the health care that they need. And this trickles down into poor outcomes, essentially."Disparities that affect a women's access to health care can include transportation, health literacy and trust in their health care provider. Dr. Cardenas-Trowers says addressing barriers to health care is key, so that all women, including Black women, receive regular routine screening. Screening helps identify cancer early, which leads to better outcomes. "It's important to address the factors that lead to poor outcomes for Black women — making sure that they have support and access to screening, access to the results, and resources if any follow up or intervention is needed," says Dr. Cardenas-Trowers.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Cardenas-Trowers discusses why disparities exist and what Black women can do to reduce their risk of cervical cancer.

Ben Ferguson Morning Update
BIDEN'S OWN COVID TEAM TURNS ON HIM, as a new doctor has blown the whistle on NIH Funding 257 Grants on Social Disparities with COVID & Only 4 on How It Spreads!

Ben Ferguson Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 45:01


Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

All Ears at Child's Voice: A Hearing Loss Podcast
#35 Disparities in Hearing Loss and Health Care with Dr. Matthew Bush

All Ears at Child's Voice: A Hearing Loss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 44:19


On episode 35 of All Ears at Child's Voice: A Hearing Loss Podcast, Wendy and Elise are joined by Dr. Matthew Bush. , Dr. Bush is the University of Kentucky Endowed Chair in Rural Health Policy and professor and vice chair for research in the Department of Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at the University of Kentucky. He completed his otolaryngology residency along with doctoral and master's degrees at the University of Kentucky. And otology neurotology fellowship training at the Ohio State University. He is an NIH funded hearing health disparity expert. Dr. Bush cares deeply about health disparities in the medical field, specifically when it comes to hearing loss. He is a wealth of knowledge who's passion drive his research.

Maryland CC Project
Krutsinger – Nudging Critical Care Research Enrollment in the Setting of Historic Abuses, Present Disparities, and Systemic Racism

Maryland CC Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 48:41


Dr. Dustin Krutsinger is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Krutsinger presents a lecture on "Nudging Critical Care Research Enrollment in the Setting of Historic Abuses, Present Disparities, and Systemic Racism" as part of the DEI lecture series.

The Health Disparities Podcast
Profiles in Health Equity: Calvin Johnson, MD, MPH.

The Health Disparities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 48:41


Dr. Calvin Johnson, MD, MPH, has built his varied career at the intersections of medicine, data science, and public health. This episode explores a wide range of topics related to health equity in a fascinating discussion, including the historical significance of Morehouse School, the importance and vulnerability of safety net hospitals, addressing the enduring issue of limited access to care for some populations, and the importance of data analysis and proactive information dissemination for problem solving and crisis management.

The LA Report
Health officials expect more child hospitalizations due to Omicron. Plus: New political maps, rate hike lawsuits, and child vaccination disparities – The P.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:09


Here's your afternoon news: Citizen's Redistricting Commission delivers new political maps; Attorneys looking to sue over utility rate hikes face limited filing period; Familiar disparities emerge in child vaccinations; Health officials expect more child hospitalizations due to Omicron; Incoming LAUSD head signals desire to keep campuses open. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://laist.com

Trend Lines
Rerun: Addressing Gender Disparities in COVID-19 Recoveries

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 28:18


Around the world, the coronavirus pandemic has taken an especially high toll on women and girls. From public health to education to jobs and livelihoods, studies have revealed a gender disparity in the impact of COVID-19 that is particularly wide in lower- and middle-income countries. Yet for all the work that's been done, experts say there's still a lot they don't know about how these impacts are being felt across different communities. To help address this problem, the Center for Global Development recently launched a new initiative to analyze the gendered impacts of the pandemic and study policy responses around the world with the aim of addressing the long-term causes of gender inequality. The leader of the initiative, Megan O'Donnell, discussed her work with WPR's Elliot Waldman in this episode that originally ran on February 3, 2021 on the Trend Lines podcast.  Relevant Articles on WPR: The Importance of Gender Inclusion in COVID-19 Responses ‘Don't We Deserve More?' Mexico's Spike in Femicides Sparks a Women's Uprising To Save the Economy From COVID-19, Protect Informal Workers Another Victim of COVID-19: Sustainable Development Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

Yale Cancer Center Answers
Tackling Disparities

Yale Cancer Center Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 29:00


Tackling Disparities with guest Dr. Andrea Silber December 26, 2021 Yale Cancer Center visit: http://www.yalecancercenter.org email: canceranswers@yale.edu call: 203-785-4095

The LA Report
When it comes to kids' vaccination rates, familiar disparities emerge. Plus: A training program for parents of first-generation college students – The Weekend Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 8:51


In this Sunday edition: Early education reporter Mariana Dale has been watching the vaccine rate for kids between 5 and 11 since the vaccine became available to that age group in Los Angeles County almost two months ago. Around 12% are now fully vaccinated against COVID-19. But there are big disparities between the least and most immunized parts of the county. To learn more, she started at a Pasadena children's museum turned vaccine clinic for the day. Then: CSU Dominguez Hills is opening a new academy to train parents of first generation college students. The program taps into families' "community cultural wealth" to support students through college and help them reach graduation. The effort will have parents co-develop and lead future trainings so that outreach isn't limited to college admissions, or dictated by the institution. Reported by Julia Barajas. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Support the show: https://laist.com

The Social Breakdown
SOC508 - Changing the Narrative for Native Hawaiian Wellbeing

The Social Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 41:50


Aloha mai kākou, we take a local perspective today with special guests, Brandon from Kamehameha Schools and Lisa from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, who walk us through a new radical study aiming to change the traditionally deficits-based narrative about the Native Hawaiian people to one of strength and resiliency. Drawing from the Kūkulu Kumuhana dimensions of Native Hawaiian wellbeing, we discuss the ʻImi Pono Hawaiʻi Wellbeing Survey 2021, from which a number of local organizations have analyzed and published numerous briefs, including ones on COVID-19 impacts in Hawaiʻi and more. Be sure to check out our website for great links that support indigenous research as well as a vocabulary list of all the Hawaiian words used in the episode! 

