Podcasts about Wastewater treatment

Converting wastewater into an effluent for return to the water cycle

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Wastewater treatment

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Best podcasts about Wastewater treatment

Latest podcast episodes about Wastewater treatment

(don't) Waste Water!
The 4 Horsemen of America's Water Apocalypse

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 18:49


"Water Apocalypse" may come in as an exaggerated stretch; I'm sorry. Yet if you want a number to understand the magnitude of what we're discussing here: fixing America's water challenges is estimated at... $1 trillion. So, what makes for this Water Crisis in America? This is the consequence of decades of flawed water management along four main lines.  Broken infrastructure starts showing with nearly 15% of US citizens served with water that recently breached the Safe Water Act. When they get served at all, as 2.2 million Americans don't get any water services.  Water economics are in dangerous imbalance. The combined effects of the "wrong pockets problem" and recurrent underinvestment place an entire section of the Water Sector in a perilous situation.  Policies move and adapt slower than the changing world we live in. And even when they tend to evolve, enforcement is an entirely new problem.  Beyond policies, an entire sector struggles to embrace change - when it inevitably will have to. ▶️ Watch the video version of this episode on YouTube  ▶️ Check out my full article on the American Water Apocalypse 

The Dave Chang Show
Talking Wastewater Treatment With an Expert, and Ranking the Best Eating Cities in the U.S.

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 96:28


Dave and Chris are first joined by environmental wastewater treatment expert Marylee Santoro to discuss how sewage systems work and what can go wrong. Then, they talk about the recent wave of laws banning gas lines in new buildings, and the benefits and drawbacks of induction cooking, before ranking the best eating cities in the U.S. Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Guest: Marylee Santoro Producers: Sasha Ashall, Aleya Zenieris, and Gabi Marler Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "People don't even know where their Water Asset is" - Henry Cordes - Sciens Water

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 0:59


Henry Cordes is Principal at Sciens Water. Sciens is a research-driven investment fund that identifies uncovered, under-researched, or misunderstood water sector opportunities that are undercapitalized. I could say a lot about the pre-conceptions out there on the involvement of private capital in the Water Sector. I've already told several times the story of when a group of university professors named me the devil's right hand for explaining during a conference how private capital could help solve some of our water challenges. But this time, I'll play it slightly differently, I'll pass on the microphone to a student I met at the Columbia Water Center in New York. I think it sums it all. I've often been very quick to dismiss the role of the private sector. I've often been led to believe that the privatization of water is inherently and unequivocally harmful. It is going to limit access. It is gonna make water more expensive. It's unjustifiable. But listening to the harsh realities of the water sector or water infrastructure is extremely underfunded in the United States. And one way to overcome it, like very pragmatically and feasibly, is by privatizing elements of it. And I think that was a hard pill to swallow because it's acknowledging that what I've been told in class might be wrong. but it's also accepting there is no either or, and the public sector isn't inherently pitted against the private sector, rather for water problems to be kind of find a resolution. This collaboration is so critical. Indeed, we shall maybe stop opposing public and private money, something Gaetane Suzenet already shared on that microphone, and rather focus on what each of both has to offer. That is what Henry will strive to do today, so I'll leave him the floor. But right before I'll do that, remember that if you like what you hear, please take this episode and share it with a colleague, a friend, or your LinkedIn network! That's the best way to support me, and I'd be grateful if you took a minute of your time to do it. Can I count on you? I'm sure I can, let's meet on the other side! Can Private Capital Change the World of Water for the Better? 

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "You would think no one still does that, and yet..." - Meshal Alduraywish - Sciens Water

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 0:59


Seeing the Sharks or the Dragons in Shark Tank or Dragon Den decide on which company to invest just out of gut feeling and business intuition is fascinating. Indeed, it's thus fascinating that the show is an international hit in almost all its variations. But do things really happen like that in real life? I honestly doubt it. Sure, if you recall my conversation with Reinhard Hübner on that microphone, he told us a couple stories on how he gets spontaneous pitches that are sometimes so off, that his gut feeling is sufficient to turn down the investment opportunity. Yet, in all other cases, you'll need more than just gut feeling and intuition. That's why what Meshal is sharing today is very interesting: at Sciens Water, he's in charge of bringing this informed view of the market that builds the rationale for the investment fund to actually bet or not on a technology and or a company.  And as he explains, his approach is not very different from an entrepreneur's one. He gathers data around a topic, builds some hypotheses and then gets actually out in the market to prove these hypotheses right or wrong.  As you'll hear, what's actually outstanding in his experience sharing, is his honesty to explain how his gut feeling is actually often proven wrong. Data wins over intuition. And actual buying and using behavior trumps all other tells. So without further due, let me leave him the floor, but not without reminding you that if you like what you hear, please share the word around you: take that episode and share with a colleague, a friend or a Shark Tank fan. And if there's anything you don't like about it, come tell me on LinkedIn! Please do it, and I'll see you on the other side!  What do you need to know to Invest Wisely in Water Technologies? 

Siouxland Public Media News
NEWS 1.6.23: Iowa Congressional Delegation Reaction to the U.S. House Speaker Controversy, New Wastewater Treatment Plant for Sioux City, Warm January, and More

Siouxland Public Media News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 1:40


88Nine: Urban Spelunking
A deep dive into Milwaukee's wastewater treatment system

88Nine: Urban Spelunking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 11:22


Three hundred feet below the surface of Jones Island lies deep tunnels that prevent pollution from getting into Lake Michigan. This week, Nate and Bobby got a tour of the deep tunnel pump room and see how the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District keeps the city's water clean. Read more at OnMilwaukee: https://onmilwaukee.com/articles/deep-tunnel-pump-room

(don't) Waste Water!
2023 Insider Info: Did Pinterest Actually Expose the Future of Water?

