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The RatedRR Podcast

Singapore Cup champion and Hougang United central defender, Anders Aplin, joins us on this episode of The #RatedRR Podcast to talk about Hougang's history-making campaign and more. Anders talked us through the final, where the key battles were won and lost, what the messaging was before, during, and after the game and he also spoke about their determination to make up for a disappointing league campaign.Aside from the highs, we also discussed the lows of their SPL season and the differences between Clement Teo and Firdaus Kassim who was installed as head coach at the start of the cup campaign. Tune in and get involved in the conversation by leaving your comments below. Remember to subscribe to the channel as we look to keep growing and providing more content.

The Rehumanize Podcast
Religious Liberty Justifications for Violence: A Legal Analysis from Kelsey Hazzard at #Rehumanize2022

The Rehumanize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 42:21


It's time for a crash course in the legal history of religious liberty! Can a "Satanic abortion ritual" trump pro-life legislation? How does religious liberty impact efforts to protect life in the womb? Kelsey Hazzard, founder of Secular Pro-Life, provides a valuable introduction to a new frontier in abortion litigation. Below are the legal opinions cited in the presentation. Employment Division, Department of Human Resources of Oregon v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990) Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye, Inc. v. City of Hialeah, 508 U.S. 250 (1993) Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., 573 U.S. 682 (2014) Prince v. Massachusetts, 321 U.S. 158 (1944) Jehovah's Witnesses in the State of Washington v. King County Hospital Unit No. 1 (Harborview), 278 F.Supp. 488 (W.D. Wash. 1967) In re Clark, 185 N.E.2d 128 (Ohio Ct. of C.P. 1962) Hoener v. Bertinato, 67 N.J.Super. 517 (1961) Learn more about Secular Pro-Life at secularprolife.org.   Transcript: Kelsey Hazzard: Hello everyone and welcome to Religious Liberty Justifications for Violence: a Legal Analysis. For those of you who don't know me, my name is Kelsey Hazard. I am the founder and president of Secular Pro-Life. SPL is an atheist led organization advancing secular arguments against abortion and uniting people of every faith and none to protect prenatal human beings. I'm really excited about this presentation. Although I am an atheist, I have always taken a strong academic interest in religion. My undergraduate majors were religious studies and psychology, and then I went to law school where I just devoured all things First Amendment. So I wanna thank Rehumanize International for giving me this wonderful opportunity to, to geek out with an audience. You have probably seen headlines about satanist groups and pro-abortion Jewish synagogues filing lawsuits against pro-life legislation planning that it violates their religious freedom. And maybe you've thought, well, that's ridiculous. You can't just kill somebody and say, Oh, but it's my religion. And if that was your reaction, Your intuition is correct. I am going to conclude that these lawsuits, these lawsuits ought to fail. But to discuss this issue intelligently beyond just our intuitive reactions requires understanding some key concepts of religious liberty law. So, this session is your crash course. I have five housekeeping matters before I begin. One, I have a lot of citations. You can find all of them in the most recent post at secular pro-life dot org slash blog. I've also dropped it in the chat, and if you're watching the later recording, there should be a link in the description. Two. A disclaimer. I am a attorney. I am not your attorney. This presentation is for general educational purposes only. It is not legal advice. If you need legal advice, you should contact a lawyer who's licensed in your jurisdiction to give you advice that's tailored to your situation. Number three, I realized that this conference attracts attendees. From around the world. In fact, I think I saw a poll earlier that about a quarter of you are from outside of the United States of America. I am focused here. This presentation is specifically about US law. Number four. If you have questions or comments, please put them in the Q and A tab. I'll circle back to them at the end if we have time. If you put them in the general chat tab, I might miss them. So please use that Q and A tab. Finally, number five. This session is going to touch on quite a few beliefs. Satanism Judaism, Native American Spirituality, Santeria, Evangelical Christianity, Jehovah's Witnesses. In the Immortal words of Stefan from Saturday Night Live, this club has everything. If you happen to belong to any of the religious communities I just mentioned, I apologize in advance for how cursory and surface level my comments are going. You could devote a lifetime of study to any one of the religions I mentioned, and many people have. We have 45 minutes. It is what it is. And I'm sorry. So all of those housekeeping matters are done. Let us dive in with a Native American church and the case of Employment Division, Department of Human Resources of Oregon versus Smith. That's mouthful. We usually just say employment division versus Smith. Mr. Smith ingested peyote for sacramental purposes during a Native American ceremony. Somehow his employer, a drug rehab center, found out about that and fired him. He applied for state unemployment benefits and he was denied. Oregon's position was using hallucinogens is illegal in our state. You used them. There is no religious exception, so it's your own damn fault you lost your job. We're not paying you unemployment. Mr. Smith argued that this violated his first amendment right to free exercise of religion. The case went all the way to the us Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court ruled against him. The court supported Oregon's position. Their reasoning, and I'm paraphrasing here, Was, what are you nuts? We can't start making religious exceptions to drug laws. Every heroin addict in the country is going to take advantage of that. Laws would mean absolutely nothing. It would be chaos . So he lost, he lost his case. And the legal standard that was announced in Smith was that if a generally applicable, incidentally burdens religious exercise that is not a First Amendment violation. The law will be upheld and the state does not have to create an exception or an accommodation for that religious person. So what does the Supreme Court mean by generally applicable law? The best way to illustrate that is with a counter. Let's talk about Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye versus city of Hialeah. I love this case, not just because it's fun to say, although it it definitely is Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye. I also just find it super interesting and my favorite law professor Douglas Laycock, happens to represent the church. So, first some background. This is where Santeria makes an appearance. And if your only familiarity with Santeria is the Sublime song, you have excellent musical taste. Don't practice Santeria ain't got no crystal ball — just don't pop a cap in Sancho, this is a consistent life ethic conference. By the way, I have no way of knowing if my stupid jokes are landing. So please, please be gentle. Santeria is most commonly practiced in Cuba. It arose from the interaction of African religions brought by enslaved people, and Catholicism brought by colonizers. When Cuban American refugees settled in South Florida, they brought Santeria with them. Santeria worship sometimes involves ritual animal sacrifice, which makes it a very foreign and objectionable, scenario to a white American audience. When a Santeria priest announced that he was opening the Church of the Lukumi Babalu in Hialeah, a Santeria congregation, it did not go over well. As the Supreme Court put it in its opinion, the prospect of a Santeria church in their midst was distressing to many members of the Hialeah community. And the announcement of the plans to open a santaria church in Hialeah prompted the city council to hold an emergency public session on June 9, 1987. That session and some later ones produced numerous resolutions and ordinances, which taken together prohibited the Santeria animal sacrifices. So this went up to the US Supreme Court. And the, the justice said the justices had no trouble figuring out that this was not a generally applicable law. It was a unanimous decision. The city argued, Hey, they we're just promoting animal welfare, and we have legitimate public health concerns as far as the animal remains go. But that was unconvincing because the ordinance. Were just riddled with exceptions for commercial meat production, for hunting, for pest control, and even for kosher slaughter. The court called it a religious gerrymander. I'll quote again from the opinion. The net result of the gerrymander is that few, if any, killings of animals are prohibited other than Santeria's s. Which is prescribed because it occurs during a ritual or ceremony, and its primary purpose is to make an offering to the Orishas, not food consumption. Indeed, careful drafting insured that although Santeria sacrifice is prohibited, killings that are no more necessary or humane in almost all other circumstances are unpunished. In other words, this law was discriminatory. And since the law was not generally applicable, The Smith's standard did not apply. Instead, the court used a much tougher standard, what we call strict scrutiny. There must be a compelling interest in support of the law, and the law must be narrowly tailored to advance that interest with the least religious burden possible. Remember that test: compelling interest, narrowly tailored. That's strict scrutiny. And there's a saying in the legal community: strict in theory, fatal in fact. Meaning hardly anything is going to pass the strict scrutiny test. Hialeah's anti sacrifice — anti sacrifice law, certainly did not, and the church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye emerged victorious. So at this point you might be wondering how this is relevant to anti-abortion laws. After all, we aren't targeting a particular religion. We didn't convene an emergency city — city council session to ban the satanic abortion ritual. We aren't trying to save only the babies conceived by mothers of a particular faith group. We wanna save as many babies as humanly possible. That's how pro-life laws are written. They're broad. They're generally applicable. Yes. Yes. That, that is right. However, The American public really did not like the outcome in Employment Division versus Smith. A lot of people on both sides of the aisle felt that Smith should have won that case, and it's not hard to see why. Right? He's a very sympathetic plaintiff. He wasn't hurting anybody. Native American use of peyote is thousands of years older than the United States itself. The war on drugs really has run a muck here. Why couldn't have Org — why couldn't Oregon have just made an exception for him? Don't we have freedom of religion in this country? And that was bipartisan sentiment at the time. So Congress passed a law called the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA. And what RFRA did was take that compelling interest, strict scrutiny test that was used in Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye and say that's going to be the test for all religious freedom claims, including claims for an exception to a generally applicable law. Now, the federal RFRA only applies to federal laws, but almost half of the states enacted their own state level RFRA. That includes much of the south and also some deep blue New England states. The end result is that whether you are going to take more of a Smith approach or more of a church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye approach depends on where you live. I told you that RFRA was a bipartisan sentiment at the time. Not so much now. Over the years, increasingly high profile RFRA claims involve L G B T issues. For instance, conservative Christian florists seeking exceptions from anti-discrimination laws so that they can refuse to serve same sex weddings. RFRA itself didn't change, but it acquired this anti-gay connotation that left a lot of liberals with a sour taste in their mouths. And like so many other issues, opinions about RFRA grew more and more partisan, more and more polarized. And then the Supreme Court decided Burwell versus Hobby Lobby. This was a huge RFRA case. It was only eight years ago. It got a ton of press and I'm sure many of you already know all about it. But I'm gonna summarize it. So as part of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, whatever you wanna call it, I don't care. Employers of a certain size were required to provide contraceptives — coverage for various contraceptives with no copay. Hobby lobby did not object to most of the contraceptive methods on the list, but it identified four that it said weren't really contraceptives, that that was a misnomer. These were really abortifacients. They weren't preventing conception, they were preventing a newly conceived embryo from implanting. Hobby Lobby considered that to be an early abortion, and the company owners' Evangelical Christian faith would not allow them to be complicit in funding their employees abortions. Hobby Lobby brought a case under RFRA. The Supreme Court used that two part strict scrutiny test. Remember: compelling interest and narrowly tailored. The court assumed that the government does have a compelling interest in ensuring access to contraception. It was that second part of the test whether the law is narrowly tailored to advance the compelling interests by the least restrictive means, which is where the contraceptive mandate failed. And that was largely because a religious exception already exists. The Department of Health and Human Services, HHS had created an exception, had had given accommodations to churches and religious non-profits that had a problem with funding contraceptives. In those cases, the government covered the cost without the employer's involvement, thus advancing the compelling interest in contraceptive access without a religious burden. So the accommodation was obviously possible. It was being done. It's just that HHS would not extend that accommodation to Hobby Lobby on the ground that Hobby Lobby was a for profit company. A slim majority of the justices, five to four, said that under RFRA, that doesn't matter. For-profit or nonprofit status doesn't matter. So Hobby Lobby got its exception from the contraceptive mandate. The mandate itself was not struck down, by the way. It's still in effect, albeit with greater, broader, religious exceptions than HHS wanted. Women are still getting their pills. Sky didn't fall, but plenty of people were convinced that the sky was falling and RFRA took another hit in the court of public opinion. So the religious liberty challenges to pro-life laws that we're seeing today are largely RFRA lawsuits. When you read the press about them, the narrative is basically, Ha ha ha, conservatives we're using your religion law against you. Like it's some kind of Gotcha. Hopefully by virtue of this presentation, you understand why that take is ahistorical. But forget the press. Let's take a fair look at the lawsuits themselves, starting with the Satanists. First of all, to correct a myth, Satanists, do not literally worship Satan or even believe in the existence of Satan. Satanism is a naturalistic system, but you do not necessarily need a deity to qualify as a religion under the First Amendment. Sincerely held Moral beliefs will suffice. For purposes of today, satanism is a religion, and Satanists provide a useful public service, in my view, keeping local governments in compliance with the establishment clause. I see you've, put up a 10 Commandments monument. Where do we apply to erect our statue to Baphomet? It's those, it's those guys. You, you've seen the satanists. One of the better known Satanist communities is the Satanic Temple, which follows seven tenets. The first tenet is one should strive to act with compassion and empathy toward all creatures in accordance with roots, in accordance with reason. Unfortunately, that noble tenant goes straight out the window when it comes to abortion. In that case, they emphasize the third tenet: one's body is inviolable, subject to one's own will alone. Classic sovereign zone. The Satanic abortion ritual involves reciting and contemplating that third tenet while getting an abortion. For the purpose of casting off guilt, shame, and mental discomfort that the satanist may be experiencing about the abortion. So the argument is not that abortion is a required part of Satanic practice. It's not like making a hodge. They're not sacrificing babies to earn points. That's not what's going on here. The argument is just that if a satanist is going to have abortion, this is the ritual that goes along with it. And by restricting abortion, you're also restricting the ritual. The Jewish lawsuits, by contrast, Argue that Jewish law actually requires abortion, at least in some circumstances. For instance, the complaint brought against Florida's 15 week ban, which is still pending. That complaint asserts that late term abortion is required under Jewish law, if necessary, to promote the woman's mental wellbeing, which obviously goes far beyond Florida's normal health of the mother exception. To be abundantly clear, that is not a universal interpretation of Jewish law. Those plaintiffs do not speak for all Jews. There are pro-life jews, and Jews are welcome at this conference. Let's assume that we are in a RFRA jurisdiction. If a state wants its pro-life laws to apply universally without granting an exception to anyone who claims a religious freedom to abort, remember what the state has to. One, the law is supported by a compelling interest. And two, the law is narrowly tailored to advance that compelling interest with the least possible burden to religious exercise. We all know what the compelling interest is. It's human life. The plaintiffs will say, Not to our religion, it's not. And I say, Bring on that debate. The science of life at fertilization is settled. And when you read the Dobbs opinion, I don't think you can escape the conclusion that the government now has a legally compelling interest in preventing abortions. Is there any way to promote that compelling interest without creating a religious clash? Not that I see. One day with the development of artificial, artificial wombs? Maybe. That, that would be great. But with current technology, no. So I believe that anti-abortion laws should survive a RFRA challenge. They survive strict scrutiny. The lawsuits will fail. But Kelsey, someone asks, What about strict in theory, fatal in fact? Thank you, person who has been paying attention. You should be skeptical. Can I point to any specific legal precedent that a state's interest in, in protecting human life, and in particular young human life, and preventing human death, can trump a religiously motivated medical decision? Well, folks, I promised you Jehovah's Witnesses, and I'm a woman of my word. Several bible verses prohibit eating blood and instruct Israelites to remove blood from their meat. Jehovah's Witnesses interpret those versions to prohibit not only eating blood through the mouth and digestion, but any consumption of blood, including taking blood intravenously. They oppose blood transfusions on that religious ground. This belief is very sincerely held. Many Jehovah's Witnesses would rather die than accept a blood transfusion. Many have proved it. Normally, we trust parents to make medical decisions for their children, but when Jehovah's Witness parents refuse to allow life saving blood transfusions for their kids, authorities often intervene. And when that happens, the parents go to court demanding vindication of their religious liberty. There's whole line of cases about this going back decades. And most of them cite this powerful quote from the Supreme Court case of Prince versus Massachusetts. Parents may be free to become martyrs themselves, but it does not follow that they are free in identical circumstances to make martyrs of their children. Oddly enough, Prince didn't involve blood transfusion or any other life or death issue. Prince was about a Jehovah's Witness who had her daughter, selling religious pamphlets late at night in violation of a child labor law. But the Supreme Court's rhetorical flourish about making martyrs of your children made it clear how it would come down in a blood transfusion case. And courts across the country took that unsubtle hint. For example, a Washington Court rejected a Jehovah's Witness blood transfusion lawsuit on the compelling authority of Prince. An Ohio Court wrote, no longer can parents virtually exercise the power of life or death over their children. Nor may they abandon him, deny him proper parental care, neglect or refuse to provide him with proper and necessary subsistence education, medical or surgical care, or other care necessary for his health, morals, or wellbeing. And while they may, under certain circumstances, deprive him of his liberty or his property, under no circumstances, with or without due process, with or without religious sanction, are they free to deprive him of his life. That same court went on to say the parents in this case have a perfect right to worship as they please and believe what they please. They enjoy complete freedom of religion, but this right of theirs ends where somebody else's right begins. Their child is a human being in his own right with a soul and body of his own. He has rights of his own. The right to live and grow up without disfigurement. Okay. You're thinking those were all born children. Okay. Allow me to introduce you to the New Jersey case of Hoener versus Bertinato. Mr. And Mrs. Bertinato were Jehovah's Witnesses. Mrs. Bertinato was pregnant with her fourth child. This was an issue of RH incompatibility. I am not qualified to explain that in any detail, so I'll just quote the court. Her first child was born without the necessity of blood transfusions and is a normal child. This accords with the medical testimony at the hearing that the mother's RH blood condition adversely affects the second and subsequent children, but rarely is harmful for the harmful to the first born. Second child needed a blood transfusion immediately. The parents refused and the baby's doctors filed an emergency petition. The court briefly placed that baby in state custody just long enough to accomplish the blood transfusion. The child survived, and the child was returned to the parents. I'll quote again. Gloria Bertinato's third pregnancy resulted in a baby who also — excuse me. Gloria Bertinato's third pregnancy resulted in a baby who admittedly also needed a blood transfusion to save its life, but defendants again refused to permit this on religious grounds. No legal proceedings were instituted to compel the transfusion. The infant died. For baby number four, the county would not allow that tragedy to be repeated. They were ready. Officials filed their lawsuit before the child was born, to ensure that a blood transfusion could occur. The lawsuit, quote, charges that the defendants, by their refusal to authorize the transfusions, are endangering the life of the unborn child, and are therefore neglecting to provide it with proper protection, in violation of New Jersey law. The court acknowledged that the parents' religious objections were sincere. But the parents' constitutional freedom of religion, although accorded the greatest possible respect, must bend to the paramount interest of the state to act in order to preserve the welfare of a child and its right to survive. The court cited Prince and various other Jehovah's Witnesses blood transfusion cases, and then it asked, should the outcome be any different because this child is still in the womb? And the answer was a resounding no. This was pre-roe. So the court embraced the science and stated medical authority recognizes that an unborn child is a distinct biological entity from the time of conception, and many branches of the law afford the unborn child protection throughout the period of gestation. Of course, in the Dobbs era, that protection is finally being restored. A pro-abortion American is free to embrace a religious belief that human life does not begin at fertilization, but she is not free to make a martyr of her child. That concludes my prepared remarks. I appreciate your time, and I look forward to answering your questions. Um, Elizabeth asked, what was the name of this case? I don't know which case you're referring to. All of the cases are in that citation, that link I gave at the beginning. And you should be able to, hold on. Are you talking about the most recent case I was talked? The, the last case I mentioned, Hoener, H O E N E R, versus Bertinato was the case with the, the unborn child of Jehovah's Witness. Love all the jokes in geek. Thank you, . I, I know that we, we cover some dark topics at the Rehumanize Conference. I'm a big believer in, trying to lighten the mood. I don't see much in Q and A tab, so I'm just gonna scroll back through the chat tab. Let me see if there's anything here. , As a fellow lawyer, I feel that caveat to my core. Yes. Thank you, Leah. Um, Oh my God. . Sorry. The poor, poor dog. Okay. Jews have been pro-life for millennia, so Yeah. I, I agree. Joey. Thank you, joey, for rick rolling us . Okay. Um. Ben says, these seem like really strong precedents, especially because some of them are arguably about letting die rather than killing and are thus even stronger than what you'd need in the abortion case. Excellent point, Ben. Yes, I, I certainly, hope that the courts see it the same way. The, the downside to the Jehovahs Witness precedence is that they are older and they are not Supreme Court precedents. But as I mentioned, the, the Supreme Court precedent in Prince, although not about blood transfusions, has, has largely been, taken up in that line of cases. And I think it would, still function in the same way in the unlikely event that one of these religious freedom abortion cases makes its way all the way to our highest court. How would you summarize this to say 240 characters? Like to tweet at Catholics for Choice? You might need a thread , or you can just, link to the eventual video of this presentation. I believe Rehumanize is going to make this footage available, and then we'll get the closed captions going and put it up on YouTube, hopefully within the next few weeks. But yeah, more, more generally, I think, the, I don't know, maybe I should start tweeting at Catholics for Choice about this. What are you seeing in the legal field regarding RFRA changing its function post Roe? I don't know that it's really changing its function necessarily. So some of the plaintiffs, and particularly the satanist plaintiffs, I think are bringing these lawsuits, not solely because they're pro-abortion, although they are — I think they would also, as a, as a strategic matter, like to push on RFRA. I think I, and I think that's why we're seeing the press around it that we're seeing. This is like — even if they were to lose and they, they have to know that they're likely to lose, this is, this is a press thing and this is a, a matter of, trying to, get, get some more public opposition to RFRA. So. I, I don't, I haven't seen a whole lot of traction on that front. I haven't seen any legislatures, taking RFRA off their books, but you never know. . David asks, How long, how do you do your legal prep? Sorry, I'm struggling to read this because other things keep popping up. How do you do your legal research and how long does it take? Did you know most of these cases offhand or did you have to look them up? So I knew some of the big ones offhand. I knew. Employment Division v Smith. I knew Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye. I knew Prince vs. Massachusetts. I knew Hobby Lobby. You know, like I, I refreshed my memory by rereading those opinions, but I knew that that was where I needed to start. And then I did have to do some additional research, when it came to the, the pen — the pending lawsuits, and also the Jehovah's Witness line of cases. I, I, because I am a practicing attorney, I have access to Westlaw, which is the, legal database. That was very helpful. And, you know, also just, I, you know, I started by just doing a general search for law review articles about Jehovah's Witness of blood transfusion that compiled some of the cases. And that was, that was a good start. And I, was definitely working on this presentation as late as last night. So , I'm glad it came together. I am a better procrastinator. But that's, yeah, that's how it all happened. Let's see. Ben asks, Apart from law, what do you think about the ethical argument from religious freedom or religious pluralism, that being pro-life depends on controversial slash contested views about the grounds of personal identity and dignity. And so no one view should be legislated for by a pluralist society. The problem is that your, your law is going to pick a line. That's what laws do. If. That, that that argument, that poor pluralism argument treats birth like it's a neutral line. It's not. The, the law is gonna pick a line and every line is gonna offend somebody . That, that's just, that's just life in a democracy. So I don't, I don't find that argument particularly, persuasive from our loyal opposition. My, I would go a step farther and say that the only neutral way to go about this is to say that, you know, human rights begin when human life begins. And that that has to be defined in a scientific way, rather than a philosophical way because, there, there's, you know, you all of these, different guideposts that are being posed. Bear a lot of resemblance to ensoulment, which would be an establishment of religion. I hope that makes sense. , Given your rationale, how would any abortion be legal without demonstrating an exceptional need such as life of the mother? I, I do oppose abortion other than for the life of the mother. Mother, excuse me. Under Dobbs, the state, it, it is still a state by state thing. I'm getting into — the 14th Amendment argument is definitely beyond the scope of what I can do in the next nine minutes. But the, so, the idea is that you're, you know, the people of a state, through their legislatures, demonstrate what the interests of the state are. Right? So Florida or, you know, let's, you know, take, take like Alabama, right? Alabama has, an active, pretty, pretty strong anti-abortion legislation post Dobbs. That is an indication that the state of Alabama has a compelling interest in preventing abortion and protecting human life. California obviously does not think that it has that compelling interest, so that — I, I don't know if I'm answering your question. But I, I hope, I hope that helps. How can interested people get involved with Secular Pro-life and what are your current needs? Yeah, definitely you can get involved in Secular Pro-life. We are always in need of volunteers. We, look for people to write guest pieces on our blog. We look for translators. We wanna get our message out in languages other than English. You can email me, info@secularprolife.org, or you can email our executive director Monica at Monica, secularprolife.org and, get connected to some volunteer opportunities that way. And you can also donate, via our website or our Facebook page. In Canada not long ago, an immigrant couple were convicted of the honor killing of their daughter. The couple sincerely believed that it was their moral duty to kill their daughter, but the majority in Canada, fortunately in the case of that issue, and unfortunately perhaps some other issues imposed their views on the minority. Sometimes it is good to impose views — not a question, a comment supporting something you said. I, yeah, that, that's an excellent example. I would stick with the Jehovah's witness example, just because it's a little less inflammatory. . I, I'm not in the habit of, comparing pro-choice people to supporters of honor killings if I don't have to. I think the Jehovah's Witness comparison is, more diplomatic and civil. But on principle, yes, you are correct. The the same reasons that, you shouldn't be able to, claim a religious exemption to commit an honor killing are, are the same reasons that you shouldn't be able to claim a religious exemption to have abortion. Um, Yeah, neutrality just seems impossible here. No neutrality when lives are on the line. Oh. Maria wrote, We will be publishing a handful of the session recordings on our YouTube in the coming weeks, but all attendees should have immediate access to all the recordings for rewatch and hopin on Monday, and that access will last for a full year. All right. Thank you. Maria. I don't. I'm, I'm guessing that's only for people who bought a ticket, though. I don't think Catholics for Choice bought a ticket. It's their loss. It's their loss. Okay, we've got about five more minutes together and I think I went through everybody's questions we might end earlier, which is, a secular miracle for a conference like this. I see Leah is on Team Westlaw. Yes, Westlaw all the way. I don't use Lexus. Never have. Um, oh. And Herb says, Thank you. All right. Herb, did you wanna come into the presentation and say anything? I was gonna do that, and then I just realized I'm in the same room as Kane who is on a panel right now, so nevermind. I'm leaving Yes, Secular Miracle would be a great band name, absolutely Ray. Hmm. Can you maybe conscience rights for physicians? Oh, can I comment on that? It's a big problem here in Canada. I unfortunately don't know much at all about Canadian law. I don't, to my knowledge, Canada doesn't have something like RFRA. So I am unfortunately not the person to ask. But, yeah, RFRA certainly can be used, for conscience protections in, in some situations. That wasn't within the scope of what I was researching, for this presentation, but I have seen that anecdotally. Um, the danger there, of course is that, you're treating, objection to abortion as inherently religious, which it isn't , but, Okay. Anything else? Always heard Canada is pretty bad for conference rights. Yeah. Yeah. That, that's what I've heard also. Oh, something in the Q and A. Thank you. What do you think of efforts to argue for pro-life conclusions within religions on specifically religious grounds? Eg. Do you think Catholic should be arguing against Catholic for Choice? Primarily just using general moral argument. To avoid creating the impression that it's really a religious issue, or do you think there's a role for intra religious debates to be more well religious? I, I think that if you are part of a religious community, and members of your community are out doing stupid things or unethical things, you should go get your guy. That's, I, I have no problem with you using a religious argument with someone that you know to be religious. Now if you're in a public Twitter argument with Catholics for Choice, then maybe consider that you're not so much trying to persuade them. You're trying to persuade the audience. So in that case you might take a more ve route, but yeah, individually, like in a one on one or small group setting, if you are speaking with co-religionists, I don't have a problem with you, using a religious argument. That's your business. I'm, I'm an atheist. That's, that's not my realm at all. So something came up in chat. Con — that's the problem we're having. Conscience is always being framed as religious, but conscience is not itself exclusive to religion. Yeah. And so that kind of gets back to my point earlier about, satanism being considered a religion. And you, you can see that also in, consci— conscientious objector rules for military, you do not have to be, religious to, to claim, an interest in pacifism. I read about a pastor who has a ministry flying women from places where abortion is illegal to get abortions legally. That's just gross. Okay. I think we are done. Thank you all so much for your time. I am going to maybe hang out a little bit at the Secular Pro-Life Expo booth if anybody wants to continue this conversation. And, yeah. Thank, thank you so much for, for dropping in. I really, and, and for, for asking such thoughtful questions.  