What's The Difference?
The Silent Threat: Disparities in Healthcare, with Tadé Ayeni

What's The Difference?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 39:29


What You Will Learn: How Tadé discovered the transformative power of education through his father's career Why Tadé believes that providing access to higher education to oppressed communities will allow them to solve their own problems What unintentional barriers are often presented to minorities during their educational careers What is the difference between health equity and healthcare disparities and equity and equality How the healthcare practitioner and the healthcare industry's bias leads to health disparities What question should be asked before considering how to address health disparities What three items when utilized together can have a great impact on healthcare disparities How to understand the difference between implicit and explicit bias About Tadé Ayeni Dr. Tadé Ayeni is the Director of Diversity and Equity as well as Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences at Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine. He is also the host of The Black Professional podcast and the CEO of Beyond Performative, a consulting firm specializing in the synthesis of diversity, equity, and inclusion principles with organizational growth and success models. He received his bachelor's degree from Rutgers University where he was first introduced to the study of societal inequities and people who have been historically marginalized. As an undergraduate student, he originally intended to major solely in English Literature and ended up accidentally double-majoring in Africana Studies as well. When he discovered that there was a field dedicated to understanding the historical contexts behind present-day inequality, he took so many courses in the discipline that his academic advisor informed him that he only needed a few more courses in Africana Studies to earn a major in that field. This began an increasingly developing interest in learning about domestic and global cultures and societies. From there, he completed a Master's degree in English Literature at Fairleigh Dickinson University and a doctorate in Higher Education Leadership at Saint Joseph's University. His dissertation was a phenomenological study of the experiences of underrepresented minority students in medicine as they matriculate to and through medical school. Dr. Ayeni has worked in various aspects of higher education from admissions to advising to teaching. This variegated background has equipped him with a detailed understanding of the student perspective as well as the systems and programs that help and hinder students in their academic pursuits. As the Director of Diversity and Equity, he enjoys creating meaningful connections with people from various backgrounds within and outside of the medical school to work toward a more genuinely equitable educational experience for all students, which is a key piece in the fight to produce more equitable health outcomes in society. In his role as a faculty member in the Human Dimension program, his educational philosophy centers on moving away from merely teaching students to memorize facts, and helping them to enter a more genuine learning process by focusing on equipping them with the tools of inquiry to become lifelong learners and researchers. How to Connect with Tadé Ayeni: Website: https://www.bpconsultants.org/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TadeAyeni LinkedIn: Tadé Ayeni How to Connect with Sara Taylor: Website: www.deepseeconsulting.com Twitter: @deepseesara

Žižek And So On
50 - Christmas Atheism

Žižek And So On

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 65:27


We're talking Jesus Christ, Žižek's Christian Atheism, and Christmas. How do Christ and God figure in Žižek's work? Is God Dead? Also, the Big (m)Other. From the pod to you, merry Christmas—especially to the atheists. Thanks to all our listeners. https://www.patreon.com/zizekandsoon Reading this week: "The Deposed God" from Disparities

WBBM All Local
1-year-old girl found safe after being abducted during a carjacking at a Dolton gas station

WBBM All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 12:06


Also in the news: Amazon puts pause on cell phone ban in warehouses until further notice; Arson is suspected in East Chatham fire; Chicago Public Schools are on winter break but says families will not go without meals; Disparities in the counting of vaccine doses; COVID vaccine in the south suburban area of Dixmoor holds event at community center to boost numbers; and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBBM Newsradio's 8:30AM News To Go
1-year-old girl found safe after being abducted during a carjacking at a Dolton gas station

WBBM Newsradio's 8:30AM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 12:06


Also in the news: Amazon puts pause on cell phone ban in warehouses until further notice; Arson is suspected in East Chatham fire; Chicago Public Schools are on winter break but says families will not go without meals; Disparities in the counting of vaccine doses; COVID vaccine in the south suburban area of Dixmoor holds event at community center to boost numbers; and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
1-year-old girl found safe after being abducted during a carjacking at a Dolton gas station

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 12:06


Also in the news: Amazon puts pause on cell phone ban in warehouses until further notice; Arson is suspected in East Chatham fire; Chicago Public Schools are on winter break but says families will not go without meals; Disparities in the counting of vaccine doses; COVID vaccine in the south suburban area of Dixmoor holds event at community center to boost numbers; and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

It’s All About Health & Fitness
#218. Addressing Disparities in our community with Lashale Pugh,Ph.D

It’s All About Health & Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 71:22


Joining us, is Dr. Lashale Pugh, the Assistant Executive Director, and Research and Evaluation Director at the Northeast Ohio Black Health Coalition (NEOBHC).  She will discuss some of the social determinants of health and how they impact our community here in Northeast Ohio. The post #218. Addressing Disparities in our community with Lashale Pugh,Ph.D appeared first on Vicki Doe Fitness.

Fertility Cafe
Ep. 54 | Disparities in Fertility Care for Minority Populations with Dr. Tia Jackson-Bey

Fertility Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 37:34


Ep. 54 | Disparities in Fertility Care for Minority Populations with Dr. Tia Jackson-Bey   Episode Summary  In this episode of Fertility Café, Eloise gets to talk with Dr. Tia Jackson-Bey to discuss disparities in fertility care in minority populations.  There are particular barriers to caring for and noticeably poor treatment outcomes for black and brown women. We're highlighting health disparities that prevent family building through fertility, diagnostics, gynecological surgery, fertility preservation, egg, sperm, and embryo freezing, and infertility treatments like Intrauterine Insemination (IUI) and In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) for minorities. They'll be discussing the importance of reproductive justice and increasing access to fertility care for all.   Guest Bio Dr. Tia Jackson-Bey is a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist and board-certified obstetrician-gynecologist who cares for patients at RMA of New York's Brooklyn office. Her professional interests include physician-patient education, IVF outcome improvement, global public health, and mentoring unrepresented college and medical students on careers in medicine.  Dr. Jackson-Bey is passionate about reproductive justice and increasing access to fertility care for all. She was recently appointed a member of the newly formed ASRM Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force which will enhance opportunities and reproductive medicine for underrepresented minority populations and reduce health disparities in access to care. She is a talented surgeon and dedicated fertility expert who was focused on fertility preservation, IVF success, and great outcomes for her patients.   In this episode, Eloise and Tia talk about:  The biggest barriers that certain communities face in regards to fertility care The importance of getting help and asking questions even early in your fertility journey How the US deals with health disparities compared to other countries Being able to find the right providers who will help you reach your goals Resources Follow Tia on Instagram Learn more about our podcast: Fertility Cafe Learn more about our surrogacy and egg donation agency: Family Inceptions Learn more about independent surrogacy: Surrogacy Roadmap On the blog: Us Surrogacy Map On the blog: A Beginner's Guide to Fertility Acronyms On the podcast: Ep 35 | Infertility Epidemic

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
Tackling Racial Inequalities in HBV Care Globally

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 42:09


In this episode, Geoffrey Dusheiko, FRCP, FRCP (Edin), FCP (SA), and Ming-Lung Yu, MD, PhD, discuss key racial inequities of care that lead to undertreatment for migrant populations and other racial minorities globally with or at risk for hepatitis B. In addition, they discuss plans to improve engagement across the care continuum and strategies to combat implicit racial biases that affect optimal HBV care.Topics include:Differences in the burden of HBV globallySuboptimal engagement of HBV careStigma associated with HBV careKey strategies for overcoming racial barriersFirst-hand patient storiesGeoffrey Dusheiko, FRCP, FRCP (Edin), FCP (SA)Emeritus Professor of MedicineConsultant HepatologistUniversity College London Medical SchoolProfessorLiver UnitKings College HospitalLondon, United KingdomMing-Lung Yu, MD, PhDChair ProfessorHepatobiliary DivisionDepartment of Internal Medicine and Hepatitis CenterKaohsiung Medical UniversityVisiting StaffHepatobiliary DivisionDepartment of Internal MedicineKaohsiung Medical University HospitalKaohsiung City, TaiwanKaohsiung City, Taiwan Content based on a CME program supported by educational grants provided by AbbVie; Gilead Sciences, Inc.; and Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP To follow along, download the slides at:https://bit.ly/3gWStjZLink to full program: https://bit.ly/3kKIb9a

The Health Disparities Podcast
Healthcare for the homeless, featuring Kelly Bruno, CEO National Health Foundation.