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 5:53


Pinterest has a superpower: it can read its users' project boards and hence... predict the future! Why so? Simply because 400 million people use the platform as a mood board to prepare for their upcoming plans. Now, if you gather and summarize that data, you can get a glimpse into the future: Pinterest does this every year with their "Predict" reports, and their track record is insane. 80% of their predictions turn out to be true! So, when in this year's edition, I saw a water prediction, I thought we should have a deeper look at it and share thoughts on what it may be changing.  Here's how rainwater harvesting, distributed water management, or wastewater reuse could play a major role in 2023. Is it a trend you can surf in the new year? Let's harvest it and make sure to understand its ins and outs! Wanna see the video version? Check it out here!  

WTAQ News on Demand
11 a.m. News on Demand - Incident at Appleton Wastewater Treatment Plant

WTAQ News on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 2:54


Earlier in December NEW Water passed their budget.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "It's happening in various places - we just don't realize it yet!" - Upmanu Lall - Columbia Water Center

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 0:59


Upmanu Lal is the Director of the Columbia Water Center at Columbia University in New York. The Columbia Water Center is on a mission to creatively tackle the water challenges of a rapidly changing world where water and climate interact with food, energy, ecosystems, and urbanization. Over the past two years, governments around the World have announced unusual water infrastructure investments, with, for instance, 111 billion dollars in the Infrastructure act in the US.  All of that triggered a sizeable 3 to 4% yearly increase in investments in that sub-segment of the Water Sector. But there's a cooler kid in town: decentralized or distributed water treatments grow at three times that pace. Let me repeat that. We see unprecedented investments in centralized infrastructure, and yet, investments in their decentralized counterpart grow three times faster!  That honestly gets you thinking. Does the centralized push arrive too late? You'll hear me asking that to Upmanu in even straighter terms in just a minute when I'm asking if we're pushing a dead beast.  I think the question is worth asking when you hear Upmanu deconstruct why these radically decentralized water treatments trump central infrastructure on nearly every level.  We might well enter the post-utility era or at least an age that's thus far from the model we imagined at the turn of the 19th century or in the sewers of Babylonia 5'000 years ago, that water and wastewater utilities will have to seriously reinvent themselves. And as we've already discussed with Seth Siegel on that microphone, I see good and bad in that new normal. Now, if you ask me, I'd rather advocate for a slightly lighter disruption as the one Upmanu described, where decentralized treatments still happen at community or building level rather than under every sink. But that's just my two cents, and I'm pretty sure I never got a scientific citation when Upmanu draws on almost 18'000 for his extensive work on the topic - kind of the definition of an expert, right? So without further due, I'll let you dive into the nuggets he shares with us. Well, wait, without further due, yes, but not without reminding you that if you like what you hear, you can make some of your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn contacts the best Christmas present there is by sharing and recommending them this episode. If you wonder how I attract someone the caliber of Upmanu on my microphone, well, it's a one-stop trick: it's thanks to these recommendations. You have that power; I'm so grateful when you use it! Please do it, and I'll meet you on the other side. Are Amazon Water Filters the Best Way to Quench our Thirst?

21st Century Water
King County (WA)'s Kamuron Gurol on The Future of Seattle's Water Sector

21st Century Water

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 49:49


Today, Mahesh Lunani talks to Kamuron Gurol, Director of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division, Washington State (including Seattle). Prior to taking on this role, Kamuron was a Corridor Development Director at a 116-mile rail system connecting greater Seattle area.  Kamuron was also the City Manager at City of Burien, a community of 50,000 with hundreds of businesses.In his current role, Gurol oversees 5 treatment plants, 400 miles of interceptor pipes, 48 pump stations, 39 CSO outfalls, and 25 regulator stations- an asset base worth billions.In a wide ranging conversation we talk about the future of water, including how we treat everything to wastewater to hot water, to PFAS, medication residue in waste, and more. He believes the circular economy can be not cradle to grave, but rather cradle to cradle.Kamuron looks at the job of building the third generation of King County infrastructure like fixing up an hold house. It may have good "bones," but it needs to be worked on.We look at ESG - too long, loud or "smelly' plants have gone into poor neighborhoods.  What can we do to work with our neighbors instead of dictating to them?Today's guest as a perspective on recruiting the next generation of water workers that we haven't had before.  If we are looking to find young people fresh out of school, we might be looking in the wrong place.Use all of your senses, and not just your brain.  Kamuron explains what that advice means.More:King County Wastewater Treatment Division Website: https://kingcounty.gov/depts/dnrp/wtd.aspxKamuron Bio: https://kingcounty.gov/depts/dnrp/wtd/about/agency/wtd-director.aspxAquasight Website: https://aquasight.io/

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "Put your Money where Water will be in the right amount at the right time!" - Lauren Enright - Michael Stanley Gallisdorfer