The Bellcast
From the helm: Starpharma's (ASX:SPL) Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Jackie Fairley

The Bellcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 7:47


In this instalment of our From the helm series, Bell Direct's Grady Wulff speaks to Starpharma's (ASX:SPL) Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Jackie Fairley. Starpharma Holdings Limited (ASX:SPL) is a global biopharmaceutical company and a world leader in the development of new pharmaceutical and medical products based on proprietary polymers called dendrimers. In this video Dr. Fairley discusses:(0:56) A brief overview of Starpharma(2:31) Growing distribution network for Viraleze(3:29) SPL's exciting oncology portfolio and key partnerships with major companies(4:56) How Viraleze works and the market opportunity going forward(6:09) What's coming up next for SPL

2 Many Guys Soccer Show
2 Many Guys Soccer Show #085

2 Many Guys Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 134:11


This week, we discuss the Premier League and highlight the recent fixtures. We then move our SPL update with Celtic Cam. We conclude with the Semi Final fixtures of the MLS Cup.

LYON DEMAIN Gérald BOUCHON
La RATP veut exploiter le réseau TCL à Lyon

LYON DEMAIN Gérald BOUCHON

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 12:14


Le contrat qui lie le Sytral et Keolis pour l'exploitation du réseau TCL s'achève en 2024. Un appel d'offres va permettre de renouveler ce marché. Le SYTRAL regroupe des élus des 59 communes de la Métropole de Lyon et et du département du Rhône. Ces élus décident de la création ou de la modification des lignes de métro, tram, bus, funiculaires. Le réseau comprend aussi les lignes de cars du département, les transports scolaires ou encore le transport des personnes à mobilité réduite. L'ensemble de ces services constitue le réseau TCL. Ce réseau est ensuite confié à un exploitant. Depuis 1993, le SYTRAL délègue l'exploitation du réseau TCL à un seul et même opérateur privé (KEOLIS Lyon) à travers une délégation de service public (DSP). Lors de la dernière procédure de mise en concurrence, le SYTRAL a, une nouvelle fois, attribué la gestion du réseau TCL à KEOLIS Lyon pour 6 ans (2017-2023). Avec peu de suspense à la clé... Keolis était le seul candidat pour l'exploitation du réseau lyonnais. Mais pour le prochain appel d'offres, le SYTRAL, devenu Sytral Mobilités avec des compétences élargies, a décidé de scinder le réseau en deux lots : modes lourds (métro, tram, funiculaire)pour l'un, bus trolleys et contrôle des titres pour le second. Sans oublier, une gestion 100% publique via une société publique locale (SPL) pour la relation usagers (communication et le marketing), la commercialisation et la distribution, l'information voyageurs en situation normale et perturbée, le service après-vente et les réclamations. Mais aussi es parcs-relais voitures et vélos. L'objectif affiché de cet allotissement est notamment de "permettre les conditions d'une concurrence juste". "L'objectif n'est pas de faire des économies mais de faire mieux au juste prix" a indiqué Bruno Bernard, président de la Métropole de Lyon et du SYTRAL. Trois mastodontes des transports publics devraient être candidats pour l'attribution des deux marchés. Un même opérateur peut être choisi pour les deux lots. Le contrat de délégation de service public actuel avec KEOLIS Lyon a été prolongé de 6 mois pour permettre de préparer au mieux les conditions de mise en place de l'allotissement. Parmi les candidats, la RATP, à travers sa filiale RATPdev. Amérique, Europe, Afrique, Moyen-Orient, Asie : RATP Dev est présent dans 14 pays. Le groupe gère des réseaux à Alger, Doha, Séoul, Casablanca ou Valenciennes... Nous avons rencontré les deux représentants de la RATP, déjà installés à Lyon pour peaufiner leurs offres. Philippe Ratto est directeur de l'offre sur le lot "bus et trolley". Arnaud Legrand est, lui, en charge du lot "métro, tramway et funiculaire". Comment voient-ils l'évolution du réseau TCL ? quelles sont leurs priorités ? comment voient-ils la mobilité de demain ? Comment améliorer la fiabilité du réseau ? Quelle politique de recrutement ? Ecoutez l'interview en podcast.

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. Seattle Public Library is an Institution of White Supremacy/Racism @SPLBuzz Director Tom Fay, Suspected White Supremacist

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022


The Context of White Supremacy host Gus T. Renegade, attended an open forum to discuss the future of Seattle Public Library and how the institute can better serve Puget Sound patrons. Director Tom Fay, White Man, Suspected White Supremacist was slated to be in attendance for one hour to field questions. Gus addressed numerous tacky, deliberate incidents of White Supremacy where White SPL staff mistreated Gus and used their authority to exercise Institutional White Power. This includes Gus's February 2022 visit to the Greenwood Branch where Emily Grayson admitted to constructing a massive "black history month" display in the front of the Greenwood facility. Grayson's "project" deliberately excluded black males to focus on the scourge of misogyny. She and Branch Manager Hayden Bass, White Woman, refused to make changes to the display or to honestly answer questions about their tacky exhibit. Literally days later, Gus was accosted at the Northeast location. Amy Faulkner, White Woman, and a White Male Seattle Public Library staff member who would only identify himself by badge number "#5419" repeatedly harassed me for speaking too loud in the library. Meanwhile, numerous White patrons spoke loudly and carefree throughout the facility. Gus spoke with Director Fay about all of these incidents earlier this year. He was dishonest in answering some questions and failed to deliver a public acknowledgement of their Institutionally Racist conduct. After eight months, Director Fay had no updates or specifics to offer. Just a lot of lame White rhetoric. Gus made a request for data: how many black males are employed at SPL; how many non-white people and black males specifically are on the SPL board of directors; what are the racial and gender demographics for the last five years of the people who've been banned from SPL? Gus is very certain SPL boots a hefty number of black males and has an overabundance of White female staff. #SeattlePublicLibrary #ReadingIsMoreImportantThanWatchingTelevision #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

한판승부
[22/10/19 전체듣기] 민주당사 압수수색 논란(박주민) 한동훈, 차기 당대표?(장성철) 김용 체포와 유동규의 상관관계(브리핑) 러시아vs우크라 언제까지?(차두현)

한판승부

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 74:57


◎ 1부 (18:00-19:00)[한판 브리핑]1. 檢, 이재명 측근 김용 체포, 민주연구원 압수수색[숏터뷰]- 박주민 더불어민주당 의원2. 카카오 대표 남궁훈 사퇴 /당정, 카카오·네이버 재난관리시설 지정 입법추진3. 양곡관리법, 野 농해수위 강행처리4. SPL사태, 고용노동부의 관리소홀 허점 있었다- 민동기 평론가[한판 인터뷰]“국힘 당권 나침판 자침, 어디로 향할까?”- 장성철 공론센터 소장◎ 2부 (19:00-19:30)[한판 인터뷰]“휴지기 없는 北 도발, 9.19 군사합의 파기?”- 차두현 아산정책연구원 수석연구위원See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Final Whistle
Champions!

The Final Whistle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 44:31


We have our 2022 Singapore Premier League Champions! The White Swans are back on their throne! And the Stags have sealed third place but it isn't over just yet! Plenty of football still on offer, so tune in as Khairul Asyraf takes the hot seat on this episode of the SPL pod

OceanFM Ireland
Gerry Farrell, Sheila O'Keeffe and more.

OceanFM Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 28:54


Author of The First Prime Minister of Ireland, Gerry Farrell, and actress, Sheila O'Keeffe, tell us what to expect at the World Premiere this weekend of the Splódar production at The Glens Centre. Craig Cox fills us in on What's On and actor and musician, Robert Gogan, talks us through Strolling Through Ulysses which plays the Hawk's Well, October 26th.

CORNISH SOCCER talking football!
RAPPO & DEACS Friday Fix - October 7, 2022

CORNISH SOCCER talking football!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 176:58


RAPPO & DEACS, Series 5, Episode 10 - Friday, October 7, 2022 TIMINGS, APPROX - (2:56:58) 00:21 - Cam Weldon & Truro City 19:33 - Western League update 19:44 - Including Charlie Davis (Falmouth Town) 32:44 - Darren Hicks (Torpoint Athletic) 51:15 - Jordan Duffey (Saltash United) 1:13:20 - SWPL Phil Hiscox 1:37:12 - Ash Bradshaw (Newquay) 2:11:23 - Womens update 2:14:49 - ECPL Jon Colenzo 2:19:00 - SPL & Cornwall Intermediate Cup 2:30:18 - Rappo's Round-up --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cornishsoccer/message

Le Sapping
#EXPERT Lin français, lin bio : états des lieux et perspectives d'avenir

Le Sapping

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 90:59


Merci à notre sponsor Tilli.fr de soutenir cet épisode ! Lin français, lin bio : états des lieux et perspectives d'avenir Marion Lemaire x Pauline LaurentUne matière, plusieurs filières. Le lin à usage textile pousse majoritairement dans l'hexagone. Sur des parcelles conventionnelles ou bio. Il est ensuite baladé sur les différentes étapes de sa transformation, souvent en Chine, parfois en Europe, et depuis récemment, intégralement en France. Ces lins ne sont pas régulés par les mêmes certifications, pas tributaires des mêmes conditions de sélection, pas soumis aux mêmes coûts sur deux types de marchés. Si vous faites partie de l'écosystème textile et mode et que cela vous semble bien compliqué, imaginez ce que cela représente côté consommateur·ice·s. Si vous tenez compte du fait que, plus que pour toute autre matière, le rendement est intrinsèquement dépendant de la qualité des sols et des faveurs du climat, vous comprenez qu'on aborde aujourd'hui la question avec une marque et une ingénieure agronome. Lin français, lin bio : états des lieux et perspectives d'avenir. Place à Marion Lemaire, fondatrice de Splice et Pauline Laurent Coordinatrice - Chargée de projet pour l'Association Lin & Chanvre Bio. Bonne écoute ! SPL!CE https://www.splice.paris/Lin&Chanvre Bio https://linetchanvrebio.org/The Good Goods https://thegoodgoods.fr/Trame de l'épisodeINTRODUCTIONPrésentations et parcours Présentation de rapide de Splice et Lin & Chanvre bioLA FIBRE DE LIN et LES FILIÈRES DU LINRappel des propriétés et de ce pourquoi c'est une fibre écologiqueCycle de production de la graine au vêtement Données sur la production : française, mondiale, bio et non bioLes différents usages textiles et hors textilesComment est évaluée la qualité d'une production / année à l'autre ? Etat actuel des sols depuis 2 ans et pour les 5 ans à venir, l'impact du changement climatiqueUn mot sur le test de nouvelles espècesComment procéder à une conversion en bio ? Quelles aides ou supports de l'État pour cela ?Comment est fixé le coût des lins ? SPL!CEPourquoi avoir choisi cette matière ? Quel a été ton choix de départ et pourquoi ?Peux-tu nous faire une déconstruction du prix de l'un de tes produits ?Comment fonctionne/est organisée ta chaîne de production ? Parle-nous de LinpossibleA-t-on des horizons temporels concrets concernant la relocalisation des chaînons manquants, notamment la filature ?Quelles sont les écueils / les réalités économiques que tu n'avais pas anticipé et comment gères-tu ces flux ? Aujourd'hui, quelle est (quelles sont ?) ta/tes grande·s problématiques ? Comment tu y remédies ?Serait-il possible de laisser choisir les client·e·s ?Quelles sont les pistes explorées pour un lift de ta marque/pérenniser ton activité ? Peux-tu nous faire un pitch investisseur ? Un point sur tes accomplissements depuis les débuts de Splice, ce qui te rend fièreOù tu veux aller, idéalement ? Références citéesLinpossibleLinfiniLinportantBPIRefashionReprendre la terre aux machines CELCSpliceLin et Chanvre bio associationPaul BoyerMéline Schmidt Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

The Call from ausbiz
"[APX] if you have been there I'm sorry for you" - Mathan Somasundaram

The Call from ausbiz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 51:23


Grady Wulff from Bell Direct and Mathan Somasundaram go in-depth and stock specific. Stocks covered: BGA, APE, ELD, JLG, OZL, WHC, RRL, SPL, TPW, UMG. Our stock of the day is Appen (APX). Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Final Whistle
Crunch Time!

The Final Whistle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 29:48


We've come to the business end of the 2022 SPL season. 4 match weeks to go and ALL to play for! If that's not enough, well, we've got the small matter of the Singapore cup & international break to discuss! Listen in as Deepanraj chimes in with Farrah Nair & Zia-ul Raushan.

Blesk Podcast
Zanikneme jako starověký Egypt a Řím? Naše civilizace upadá, varuje Bárta

Blesk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:13


Přední egyptolog Miroslav Bárta a cestovatel Petr Horký se kvůli svému dokumentárnímu filmu Civilizace vydali kolem celého světa. To, v jakém stavu se lidstvo nachází, oba pořádně znepokojilo. Splňujeme totiž základních 7 podmínek rozpadu civilizace. Jestli dopadneme jako starověký Řím, Egypt a další velmoci rozebral profesor Bárta pro Blesk Podcast.

Did Ye Aye? Podcast
#25 - Jim Craig

Did Ye Aye? Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 85:05


Jim Craig is a name synonymous with the famous Lisbon Lions. The first British side to win the European Cup, the right-back was a driving force in Scotland's greatest club team. Jim chats to the Did Ye Aye? Podcast about those heroics, growing up in Govan and his career outside of football.In association with, Bend Breathe Become, Nurture Steps and Shieldbank Coffee Shop.Music by @jimmyandverona

Radiostilte
In gesprek met Marnix Eysink Smeets over onrust

Radiostilte

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 50:40


"De politie heeft een hele aparte plek. Je ziet als mensen zich onveilig voelen, onrustig zijn, dan gaat het vertrouwen omhoog in die partijen waarvan mensen denken dat die hen zekerheid kunnen brengen en de belangrijkste van die partijen is de politie." In deze aflevering van de SPL podcast 'Radiostilte' spreken makers Sophie van Berkesteijn-Gootjes en Piet-Hein Peeters met lector en onderzoeker Marnix Eysink Smeets. Onderwerp van gesprek: onrust. Een veel gebruikte termijn in deze tijd, maar wat is het precies? Waar zijn mensen 'ongerust' over? Eysink Smeets bepleit 'anders kijken', maar wat is dat dan? En wat bedoelt hij met 'professioneel luisteren'?