The Health Disparities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 44:31


Kelly Bruno, President & CEO of the National Health Foundation joins us to discuss healthcare for the homeless. California has a disproportionate share of the nation's homeless population, approximately 161,000 of the total homeless population of 580,000. The National Health Foundation, a California-based organization focused on recuperative care in Los Angeles and Ventura counties, offers medical respite care programs as an equitable pathway to health and housing for people experiencing homelessness. It's an approach that can mitigate some social determinants and barriers to care and build community in the process.

Speaking of SurgOnc
Landmark Series on Disparities in Surgical Oncology: Melanoma

Speaking of SurgOnc

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 13:50


In this episode of Speaking of SurgOnc, Rick Greene, MD and John H. Stewart, MD, discuss the unequal burden of melanoma between Blacks and whites in the United States and the differences in access to melanoma care. Dr. Stewart is author of the article, “Landmark Series on Disparities in Surgical Oncology: Melanoma.” Dr. Stewart is Professor of Surgery, LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and is Center Director of the LSU Health New Orleans/LCMC Health Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA.

4sight Friday Roundup (for Healthcare Executives)
Studies Find Disparities in Physician Compensation, Too

4sight Friday Roundup (for Healthcare Executives)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 22:57


You can find the lack of diversity, equity and inclusion everywhere in healthcare, including how much we pay doctors. We talked about why and how to fix it on today's episode of the 4sight Friday Roundup podcast. Here the week's biggest news around market-based change. David Johnson is CEO of 4sight Health. Julie Vaughan Murchinson is Partner of Transformation Capital and former CEO of Health Evolution. David Burda is News Editor and Columnist of 4sight Health. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, other services.

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
4sight Roundup: News on 12-10-2021 - Studies Find Disparities in Physician Compensation, Too

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 22:58


Studies Find Disparities in Physician Compensation, Too You can find the lack of diversity, equity and inclusion everywhere in healthcare, including how much we pay doctors. We talked about why and how to fix it on today's episode of the 4sight Friday Roundup podcast. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

Smart Healthcare Safety from ECRI Institute
Fighting Healthcare Disparities | Person-Centered Care Programs

Smart Healthcare Safety from ECRI Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 36:51


This episode is part of a series regarding the ECRI and the ISMP Patient Safety Organization's (PSO) annual Deep Dive report.The 2021 Deep Dive report focuses on issues of racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare. Research has repeatedly confirmed that members of racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to experience disparities in care, including having an increased risk of being uninsured or underinsured, lacking access to care, and experiencing worse health outcomes for treatable and preventable conditions.In this episode, we're talking to guests from Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, serving Camden, New Jersey, residents to improve the lives of people with complex health and social needs. The Camden Coalition also works to help patients across the country through the Coalition's National Center for Complex Health and Social Needs. We'll talk about how the Coalition's mission is to improve care for people with complex health and social needs by implementing person-centered care programs that address not only illness but strive to overcome social barriers to health and enhance wellbeing.

On The Record on WYPR
Johns Hopkins disparities researcher Lisa Cooper describes the path to a healthier world

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 24:29


From her days growing up in Liberia, through medical training, and now heading Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity, Dr. Lisa Cooper has tried to understand and explain the ways race and the stress of discrimination shape health care and health outcomes. She's distilled her work and ideas into a book, "Why Are Health Disparities Everyone's Problem?" Now, Cooper says she's eager to translate her health-disparities research to her new appointment to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Watch the council's meetings here. Original air date: September 27, 2021. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Empowered Patient Podcast
Earning the Trust of Patient Communities to Drive Research and Address Disparities with Lauren Walrath and Susan Thiele Kyowa Kirin TRANSCRIPT

Empowered Patient Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021


Lauren Walrath is Vice President of Public Affairs in North America, and Susan Thiele is Director of Advocacy and Brand Communications at Kyowa Kirin, a Japan-based global specialty pharmaceutical company known for its cutting-edge scientific discoveries in four therapeutic areas including neurology, nephrology, hematological cancers, and immunology. Lauren explains their approach to patient-centric discovery, "In advocacy, we're really trying to find where the gaps are and how we can best work with partners to make long-term and sustainable improvements for patients. So that can be in the form of starting new research, funding new grants, addressing disparities, working on developing new education programs. Generally, we're looking for meaningful opportunities to help patients and their families on their journey from diagnosis to treatment. We work closely with the advocates, and we bring all of that understanding back to our teams here at Kyowa Kirin so that we really can engage our cross-functional partners in doing more to help the patients we serve." Susan elaborates, "And then there is Jim and Jeffrey who have Sézary syndrome, which is a more serious form of CTCL that affects less than 5% of the patients. What we've done is we've captured their journeys in their own voice, the journey to diagnosis, their experience on treatment, and ultimately what they've learned along the way, what really keeps them motivated to not give up. And people can now hear those stories by going to POTELIGEO.com." #KyowaKirin #KKNA #DrugDevelopment #RareDiseases #Antibodies #immunology #Cancer #CTCL #Neurology #ParkinsonsDisease #NeurodegenerativeDiseases #Nephrology #HematologicalCancers #SezarySyndrome KyowaKirin.com Listen to the podcast here

Empowered Patient Podcast
Earning the Trust of Patient Communities to Drive Research and Address Disparities with Lauren Walrath and Susan Thiele Kyowa Kirin