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 0:59


Lauren Enright is the Founder of Axiom Climate, and Michael Stanley Gallisdorfer is a Water Sustainability Strategist you've already heard on that microphone by the excellent Episode 17 of Season 2. Together with Indrani Pal, Lauren and Michael will lead a Session Day at the upcoming American Geophysical Union Meeting in Chicago titled "Adapting to Climate Change: Innovative Solutions for Building Water Resilience to Long-term Meteorological & Hydrological Change." If you've followed the series of COP Conferences that aim to take on Climate Change challenges, you've probably noticed a difference between the latest COP 27 and the previous 26. So far, we mostly talked about climate change mitigation - and hence, it was much of a carbon topic. COP 27 happened to be different: for the first time, the focus was on climate change adaptation. And in that new realm, much of the focus is switching to water. Why so? Well, because climate change is increasing variability in the water cycle, thus causing extreme weather events, lowering the predictability of water availability, decreasing water quality, and threatening sustainable development, biodiversity, or simply the enjoyment of the human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation worldwide - for the ones that are blessed with it.  Those would be just some of the consequences, but in a nutshell, we can say: climate change will be felt through water. So what do we do about it? That's where climate change adaptation kicks in. We don't have to reinvent the wheel; we just - between quotation marks - have to implement existing technology and fast-track the path to market for the right innovations. It's not because we start deploying climate change adaptation that we accept our fate and stop with the mitigation efforts; both can and should work hand in hand. But if we accept that, by now, a good chunk of the effects of climate change can't be reversed for a long time, we better leverage our water knowledge to limit how much it will affect populations across the globe. That is Lauren, Michael, and Indrani's proposal to the World: kickstarting actionable innovative solutions for the World to start adapting and protecting every crew member of spaceship earth. If you like what you hear today, you'll probably enjoy their session at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in Chicago as they schedule an entire day on Friday to light the climate change adaptation topic with fresh angles and new approaches.  And for today's conversation, if you feel more people shall hear it, you have that power: share it with a friend, a colleague, or your LinkedIn network! Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side. The Climate Change Adaptation Opportunities You Don't Want To Miss Out

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "There's a market niche that no-one want's to do!" - Josiah Cox - Central States Water Resources

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 0:59


Josiah Cox is the founder and president of Central States Water Resources. Central States Water Resources transforms how water utilities work by acquiring small, often non-compliant systems and then using expertise, technology, and innovation to quickly assess and turn them into reliable infrastructure. I bet you've never heard of Central States Water Resources. Please don't get offended; I had never heard of the company either before my interview with Alex Loucopoulos on that microphone a bit over a year ago. I did a little Google Trend exercise before recording: I've compared the occurrences of "American Water" and "Central States Water Resources" in search terms, and AW wins by a 99 to 1 score. Now, I hear you rolling your eyes and telling me it's an absolutely unfair and non-sense comparison, and you're widely right. Yet, last year, Central States Water Resources completed 40% of the recorded M&A moves in water and wastewater utilities in the US. Over less than a decade of existence, the company has been closing over 80 moves a year on average - which is far more than any other water or wastewater utility company in America.  So why does it fly under the radar? Well, simply because all of these systems are small, located in the states that rarely make the news, and aim to better the lives of communities, we all simply ignored they were such distressed about water.  There's a major difference, though, with the projects we discussed last week with Sean Davis. CSWR isn't a charity or philanthropy. It's a private company backed by Sciens Water, and aiming to turn these non-compliant water systems not only into better, safe, and reliable services but also to make them profitable. If you recall my discussions with Seth Siegel and Trace Blackmore some weeks ago, 85% of American utilities have three or fewer employees. This means they lack the critical scale to apply best practices, embrace innovations and new technologies and are at high risk with the upcoming silver wave. So in a sense, Central States Water Resources is the typical portrait of a distributed water utility that may become the norm in the very near future. I'm carefully using "distributed" and not "decentralized" because you'll see that Josiah firmly refuses the decentralized concept - I'll let him explain why. In this week's exploration, I'm scratching the surface of something that could become a major trend, and not only in the US, when you think of Germany's 10'000 utilities or Switzerland's 700 wastewater treatment plants, to just name the two first examples that crossed my mind.  If that's a topic of interest for you, let me know, and I'll make sure to dive deeper anytime soon! How can you express your interest? Well, you know the maxim I keep repeating week after week: if you like what you hear, share it with a friend, a colleague, or simply your LinkedIn network. I'm thrilled to see the number of these shares increase because that means we're all spreading the word and coming closer to my vision: when you understand Water, you solve the World! So come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side! 800 Water Consolidation Moves in a Decade, Yet You've Never Heard of this Water Utility!

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "It's harder to Give Away Money than it was to Make the Money!" - Sean Davis - Merton Capital Partners

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 0:59


Sean Davis is the founder and managing director of Merton Capital Partners, an adjunct professor at Palm Beach Atlantic University, and the Author of "Solving the Giving Pledge Bottleneck." Merton Capital Partners develops innovative investment strategies to unlock philanthropy's potential by incentivizing corporations to generate large-scale good in their core businesses. What the heck is the link between philanthropy and water? That may be very obscure if you're like me before meeting Sean. Yet you'll see that it will make a lot of sense in just twenty minutes.  I've often discussed with brilliant minds on that microphone how people without safe water or cities without wastewater treatment made little economic sense. We've talked about wrong pockets issues and highlighted all the reasons why we thought something could be done.  Yet, I was long seeking the spark that could ignite the revolution, and I fear that I'm not the only one. In their "Worth of Water" book, Gary White and Matt Damon say nothing else: they have a proven path to scale to solve the water challenges within two decades, but they lack the seed money to get the ball rolling.  Sure, we could all wait for states to walk the talk. But if we're still discussing SDG 6 or aging infrastructure at the end of 2022 in pessimistic or alarming terms, it's probably a sign that we should not have too high hopes from that path.  So what's left? Tears and sighs? Well, that's where the new path Sean introduces today brings a bright new hope. Philanthropic money doesn't have to be spent at a loss - and there are significant pockets of investments that look for the right vehicles.  This is how in a minute, we'll discuss evergreen investment strategies, blended capital, helping philanthropists to get the highest bang for their buck, and much more. My conversation with Sean made me think of many new ways to connect the Water dots, so I'm pretty sure it might do the same for you! If that's the case, spread the word and share that episode with your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network. And if you want me to dive deeper into the topic, I'd be honestly delighted to, now that I've got a bit more knowledge thanks to Sean's book (the link to it is in the show notes, check it out!) Come tell me on LinkedIn, remember to share that episode, and I'll meet you on the other side! How to Actively Invest Philanthropy and Save the (Water) World?