The Call from ausbiz
"[ALX] hold if you are already in" - Claude Walker

The Call from ausbiz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 55:54


Luke Winchester from Merewether and Claude Walker from A Rich Life go in-depth and stock specific. Stocks covered: SPL, DVR, NAB, RUL FMG, AEF, WSP, AEF, WSP, DDR, HLS and CUL. Our stock of the day is Atlas Arteria (ALX). Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Preediction
The Backliners: The State of Smite + Esports Casting w/Guest, Dolson

Preediction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 58:55


Smite designer (and longtime SPL caster), current SPL caster Dolson, and Olympus Bolts backliner, BaRRaCCuDDa, discuss the art of casting the Smite Pro League. To support the show and save, check out https://nordvpn.com/backliners and https://mintmobile.com/backliners Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

She Podcasts
370 Conference Culture

She Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 50:57


PM22, Conference Culture, the Multilingual Podcasters Meetup, a tool tip from Elsie and more! Jess and Elsie discuss all things PM22. Jess wrote a piece on conference culture and who creates it as well as SPL sponsorship and how they decide who to accept. Read it here. The Multilingual Podcasters Meetup is happening on Sept 15 from 6:00 - 8:00pm. Sign up here. Podcast consultant and strategist Rekha Murthy is joining the advisory board at LWC Studios. Read about it here. Elsie's Tool Tips Shure MV88+ Video Kit was perfect for Elsie at PM22. Super light and it fit in her pocket! Tickets to She Podcasts LIVE 2022 at the MGM National Harbor from October 11 - 14 are on sale now! She Podcasts Members have access to a discounted ticket price. Click here to get your Member ticket. Also, make sure to get your hotel room at the MGM as supply is limited. We are collaborating with Marco Arment from Overcast . He has committed to continuing to feature podcasts led by people of marginalized genders. And we are thrilled. All women and non-binary folks please fill out this SUPER EASY FORM! DO IT NOW. She Podcasts thanks our Sponsors! → My Podcast Biz WAY TO CONNECT! Elsie (and occasionally Jess) will be texting you directly! - Sign up here! 302–240–3425, text yes or my.community.com/shepodcasts Send us your feedback, email feedback@shepodcasts.com! We can't wait to hear from you

Unstuck | Mindset Coaching For Women
BEST OF: Make More Money In Less Time With These 4 Business Swaps — Ep. 163