Empowered Patient Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 17:47


Lauren Walrath is Vice President of Public Affairs in North America, and Susan Thiele is Director of Advocacy and Brand Communications at Kyowa Kirin, a Japan-based global specialty pharmaceutical company known for its cutting-edge scientific discoveries in four therapeutic areas including neurology, nephrology, hematological cancers, and immunology. Lauren explains their approach to patient-centric discovery, "In advocacy, we're really trying to find where the gaps are and how we can best work with partners to make long-term and sustainable improvements for patients. So that can be in the form of starting new research, funding new grants, addressing disparities, working on developing new education programs. Generally, we're looking for meaningful opportunities to help patients and their families on their journey from diagnosis to treatment. We work closely with the advocates, and we bring all of that understanding back to our teams here at Kyowa Kirin so that we really can engage our cross-functional partners in doing more to help the patients we serve." Susan elaborates, "And then there is Jim and Jeffrey who have Sézary syndrome, which is a more serious form of CTCL that affects less than 5% of the patients. What we've done is we've captured their journeys in their own voice, the journey to diagnosis, their experience on treatment, and ultimately what they've learned along the way, what really keeps them motivated to not give up. And people can now hear those stories by going to POTELIGEO.com." #KyowaKirin #KKNA #DrugDevelopment #RareDiseases #Antibodies #immunology #Cancer #CTCL #Neurology #ParkinsonsDisease #NeurodegenerativeDiseases #Nephrology #HematologicalCancers #SezarySyndrome KyowaKirin.com Download the transcript here

Neurology Minute
Disparities in Acute Ischemic Stroke Interventions in the United States

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 2:53


Dr. Andy Southerland talks with Dr. Jyri Virta about the use of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Show references: https://n.neurology.org/content/early/2021/10/14/WNL.0000000000012943

On The Record on WYPR
Migraine disease goes beyond headache pain

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 25:16


Nearly 40 million Americans suffer from migraine attacks. They've been viewed as a ‘middle-aged white woman's malady,' --but research shows otherwise. Dr. Courtney White talks about racial disparities in treatment and why the syndrome is misunderstood: “People think it's just a bad headache and that you can tough through it -- take some over the counter medications. And this is not true, this is a neurological disease.”  Then Jaime Sanders, who has lived with daily migraine pain for forty years, tells why she pushes for better access to care, and talks about her advocacy goals:  “To make sure that everyone is seen and heard and validated and respected. I've gone through so much of my life being dismissed, and I know how that feels not being believed.”  Links: Coalition for Headache and Migraine Patients, the Disparities in Headache Advisory Council, The Migraine Diva blog. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Changing The Conversation
Recovery Rising: Supporting All Pathways to Recovery in Pennsylvania

Changing The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 19:51


Jennifer Smith and Laurie Johnson-Wade discuss a process for fostering recovery supports for all with a focus on Black communities and anti-Black racism with host Livia Davis. Visit c4innovates.com, subscribe to receive newsletter and training updates, and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube for more resources to grow your impact. Learn More Jennifer Smith Laurie Johnson-Wade Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs Recovery Rising, Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs Lost Dreams Awakening Faces and Voices of Recovery Access a transcript of Recovery Rising: Supporting All Pathways to Recovery in Pennsylvania (coming soon)

Health and Medicine (Video)
COVID-19 Disparities: The Disproportionate Impact on African American and Latinx Communities

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 79:20


Health equity requires transformational change. Kim Rhoads, MD, MS, MPH, explains how programs embedded in communities can help make that change. Alicia Fernández, MD, takes a look at how COVID-19 has revealed and enforced health disparities as well as how we can use what we have learned to reimagine our public health system. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37574]

Health and Medicine (Audio)
COVID-19 Disparities: The Disproportionate Impact on African American and Latinx Communities

Health and Medicine (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 79:20


Health equity requires transformational change. Kim Rhoads, MD, MS, MPH, explains how programs embedded in communities can help make that change. Alicia Fernández, MD, takes a look at how COVID-19 has revealed and enforced health disparities as well as how we can use what we have learned to reimagine our public health system. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37574]

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
COVID-19 Disparities: The Disproportionate Impact on African American and Latinx Communities

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 79:20


Health equity requires transformational change. Kim Rhoads, MD, MS, MPH, explains how programs embedded in communities can help make that change. Alicia Fernández, MD, takes a look at how COVID-19 has revealed and enforced health disparities as well as how we can use what we have learned to reimagine our public health system. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37574]

Mini Medical School for the Public (Audio)
COVID-19 Disparities: The Disproportionate Impact on African American and Latinx Communities

Mini Medical School for the Public (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 79:20


Health equity requires transformational change. Kim Rhoads, MD, MS, MPH, explains how programs embedded in communities can help make that change. Alicia Fernández, MD, takes a look at how COVID-19 has revealed and enforced health disparities as well as how we can use what we have learned to reimagine our public health system. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37574]

Dope Black Dads Podcast
Every Mind Matters - Taking Care of Your Mental Health

Dope Black Dads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 53:07


*TW: mention of suicide* The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities is launching a new Better Health - Every Mind Matters campaign, heroing the little things we can all do to look after our mental health and how they can add up to make a big difference; helping us to lead happier, healthier lives and cope with life's challenges. At the heart of the campaign is the free, NHS-approved Mind Plan. By answering five simple questions online, you get a personalised mental health action plan with practical tips to help deal with stress and anxiety, boost your mood, sleep better and feel more in control. Having good mental health helps us to relax more, achieve more and enjoy our lives more. Search Every Mind Matters to see what works for you. Dope Black Dads is a place where we are changing the narrative and having progressive conversations about black fathers and creating a safe digital space for the community.  Join the conversation and the community online through our social channels: Twitter: @DopeBlackDads Instagram: @DopeBlackDads Facebook Page: @DopeBlackDads If you want to get in touch with us, email us at hello@dopeblackdads.org or follow our conversations in-depth on our Facebook Group by searching 'Dope Black Dads'.

New Books Network
Max Rashbrooke, "Too Much Money: How Wealth Disparities are Unbalancing Aotearoa New Zealand" (Bridget Williams Books, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:54


Today, someone in the wealthiest 1 per cent of adults – a club of some 40,000 people – has a net worth 68 times that of the average New Zealander. Too Much Money: How Wealth Disparities are Unbalancing Aotearoa New Zealand (Bridget Williams Books, 2021) is the story of how wealth inequality is changing Aotearoa New Zealand. Possessing wealth opens up opportunities to live in certain areas, get certain kinds of education, make certain kinds of social connections, exert certain kinds of power. And when access to these opportunities becomes alarmingly uneven, the implications are profound. This ground-breaking book provides a far-reaching and compelling account of the way that wealth – and its absence – is transforming our lives. Drawing on the latest research, personal interviews and previously unexplored data, Too Much Money reveals the way wealth is distributed across the peoples of Aotearoa. Max Rashbrooke's analysis arrives at a time of heightened concern for the division of wealth and what this means for our country's future. Max Rashbrooke is a journalist, author and academic based in Wellington. His books, led by the best-selling Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis (new edition 2018), have helped transform national understanding of income and wealth inequality. Max's journalism has appeared in publications worldwide, including The Guardian, The Economist Group and the New Zealand Herald, and he has twice received the Bruce Jesson Senior Journalism Award. He is also a research associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies at Victoria University of Wellington and was a 2015 Winston Churchill Fellow and the 2020 J.D. Stout Fellow. His TED.com talk on renewing democracy has had over 1 million views. To explore Max's other work please visit: https://www.maxrashbrooke.net/ Ed Amon is a Master of Indigenous Studies Candidate at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, a columnist at his local paper: Hibiscus Matters, and a Stand-up Comedian. His main interests are indigenous studies, politics, history, and cricket. Follow him on twitter @edamoned or email him at edamonnz@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Max Rashbrooke, "Too Much Money: How Wealth Disparities are Unbalancing Aotearoa New Zealand" (Bridget Williams Books, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:54