Grad Chat - Queen's School of Graduate Studies
Derek Russell (Chemical Engineering) – finding water soluable and degradeable polymers to help in wastewater treatment

Grad Chat - Queen's School of Graduate Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 29:15


Assessing how to guide the selection of appropriate treatments using polymers for environmental remediation. For upcoming interviews check out the Grad Chat webpage on Queen’s University School of Graduate Studies & Postdoctoral Affairs website – https://www.queensu.ca/grad-postdoc/research/share/grad-chat

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "Being in the Water Industry feels like Sisyphus pushing the Rock up the Hill!" - Tom Rooney - Sciens Water

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 0:59


Tom Rooney is Chairman and Operating Partner at Sciens Water. Sciens is a research-driven investment fund that identifies uncovered, under-researched, or misunderstood water sector opportunities that are undercapitalized. I cannot name one of my about 120 guests so far that would not have taught me something during our conversation. If you've been listening to this podcast for a while, you know how intentional I am about connecting the dots. Every single new episode hence has to bring us one step closer to the "Truth" with a big "T" - given that this Truth is a moving target and doesn't really exist. Yet, every once in a while, I collect a nugget that really shines a new light on what I thought I knew. It could be Paul O'Callaghan's take on the dynamics of Water Innovation by Season 3, Episode 3. Or Reinhard Hübner's water company M&A masterclass by Season 5, Episode 1. Or Piers Clark's debunking of the water pilot's myth by the first episode of this Season 7, to only name three. Well, Tom's adaptation of Maslow's theories to the Water field clearly belongs to this category, as all of a sudden, it explains a lot of the undervaluation of water we experience every day.  What is it? Well, I won't butcher the concept and let Tom explain in a minute. You'll probably enjoy as well how clear and explicit he is about the one challenge that's the root of all the other ones, and I'd bet you'll have as much fun as me listening to that conversation. If that's the case, all I ask is that you take this episode and share it with a colleague, a friend, or your LinkedIn network! That's the best way to support me, and I'd be grateful if you took a minute of your time to do it. Can I count on you? I'm sure I can, let's meet on the other side! How does Maslow explain a lot of America's Broken Water Economics?

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "That will translate into all sorts of financial KPIs but that's NOT the driver!" - Mirka Wilderer - De Nora Water Technologies

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 0:59


Mirka Wilderer is the CEO of De Nora Water Technologies. De Nora is a leading provider of equipment, systems, disinfection, and filtration solutions for water and wastewater treatment. Back in my years as a sales engineer, I used to map the competitors' landscape when working on large projects. And in my quite specialized world of advanced wastewater treatments, I was very good at predictions, or that's what I thought. One day, on a very large project, I was discussing with the design office, and they had curious Ideas as to how to shape their process. I couldn't recognize any of the patterns; the usual suspects would have left! The reason would reveal some weeks later: there was a new kid on the block, De Nora Water Technologies. If you recall my discussion on that microphone with Reinhard Hübner, we've already seen examples of companies rapidly built from the bottom up in our otherwise conservative sector. But DeNora is again another breed than SKion Water. The water division was created in 2015 from an M&A move involving Severn Trent Services. And since then, the company has followed quite an aggressive track, through internal and external moves, with a double-digit growth that led to a successful initial public offering on the Milano stock exchange last summer.  It's been a while that I wanted to address this trajectory on the podcast, and I had already approached Mirka for this around the BlueTech forum last year in Vancouver, but with the IPO on the horizon, the timing wasn't right.  So when our paths crossed again during Sciens Water's Rethinking Water conference in New York, I couldn't let the opportunity slip away to get some valuable insight on how to successfully go public, keep and develop a hunter mindset, or grow into a fully different area as a before quite traditional family business.  As for Patrick Dekker last week, I was a bit short on time to go into the level of depth I would have liked to. But you'll see that Mirka goes straight to the point and probably delivers a new record in insights per minute on that microphone!  So without further due, I'll let you dive into our conversation. Just remember that if you like what you hear, please take that episode and share it with a colleague, a friend, or your LinkedIn network! Come one, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side! How De Nora Grew from 0 to IPO in 7 Years (with Cheat Codes!)

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] PFOA is 100'000 times more toxic than we thought - Henrik Hagemann - Puraffin

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 0:59


Henrik Hagemann is the CEO and co-founder of Puraffinity. Puraffinity is a GreenTech Company that designs smart materials for environmental applications. As you may have discovered by Season 4, Episode 1, they strive to solve the daunting PFAS / Forever chemicals challenge we face. We all have PFAS in our blood, and this for quite a simple reason: forever chemicals are everywhere around us. For the better and, let's face it, often the worse, we use PFAS in so many parts of our daily lives that it would be almost impossible to ban them.  This wouldn't be much of a problem if they weren't that toxic: I know, thank you, captain obvious.  Yet, PFAS also confronts the Water Sector with a complex equation to solve. On the one hand, we'd like to protect everyone from toxic substances, and with the advancement of technology, we can, but on the other hand, doing so is still prohibitively expensive today if we were to do it on a large scale.  Sure, promising new ways might change the name of the game; we've, for instance, discussed on that microphone how supercritical water oxidation could eliminate PFAS and everything else theoretically in an even energy-positive fashion. But we're still far from the large scale today. Let's pause here for a second and apply some advice we heard here a while ago from Claudia Winkler and Alice Schmidt: let's zoom out before we zoom in. We need PFAS in so many of the products we use, so we produce PFAS. And then, we realize more and more how dangerous they are, so we destroy PFAS. And the cycle goes on. Don't you think there may be a better way? Well, that's what we'll explore today with Henrik. And he'll do that much better than me, so I won't spoil you with what he explains so well! I'll let you buckle up for a fascinating 360-degree update on PFAS, where we discuss regulations, recycling, new treatments and their limits, perspectives, and even Erin Brockovich! And remember, if you like what you hear, please share that episode around you. Send it to a friend, a colleague, or your LinkedIn network; come one, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side! Should We Really Destroy PFAS? No! Your Fridge Knows a Better Way.