Unstuck | Mindset Coaching For Women

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 68:02


I think most of us would agree that making more impact and income while working fewer hours is the ultimate business goal. That phrase "making money while you sleep" is actually a real possibility as is "making money while playing with your kids/on vacation/with another client/living your life." Sound pretty good, right? In this episode, I'm sharing the 4 swaps you need to make in your business so you actually can make more money in less time. We're talking passive income, the 1-to-many business model, and so much more.  "You can always create more income by having your own business, by having these other possibilities, and even though time is finite, you can create more time in a sense of you being able to do what you want with that time." - Shawn Mynar "Go from a lack mindset to an abundance mindset." - Shawn Mynar "You have a bigger why, you have a bigger purpose. Put the attention on who you are helping, how you want to help them, and what do you need to get there in a bigger way. Focus on that instead of it being all about the money." - Shawn Mynar +++ SIGNATURE PROGRAM LAB @SHAWNMYNAR - Chat with me on Instagram UNSTUCK ENTREPRENEUR INSTAGRAM SHAWNMYNAR.COM - Get the latest scoop +++ Enjoying the podcast? Be sure to SUBSCRIBE + leave a REVIEW and tell me why! I appreciate your support. FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT BELOW: 0:00 Hey, Hey there friends, Shawn here. And this is a best of episode of The unstuck entrepreneur podcast, where I'm taking the most popular most talked about most important episodes of the past and bringing them back for an encore presentation. So enjoy the replay of this episode, and I'll be back in a few weeks with another new episode and fresh topic. I'm Shawn Mynar, and this is unstuck a space for heart centered entrepreneurs to implement both the inner work and outer strategies required to get unstuck and build the impactful, profitable business of their dreams, no hustle, grind, or long hours required. Let's get into today's session. Hey, hey there, friends. Welcome back to unstuck, so grateful to have you here. As always, and I am super jazzed for this episode. I think I say that pretty much every episode. But this one really is taking like everything I love to talk about and teach with entrepreneurs, to entrepreneurs, and putting it all into one episode. Obviously, the reason why I love talking about it so much is because I'm all about all of you, creating financial freedom in your life. And I really am determined to help more women specifically create financial independence for themselves, regardless of their partners, their situations, their careers, their families, anything else like that just having this empowerment of financial independence is pretty freakin cool. And not only that when in terms of money, but I'm also super passionate about helping people actually find enjoyment in their lives and actually get back to the point of why we're here and what we're meant to be doing here. And finding that passion within their business and what they're doing. But then also finding their passion and mission and purpose outside of their business and spending time doing things they love and building a life they love and less time trapped behind the computer trapped in an office and even more so trapped in this mentality or this mindset of always having to work and strive and go go go and do this and do that in order to actually make a decent living. Because that's all just lies. So we're here to debunk all that. And we're to talk about that more today. So that's why I'm just thrilled to be here having this conversation with you really, this podcast could be either like eight hours long, or like seven other podcast episodes, which it probably will end up being. But I wanted to at least start the conversation here today. So this idea of making more money, having more income more profit, while working less, working fewer hours, and spending more time outside and your actual life. Really being an entrepreneur, having your own business is the perfect place to do all of that. And I think that's one of the main reasons well, I don't think I know, that's one of the main reasons we've all been drawn into this lifestyle. Yes, we have this purpose, we have this passion, we want to make an impact. We want to help others, we have all this stuff. But then also we would love to do that, while also working less and creating financial independence, creating financial freedom, creating time, freedom, all that stuff. This whole kind of hashtag Be Your Own Boss Life. Yes, I just used the hashtag in a sentence. I'm like, not normally that kind of person, but I just did and that's fine. Anyway, when you are working for someone else, there's very little if any room really to do this to have the opportunity to work fewer hours and make more money. You're kind of stuck in your designated schedule, and your designated salary. You may get bonuses at certain times if you do certain things. Maybe you get commissions. And I would say that not always but usually in order for you to get a commission for something it involves working more hours or working harder or hustling a little or something like that if you're in more of a sales role. So while there of course nuances to that I think the vast majority of the working for someone else role doesn't allow for much of this flexibility that we find when we are in a place of having our own business being our own boss being an entrepreneur. So then here we are, as entrepreneurs with this dream with this desire. But how do we actually make it a reality. And especially, it may seem kind of far off, or kind of impossible, almost, if you are someone who's just starting out, or you know what, maybe not even just starting out, but you still find yourself stuck, maybe you've been doing the same thing in your business for years, and you find yourself stuck getting paid the same amount, having the same amount of income of revenue, having the same amount of profit or lack thereof, of year in, year out. And it feels like you're working a ton. And you really don't have much to show for it. And this can happen at the beginning of your business. It happened to me for a couple of years in my business, where I felt like I was working a lot and I had no flexibility. In my schedule, I was really kind of bending over backwards for my clients and their schedules, which meant getting up at five in the morning, most days of the week, working Sunday through Friday, so only having one day off per week. And it felt like I was doing the opposite of what I actually wanted, which was this life of freedom, flexibility, and uncapped earning potential, I wanted all those things, I was getting none of it. So you may be in a similar place right now. Or you may not even be there, but you're worried you're scared, you might get there someday, if you do start your business, or if you do go all in where you're working a ton and not making very much. And it's the opposite of what you want. So how do we turn this ship? Around? Is the real question we have today. And the question I'm going to answer, I have four swaps, that you are going to start making in your business today. As I said, I probably could think of like 20 swaps that you could make in your business. But let's just get you started today. As you know, if you have listened to any episode of The unstuck podcast before, we've got to look both internally and externally. So this is not just a question of the practical, tangible stuff that you can do in your business to start making more money, which we are going to talk about, that's two of the four are these practical, tangible things. But we also have to talk about this other stuff, the internal stuff, that inner work, otherwise, those practical things, you're still not going to do them, they're still not going to make a profit, you're not going to make any more money, you're still going to find yourself working 10 hours, it's going to be pointless. Okay. So that's what we do hear on unstuck is we do that inner work, while also looking at the outer strategy. So we do a little bit of both, starting with a quote, as always, from Jim Rohn. Time is more valuable than money, you can get more money, but you cannot get more time. And this is really speaking to the idea that time is finite, whereas money is infinite. And so the conversation we're having here today is to really prove reprioritize, I guess and showcase that ability, that you have the power to make more money, but you cannot create more time. But what we can do, through the conversation we're going to have today is actually create more time than what I just said you can do. But what we're going to do is reallocate your time to be where you want to be spending it, which is out with your family, with your loved ones out in nature out traveling. I know there's so many people that wish they could travel more. And now we're back in a place in the world where we can start traveling again, thank goodness. So is that something that you want to start adding in more of, but you just need to find the time. This is how we can do that. So I want I really wanted to use that quote. It's a very well known quote, but I wanted to use that here in order for you to see that you can always create more income by having your own business and by having these other possibilities. And when you do so even though time is finite, you can actually create more time in the sense of you being able to Do what you want with that time. So that's really cool and super, super loved that whole idea. Before we get into these four swaps I have for you, I just want to share a little bit about my story. Some of you may have heard this before, it's just a little snippet of how I used everything that we're going to talk about today. And within a matter of a year completely transformed. My business, I, as I mentioned, was at a place where I was taking clients one on one for both personal training, which is how I originally started my business. And then added on nutrition coaching, once I became a nutritionist through the NTA. So I was doing both and I was taking one on one clients and I was working a lot, I didn't have the problem of not finding clients, which I was very fortunate and very grateful for. But I was taking a lot of clients and I was working around the clock with them, I was getting super burnt out. If you take one on one clients, then you probably know how that feels that feeling of like your energy being kind of sucked dry, because you are giving it to your clients, which is really wonderful and really great and really needed. But if you don't have those boundaries in place, yet, it can be very draining. And I didn't have those boundaries in place yet. Because I was fresh, I was new, I was making money, and I was excited. But I wasn't making enough money. And that was definitely not making enough money for the time and effort and energy that I was putting into my business. I was barely making ends meet. I think that this year that I'm speaking of in my business, which was 2015 2016 I net ID like $15,000 in my business, so not enough by any means money. And then I got sick. And I started working on myself, I started doing a lot of personal growth, self development, self improvement, spiritual work, started working on my mindset started working on connecting to my intuition and trusting it started working on my relationship with my higher power, the universe, source God love whatever you want to call it started working on that whole concept, which was really totally new to me at that point, nothing I had really ever considered. But I was sick, and I needed to get better. And I had tried everything I knew how to do. And I was working with all these practitioners, and doctors and all these supplements and all these dietary changes and all this stuff to try to get better. And it wasn't working. And so I realized the thing that was still something that I could do that I couldn't work on was my inner self. And I don't even know how I came to that conclusion, except that it was complete desperation, because I had never considered that before in my life. I've never done any like inner work when unquote, in my life. But I did. And so I started that journey. And it was so eye opening for me a lot of you know, this part of my journey already. But when it comes to my business specifically, while I was not doing this work to help my business, I just started applying it to it just almost naturally. And just like well, it's actually working for my health, I might as well just give it a try and see what I can do for this business situation that I'm in because I'm broke. And I'm burned out. And I don't really know where to go next. And through this, you know, long story short, there was a lot of journaling and a lot of meditation and a lot of really doing some digging on myself and reading and writing and all that stuff. But long story short, it ended up to where I was able to have this like intuitive download of something I wanted to create in my business. And I actually went for it for probably the first time ever I listened to my intuition, I was able to actually hear that side of me. And I didn't let my fear and my stories and all this stuff about the money that I didn't have that i How was I ever going to make that work when I couldn't invest anything. Because also I should mention part of this whole self improvement work I was doing was on my money mindset, which was a big huge thing that I had no idea was a problem for me until this point in my life. And now I can see that it had absolutely affected everything up until then. But I was able to let go of some of that and allow my intuition to come through and allow myself to trust that and to go for it and to invest money I didn't have into this idea. And in a matter of months, it completely transformed my business. Some of you may A know what that thing was, it was called the fat burning female project. It was an online course, for women teaching a in an intuitive approach to a keto diet, something that no one had done before. If there wasn't something out there like that, and I had never done that before I had never, I had no clue how to create an online course or what that even meant, or what it would even look like or would it even be successful? How would it even go, I had no clue. But I kept going with it. I compiled everything that I was teaching one on one to clients and put it into this course and created a system for it that was proprietary, no one else had ever done it no one else it came from, no one, nothing else, but my own intuition and my own brain. And I put it into this course, with absolutely no clue what I was doing. Fast forward a year. So this is 2017. By the end of 2017. That course alone had made almost $100,000. And that was on top of me still seeing clients and still having a regular schedule and still working with brands on affiliate. So that was just one piece of my income that year. And to go from having the year before. Net income $15,000. To now having this in one year was really huge for me, I've talked about that situation before was kind of what some people might call this quantum leap in business. For me, it was just a compilation of the inner improvements, I was doing the inner work I was doing and really getting in touch with myself for the first time ever, and really getting through all the muck that I had that I didn't even know I had, from my past and and my growing up and things like that, and doing all this work on myself, and then letting that lead the way and taking action on it. And so to kind of connect the dots between this story and what we're going to talk about today, that was my first venture into a passive income opportunity into an opportunity to go from working one on one with clients, which meant I was trading my time for dollars to working one to many, which we're going to talk about which opens the doors to an unlimited source of income potential, which is amazing. And it just opened my eyes to the possibilities in my business. That's what we're going to talk about today, I've never looked back, you will feel the same way. Let's get into it. The first swap is to go from lack to abundance. So as you can see, we're kicking it off with mindset work, going from a lack mindset, to an abundance mindset. The vast, vast, vast majority of society right now is operating from a lack mindset. And you may be one of those people. If you come from this place of lack, you can do all the external things that we're going to talk about coming up and still struggle to make money, you can take all the courses, you can hire all the coaches, you can do all of this and you can do all of that. And you're still not going to make the money that you want to make. Or if you do end up making that money, you will sabotage yourself to no longer make that money. That is how powerful our minds are. It can up here like you are doing everything, quote, unquote, right? To create this freedom filled financially sound business. But in the end, it will be the same thing that you're used to will be working tons of hours, not making enough money, feeling frustrated, feeling scared, feeling worried, not investing in yourself all of these practices that are the external output of a lack mindset. Because those stories that you have about money, about hard work about how to make money about how much money you are capable of making your worth your value, what you deserve, all that stuff. They're still running the show. They're taking over your thoughts and emotions and ultimately, they're directing your actions in your business. So this is where we start talking about that ego voice that little internal chatter that you have going on all the time that you can hear pretty well when you listen, it's it's right there. But it's saying things like money doesn't grow on trees. I have to work hard to make money. I have to make sure I earn every penny. I can't afford to, you know, insert thing here and buy So in my business, quit my job and go all in, there's all kinds of I can't afford out there in business, my financial gain is someone else's loss. You can see these are stories that are playing in your head, they may not sound exactly like that. But the end result is this story, you could also probably see that they didn't necessarily come from you, you were taught that that is what you saw or heard growing up. That's probably what your parents saw or heard when they grew up. And so it's been passed down from generations to generations, this lack mindset. So nobody's fault, nobody needs to have any sort of blame put on them. But this is where we're at, as a society really, with all of us kind of snowballing into this lack mindset, and having these stories about money that simply aren't true. And when we have these stories, this is how it may look for you and your business, not being willing to invest in yourself or your business, because you don't believe it will come back to you. Like you don't believe in that flow of abundance, that giving and receiving flow that we're always in. It could look like you not charging appropriately because you don't feel like you deserve or are worthy of making that money you feel like, again, this my financial gain is someone else's loss. So you feel quote, unquote, bad for charging for your services, it can look like being scared to talk about your pricing to potential clients, or just talking about money in general, it could look like quote, unquote, busy work for the sake of working and this is where it gets back to this, like I have to work hard, I have to earn my money. So instead of just letting things flow, you're like constantly busy working yourself. In order to make yourself feel like you deserve or are worthy of making money of putting out some pricing for your clients. It can look like ignoring your intuitive nudges because they don't make logical sense. And or will cost money. This is a big one. This is one of the one I see probably the most often is ignoring what you want to be doing what you're being guided to do, because but how will the money come? Or how will I afford it, or I don't have the money for that, or that doesn't make financial sense. It's a big one. It could look like comparing your success to others and getting jealous of others success, or not doing what you want to do in your business because someone's already doing it. Again, lack lack, lack lack, really diving into that idea that there's not enough to go around, there's not enough for everyone. And lastly, sabotaging it, when you do start making money, like I said a few minutes ago, you may find yourself in this new place of financial success, things may be going really well. And then you find a way to make it not go so well. You find a way to get back to where you're used to being the struggle bus you're used to being on this happens a lot people and it all comes back to your money blocks, those stories that you have about money and more specifically, the lack versus abundance space that you are in. This is just a sampling. If you want to hear more about lack versus abundance, I have several episodes scroll back and or go to my website and type in abundance and search for that. And you'll get all of those episodes that you can look into further but it's super important people, we really need to take the time to understand this and when now I'm sure you're asking well what the heck do I do? Because clearly I'm in this lack mindset that means I'm doomed. I'm never gonna make any money. No, no, no back off a little grasshopper, it's fine. You will be able to, I think the first thing start paying attention to the thoughts and actions and emotions that you have when it comes to money. Are they moving towards lack? Are they in this space of lack? Do they sound like a lack based thought or story? Or are they from this place of abundance knowing that money is a form of energy and it is in a constant state of flow and you can tap into that flow anytime, anywhere and receive abundance. So where are you most of the time? And all it takes is a little bit of as always we got to talk about it is the unstuck podcast awareness that first step to all of this awareness, awareness awareness. What are you saying to yourself? What actions are you taking? And what camp do they go in lack or abundance. And then from there, allow yourself to let go just a little bit, allow yourself to loosen your grip on this idea of money and finances and investing, and debt and all this stuff, just loosen your grip, I'm not saying go into all kinds of debt, I'm not saying blow your savings. I'm not saying any of that. So please know that. But just start loosening the grip a little bit, maybe take a small risk, do something different, prove yourself wrong, make a small investment in something that you know is really needed for you or your business. And just see what happens. It's part of that proving yourself wrong where we have to, sometimes the only way that we can get out of that system that we're in, is to just step our toe out for just a little bit. See that nothing bad happens, see that actually amazing things happen when you do something out of the ordinary when you take a little bit of a risk. And that starts the flow that starts the process of getting out of that mindset. Next kind of goes along with this is to stop thinking so much about money. Just see if you can, especially in your business, like you have a bigger why you have a bigger purpose here. So put the attention on who you're helping how you want to help them what you want that to look like. And then what do you need to do to get there in a bigger way? Focus on that, instead of being all about the money like, can I afford this, can I do that I need to make this much money, it needs to be this much in this time, I don't deserve to charge this much I can ask for this much money, like a lot of our talk in business in general is money talk. So what can we do if we take that away, and instead focus on our bigger why. And then lastly, like just another reminder, money is a form of energy is in a constant flow state of flow. It is always around us as always flowing. And giving and receiving allow for that flow in your own life. Give money, invest in yourself, invest in your business, and then receive receive receive based on that. And then when you receive money into your business, because you gave, then you're able to get back into that flow of giving again. So it's this receive and give, receive and give, receive and give and it just gets bigger and bigger and bigger, and snowballs. As you step into this place of abundance more and more and more. That's all I'm going to talk about today with lack and abundance. As I said, I could talk about that just all the time. And I do have several episodes if you want to go back and listen. The second swap is from forcing to flowing, forcing to flowing. I love this one so much as a lot of you probably know, by far, the thing that most entrepreneurs are not doing that is keeping them stuck is to stay in this place of force versus flow. Because we're taught to force to strive to push to do whatever it takes to achieve a certain goal. We're taught that in school, we're taught that in sports, we're taught that in trying to get to a certain college we're taught and trying to get a certain job or into a certain career. And now we're taking that and then putting it into our business because that's also, you know, talking about this hustle culture hustle mentality that we do here. That's what a lot of people show us. A lot of entrepreneurs have this story of the hustle and grind that it took to get their business off the ground. So now we're also still applying that and applying everything we learned into our business. But what happens, especially as an entrepreneur, is that forcing mentality blocks you from being able to see and work on what will actually be the thing that makes you profitable, that makes you happy, that makes you impactful. That gives you freedom, you are blocking that as you try to force things. And the forcing, as you can probably guess, is also going back to the last one black mindset driven. It's like you got to make money. You got to make a certain amount of money before a certain date or you got to make a certain amount of money at a in a specific amount of time. That is what is steering a lot of businesses right now. And what it's doing is actually keeping you from making good money. Because you're not making good decisions, you're not making the best decisions, or the most informed decisions because that force, that striving, that go, go go that very masculine energy is what's making the decisions, because you're coming from a place of lack. And as you can see, if you step into abundance, that's a very feminine flow like energy. And when we get there, and we find this place of flow, it's this place where you get to work on what feels good to you. What lights you up what you do, where you just get lost in the process of doing it. And where you trust your intuition, without letting that ego that inner chatter get involved. Like, how amazing does that sound. And going back to my story at the beginning, that's exactly what happened to me, I stopped forcing, I stopped saying yes to everything, I stopped doing what I thought I should be doing. And I started working on myself, I got into this abundance mindset, because of all the money mindset work I had done. And I let go of like that need to control and be worried and be scared about money, in my business in general, and success in general. And as soon as I did that, I got this amazing idea. amazing idea. And no, I had no idea what I was doing. I didn't know if it would work. I didn't know what was going on. I knew nothing except that that idea came from a different place than the other things I thought I should be doing. And the other ways I was spending my time, it came from a different place, it came from my intuition. So that place and that space of flow is available to you, too. And it's available to you right now it's available to you 100% of the time, all it is is a matter of allowing it in allowing it to happen being okay with taking a step back being okay with not doing this busy work all the time just for the sake of working and not striving and not having these crazy goals and not feeling like you have to push yourself in order to make any of this happen. But what happens if you take a little bit of a step back, because building your business is a highly creative and intuitive process. Please always remember that highly creative and very intuitive. And blocking that will result in you being stuck exactly where you are right now. You'll either be stuck not doing anything, not taking any action at all. Or you'll be stuck doing something you actually don't want to do. Like you're stuck doing something that doesn't make money or doing something that you don't love or doing something that's a total time stock requires long hours, or a combination of all the above. Right. So how do we start tapping into the space of flow or another way I like to call it is being in alignment, which I talked about here a lot on the show to where do we start, the very first thing I want you to try is when you're beginning to get into this block of time that you're using for working on your business. Start with something that gets you into this place of alignment where you feel really good, where you feel more connected to your body, more calm, less ego voici, we'll call it you know that ego voice is a little quieter, perhaps. So meditation, a few deep breaths, maybe brewing a cup of coffee, or a cup of tea, maybe putting on some music, having a candle going or putting some crystals around your workspace, something like that. Whatever your little thing is that you do that helps you get into