Today, someone in the wealthiest 1 per cent of adults – a club of some 40,000 people – has a net worth 68 times that of the average New Zealander. Too Much Money: How Wealth Disparities are Unbalancing Aotearoa New Zealand (Bridget Williams Books, 2021) is the story of how wealth inequality is changing Aotearoa New Zealand. Possessing wealth opens up opportunities to live in certain areas, get certain kinds of education, make certain kinds of social connections, exert certain kinds of power. And when access to these opportunities becomes alarmingly uneven, the implications are profound. This ground-breaking book provides a far-reaching and compelling account of the way that wealth – and its absence – is transforming our lives. Drawing on the latest research, personal interviews and previously unexplored data, Too Much Money reveals the way wealth is distributed across the peoples of Aotearoa. Max Rashbrooke's analysis arrives at a time of heightened concern for the division of wealth and what this means for our country's future. Max Rashbrooke is a journalist, author and academic based in Wellington. His books, led by the best-selling Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis (new edition 2018), have helped transform national understanding of income and wealth inequality. Max's journalism has appeared in publications worldwide, including The Guardian, The Economist Group and the New Zealand Herald, and he has twice received the Bruce Jesson Senior Journalism Award. He is also a research associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies at Victoria University of Wellington and was a 2015 Winston Churchill Fellow and the 2020 J.D. Stout Fellow. His TED.com talk on renewing democracy has had over 1 million views. To explore Max's other work please visit: https://www.maxrashbrooke.net/ Ed Amon is a Master of Indigenous Studies Candidate at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, a columnist at his local paper: Hibiscus Matters, and a Stand-up Comedian. His main interests are indigenous studies, politics, history, and cricket. Follow him on twitter @edamoned or email him at edamonnz@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Rheum Advisor on Air
Beyond Race and Ethnicity: Social Determinants of Health and Disparities in Rheumatology

Rheum Advisor on Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 19:15


Health care disparities in rheumatology have been shown to have a significantly negative effect on quality of life and patient outcomes. There are several factors that drive health inequities in the US, including race, ethnicity, and socioeconomics, such as education, health care access, and income. In the first episode of the ACR Convergence 2021 series, we speak with rheumatologist Iris Y. Navarro-Millán, MD, who provides a deeper insight into understanding social determinants of health as drivers of health disparities in rheumatology and urges researchers and clinicians to look beyond just race and ethnicity when addressing these disparities.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 23, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 24:40