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] How Xylem evolved from a Pump Company to a Solution Provider - Patrick Decker

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 0:55


Patrick Decker is the CEO of Xylem. Xylem is the fourth largest water business in the World and a water and wastewater technology company that's well known for its motto: "Let's solve water." Eleven years ago, almost day for day, ITT spun off its water business to create Xylem. That move itself didn't change much, but the eleven years' journey that followed profoundly reshaped the company and, by extension, many aspects of the Water Industry itself.  Patrick Decker has been leading that transformation for now almost nine years, and in a sometimes very conservative Water Sector, he's bringing much of a fresh breath!  For instance, a couple days ahead of his WEFTEC visit, he shared on social media which days he would attend and invited anyone to come to talk with him at Xylem's booth. And as we'll discuss today, as walking the talk is a critical pillar of his values, he also really had those informal discussions: the perks of being approachable. Does Xylem need the exposure of this podcast? Not at all; they already draw 1 billion people to their campaigns through their partnership with the City Football Group. But I think we all need the inspiration Patrick shares today. Before even recording, he mentioned how he would be worse of a guest than his brilliant colleagues Austin Alexander and Sivan Zamir that already appeared on that microphone. It wasn't humble brag but a sound respect for his team. And during and after recording, he addressed me as a peer in this Water Industry - which arguably I'm by no means, as I would be aware if I was leading a 5 billion business.  What I want to underline here is how inspirational it is to see this kind of Water Leader. We know the challenges ahead, and it's good to see those qualities in the captains of the boats! Patrick was kind enough to stop by my microphone to share this wisdom shot. But he also had to continue his journey, as he was awaited on scene to give his talk, which makes for a short episode today.  As you can imagine, I have dozen more questions that I would love to raise him, and that's where you can help me to provide you with the answers. If you like that first session and enjoy Patrick's answers, share that episode around you. Recommend it to your friends and peers, and come leave me a comment under my LinkedIn post to encourage Patrick to come back! I'm pretty confident that with the right level of support from all of you, I can win him over for a deeper dive. So come one, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side! What's Patrick Decker's Call To Action? Let Us Solve Water!

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "We need to Bring People into the Equation!" - Paul Gallay - Columbia Climate School

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 0:59


Paul Gallay is Lecturer & Co-Director at the Columbia Climate School. Columbia University is a global leader in climate and sustainability education, aiming to bring an interdisciplinary knowledge base for future climate leaders to work with businesses, communities, governments, and civil society to address the climate crisis. If you recall Season 3, Episode 13, I had David Lloyd Owen on that microphone to discuss his book, Global Water Funding. I've said it several times ever since, but if there's one book you shall read to understand the water challenges ahead, it's this one. It's hard to read, it's packed, and it's dense, but it's invaluable! So, in that book, I discovered the Catskill Mountain and Croton Watershed agreements, which the city of New York concluded in the 1990s. The Idea was to leverage nature-based solutions to prevent pollutants from entering New York's water scheme rather than heavily investing in a treatment plant that would take them out.  Since then, we've further explored nature-based solutions on that microphone, with the City of Glasgow, the City of Paris, or watershed experiments in Italy and Austria.  Yet, I had never heard of the one Paul will touch on in a minute after expanding on the New York watershed example I just mentioned.  And that new program he'll introduce to us is the perfect example of a clever application of the Climate Change adaptation we discussed with Kevin Sofen last week. Climate Change is here to stay; it will have consequences, and fencing those off using nature sounds like a very sensible approach! Water quality, involving communities, teaching, or further researching, there's a dense agenda for today's conversation. So without further due, let me remind you that if you like what you hear, please - and I can't stress that enough - share it around you. Grab your friends' phones, and subscribe them to the podcast. Recommend your favorite episode to a colleague, or tell the World with a LinkedIn post! And, of course, if there's anything you don't like about the podcast, come tell me! Can Nature Protect New York From Water Catastrophes? Yes!

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "The Word that S*** Scares Utility Bosses" - Kunal Shah - Anaergia - Carbone Negative Fuels to Save the World

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 2:07


Hallo, bonjour, and welcome to the Don't waste water podcast! I am your host, Antoine Walter, and in today's episode, I am delighted to welcome Kunal Shah as my guest! Kunal is Chief Growth Officer at Anaergia, and a council member of the World Biogas Association, the Singapore Water Association, and Imagine H2O Asia. Anaergia ambitions to convert waste into a carbon-negative fuel for a sustainable future. By Season 5, episode 12, we got to meet one of the Water Industry's legends, Andrew Benedek, the founder and architect of Zenon. There were so many nuggets to dig, from wastewater membranes to entrepreneurship through some of the boldest moves in our industry, that I didn't really cover his new endeavor with Anaergia. Actually, to be honest, I did it on purpose at the time. Because when I interviewed Andrew, I had just met Kunal a couple weeks before at the Global Water Summit. And the least I can say is that I got incredibly impressed by his speed of thought, his knowledge, and his accuracy. And as he had almost agreed to join me on that microphone, I wanted him to be our guide into the present and the future of biomethane production, aka our sector's carbon-negative fuel.  I finally could take my microphones to Anaergia's office in Singapore some weeks ago, and let's face it, the rest is gold.  But don't take my word for it; experience it for yourself. So I'll strive to keep this intro short and let you dive into Kunal's insight as fast as possible.  Because when interviews are on my editing table, I always extract some highlights to share them on social media. Kunal broke a record: right now, I have about 14 minutes of highlights! So remember, if you like what you hear, don't keep that knowledge for you. Sharing is Caring, take this episode and share it with a colleague, come tell me what you liked about it on LinkedIn, grab your friend's phones and subscribe them to the podcast, come on do it, and I'll meet you on the other side! How to Make Carbon Negative Fuel, Boost Utility's Revenue and Save the World