alignment. And then I want you to ask yourself, and perhaps get out a piece of paper or your journal and write down. What do I want to create today? That's all you're going to ask and just see what comes up, see what would feel good for that period of time. It may not make sense. And it may be something like I want to write an email newsletter, which is great because some of that I think we get into this space where we think it has to be kind of like on this day I write this newsletter and even when I don't feel it at all, I still have to force it out. And that's what we want to try to stay away from. Now. This does not mean and please do not get me wrong that everything in your business building activity bank is going to be things you want Want to do all the time, but they can all feel good. They can all come from this place of flow. If you start by getting into alignment, reminding yourself of your bigger why and doing what you need to do to make it fun for you. So when I'm doing something that I don't necessarily, it's not like my favorite thing ever, I will either Well, back in the day, I would go to coffee shops and do their because I find that just to be super fun in general, and I get a latte or a matcha or something like that and just enjoy myself. And you know, have my headphones in some music, then COVID hit and I couldn't do that. And then now I am living in a place where that's not super convenient to get to. But now I have my own office and I put on music and I brew my own tea and I bring tea into my office. And then I put on my diffuser and have essential oils going. So it smells really good in here. And I'm just like completely surrounded by crystals, my entire desk is full of crystals. And I have all that and I feel really good in my office. And then I work on those things. And then the other thing that I do is I give myself was kind of like I'll think of it as like time space. Like, I know, I will have to do something I'm not super excited to do this week sometime. But I give myself the freedom within that week to decide when I do it. So very rarely Am I ever on a time crunch, where it's like, I have to do this by tomorrow, because I prefer to give myself a little bit of time and think ahead a little bit. So I can wait and do something I don't super want to do when I'm in really great alignment, like just coming back from a hike or playing with my dogs or having a good meal or something like that. And then I'll come back and I'll be in this high vibe place. And I'll do that thing and it still feels flowy it doesn't feel like I'm forcing it because I have to get it done by a certain time. So just a few little quick tips there. But please, no, I am not saying that you're going to want to do things in your business all the time. There are definitely some things that just aren't that fun. And it'll be different for everybody what that actually is, but you can still do so while being in alignment and while feeling like it's flowing for you. And that makes all the difference in the world. And I hope you guys can see from this energetic perspective, how this how much this matters, to your overall profit and to your overall revenue and being able to actually tap in to what will be the game changer in your business and to not force things because someone else is doing it or someone told you you need to be doing it, or your ego is telling you you need to be doing it. But instead of giving yourself some space to figure out what you actually want to be doing what you actually want it to look like, what feels good for you, and just what comes up. Because you've given yourself the space, I can guarantee you with a 100% certainty because this is how energy works, that when you do that, and you have this sort of download, or this intuitive nudge or whatever you want to call it about something that would be really cool to add into your business, and you take action on it, it will be so successful beyond your wildest dreams, because you went with that, and you got into the flow with it. That's all I'll say for that. Let's move on. Now we're getting into the actual, like, I can feel it kind of tangible stuff that you can do today, to start making more money in your business while you work less. The first thing is to go from active income to passive income. I looked up the definitions of each because I wanted it to help you really understand what each one means. Even though I think you all probably get it. But still, let's just do this because it's fun. Active, the definition of active is engaging in physically energetic pursuits. And then the definition of passive is accepting or allowing what others do without active response. Now in the business world, and especially the online service based business space, passive income is more so defined by like, make money while you sleep. I really like making money while you're living your life. And I also really like make money while you're making other money. Now this all sounds pretty great. I think we can all agree with that. We all want more of that. Yes, you actually legit can make money while you sleep. You can legit make money while you're on vacation or out playing with your kids or on a date with your partner or whatever. You can also make money while you're busy making You'll have money like you're having a session with a client, and you're getting other income sources coming in during that hour with your client. So that's pretty cool. Two examples of active income would be things like working one on one with clients, which I think is going to be the most common for the people listening to this podcast. Or if you are someone that still has another job having an hourly wage or a salary as an active income, getting tips or commissions would be considered active income, and then pass it an income would be things like affiliate or advertising income, online course, or product sales. So I like to call this like digital products. And making money on your investments would be another example of passive income that isn't necessarily directly tied to your business. But if you're having trouble figuring out what passive income looks like, That's it, you put money into an investment. And depending on how the market does, you make money on that money, without you necessarily having to do anything with it. I personally superduper love and very much recommend having a combo of both passive and active income. Now, eventually, it could get to the point in your business where you are just doing passive income stuff. And that's totally fine, too. I personally have found that when I include active income sources in my business, of course, not only is it another opportunity to make money, but it also usually leads to another passive income opportunity down the road. It's I'll explain later, when I explained some of my active and passive incomes, but just know that I recommend both, at least for a period of time in New York Business, most service based entrepreneurs that I work with, which are primarily in the wellness space, so like nutritionists, coaches, personal trainers, therapists, those kinds of people are engaging in business activities that produce active income. As I mentioned, one on one clients or patients may be doing some small group coaching. And that's about it, which is great. And I encourage everyone who wants to help people in that way, and that one on one capacity to do so absolutely. We're going to talk more about that coming up. But what's missing are the tons of other income opportunities that you can be doing while also taking one on one clients. Becoming an affiliate for the brands you love is a great option. And probably the easiest way to generate some passive income. I don't there are very few brands out there these days that don't have a partnership opportunity or an affiliate system built into their business at this point, because it is so great for both parties. And when you do have this relationship with brands you love, then all you have to do is talk about them on social media, write blog posts featuring their products, or send out an email to your email list, when with a recommendation for their products, why you're loving them, what you how you're using them, all that kind of stuff. So things that are very easy, I think for us to do as humans is just to recommend things that we love. And the only thing you're doing is creating a relationship with the brand. That gives you a little bit of a kickback when you get someone to buy from them. So you're creating a recommendation and you're getting a kickback for it. That's it and it doesn't cost the person any more money at all. It all comes from the brand, because essentially, you're doing their marketing and advertising for them. So it's a very, very great situation for them to and you earn some passive income. I have an example of this. I have. I've been affiliates and brand partners with lots of brands over the years. I'm currently kind of only working with few very specific ones that I super love. And by the way, let me recommend that you only partner with brands that you really, really do love you know a lot about and you've done your research to know that they're a good company, that they have good inclusion and diversity practices that just know for sure and really trust that company. So do your research first before you choose to partner with them. So just a side note there but I long ago was probably one of my very first brands I partnered with I was using a brand of colostrum, which if you don't know what it is, I'm not gonna bother explaining it. It doesn't really matter, but it's a supplement that can help with gut health. And I was using colostrum, to help with my auto immune disease recovery. So putting that into remission, and I was actually having some really great success with it. I wrote a blog post about it. This was in 2015, I believe, I wrote a blog post about it. First of all, still, to this day is one of my top blog posts of all time, which is so crazy. And second of all, still, to this day, out of one blog post, I get at least $50 in commission every month from them from that blog post, is that not crazy? I talked about it one time in one blog post six years ago now. And I still I mean, not that $50 is a ton of money or anything. But hey, it pays for like a date night out with my wife once a month, every month for the past six years. And that's kind of dwindled down. I mean, back in the day, I was making a couple $100 on that when it was a little more popular, have a blog post. But yeah, it's just so fascinating how. And that really is the prime example of passive income. I wrote one blog post, I probably spent maybe an hour two years ago, and I'm still making money from it, even though I haven't touched it since. And this is something you can easily put into your business right now, as well. And even if you don't have a big audience, either, if you are working with clients, and you're putting them on protocols that include certain supplements, or certain products, or certain books or anything, you can partner with those brands and get a kickback for recommending them. The only thing that is required to make it legal is that somewhere in some of your documentation that you provide to your clients or to the people reading your blog posts or to the people on your email newsletter is just somewhere you disclose that you are a partner with that brand. And you may receive a small commission for using that specific link that you give at no additional cost to them. So that's it, that's all you have to do. And if you do want to start working on that, in your business, just Google like affiliate commission statement or something like that, disclosure, maybe and you'll can get some examples of what people use, but you'll see them all over the place. So that's the one thing that you do not need to make sure to do. Other than that you are free to do whatever you want, and to partner with any brands that you love, and just give your honest feedback, say how much you love it and make money doing. So you're just being someone else's marketer, which is great. It's like, I like to think of myself as the Triet. Before they buy it person, like, I'll try it, I'll see if I like it or not. And then if I do like it, I recommend it to other people. And I give my honest opinion and feedback. And I tell them how it smells and how it works and how it tastes and all that stuff. And they can go from there. And then I get a little kickback for doing so. The other passive income opportunity we're going to talk about today are digital products, such as online courses, or ebooks, virtual workshops that are pre recorded, that kind of thing. The premise here is simple. You create something, you put it out somewhere for people to buy, and then people buy it. Easy peasy. However, as I'm sure you can imagine, it requires more work to get to that point than just that. Passive income does not mean no work involved, there's actually usually quite a bit of work involved in creating a digital product to use as a passive income opportunity. It's just mostly on the front end. So it's creating the course, before anyone knows it even exists. And before you're taking any sort of payment for it. It's writing the ebook, it's developing the recipes for the recipe book. It's doing all of that stuff before you make income on it, and then putting it on your website, then promoting it so people know it's there. And that's when it becomes a lot more hands off. And all you have to do is promote, promote, and people buy and it's more passive, as you can see. However, it absolutely works. And it is absolutely worth that upfront work. As I just mentioned in my last little story about my passive income just from this one product that I affiliated with years ago, I haven't lifted a finger in six years and I'm still having income come in from that work. So it really does work and is so so worth it. I currently have several passive income streams going on at the moment. I have a few courses. I have an ebook actually, again, something I created back in two One nice 16 I want to say I created an ebook. That is a 28 day workout program for people with chronic illness, autoimmune disease, even adrenal fatigue, anyone that can't feel like they work can work out to their full capacity. So this is at home workout program that I created as both a trainer and a nutritionist, and someone that was dealing with adrenal fatigue, and autoimmune disease and all that stuff. And it still gets revenue coming in all the time, from people that find it on my website. Again, it's not something I talk about anymore, and haven't talked about it in years, I haven't said anything or done any blog posts or anything like that on it in years, I have talked about it in a past episode of a past podcast years and years ago. So either from there or from a blog post that I did on it years and years ago as well. So that still creates income for me. So that's just another example. And then, like I said, a few courses I have. And really, in 2020, it was actually interesting, almost exactly half of my business revenue was passive income. And the other half was active income, it was almost exactly cut down the middle, half and half active versus passive. And for me, that's a really good place to be. And it feels really good because I also do like to connect with people and, and not have everything just happened behind the scenes, but to have more of a connection with those that I work with. So if you want to start adding this to your business, my very first step for you would be to research brand partnership opportunities, start thinking about some of the things that you love that you could start recommending things you use in your life, in your business, for your health things, you eat anything. And if it's something that you want to start recommending to other people see if they have a brand partnership opportunity. So you can just usually go right to their website, and they'll have information about their affiliate program if they have one. And then also start thinking if there's something that you want to create some again, let's get into our flow state and see what could come up potentially, or has come up that you've been ignoring, that you could create, or maybe it's something you've already created that you would like to turn into an e book or a course or a workshop or something like that. Is there anything perhaps that you already have? Or that you've been sitting on? This idea keeps coming up? And can you start working on that? And then before you do, I want you also to start considering how you would market these things, say you do have an ebook or a course, or something like that. Or you even just are partnering with a brand and you want to start getting the word out there? Do you have a way to tell people? Do you have an audience? Do you have a way to connect with them and tell them about the opportunities that you have? Do you have a website or a space on the web to host certain things, like start thinking about the network that you have the audience that you have the people you have, that will actually be the people buying what you're selling what you're talking about. And if you don't have that, then you need to get into unstuck entrepreneur in September. And we will work on that together. Because that's super important. Obviously, you can have the most amazing course ever, or the most beautiful ebook ever. But if you have no one to tell, then you don't have a business and you don't have a passive income opportunity. So we'll work on that together this fall in unstuck entrepreneur. And then the last swap I have for you is to go from one to one work to one to many. So we talked about that one on one work where you're taking clients. This is specifically for my service based entrepreneurs, you're taking clients or patients you have this situation where you spend an hour or 90 minutes or 30 minutes or whatever, you spend a certain amount of time with one person helping them on their thing, helping them solve their problem. This is called trading time for dollars. As you can tell, you are spending one time with one person for a specific amount of money, you're charging XYZ dollars per hour or per session or per three sessions you have a package something like that. So when you trade time for dollars, it will keep you from ever being able to break through this income ceiling that you have because you only have a certain amount of time you could only take so many clients per day per week per month per year. You will eventually run out of time because time is finite. And so as you're trading time for dollars, you're also creating an income cap for yourself. creating passive income streams, like we just talked about is one way around it and definitely start doing that. And then the other way, which we should be doing both, is to go from one on one work, to one to many work. So not just working one on one with people, but working one, which is you with a group of people. Now, before I go any further, let me say what I said before, I think working one on one with people is amazing. And if you enjoy doing it, and it is part of your passion and purpose and mission, keep doing it. But what I'm saying here is don't make it the only thing you do, if you want to work less, and make more, if you want to improve your income potential, and get past that cap that you've created for yourself. So add the passive income and add an opportunity for a one to many situation, you can do them all at the same time, and exponentially grow your business. What we're doing here in this one to many situation, is turning what you're doing with your one on one clients, essentially, and making it applicable to a group format. So instead of one hour of your time helping one person, you're spending one hour of your time, and helping five or 10, or 20, or 100 or 1000 people at one time. Obviously, total fan of this method. And especially for service based entrepreneurs, I think it is just a no brainer situation. For those of you in this kind of work. There's so many reasons, I have five that I'm going to share with you just quickly. But this list could go on and on. First of all, you are helping more people at one time, which means you're making a bigger impact in other's lives and a bigger stamp on the world, you are making your mark in this world in this time for this reason. And you can do that in a much bigger, broader, better way, when you're helping more people at one time. The second thing is you're working less because of this group format you created. So instead of having 10 clients in 10 hours of your week, you can have 20 clients in one hour. And then you have those other however many hours to do what you want. Live your life, have some fun, create more passive income opportunities, whatever you want to do. Third, you're making way more money. So instead of that one person paying for that one hour, you're having, say you have a group of 10 people in your group 10 People pay you for one hour. Now and this goes into number four, they're paying less because they're in this group format, which means it makes it more affordable and accessible for more people. There are some people that simply cannot afford to work one on one with you. But if you create a group program where they could get the same impact, the same benefit, the same help, they need the same problem solved. But in a small group format, where you charge a slightly lower rate for each person. But then you're still spending, you're actually spending less time with them and making more money. So I hope that makes sense. Because really, that's working for both you and them. So it's a win win situation. And lastly, it's you creating something that is unique and signature to you. And this is where things just become so much different for your business because you now have this thing that is proprietary to you and your work that you created and you develop and it's unique to you. It's your signature program. And no one can take that away. And then you have something really cool to market to it makes your marketing easier. And your selling easier because you have this thing that is specific to the work that you do. So that's also something that is super cool. And obviously so many other things I could talk about. But we'll stop there. Even though I want to tell you how much fun it is to have a signature group program as well. But I'll save that for another day. Let's talk about how you do this. First, you have to figure out what that journey is going to be for the group. So the point A where they're starting now, which is I have this problem. I've tried to solve it on my own, and I can't solve it to their point B which is I want to be here I want to live this life free of this symptom or problem or all this stuff and I don't know how to get there. So you are the person that knows how to get them there. And you have to figure out what that is. So not only what that journey is, but the steps along the way of that journey, that then becomes your program. And so then you create a framework around those steps around the system that you created, that becomes your signature, your unique formula. And then from there, you write and build your program in a way that is super user friendly, very beautiful, and easy to use an easy to navigate. And it's very engaging for your clients. And it works. You know, it works because you've done it with other people, or you have done it yourself, you have proof that it works. And then you sell the thing, then you get people into your group. And you have I don't know, however many groups you want per year, and this is a new income opportunity for you, in less time, and it can be the only income opportunity for you, honestly, you can just run this thing four times a year. And that's all you do. And you get a certain amount of people in the group at a certain price. And that is your revenue, and cool, you're done. And then the other times of the year, you're getting ready to run it again. And you're getting in front of new people, and you're building your audience more. And so you get new people into your group, all so much fun. Now, I have something for you. If this is something that you want to add to your business model, if you want your very own signature program. Right now, I am asking for beta testers for my new signature program and get this it's called signature program lab. Yes, that is right, I have created a course that will take you through every single step every single nook and cranny of creating a one to many program in your business, all the way from brainstorm as in like, I don't even know what I could possibly build a program about. From that stage, two beta launch as in people are paying you to get into your program, we go from A to Z or B to B, we'll call it and I am currently looking for a small group to test my idea on to test this program I just built on and we're doing it right now we actually start July 20. So if you're listening to this, when it airs, there may still be spots available to become a beta tester. And I would love to have you, as of me recording this, which is a few days before it airs, there are seven spots left. So not very many, I offered it up to the current members of unstuck entrepreneur and a lot of them took me up on it. So as of the time you're listening to this, there may or may not be spots left. But either way, if you're interested if you want a signature program of your own in your business, so you don't have to go just straight to one on one clients all the time. But you want to start building this other income stream that gives you more freedom and flexibility. Head to Shawnmynar.com/SPL stands for signature program lab. So Shawnmynar.com/SPL, if there are still spots available as a beta tester, there will be a checkout page for you to join the course. And it's a live course actually, this is the only time I will be offering it live. So I will be teaching you in actual live sessions as a group. So I'm really excited for that. So you'll definitely want to be a part of that if you like being taught as a group in live classes and just want to hang out with me for like, I don't know, 12 plus hours over the next few months. Or if it's already filled up, there will be a waitlist page for you to get in when I opened the doors again this fall. So I will be opening the doors again, this fall for the signature program lab. And if you want to get in on that, just get on the waitlist so that you'll know when it's open and available and you can sign up this fall. Okay, so either way, Shawnmynar.com/SPL. And that will end this conversation we had today. I knew it was going to be a long one. I didn't know it was going to be this long. I just love talking about this stuff. Because I want you to start considering these new options for you in your business potentially if you're not already doing them. And if you are, maybe it's a case where you do have some brands that you're working with, but are you even talking about them? Are you even pushing them not pushing them? Because that sounds like weird and gross and we don't do that stuff. But are you talking about them? Are you sharing about them? Are you openly discussing the things that you love and providing that link so other people can love them too? So yeah, um super passionate about this stuff, and I love talking about it. And if you have any questions, please reach out and let me know I'd love to help you get this figured out in your business, you can head to my Instagram at unstuck entrepreneur and send me a message and just let me know what you think, what you're working on what you're having problems with, and I'm happy to help you out. All right, my friends. Until next time, take care if you're like most of my clients, you followed your passion for health, got your certifications, did the trainings. And now you're excited to have your very own thriving impactful wellness business. But how do you actually do that? It's a common position to be in, especially in the wellness space because no one teaches you this whole business thing along the way. This trend is exactly why I'm here a passionate nutritionist turn business coach for wellness professionals. Because I'm done seeing wellness practitioners continue to play small in their business, simply because they don't know the right steps to take. If you're like most wellness pros out there with a dream to start their own impactful freedom build business, you've probably spent hours trying to build your website, figure out what the heck to post on social media and taking all the courses to try to get competent in what you're doing. Or maybe just the thought of all that sends you into a puddle of stress and overwhelm good news, you don't need a perfect website, a killer Instagram strategy, or to be an expert to have an impactful and successful business. What you do need is a plan. The wellness business blueprint is the Jumpstart you need to plan prepare and execute on your passion for helping others without that sinking feeling of overwhelm. Because this isn't like the other stuffy, boring business plans out there. The wellness business blueprint is centered around you, what feels good to you, what's right for your business, your dreams and your lifestyle. What keeps you in alignment and your energy flowing? What allows you to stay sane and stress free and excited in your business? Because building your dream wellness business starts with a plan that works for you. This free 15 Page printable workbook will take you through my signature flow and grow business framework so you can create your own business vision while gaining clarity structure and a solid plan to move forward. Download it today and get started on your business blueprint head to Shawnmynar.com/wbb that stands for wellness business blueprint and get started building your dream wellness business today. Again, that's Shawnmynar.com/wbb  