Please join first author Yuan Lu and Guest Editor Jan Staessen as they discuss the article "National Trends and Disparities in Hospitalization for Acute Hypertension Among Medicare Beneficiaries (1999-2019)." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run: your weekly podcast, summary and backstage pass to the journal and it's editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, and director of Pauley Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, today's feature discussion is about the national trends and disparities and hospitalizations for hypertensive emergencies among Medicare beneficiaries. Isn't that interesting? We're going to just dig deep into this issue, but not before we discuss the other papers in today's issue. I'm going to let you go first today while I get a coffee and listen. Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh, thanks so much, Carolyn. My first paper comes to us from the world of preclinical science and it's from professor Christoff Maack from University Clinic Wursburg. Carolyn, I don't have a quiz for you, so I'm going to give a little break this week, but this particular paper is about Barth syndrome. Barth syndrome is caused by mutations of the gene encoding taffazin, which catalyzes maturation of mitochondrial cardiolipin and often manifests with systolic dysfunction during early infancy. Now beyond the first months of life, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy typically transitions to a phenotype of diastolic dysfunction with preserved ejection fraction, one of your favorites, blunted contractile reserve during exercise and arrhythmic vulnerability. Previous studies traced Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy to mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species. Since mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species formation are regulated by excitation contraction coupling, these authors wanted to use integrated analysis of mechano-energetic coupling to delineate the pathomechanisms of Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, I love the way you explained that so clearly, Greg. Thanks. So what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. Well, first defective mitochondrial calcium uptake prevented Krebs cycle activation during beta adrenergic stimulation, abolishing NADH regeneration for ATP production and lowering antioxidative NADPH. Second, Carolyn, mitochondrial calcium deficiency provided the substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and contributed to blunted inotropic reserve during beta adrenergic stimulation. And finally, these changes occurred without any increase of reactive oxygen species formation in or omission from mitochondria. So Carolyn what's the take home here? Well, first beyond the first months of life, when systolic dysfunction dominates, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy is reminiscent of heart failure with preserved rather than reduced ejection fraction presenting with progressive diastolic and moderate systolic dysfunction without relevant left ventricular dilation. Next, defective mitochondrial calcium uptake contributes to inability of Barth syndrome patients to increase stroke volume during exertion and their vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Lastly, treatment with cardiac glycosides, which could favor mechano-energetic uncoupling should be discouraged in patients with Barth syndrome and left ventricular ejection fractions greater than 40%. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, how interesting. I need to chew over that one a bit more. Wow, thanks. But you know, I've got a paper too. It's also talking about energetic basis in the presence of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, but this time looking at transient pulmonary congestion during exercise, which is recognized as an emerging and important determinant of reduced exercise capacity in HFpEF. These authors, led by Dr. Lewis from University of Oxford center for clinical magnetic resonance research sought to determine if an abnormal cardiac energetic state underpins this process of transient problem congestion in HFpEF. Dr. Carolyn Lam: To investigate this, they designed and conducted a basket trial covering the physiological spectrum of HFpEF severity. They non-invasively assess cardiac energetics in this cohort using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy and combined real time free breathing volumetric assessment of whole heart mechanics, as well as a novel pulmonary proton density, magnetic resonance imaging sequence to detect lung congestion, both at rest and during submaximal exercise. Now, Greg, I know you had a look at this paper and magnetic resonance imaging, and spectroscopy is your expertise. So no quiz here, but could you maybe just share a little bit about how novel this approach is that they took? Dr. Greg Hundley: You bet. Carolyn, thanks so much for the intro on that and so beautifully described. What's novel here is they were able to combine imaging in real time, so the heart contracting and relaxing, and then simultaneously obtain the metabolic information by bringing in the spectroscopy component. So really just splashing, as they might say in Oxford, just wonderful presentation, and I cannot wait to hear what they found. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, they recruited patients across the spectrum of diastolic dysfunction and HFpEF, meaning they had controls. They had nine patients with type two diabetes, 14 patients with HFpEF and nine patients with severe diastolic dysfunction due to cardiac amyloidosis. What they found was that a gradient of myocardial energetic deficit existed across the spectrum of HFpEF. Even at low workload, the energetic deficit was related to a markedly abnormal exercise response in all four cardiac chambers, which was associated with detectable pulmonary congestion. The findings really support an energetic basis for transient pulmonary congestion in HFpEF with the implication that manipulating myocardial energy metabolism may be a promising strategy to improve cardiac function and reduce pulmonary congestion in HFpEF. This is discussed in a beautiful editorial by Drs. Jennifer Hole, Christopher Nguyen and Greg Lewis. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great presentation, Carolyn, and obviously love that MRI/MRS combo. Carolyn, these investigators in this next paper led by Dr. Sara Ranjbarvaziri from Stanford University School of Medicine performed a comprehensive multi-omics profile of the molecular. So transcripts metabolites, complex lipids and ultra structural and functional components of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy energetics using myocardial samples from 27 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and 13 controls really is the donor heart. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, it's really all about energetics today, isn't it? So what did they see, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts showed evidence of global energetic decompensation manifested by a decrease in high energy phosphate metabolites (ATP, ADP, phosphocreatine) and a reduction in mitochondrial genes involved in the creatine kinase and ATP synthesis. Accompanying these metabolic arrangements, quantitative electron microscopy showed an increased fraction of severely damaged mitochondria with reduced crystal density coinciding with reduced citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial oxidative respiration. These mitochondrial abnormalities were associated with elevated reactive oxygen species and reduced antioxidant defenses. However, despite significant mitochondrial injury, the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts failed to up-regulate mitophagic clearance. Dr. Greg Hundley: So Carolyn, in summary, the findings of this study suggest that perturbed metabolic signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are common pathogenic mechanisms in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and these results highlight potential new drug targets for attenuation of the clinical disease through improving metabolic function and reducing myocardial injury. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, what an interesting issue of our journal. There's even more. There's an exchange of letters between Drs. Naeije and Claessen about determinants of exercise capacity in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. There's a "Pathways to Discovery" paper: a beautiful interview with Dr. Heinrich Taegtmeyer entitled,"A foot soldier in cardiac metabolism." Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn, and I've got a research letter from Professor Marston entitled "The cardiovascular benefit of lowering LDL cholesterol to below 40 milligrams per deciliter." Well, what a great issue, very metabolic, and how about we get onto that feature discussion? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to our feature discussion today. We have a paper that is going to address some issues pertaining to high blood pressure, or hypertension. With us, we have Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. We also have a guest editor to help us review this paper, Dr. Jan Staessen from University Louvain in Belgium. Welcome to you both and Yuan, will start with you. Could you describe for us some of the background that went into formulating your hypothesis and then state for us the hypothesis that you wanted to address with this research? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Thank you, Greg. We conducted this study because we see that recent data show hypertension control in the US population has not improved in the last decades, and there are widening disparities. Also last year, the surgeon general issued a call to action to make hypertension control a national priority. So, we wanted to better understand whether the country has made any progress in preventing hospitalization for acute hypertension. That is including hypertension emergency, hypertension urgency, and hypertension crisis, which also refers to acute blood pressure elevation that is often associated with target organ damage and requires urgent intervention. We have the data from the Center for Medicare/Medicaid, which allow us to look at the trends of hospitalization for acute hypertension over the last 20 years and we hypothesize we may also see some reverse progress in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension, and there may differences by population subgroups like age, sex, race, and dual eligible status. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. So you've described for us a little bit about perhaps the study population, but maybe clarify a little further: What was the study population and then what was your study design? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yeah, sure. The study population includes all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older enrolled in the fee-for-service plan for at least one month from January 1999 to December 2019 using the Medicare denominator files. We also study population subgroups by age, sex, race and ethnicity and dual eligible status. Specifically the racial and ethnic subgroups include Asian, blacks, Hispanics, North American native, white, and others. Dual eligible refers to beneficiary eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This study design is a serial cross sectional analysis of these Medicare beneficiaries between 1999 and 2019 over the last 20 years. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Yuan, what did you find? Dr. Yuan Lu: We actually have three major findings. First, we found that in Medicare beneficiaries 65 years and older, hospitalization rate for acute hypertension increased more than double in the last 20 years. Second, we found that there are widening disparities. When we look at all the population subgroups, we found black adults having the highest hospitalization rate in 2019 across age, sex, race, and dual eligible subgroup. And finally, when we look at the outcome among people hospitalized, we found that during the same period, the rate of 30 day and 90 day mortality and readmission among hospitalized beneficiaries improved and decreased significantly. So this is the main findings, and we can also talk about implications of that later. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And did you find any differences between men and women? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yes. We also looked at the difference between men and women, and we found that actually the hospitalization rate is higher among females compared to men. So more hospitalizations for acute hypertension among women than men. Dr. Greg Hundley: Given this relatively large Medicare/Medicaid database and cross-sectional design, were you able to investigate any relationships between these hospitalizations and perhaps social determinants of health? Dr. Yuan Lu: For this one, we haven't looked into that detail. This is just showing the overall picture, like how the hospitalization rate changed over time in the overall population and by different population subgroups. What you mentioned is an important issue and should definitely be a future study to look at whether social determine have moderated the relationship between the hospitalization. Speaker 3: Excellent. Well, listeners, now we're going to turn to our guest editor and you'll hear us talk a little bit sometimes about associate editors. We have a team that will review many papers, but when we receive a paper that might contain an associate editor or an associate editors institution, we actually at Circulation turn to someone completely outside of the realm of the associate editors and the editor in chief. These are called guest editors. With us today, we have Dr. Jan Staessen from Belgium who served as the guest editor. He's been working in this task for several years. Jan, often you are referred papers from the American Heart Association. What attracted you to this particular paper and how do you put Yuan's results in the context with other studies that have focused on high blood pressure research? Dr. Jan Staessen: Well, I've almost 40 years of research in clinical medicine and in population science, and some of my work has been done in Sub-Saharan Africa. So when I read the summary of the paper, I was immediately struck by the bad results, so to speak, for black people. This triggered my attention and I really thought this message must be made public on a much larger scale because there is a lot of possibility for prevention. Hypertension is a chronic disease, and if you wait until you have an emergency or until you have target organ damage, you have gone in too late. So really this paper cries for better prevention in the US. And I was really also amazed when I compared this US data with what happens in our country. We don't see any, almost no hospitalizations for acute hypertension or for hypertensive emergencies. So there is quite a difference. Dr. Jan Staessen: Going further on that, I was wondering whether there should not be more research on access to primary care in the US because people go to the emergency room, but that's not a place where you treat or manage hypertension. It should be managed in primary care with making people aware of the problem. It's still the silent killer, the main cause of cardiovascular disease, 8 million deaths each year. So this really triggered my attention and I really wanted this paper to be published. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Jan, I heard you mention the word awareness. How have you observed perhaps differences in healthcare delivery in Belgium that might heighten awareness? You mentioned primary care, but are there any other mechanisms in place that heighten awareness or the importance? Dr. Jan Staessen: I think people in Belgium, the general public, knows that hypertension is a dangerous condition. That it should be well treated. We have a very well built primary care network, so every person can go to a primary care physician. Part of the normal examination in the office of a primary care physician is a blood pressure measurement. That's almost routine in Belgium. And then of course not all patients are treated to go. Certainly keeping in mind the new US guidelines that aim for lower targets, now recently confirmed in the Chinese study, you have to sprint three cells. And then the recent Chinese study that have been published to the New England. So these are issues to be considered. I also have colleagues working in Texas close to the Mexican border at the university place there, and she's telling me how primary care is default in that area. Dr. Jan Staessen: I think this is perhaps part of the social divide in the US. This might have to be addressed. It's not only a problem in the US, it's also a problem in other countries. There is always a social divide and those who have less money, less income. These are the people who fell out in the beginning and then they don't see primary care physicians. Dr. Jan Staessen: Belgium, for instance, all medicines are almost free. Because hypertension is a chronic condition prevention should not only start at age 65. Hypertension prevention should really start at a young age, middle age, whenever this diagnosis of high blood pressure diagnosis is confirmed. Use blood pressure monitoring, which is not so popular in the US, but you can also use home blood pressure monitoring. Then you have to start first telling your patients how to improve their lifestyle. When that is not sufficient, you have to start anti hypertensive drug treatment. We have a wide array of anti hypertensive drugs that can be easily combined. If you find the right combination, then you go to combination tablets because fewer tablets means better patient adherence. Dr. Greg Hundley: Yuan we will turn back to you. In the last minutes here, could you describe some of your thoughts regarding what you think is the next research study that needs to be performed in this sphere of hypertension investigation? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Greg, in order to answer your question, let me step back a little bit, just to talk about the implication of the main message from this paper, and then we can tie it to the next following study. We found that the marked increase in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension actually represented many more people suffering a potential catastrophic event that should be preventable. I truly agree with what Dr. Staessen said, hypertension should be mostly treated in outpatient setting rather than in the hospital. We also find the lack of progress in reducing racial disparity in hospitalization. These findings highlight needs for new approaches to address both the medical and non-medical factors, including the social determinants in health, system racism that can contribute to this disparity. When we look at the outcome, we found the outcome for mortality and remission improved over time. Dr. Yuan Lu: This means progress has been made in improving outcomes once people are hospitalized for an acute illness. The issue is more about prevention of hospitalization. Based on this implication, I think in a future study we need better evidence to understand how we can do a better job in the prevention of acute hypertension admissions. For example, we need the study to understand who is at risk for acute hypertensive admissions, and how can this event be preempted. If we could better understand who these people are, phenotype this patient better and predict their risk of hospitalization for acute hypertension, we may do a better job in preventing this event from happening. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And Jan, do you have anything to add? Dr. Jan Staessen: Yes. I think every effort should go to prevention in most countries. I looked at the statistics, and more than 90% of the healthcare budget is spent in treating established disease, often irreversible disease like MI or chronic kidney dysfunction. I think then you come in too late. So of the healthcare budget in my mind, much more should go to the preventive issues and probably rolling out an effective primary care because that's the place where hypertension has to be diagnosed and hypertension treatment has to be started. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Well, listeners, we've heard a wonderful discussion today regarding some of the issues pertaining to hypertension and abrupt admission to emergency rooms for conditions pertaining to hypertension, really getting almost out of control. We want to thank Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale New Haven and also our guest editor, Dr. Jan Staessen from Louvain in Belgium. On behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions express by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association for more visit aha journals.org.