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "I look at Water from the Human Connection" - Kevin Sofen - W.S. Darley - SDG Talks - Smart Firefighting

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 0:58


Kevin Sofen is Director of Innovation at W.S. Darley, but also a repeat podcast host with the Smart Firefighting podcast and the SDG Talks, a social entrepreneur with Wristsponsible, and adjunct professor at DePaul University, a multiple board member and a talent at Unleash. And if you wonder how he packs all of this in one life, don't worry, I wonder too! The SDG Talks podcast highlights Change Makers and their work towards the UN SDGs with a sound passion for highlighting people and organizations that will transform the World into a better place for everyone. To me, teamwork is the beauty of our sport. Where you have five acting as one, you become selfless. That's not from me; it's a quote from Coach K, the legendary 3 times basketball Olympic champion, 5 times NCAA winner, and Hall of Famer.  Why do I talk about basketball? Well, because among all Kevin's activities, he's rolling out a coaching program that enforces people's ownership and intentionality toward their water. I'll let him expand on it in a minute. But beyond the anecdote, the key message here to me is that change is a process no one can fully undergo alone. And if we want to change the World for the better, we need to team up, build upon each other's strengths, and get inspiration from proven best practices. So Kevin sharing two hands full of his volunteering, activist, associative, business-related, or entrepreneurial experiences is like a mini-masterclass and a powerful refuel on inspiration.  I bet that in some minutes, you'll start seeing SDGs differently, starting with all the ones that are not number 6. And if I further zoom out, you may look at water with a different eye.  But without further teasing, I'll let you dive into my conversation with Kevin right after reminding you that if you like what you hear, please - and I can't stress that enough - share it around you. Grab your friends' phones, and subscribe them to the podcast. Recommend your favorite episode to a colleague, or tell World with a LinkedIn post! And, of course, if there's anything you don't like about the podcast, come tell me; I'm doing my best to better that content, one episode at a time. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  The Dear Link Between Water, SDGs and our Everyday Lives

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] How a Karen Changed DigDeep's Destiny! - George McGraw - DigDeep

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 0:55


George McGraw is the CEO and Founder of DigDeep. DigDeep is a human rights nonprofit serving the 2.2 million+ Americans without the sinks, bathtubs, or toilets that the rest of the developed World takes for granted. I hope that the 2.2 million figure shocked you so much when I first mentioned it on that microphone a couple weeks ago in my introduction to my conversation with Colin Goddard from Source that you couldn't forget it. Cause I couldn't, honestly! If the richest country in the World struggles to bring tap water and sewage services to its entire population, doesn't it mean that we're somewhat doomed everywhere around the World? Actually, sitting down with George is exactly the kind of experience that makes you think: yes, there's a big problem. Probably even bigger than we all think it is. But at the same time, it's absolutely solvable. Or to quote him: humanity has solved much more complex issues than this one! So why do we still repeatedly fail at closing the water gap? Why, despite the brilliant minds and charismatic leaders from Bill Gates to Mina Gulli through Matt Damon and, of course George McGraw, that devote themselves to solving that riddle, why do we keep failing? Well, it might all boil down to one single issue. The wrong pocket's symptom. Those who've been in sales know the power of the right incentive! That is exactly where we're failing today. We heavily rely on utilities to manage water, and utilities are disincentivized to invest in helping these struggling communities because they would never be the ones reaping the benefits of this right move.  But if there's one thing you'll be convinced of once you've listened to George, it's that we're not doomed at all. It takes half-full type of persons like him to bring us back on track, and I'm sure you'll exit this conversation freshly energized to go out and reap the five-to-one investment opportunity there is in doing what's right and good for everyone.  So, if I'm right and George's message hits home with you, don't keep it secret. Take that podcast wherever you're listening from, hit the "share" button, and pass it over to one person over WhatsApp, LinkedIn, or TikTok for all that matters! Wanna distribute it further? Of course, please do so! But even just one person more that gets the message is one step closer to the goal of closing the water gap.  Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  Will you help Closing the Water Gap and Save Lives?

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "We have to see the problems coming, before they come!" - Errick Simmons - Mayor of Greenville Mississippi

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 0:59


Errick Simmons is the Mayor of Greenville, Mississippi, and the co-chair of the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative. The Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative works to improve the river's water quality, restore its habitat, coordinate the state's efforts, create sustainable economies around the basin, and celebrate the river's culture and history. About one year ago, I was working on my session as a moderator at the UN Innovate for Cities conference. What you've maybe noticed from that work are the three interviews that were featured on that podcast around nature-based solutions. But what I haven't shared here are my next steps into the rabbit hole. Having explored how the city of Glasgow was preparing for COP 26 and had adopted nature-based solutions some years before, I had a curious eye over the part of COP 26 that revolved around these innovative ways to administer and manage a river's watershed. And I had noticed how a dynamic Mayor, part of the American governor's delegation, was brilliantly bridging the social topic, the economic one, through aquaculture and nature-based solutions at the river basin level. You would have guessed that Mayor was Errick Simmons. About one year down the line, I got to sit down with him on this microphone at the Rethinking Water conference in New York, thanks to Sciens Water's invitation. Time was short, but I hope you'll get a glimpse of that other American story, where one has to be clever in government and bring together private and public funds while securing grants to guarantee the long-term sustainability of river basins and the cities they host.  Social topics interlinked with Water. Intertwined with climate change and extreme weather events that regularly impact the region. And a water sector that needs to find a fix to overcome the silver wave. I'll leave the floor to Errick so that he shares the solutions and initiatives he contributes to roll out and the proposition he makes to bring Water to the place it should be in the public space: right in the center. Remember, if you like what you hear, please share this episode around you with your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn Network.  And as always, if there's anything you don't like about this episode, pleach reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing better or differently. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side! How to Make Water more attractive than the Apple and Samsungs of this World