Crypto Hipster Podcast
Building a Collaborative Decentralized Society through Servant Leadership, Cyrus Taghehchian, CEO, Splyt Core Foundation

Crypto Hipster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 38:50


Jamil interviews Cyrus Taghehchian, Founder, CEO @ Splyt Core Foundation about his positive and life changing initiative. Linkedin.com/in/taghehchian About Maker of things awesome, Executive and Lean-Agile coach, blockchain nerd, people motivator, Deloitte Consulting alum, digital hipster, business professional and kid at heart. An accomplished entrepreneur with leadership, strategy, and business execution expertise in e-commerce, digital marketing, Lean-Agile dev, and blockchain. Curious. Persistent. Courageous. I spend my time thinking of the Future of Work and my intention in life is to heal people by empowering them to follow their purpose using agile, blockchain, social media, e-commerce, and/or just believing in themselves. Purpose before profits makes the world more whole. Things I care about: youth privilege equality and sustainability. What good is it to have a unicorn exit when you're destroying future generation's opportunities and/or the planet? "NFTs and its immutable data nature will be the most coveted commodity in the future once we reach singularity. Blockchain preserves our reality." -me About Splyt: Splyt is an e-commerce NFT infrastructure that connects e-commerce stores, brands, and affiliates. A unique eNFT is assigned to each item providing users with a globally updating inventory. Users can also mint their products as eNFTs. There is a certificate of authenticity to prevent counterfeits, a built in smart contract that holds money in escrow to avoid scams, and a commission to incentivise affiliates and stores. The protocol is equipped with automated dispute and arbitration mechanisms, and is governed by consensus to maintain decentralization, flexibility, and user engagement. Visit Splyt Website: https://Spl.yt Follow Splyt on Twitter Follow Splyt on Medium Follow Splyt on Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crypto-hipster-podcast/support

2 Many Guys Soccer Show
2 Many Guys Soccer Show #079

2 Many Guys Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 126:22


This week, we have a packed show. We begin with a chat about the success of North London's Arsenal and Tottenham and move into our SPL recap and Bundesliga. We conclude with other action around the premier league and the lower league wrap up.