Out, What Now?!
Healthcare disparities in the LGBTQ+ community & the importance of advocating for yourself w/ Tessa Micho!

Out, What Now?!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 62:20


Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/outwhatnowpodcast)

Cleveland Clinic Cancer Advances
Funding Disparities Affecting Cancers with High Mortality Rates

Cleveland Clinic Cancer Advances

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:21


Hematologist and medical oncologist at Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center, Suneel Kamath, MD, joins the Cancer Advances podcast to discuss his research on funding disparities. Many cancers with higher mortality rates and high incidence are underfunded, including colorectal, lung, hepatobiliary and uterine cancers. Listen as Dr. Kamath discusses his research from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2021 annual meeting, highlighting how critical funding is for advancing cancer research.

Washington Post Live
Physicians discuss the disparities in cancer rates and outcomes

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:22


Washington Post national reporter Yasmeen Abutaleb speaks with Carol L. Brown, MD, Karen Winkfield, MD, PhD and Sanjay Juneja, MD about solutions to closing the cancer treatment and survival gaps when it comes to race, economic status and the social determinants of health.

Live Yes! with Arthritis
Episode 47: 2021 Arthritis Research Highlights

Live Yes! with Arthritis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 34:01


Learn about new research and insights that may lead to better treatments and access to health care for people living with arthritis and related conditions. This episode features some highlights from the American College of Rheumatology's annual scientific meeting — a six-day conference that draws professionals in rheumatology worldwide to learn about and discuss the latest research. Topics this year include the impact of COVID-19 on people with rheumatic conditions, benefits and warnings about certain medications, and disparities in health care. Host Rebecca Gillett also speaks with the Arthritis Foundation's Steven Taylor about how the Foundation supports research and initiatives to improve the lives of those with arthritis. Visit the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast site to read the blog and get show notes and a full transcript: https://arthritis.org/liveyes/podcast We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think about the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast. Get started here: https://arthritisfoundation.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ebqublsylCl7BIh

TIME's The Brief
Counting Your Carbon Footprint One Meal At a Time... and More Stories

TIME's The Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 28:45


Included in this episode: 1. Counting Your Carbon Footprint One Meal At a Time 2. COP26 Ends With Nobody Really Happy 3. Biden's Health Equity Task Force Highlights Progress in Addressing COVID-19 Disparities 4. The True Story Behind The Shrink Next Door .