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "What's a podcast? I had no Idea!" - Trace Blackmore - Scaling Up! H2O - Blackmore Enterprises

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 0:59


Trace Blackmore is the Owner of Blackmore Enterprises and the Host of the "Scaling Up! H2O" podcast. The "Scaling Up! H2O" podcast intends to prove to you every week why working in Industrial Water Treatment is the best job in the World. If you're listening from the UK, Singapore, or maybe Denmark, you'll be surprised by the rest of this introduction. But actually, for the majority of water professionals, this water job is quite lonely. Think of it, there are over ten thousand water utilities in Germany or more than seven hundred wastewater treatment plants in Switzerland. And, of course, the record goes to the US with over 90 thousand water and wastewater utilities.  As a consequence, when you're working for one of these scattered utilities, you have few colleagues. For instance, 85% of US utilities have three or less than three employees. The same is true when you're in industrial water treatment. Sure, many people work on an industrial site. But how many deal with Water? In most cases, at most, a hand full. So yes, Water is everywhere, and so are water professionals. Everywhere, and often alone. What's wrong with that? Nothing, except that it turns personal and professional development into a challenge. When you don't have colleagues to challenge you, bring you some industry news, or share best practices, you can only rely on yourself to improve. Unless there's another way! Because you might be commuting to work. Or having a run in the evening. Or getting bored while you mow the lawn. That's where podcasts have your back. I know, right now, this may sound like inception because I'm advocating for podcasts on a podcast. But my message here is that you may well right now be enjoying the best water podcast ever produced by a french guy - to my knowledge, I'm the only one, so I'm quite confident about that assumption. Yet, there are other great shows out there, like "Water we talking about" with Adam Tank and Jim Lauria, Abdelhakim el Fadil's excellent "Smart Water Solutions," Paul O'Callaghan's BlueNotes by BlueTech, or Dave McGimpsey's grandaddy of all shows with the Waver Values Podcast, which is the only one in this list that never appeared on that microphone, hey Dave, we should talk, and inevitably the famous Nation with Trace Blackmore's Scaling Up H2O podcast I thought you might enjoy going a bit behind the scenes of the podcast production today if you already know Trace and the Scaling Up H2O podcast. Or you may appreciate getting to know a great new podcast in the unlikely event you never heard of Trace before, in which case you'll be delighted to discover you can listen to someone talking about water without my annoying french accent.  So without further due, I'll let you enjoy my conversation with Trace; just remember that, if you like what you hear, please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what they should take home from the nuggets Trace shares today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  How to Make a Lonely Water Professional's Mentor, Friend, and Caring Colleague

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "Should we think a little Laterally?" - James Rees - Botanical Water Technologies

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 0:59


James Rees is Chief Impact Officer at Botanical Water Technologies and Board Advisor at Bluerloop, Droople , and Noverram. Botanical Water Technologies strives to positively impact water scarcity by providing a new source of drinkable, sustainable, plant-based Water for social and environmental projects. Let me bring you a bit behind the scenes to start with today. I've been recently invited to give my first-ever TED Talk, which will happen end of November in Shaftesbury, UK. So now I'm binge-watching the most successful ones to extract best practices. And the link to today's topic is twofold. First, one of the most watched TED Talks ever, and maybe my favorite one, is Simon Sinek's one advising all of us to start with Why.  Let's follow that advice! Why should we adopt new technologies in Water? Well, because we're facing new challenges. Why does the roll-out of these technologies take a while? Well, because Water is a highly political and sensible field with low rewards and harsh punishments.  And why does it matter so much that new technologies get to roll out faster, succeed and bloom? Well, because that's how they will maximize their impact. Now, remember, I said the link was two-fold; here's the second one. Binge-watching TEDs to identify patterns takes a while, but it's doable. But is there a similar directory of instructions as to how to succeed as an early or mid-market water technology company? Of course not. There are incredible pieces of ecosystems: think of the accelerator programs, like Imagine H2O or Elemental, which we addressed on that microphone. Think of the incubation or pilot programs like the Xylem Innovation Labs or Isle Utilities' Trial Reservoir, which we addressed on that microphone. There are market data and analyst companies like BlueTech Research or Global Water Intelligence, which we addressed on that microphone. And, of course, there are associations, conferences, and brilliant podcasts outside of this one, and there is that very microphone. But who's connecting the dots? People, humans. You'll hear with James in a minute how we're just scratching the surface of the importance of connecting those dots and how one can actually do that. And if we start with why, the reason why we shall connect the dots is that it takes a village to solve today's water challenges. Many players still speak many different languages, and someone needs to translate.  So I'll leave the floor to James after reminding you that if you like what you hear, please share it around. Tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what you found interesting or inspirational, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  How to take Mid-Market Green Tech Companies to the Next Level?