The Zeitgeist
DraxxTS - Famous Foxes Federation Co-founder, Ep. 8

The Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 28:45


Brian Friel sits down with Famous Foxes Federation Co-founder DraxxTS to hear how he built one of the most admired NFT projects on Solana.Show Notes:01:19 - Origin Story / Background        06:41 - What is Famous Fox?              08:15 - The importance of the community  10:01 - The Team                         13:08 - Top utilities available to users  17:47 - How Famous Fox approaches collaborations 20:33 - How to decide what to build?    23:21 - The future of NFTs               27:08 - Builders DraxxTS admires              28:09 Info and contact        Full Transcript:Brian (00:06):Hey everyone. Welcome back to The Zeitgeist, the show where we highlight the founders, developers and designers who are pushing the web three space forward. I'm Brian Friel developer relations at Phantom. Today, we have a very special guest, the co-founder and general of the Famous Fox Federation, DraxxTS. DraxxTS, welcome to the show.DraxxTS (00:27):Thanks for having me, Brian. Appreciate it.Brian (00:27):Thanks for coming on. I'm really excited about this episode today. You guys are a well-known NFT collection that has really come to embody the builder spirit on Solana. Before we get into all that, I think it'd be great if you could walk us through a little bit about your background, who you are and how you got started with Famous Foxes.DraxxTS (00:44):Yeah. Excellent. I'd love to, so my name DraxxTS, co-founder of Famous Fox Federation, like you had pointed out. As far as my background goes, my degrees, if you will, an undergraduate in electrical engineering and actually my graduate degree is in business and finance. And realistically, I've been in the web3 space slash-like involved with crypto since like early 2017. I've always kind of had a passion for investment products and such. And so late 2016, I actually had gotten more into Bitcoin Ethereum and just like the concepts of them, but didn't dip my feet in until early 2017 and really just been part of different groups for trading crypto and such in last year had just seen so much of a general interest happen with NFTs. I was around when CryptoPunks first came out, never bought any, unfortunately.Brian (01:37):You and me both, don't worry.DraxxTS (01:38):Yeah. And there were a bunch of them, but at the time, to me didn't really make much sense just like what they were. Who's going to spend $50 on a picture? In hindsight, obviously it was a mistake, but last year, part of one of the crypto groups I was in, actually, it kind of started up like a little bit of a fund for like trading NFTs and someone was a designated trader and everyone else just funded them and they were trading CryptoPunks and they were making like almost an ETH profit power. And that was when punks were like around 10, 11, 12 ETH or something like that. So they were doing quite well with it. And one day, I think they had eight punks in total. They all sold out and the trader didn't want to get back in. So they dissolved it and paid everyone their profits and that kind of went on.DraxxTS (02:20):And for me, the idea that they all sold out on a day and the floor price had pumped them kind of like, why? These things were going for 20, 30 ETH and didn't make any sense to me as to why people were paying so much money for it because I just really didn't understand what NFTs were about. And so since that time frame, that was probably early summer of last year, of 2021, just kind of wanted to learn more about NFTs and about Ethereum and about like the way that the chain works and all that kind of fun stuff and had met Dev and at the time our artist for creating our collection through just trading groups that we were part of for crypto. We talk often and understood that we have a pretty diverse skill set between us to possibly make something that's worth value to the space.DraxxTS (03:12):And that's really where Foxes were born. We actually were planning on doing our collection on ETH because we really wanted to do Solana, but at the time Solana seemed more of a country club and mints were quite challenging to do since it was so brand new. I think most of the original collections had minted early August. And so we determined that we were going to start doing a project around that time and we really wanted to be on Solana. Because we saw the benefits of the chain, the speed you could do the pricing of transactions. There were just so many benefits to it from really what we determined could be our strong suit from a builder's side, but we still thought there was enough opportunity on ETH to get involved, looking at how L2s were working and developing.DraxxTS (03:57):We just saw there was a potential opportunity there. And I think it was like midway through September, just saw an opportunity open up and Solana became a little bit easier to get onto. And so we just pivoted our marketing towards SOL. I think we probably did onboard some ETH people into SOL at the time. And then from there we just built out our product. I mean our roadmap one, which I know we'll probably talk a little bit more in-depth on some items we far surpass that. As far as the under promise over deliver aspect, that's always been part of our ethos. And once we had created our project, we just wanted to be as creative as possible and to create as much value as we could have.DraxxTS (04:37):And our Mint price was one SOL at the time. I think SOL was around $160 and originally it was two SOL, we cut it in half and then air dropped out part of our collection for folks that had minted originally, but we just were not priced properly in the market. And we've kind of been just building out really unique tools and a fun way of building out our brand through some of the other pieces such as missions, which I think are one of our most popular benefits for our collection as far as Fox holders go. And yeah, so we've kind of had an idea for what we wanted to do on our roadmap V one and we've far destroyed that. And then for our roadmap V2, we wanted to get more buy-in from our community. We got a ton of buy-in and we've been exceeding that one as well. We still have some items left open on our roadmap V2, but the builder aspect for our products has for sure been our strong point. And I think it's kind of garnished a lot of trust and respect within this Solana ecosystem.Brian (05:34):Yeah, absolutely. So you mentioned, this time going back to summer 2021, I think a lot of people first recognized Solana around that same time. It was right in this crazy way where the mainstream world was discovering what NFTs were. You mentioned that prices were doing these ridiculous things. Some people decided to leave projects around this time. You guys came in and really buckled down and built a project that has really built this lasting community on Solana. In your own words, what is Famous Foxes? How would you describe it to somebody who's maybe not familiar with the NFT space at all?DraxxTS (06:06):So my definition for Foxes kinds of changes every once in a while. And I think it just really depends on how much we've built and seeing the value that we've created for the space. Right now, I kind of almost consider us like a Swiss Army knife of NFTs within the Solana ecosystem, both from a creative side that we just kind of develop really unique tools for folks to try to make their life easier. We've been early for a lot of different tools that we've created. And then at the same time we have a sustainable model to be able to give a good bit of benefits to our holders outside of just our tool usage. Because I think that kind of concept has been an interest in a lot of projects and once they run out of funds then that project kind of really does end up dying for the most part.DraxxTS (06:57):And so for us, I would kind of consider us like a Swiss Army knife of Solana tools. I think our community is amazing. I think they're probably our largest asset realistically within the space and we're very flexible, adaptable, creative, and I think a very well, trusted brand if I will, within the Solana ecosystem. Whenever we put out a new tool, people don't really question it for the most part. If it's something that they've been interested in trying to use, they just go in and use it and we usually get really good feedback for it.Brian (07:30):Yeah, no, that's awesome. I think, me personally, the a-ha moment that kind of clicked for me with NFTs – I used to be a bit of a wild gamer growing up. I think a lot of folks in this space have some sort of like MMO gaming experience, but this concept of having a guild, like a community that you kind of trust that you kind of build tools together and use these tools together, you can go further in this, exploring a new space then that you can on your own.DraxxTS (07:55):Yeah, 100%. IBrian (07:56):I don't know how you feel about that.DraxxTS (07:57):Yeah, I was going to say I actually was a RuneScape player.Brian (08:00):Okay. There you go.DraxxTS (08:01):I've put in probably close to 4,000 hours in RuneScape from back in the day. So yeah, 100% agree with you and I think that's a really good way of looking at it. A lot of products really just refer to them as community, but I really do think it is more so like a guild when you look at certain projects like ours, for example, even though we are primarily like a utility project currently, we have a lot of the branding for our PFPs and such.DraxxTS (08:27):And so it also promotes our brand by having people use our NFTs as their own individual identities within the digital space. And I think that's kind of critical for a lot of projects because when you look at most utility plays, they aren't primarily a PFP project or that have PFPs associated with them. So, knowing who's part of that community can be kind of challenging. And then also the people that are in there as they represent that brand, it does reflect what you've been creating as well as a project creator.Brian (09:04):Yeah, totally. No, I think it's a very internet native phenomenon, but it's a way that you can recognize people online, know that you have these shared experiences and know you're working together cooperatively, which is pretty cool to see. You mentioned back in the day it was yourself, I believe, was it two other co-founders, Dev, and you also had an artist as well, is that correct?DraxxTS (09:25):That is correct. Yeah. So we were three original co-founders and we had at the time, I want to say about 10 or so, like moderators and other folks had helped our team out for our marketing and community management and all that kind of fun stuff. The team has kind of shifted around quite a bit since then. I want to say right now we're probably pushing 15 total between marketing, creatives, additional developers, system admins, and then moderators as well. So yeah, we've got quite a sizable team, but we're also now only two co-founders that are left for our project at the top.Brian (10:03):That's really cool. And how have you gone about assembling this team? Are these folks from the community that you've engaged with? I think building an NFT team is a bit of a new field and you guys are a bit of a pioneer here. Do you have any advice for other teams who are looking to grow their project? How have you guys gone about assembling your team?DraxxTS (10:23):Yeah, that's a fantastic question. For the most part. The answer there is yes, it's folks from our community. I think that's what we've come to understand. The people that are the most interested. If you look at the way structures are, I'll say with most NFT projects, they're not really able to offer equity in a company or what have you to people that want to participate. And usually that's an incentive for people to participate more because then they get more of a reward from it.DraxxTS (10:54):So we just see a lot more value for people that have been a part of our community. Even if they've only been doing it for themselves, from a creative angle, from a marketing angle, from a developer angle, people can be involved in other projects and things might not work out, but if they've been part of our community, they understand our core OGs that we have, they understand the structure, they understand the way that our community typically is being helpful and respectful on the space and having a little bit of a builder's mindset, because everyone in our space certainly likes to provide feedback on ways we can improve what we've created.DraxxTS (11:31):And I think that's kind of critical for us as a brand to keep continuing to have that general mindset within our team. I think it's kind of important. I think you can bring on outside people. I think you just have to be a little bit more mindful as to who you're bringing on and you know, as long as they understand your core business, they're dedicated with what you guys are doing, then they're going to be a perfect fit. And I would highly suggest that too, especially for folks that are building new brands or new products within the space, you want to have someone that's more than just an advisor. And if there are ways you can give them a little bit more skin in the game, you definitely want to try to do that as best as possible.Brian (12:39):Let's switch gears a little bit and talk about some of these features that you guys have built. Famous Foxes is quote, unquote, "famous for building so many features and utilities into the project." If you go to your guys' website, you can see tons of tools that let you do easy minting, swapping, sending raffling messaging, all kinds of things that can extend the functionality of apps. And while it's like Phantom, you guys have also built missions into your guys' site. What do you guys see as some of your top utilities and features that your community is most excited about?DraxxTS (13:09):Yeah, that's awesome question. So for us, we do kind of see ever evolving metas. So I'll go with, based off what is currently true for our project. I think the number one utility from like a SOL volumes perspective would be our peer-to-peer swapping platform, Foxy Swap. So that's been something that we've also had to create a separate Twitter channel for. And it's one of our oldest utilities that believe it's actually the second utility we've created for our project, but on any given day, we can have up to 10,000 -ish SOL of NFTs that get swapped on that platform. So it's a way for a trusted peer-to-peer way for people to swap. We don't have a platform that's created to find these different individual trades.DraxxTS (13:55):Everyone finds them on their own. It's not to miss out on anything in particular, it's just for people seeking different NFTs and a lot of times too, you'll have swaps from NFTs to NFTs or like a combo deal might be like a five for one kind of deal. Based off the way a transaction is created on Solana, you can have up to six NFTs in a single transaction. So that way it doesn't have a chance of partially filling and failing or anything along those lines. So it's been quite utilized, I'll say like consistently, since we've created it, but it certainly has ramped up, I'll say over the past few months.Brian (14:29):Yeah. That's a ton of volume just for OTC. That's really cool.DraxxTS (14:32):A ton of volume. Yeah. It's a ton of volume and it's interesting too. Because a lot of communities... I mean, we don't just onboard like every single project that wants to be on there. So we do get buy-in from communities as well to be on there. And there's certain communities such as Okay Bears that have their own separate area on their discord for doing OTC trades as do the DeGods and a bunch of others. So, projects are definitely aware that people will do OTC trades and they want people to do it in a safe fashion. And we've also kind of seen a tick up in like people trying to scam each other saying like our site isn't working or something along those lines when that's not the case, like we would send a message out to everyone to let them know if there's any issues on our website, which has not been the case.DraxxTS (15:17):But yeah, it's very interesting to see that meta exist. And you know, I think it's just based off of current market sentiment, my personal opinion. But yeah, that's what I would say is probably our most heavily used tool right now. Second to that, I would probably say as our raffle tool that we had created. So that's where anyone can create their own raffles. It's by no means a perfect product. People set their own prices. It's SPL tokens that have been integrated into that platform. Projects actually will kind of commit a number of FOXY to be added onto that platform. So it's like a business to business service if you will. But it also benefits our collection by also taking out of some of the emissions from our system. And outside of that, I mean, I would probably say, as an underdog, is Ding!, our messaging platform, a lot of people use it for different reasons. We've seen anything from people accidentally setting NFTs to wrong wallets and getting them recovered to messaging, I'll say [messaging] celebrities and actually getting a response back from them.Brian (16:19):Shaq.solDraxxTS (16:20):Yeah, basically. And so also for projects, such as DeGods, when they were on their initial rally to break 333 floor, there was somebody that had one listed, I think at 330. And I don't know if there was like no one interested in buying it, but a bunch of their members had sent dings to that wallet to basically tell them that they can sell it, but just to re-list it at 3:33. And so they peer pressured them to move it up. So I've seen a bunch of different use cases and of course people will send messages to low ballers and all that kind of stuff. But we do have a browser extension for Chrome that you can access. And I think it's got over well over a thousand people that have it enabled, but you can go right directly from Magic Eden and send a ding to someone. You know, if you wanted to shoot them a message to try to get them to lower their price or to do an OTC trade or anything along those lines. So I think ding is probably our most underrated utility, if you will. And actually our very first one that we created.Brian (17:19):Oh, no way. That's really cool. That's the whole array of really creative projects that you guys have built. You mentioned a couple things in there about collaborating with other projects. Okay Bears maybe being on the OTC platform, I've seen, you can use other tokens like DeGod's dust for the raffles. How have you guys approached these collaborations?DraxxTS (17:40):Yeah. So we've done it in a bunch of different fashions. I would say the earliest collaborations for us was actually pre-mint and that was really to kind of just co-mingle communities. I think, to just find more people that are in the space. I think that was probably one of the more difficult things back in September. And after that, it's kind of just been around what we've created. And I think primarily what really started us getting deeper in collaborations, almost like partnerships was our missions. So we have missions that I didn't really talk too much on, but our staking has kind of evolved from just a regular stake it into a wallet and forget about it to a more active staking environment. So for our missions, you send foxes out for a six day mission. They come back with experience, which we call fame, to be the most famous fox.DraxxTS (18:29):And then on top of that, you also get like a chest which can have different kinds of rewards in it. Anything from FOXY, which is our native token that we have, to NFTs from our collection to rooms for dens to NFTs from other collections via orange BOX or golden BOX. And then we've also been adding in on a weekly basis. That's not including weeks. We do our monthly raffle more expensive entity. So the very first one we did was with Blocksmith Labs and we did Degen Ape Academy. And the last one we did was a Cats on Crack. And so we kind of approached collaborations, a plethora of ways. For the most part, a lot of projects that reach out to us and say, "Hey, we just created a project or there might be a more popular project in the space."DraxxTS (19:15):We have a token we'd love to integrate it into, your different platforms and we've created forms where folks can fill them out. And then I would also suggest to DM myself or someone else from the team just to kind of get the ball rolling. Because there are some forms that have just been inundated with requests that can kind of be like helpful, not helpful. And you know, it really doesn't take too long to integrate onto our platforms. Within 24 hours, for the most part, we can get any other SPL token integrated into our system to add collections is kind of the same way we've had to kind of be a little bit careful with adding collections just because we have to make sure there's like a certain number of volume and a certain amount of like people that are part of that community.DraxxTS (19:55):So that way people can't just like change a mutable NFT to look like something else and possibly scam someone, our platform. So that is one thing that we've had to kind of be a little bit more conscious of, especially in the current environment. So yeah, we approach collaborations in many different fashions, especially for like newer projects that are coming out that are popular. You know, we'll also reach out to folks as well. And you know, it's been very fruitful for both sides. Being able to have the utilities that we have into another project where they might not want to wait a month or three months or spend a whole lot of money to get it integrated. They can kind of reach out to us and we can try and strike up a deal and get them involved in one way or another.Brian (20:38): That's awesome. You know, you guys have built a ton here. I got to know, or I got to know from you, how do you guys decide what to build next? Are these ideas that come from the community? Do you guys have a big roadmap as part of your team that you're sticking to? How do you guys decide where to put your resources in all this building?DraxxTS (20:56):Yeah. Yeah. That's, I'd say probably that's probably the number one question that I think a lot of projects would be interested in knowing about. Yeah, primarily that's exactly right. It's community driven for the most part, I would say two thirds plus of our utilities have actually been suggestions from our community. And I mean, realistically, our community has more eyes on everything else collectively than what we do as a team. You know, even for a 15 person team, if we have a community of 3000 plus people that are fairly active in the space, they're going to have a lot more opinions and eyes and different things that exist in the whole ecosystem than we ever could for being 15 people. And our original roadmap when we had created it, we've destroyed everything on that in short order. And we do have a current roadmap version, 2.0, that's out again, majority of the items on that were suggestions from the community.DraxxTS (21:53):Most of those have been completed will actually be putting out our merch, this coming weekend. That was another item on our roadmap 2.0, and then we have a few other items that we're building out there as well. That should be coming out shortly, such as our attribute upgrades and our Boom Box, which is our music NFT marketplace, which will be coming out shortly as well. And we really, for our like roadmap 2.0, we just basically shot out like a discord thread. And we said, show us ideas. What, what are problems that exist in the space that you think we can solve better? And we just got a ton of suggestions. A lot of times too, they might be smaller ideas that might be more beneficial for just our community or certain things such as missions, which will integrate over time.DraxxTS (22:39):But for us, we kind of really looking for like big ideas, like Hype-o-Meter as an example where we can kind of leverage our community to do different tasks. And at the same time, try to garnish some kind of a reward for a specific set of people. And it doesn't have to be like an actual NFT. It can be a reward such as a trait teaser for our upcoming attribute upgrades or anything along those lines. But yeah, I think getting the buy-in from our community and suggestions from our community has been monumental in our success so far.Brian (23:12):That's really cool. I can tell that you guys are going to be busy for the next couple months here. You guys have no shortage of things to do on your roadmap. You know, we mentioned kind of at the start, like at a very high level, this concept of internet community, we talked about guilds. How do you see NFT collections evolving over the next, say like three to five years? Where is this space heading? And, and what's in the future for Famous Foxes?DraxxTS (23:37):Yeah. Three to five years is a very tough timeline, I'll say, to kind of gauge, but realistically, I mean, we do kind of look out that far. I mean, from a project standpoint, that's kind of what we want to do. We don't want to just look at what's going to happen in three months in my personal opinion. You know, I think in the next three to five years, I mean, I think there will be a lot more people that will be concerned with and interested in the ownership side. I think NFTs will kind of bridge a little bit of that understanding, but also crypto too into owning what is actually yours. I think that'll kind of be a really big thing, in my opinion. I think too, like you had mentioned the community side, I think you're starting to see a lot more interest in people that might have a large fan base, but little connection with those individual fans on a regular basis.DraxxTS (24:27):And it could be anyone from the music industry, from the sports industry, from just general celebrities and things that might be interested in having their own hub for users to come into and chat with them if they're interested, not everyone's interested, but I think that too is going to be a pretty decent portal. We're already starting to see that kind of trend exist in the space. But I think having direct access to people that you are interested in, like learning more about or asking questions and then tying NFTs into it by added benefits of being able to maybe talk to the person once a month or once a quarter or something like that, or to even have like one on one time with someone like Gary V or anything along those lines.DraxxTS (25:13):I mean, I think you're going to start seeing a lot more of those utilities initially, and then it's going to kind of fold into more where you then have airlines offering NFTs for like mileage and different kinds of rewards and free upgrades on seats or free baggage and stuff like that. I've already started to see local businesses have NFTs that I think are just like a promotional item currently, but I could see them also integrating that into, like food offerings that they have or some way of kind of building it more into like their actual physical products.Brian (25:47):Yeah. Loyalty programs. Yeah.DraxxTS (25:49):Loyalty programs. Exactly. I was kind of surprised to see that as local as it is like literally down the street. I just kind of found that quite funny, just one day random happenstance, but you know, I think NFTs personally, I think the one thing that people look at is that Bored Apes and such are kind of like such a big picture if you will as like the face of NFTs, but they don't all have to be very expensive. They don't all have to do all these crazy things. You can literally have like free NFTs. Like I think when people branch out of just the Ethereum chain, even on our site you can mint an NFT using our Foxy Mint and it costs like 0.012 SOL. So you're talking like a few cents to kind of create their own NFT and then you can do whatever you really want with it.DraxxTS (26:35):I mean, there's just so much opportunity with how you can integrate it into your own website, your own platform. You can just do nothing with it, just make it for fun. There's just so many options out there that I think it'll become more and more popular for people to do or to be involved with. And worst case scenario, I mean people get involved with whatever level of money they want to get involved with, but again, you don't have to come in with hundreds of thousands of dollars or anything, get involved with it. And also you don't have to stay around discord 15 hours a day and all that fun stuff. It's as much as you want to get out of it, you can. And I think that's kind of the beauty of web three is that it exists all the time if you want, and you can kind of take it as bits and pieces as you go along.Brian (27:17):That's really cool. Well, DraxxTS, this has been a really awesome discussion. One question we always ask at the end to all of our guests, and I would love to know this from you, given you guys this prolific building history is who is a builder that you admire in the Solana ecosystem?DraxxTS (27:33):Ooh, that's a good question. Who's a builder that I admire in the Solana ecosystem. I have to say I will 100% throw this out there, not to sound ignorant, because I'm not 100% sure who the actual creator was, but the mercury platform from blocksmith labs I would say is the most impressive thing to me in my personal opinion from what's been created and the level of integration that happens with that tool itself with other projects and people that exist in the ecosystem, I think is probably one of the best other tools that are out there outside of our own. So I will apologize for not knowing the actual creator for it, but that's who I would certainly tip my hat to.Brian (28:16):No, that's a great shout out. And I think you're the first one to shout them out on the pod. So we'll have to get them on as well to hear their story.DraxxTS (28:23):Yeah, yeah, yeah. You'll definitely have to get Blocksmith Labs on that for sure.Brian (28:26):That's great. Well, DraxxTS , this has been awesome. Thank you so much for your time. Where can people go to learn more about Famous Foxes and get involved?DraxxTS (28:33):Oh, 100%. So our website is famousfoxes.com. Twitter is @FamousFoxFed. And our discord is also a vanity link, which should be Famous Fox Fed as well, but you can also get to that, those different items from our website. So I would say famousfoxes.com is probably the best one stop shop for finding about Foxes.Brian (28:57):Awesome. DraxxTS , thank you so much.DraxxTS (28:59):Thanks for having me, Brian.