Analytics Exchange: Podcasts from SAS
The Health Pulse S2E3: Eradicating Disparities in Cancer Care with Social Determinants of Health Data

Analytics Exchange: Podcasts from SAS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 26:10


On this episode, Greg Horne talks with Dr. Robert Winn, Director at VCU Massey Cancer Center. Dr. Winn is the second ever African American to be director of a cancer center in the United States. Growing up as the child of a 15-year-old mother, he didn't dream of becoming a doctor, but two priests in his life saw his potential and helped him to get on a path that eventually led to medical school. In his role at Massey Cancer Center and his life, Dr. Winn focuses on two goals – eradicating cancer and eradicating disparities in access to quality health care wherever they exist. People who have access to quality treatment receive it. It's that simple. And, trust and affordability play a critical role. As Dr. Winn explains, in order to earn people's trust in science, the scientific and medical community must be trustworthy. That's why Massey Cancer Center is working on a trustworthiness scale to measure how they are doing with their patients.Dr. Winn also shares his perspective on the role of health data convergence in improving health outcomes and the importance of using data from the community to improve scientific questions and address social determinants of health. When it comes to disparities in health care, we already know that a patient's zip code has a significant impact on their health outcomes. Taken a step further, we can look at the implications of racism historically and identify how it is impacting health outcomes for African Americans today.Another foundational value for Dr. Winn is respect for humanity. He describes his awe and humility at both the power and limitations of science in treating cancer. He recognizes that there are some cancers and diseases that even today's best medicine cannot fix. This is when it is imperative for cancer centers to ensure patients have the best possible palliative care to support their transition from this life. Finally, Dr. Winn leaves us with his thoughts on the cancer center of the future and the importance of data to better understand population health and communities. 

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19
Ep. 406 - Healthcare Disparities, Understanding the Pandemic, and Opioid Epidemic

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 9:54


Today, in episode 406, our expert Infectious Disease and Community Medicine doctors discuss the latest on COVID-19. We talk about healthcare disparities, understanding the pandemic, and the opioid epidemic. As always, join us for all the COVID-19 information you need, explained in clear terms by health experts. Website: NoiseFilter - Complex health topics explained simply (noisefiltershow.com) Animations: NoiseFilter - YouTube Instagram: NoiseFilter (@noisefiltershow) • Instagram photos and videos Facebook: NoiseFilter Show | Facebook TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@noisefiltershow --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/noisefilter/message

Managed Care Cast
Managing Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease Through Value-Based Arrangements

Managed Care Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 24:38


On this episode of Managed Care Cast, we speak with Dr Abi Sundaramoorthy, MD, MBA, executive vice president of clinical enterprise at Somatus, a national value-based care company serving patients with underlying kidney disease, on the potential of value-based arrangements to address disparities in chronic kidney disease and promote preventive, effective care.

Handle with CARE: Breast Cancer & Beyond
Disparities In Health Care Part 1 with Dr. Martin, Tahira Davis and Ayanna Clark.

Handle with CARE: Breast Cancer & Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 61:05


Carrie is joined by her own Primary Care Physician, Dr. Angela D. Martin, as well as Tahira Davis and Ayanna Clark. Both Tahira and Ayanna bravely share some of their traumatizing experiences with healthcare professionals at some of the most vulnerable moments in their lives. (Miscarriages, childbirth and breast cancer.) They believe being African-American played a huge factor in how they were overlooked, blown off or downright disrespected and violated. Dr. Martin weighs in from the medical professional side and is African-American as well.#hwcarepodcast #thecareprojectinc #healthcaredisparities #healthequity #racialdisparities

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
How Drexel will spend $14.4 million examining disparities in public health

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 26:28


How do you tackle disparities in public health? Drexel University is going to try to find out with a new grant from the National Institutes of Health. The Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health and College of Nursing and Health Professions recently received an NIH grant for $14.4 million dollars over five years. The money is for the hiring of diverse early career researchers who will focus their research on health disparities. We wanted to learn more about the importance of this grant - and why studying health disparities is important in the first place - so we caught up with Dr. Ana Diez Roux, Dean of the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

New Books in Literary Studies
Hsuan L. Hsu, "The Smell of Risk: Environmental Disparities and Olfactory Aesthetics" (NYU Press, 2020)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 51:58


Our sense of smell is a uniquely visceral—and personal—form of experience. As Hsuan L. Hsu points out, smell has long been spurned by Western aesthetics as a lesser sense for its qualities of subjectivity, volatility, and materiality. But it is these very qualities that make olfaction a vital tool for sensing and staging environmental risk and inequality. Unlike the other senses, smell extends across space and reaches into our bodies. Hsu traces how writers, artists, and activists have deployed these embodied, biochemical qualities of smell in their efforts to critique and reshape modernity's olfactory disparities.  Hsuan L. Hsu's The Smell of Risk: Environmental Disparities and Olfactory Aesthetics (NYU Press, 2020) outlines the many ways that our differentiated atmospheres unevenly distribute environmental risk. Reading everything from nineteenth-century detective fiction and naturalist novels to contemporary performance art and memoir, Hsu takes up modernity's differentiated atmospheres as a subject worth sniffing out. From the industrial revolution to current-day environmental crises, Hsu uses ecocriticism, geography, and critical race studies to, for example, explore Latinx communities exposed to freeway exhaust and pesticides, Asian diasporic artists' response to racialized discourse about Asiatic odors, and the devastation settler colonialism has reaped on Indigenous smellscapes. In each instance, Hsu demonstrates the violence that air maintenance, control, and conditioning enacts on the poor and the marginalized. From nineteenth-century miasma theory theory to the synthetic chemicals that pervade twenty-first century air, Hsu takes smell at face value to offer an evocative retelling of urbanization, public health, and environmental violence. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.
148 - Healthcare Disparities in Our Own Backyard: Panel Discussion with Meharry's Dr. James Hildreth, VUMC's Dr. Consuelo Wilkins, HCA's Dr. Tama Van Decar, and Ascension's Mary Kate Mouser

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:34


On October 6th, the United Way of Greater Nashville hosted a timely and compelling discussion on “Healthcare Disparities in Our Own Backyard.”  The panel was made possible by the United Way's de Tocqueville Society, a now-global society that was founded in 1981 by my brother Dr. Tommy Frist, Jr., to deepen relationships between the United Way and community leaders. We're sharing this discussion with you as a close look at the health and healthcare disparities in one southern city, my hometown of Nashville, Tennessee, as well as examine how our leading healthcare providers are working to specifically address these shortfalls. In the discussion, we highlight some of the concerning statistics uncovered in a recent community health and well-being survey, which you can find at: www.nashvillehealth.org/survey Now let me turn to our panel, where I'm joined by: James Hildreth, President & CEO of Meharry Medical College, and a member of the Biden-Harris COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force; Consuelo Wilkins, Senior Vice President & Senior Associate Dean for Health Equity and Inclusive Excellence at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Tama Van Decar, Chief Medical Officer of HCA Healthcare – TriStar Division; who prior to joining the private sector had a highly decorated 20-year military career, and Mary Kate Mouser, Director of Community Health and Benefits at Ascension Saint Thomas, where she works to establish strategies to improve the health of communities.