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "We come in on a Disaster's Survivor's Worst Day!" - Nick Shufro - FIMA

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 0:59


Nick Shufrois Deputy Assistant Administrator at the Federal Insurance & Mitigation Administration. The Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA) manages the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and a range of programs designed to mitigate against future losses from all hazards, including floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, and other natural disasters. If you recall my conversation with John Robinson some weeks ago, we discussed how we often feel the impact of Climate Change through water. And yes, water scarcity will be a major challenge in the coming decades - it already is a challenge. But the other end of the spectrum probably doesn't get all the attention it deserves. Too little water is a problem. But too much water is probably even more of a risk! As I'm recording this introduction in early October 2022, the World still has the very pregnant images of one-third of Pakistan being underwater. And hurricane Ian still threatens Florida and many other places in the region. But as the European example showed, we humans have a strong capacity to forget about those crises and be surprised again when they return. Summer 2021 was all about floods, Summer 2022 was all about water scarcity, and we sometimes get lost. But what can we do about it? Actually, quite a lot. Pre-disaster mitigation is a vast toolbox with many options to reduce the impact of events we can't avoid or prevent from happening. Yet, pre-disaster mitigation is also often doomed. We wish we would have done more when it's too late. So, the message of administrations like the one Nick represents today is one to be heard, especially when there's no flood on the horizon, and we're all deeply convinced it will never happen to us. I'll leave the floor to Nick to quickly take us through the topic in just a second; the time for me to remind you that if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that episode around you.  Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what they should take home from the nuggets Nick shares today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  Pre-Disaster Mitigation Needs to Quickly Ramp  Up in the US. Will it?

Scaling UP! H2O
275 Industrial Water Week 2022: Wastewater Thursday

Scaling UP! H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 37:18


On day 4 of Industrial Water Week, we are celebrating Wastewater Thursday with water treatment expert and consultant Dave Christopherson.  What is Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment? How do you describe what you do for a living to those unfamiliar with your field? What are the 4 types of Wastewater? Do you only work in sewers when working in Wastewater (*asking for a friend)? What do you need to know about your client's water before you meet with the client? What's the best advice for Jar Testing? I'm asking those questions and more in today's Wastewater Thursday interview with Dave Christophersen.  Join me, Trace Blackmore, the host of the Scaling UP! H2O Podcast and Dave Christophersen, as we celebrate Wastewater Thursday together. Bottom line: Dave Christophersen will introduce Wastewater to students and recent graduates considering careers in water treatment.  Your roadside friend, as you travel from client to client.   -Trace   Timestamps:  Trace Blackmore welcomes you to Wastewater Thursday [00:01] James McDonald's Wastewater Story [05:07] Wastewater Thursday interview with Dave Christophersen, CWT [10:50] What I wish I knew my first day as a water treater with Shawn McGrade [19:40] Detective H2O: The Case of Breaking Free [28:44]   Quotes: “Wastewater is water that has been used for some purpose, and now has some components that need to be removed if you want to reuse that water.'' - Dave Christophersen “On my first real Wastewater Project, I learned how complicated it is. I learned that the more complicated the problem was the greater the learning opportunity, which meant the greater the reward was.”  Dave Christophersen   Connect with Dave Christophersen: Phone: 937.477.7129 Email: christophersendave@gmail.com LinkedIn: in/dave-christophersen-a3291328    Links Mentioned:  Industrial Water Week 078 The One with The Waste Water Guy (Part 1) (with Kevin Cope) 079 The One with The Waste Water Guy (Part 2) (with Kevin Cope) 255 Pinks And Blues: Testing for Halogen in A Water System 269 The One About The Water Treater Risk Factor Index (with Dave Christophersen) 271 The One With The Secrets to Buying A Company (with Chuck Hamrick) AWT Technical Reference & Training Manual, Chapter 6: Wastewater (Edited by Peter Hawkins)  

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "If we just fix the Super-Emitters we directly reduce Biogas Emissions by 62%!" - Semra Bakkaloglu - Imperial College London

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 0:59


Semra Bakkaloglu is a Research Associate at the Imperial College of London. She recently showed in her research how the methane emissions along the biosolids supply chain were vastly underestimated and proposed straightforward actions to correct it swiftly. Sure, wastewater treatment plants gobble a lot of energy. But if you equip them with sludge digesters, they also produce a good chunk of power in the form of biogas.  So, when you do the exercise of a mass carbon balance over the sewage treatment chain, you don't get to zero yet. Still, you're not that far - even more so if you go for advanced biogas production approaches, such as the ones we've covered on that microphone with Cambi, EMG, or anytime soon, Anaergia, and yes, that's a spoiler. Yet, there may well still be a silent killer in your plant. Because there's as much carbon in one molecule of carbon dioxide as in one molecule of methane. But releasing methane into the atmosphere has 27.2 times higher global warming potential!  And as Semra demonstrated in her research, the total global biogas and biomethane emissions to the atmosphere today are about twice as high as previously estimated! But where's that gas leaking from? Well, here again, Semra and her team looked into a full range of emitters to identify the culprits along the supply chain. And then again, they identified a subgroup of super-emitters responsible for 62% of the emissions. Do you have one or several wastewater treatment plants within your area of responsibility? Then you'll want to double-check if you're not one of the bad pupils. And if you're a technology provider - be it in sensors or along the biosolids supply chain - it looks like the challenge you're solving just got twice more pressing.  I'll leave the floor to Semra for you to get the entire story and the plentiful insights about the underlooked biosolids and biomass treatment chain in a second. Just allow me to remind you that, if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that content around you.  Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what surprised you in what Semra reveals today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  The Underestimated Hidden Threat of Biomethane Production. Time to Act?

Action and Ambition
Adam Tank Builds Software That Designs Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants Automatically

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 35:52


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Adam Tank, the Chief Customer Officer of Transcend, an intuitive, online generative design platform that enables capital planners, project developers, and engineering professionals to rapidly generate preliminary engineering designs for water and wastewater treatment facilities. He is passionate about inspiring, informing, and helping others scale their businesses and has often been referred to as the trusted “go-to guy” when others need a leader to step into complex situations, rapidly identify the moving parts, develop sound business strategies, and execute to completion. Tune in to learn more!