The Zeitgeist
Rooter - Solend Founder, Ep. 7

The Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 37:52


Brian Friel sits down with Solend founder Rooter to hear how he built the largest lending protocol on Solana.Show Notes00:41 -  Origin of PFP                    01:27 - Origin Story                     03:26 - When did they settle on Solana?  04:36 - The Journey of Solend            08:19 - Dealing with the Whale and Governance Proposals14:23 - Time Frame from whale discovery to governance proposal16:06 - What were the proposals?         19:06 - The third proposal               21:31 - Thoughts on governance and decentralization23:46 -  What would he do anything differently?25:36 - Advice to other founders on governance26:49 - Isolated pools                   31:24 - Onboarding onto DeFi             32:57 - Permissionless pools             35:39 - What's next for Solend           36:33 - A builder he admires        Full TranscriptBrian (00:06):Hey everyone and welcome to the Zeitgeist, the show where we highlight the founders, developers, and designers who are pushing the web three space forward. I'm Brian Friel, Developer Relations at Phantom. I'm super excited to introduce my guest, Rooter. Rooter is the founder of Solend, the largest decentralized lending protocol on Solana. Rooter, welcome to the show.Rooter (00:26):Hey, thank you, and thanks for having me.Brian (00:27):I think everyone on crypto Twitter will recognize you by your iconic profile picture. It looks to me like a aardvark that's shedding a single tear. Can you give a little background on what is that animal in your profile pic and how you came to rock that as your PFP?Rooter (00:41):So it's actually Pequenino, which is a fictional species from a book called Speaker for the Dead, which is part of Ender's Game series.Brian (00:52):Oh, I love it.Rooter (00:52):Basically, I was looking for a profile picture and this is one of my favorite sci-fi books. I found a frame in a comic and thought it was unique to have the character crying. Took that frame and ended up getting a custom artist piece made.Brian (01:08):That's an awesome backstory. I even seen some derivative pieces of that made now that you're a judge on the latest Solana Hackathon that's become a very iconic image in Solana lore.Rooter (01:18):Yes, it's funny.Brian (01:20):For folks who maybe aren't on crypto Twitter, would you mind giving us a little background on who you are and how you became to be founding Solend?Rooter (01:28):Sure. My background is in software engineering. Basically, I've been working as a software engineer for multiple years. Been doing smart contract development for a few years as well. Started off in the Ethereum space, did a startup in the past, which ended up getting acquired. And basically last year, I was looking at what to do next in crypto. And it was very clear that building something on a scalable version of Ethereum was the way to go because it would cost hundreds of dollars to do certain operations which would add up to thousands very quickly. Basically, at the time, Solana was one of the only alternative blockchains that provided good scalability and was actually live, since a lot of what was out there was just not live yet.Brian (02:13):And how did you settle on a decentralized lending protocol, in particular?Rooter (02:17):I was always quite fascinated by lending protocols. I read the Compound white paper when it first came out and was super excited about it when it first launched, I was a user. I always felt like there was something missing in the lending space, namely that not enough assets were supported. During DeFi Summer, there were all these different old coins launching like YAM, and PASTA coin, and whatnot. One thing I really wish I could do was short a lot of them or at least farm and hedge the risk, but there were no lending markets that wanted to list these coins because they're too risky and it imposes risk on the rest of the protocol. So I really felt isolated lending protocol was needed, which eventually came in the form. It was Arari launched Fuse. It was always like really want to see this in the market. The opportunity that Solana presented was perfect since basically, Solana was a fast-growing blockchain, and the ecosystem was rapidly coming together, and there was not yet any leader in lending. It just made sense that someone would need to lead that space, and why not be us?Brian (03:27):When did you guys settle on Solana as the chain that you were going to build onRooter (03:31):At the very start, I just want to learn about different technologies so I was looking at Optimism, which hadn't launched yet. Polygon was live, aka MATIC, and I had dabbled around with that a bit. Basically, I want to mess around with Solana a little bit, see what the developer experience was like, and it turned out to be pretty good, which I guess some people might be surprised to hear. It wasn't terrible, terrible. We built the first version of Solend prototype during the Solana Season Hackathon, and we saw from that experience how powerful it could be and that there was a lot of potential. After that learning experience, we decided to double DAOn on it.Brian (04:13):That's great. And so you guys essentially went from a Hackathon project to today, one of the largest DeFi protocols on Solana, the largest lending protocol. You guys are facilitating hundreds of millions of dollars in loans every day. Walk us through that journey. What do you attribute that success to? And how big is the Solend team? You guys started, I assume, mostly just you in a Hackathon project. What's that journey like?Rooter (04:37):So in the start for the Hackathon, it was about four of us I think, and then we became five for launching the Mainnet, stayed around that size for a couple months. More recently we started growing so we're up to nine people now, mainly engineers still. And as for what I would attribute the success to? I would say, a lot of our success was on this pivotal moment which was when we launched our liquidity mining program and our token, that's when we saw a really huge spike in deposits. Basically, I think it was timed well.Rooter (05:12):Liquidity mining is just a really great way to bootstrap liquidity, which in lending you need that liquidity for it to be useful because if there's only a couple hundred thousand dollars of liquidity in assets, a lot of users just ... It's not useful to use it. If you're doing any size, you would be moving the rates too much. If you borrowed the rates would spike due to the algorithmic nature of it. I'd say that was definitely a pivotal moment since ... When we launched it I think we had $200 million in deposits, and basically, in one or two days we jumped up to $2 billion so that was quite a wild day for us.Rooter (05:48):Before that, there was a lot of anticipation to our token launch and our liquidity mining because I think we just did a good job with our branding and our UI. To this day, I think we have the simplest UI for a lending protocol that's the most easy to use and just straightforward. And, of course, coming from myself, take it with a grain of salt but I actually really do believe that. And we spent a lot of time going back and forth with a designer who is really, really talented, and coming up with this design that we felt was improving upon existing models. We tried to design it from the ground up, especially having used these products a lot. What are the pain points and what do we want to improve on?Brian (06:28):It sounds like you guys took a lot of your learnings too from DeFi Summer, as you mentioned that being a inspiration for you guys and how Compound's COMP token really kicked off that whole scene. I definitely agree that a well-timed liquidity mining event can really spur some pretty crazy liquidity in a bull market here.Rooter (06:45):And actually, I would add another thing, which is that we've built up this reputation of doing what's right by our users. Multiple times there have been issues, whether it's Oracle issues, where wrong prices are printed, and then there are some wrongful liquidations that happened. Or, at some other occasion, the Solana network went DAOn for quite a long time, which meant that some people couldn't pay back their loans when they wanted to, and as a result, they got liquidated so we've refunded people for all of these issues. And also, there was a vulnerability disclosure from Neodyme at one point, and we worked with them to get them a million-dollar bug bounty payout. No users have ever lost money due to anything that's out of their control really on Solend, and I think that goes a long way as well.Brian (07:39):I think that's a great segue. I think a lot of folks who maybe aren't users of Solend might have heard Solend for the first time back in June, this was around when much of the crypto market was experiencing cascading liquidations. Solend was trading around 25, $26 today, at the time of this recording in July, just a month later it's back up to $40. Around this time, there was a pretty big whale on Solend who was at risk of liquidation, and Solend initiated its first three governance proposals all in rapid succession. Could you walk us through what events were going on at that time in your own words? How the situation was affecting Solend?Rooter (08:20):I'll rewind a little bit. So basically, we first noticed this whales activity back in February when they deposited around $200 million worth of Solana at a time when we had around $2 billion. Or, maybe it was closer to one billion actually. Basically, they were a very large position but it wasn't anything super crazy, and also, they weren't borrowing anything at the start. And basically, what happened is, over time they started borrowing USD against their SOL position until it got to a point where they were borrowing $100 million.Rooter (08:52):At the time, it was almost 90% of the USDC borrowers in the main pool, and their so deposits were 95% of the deposits in the main pool. Over time, they gradually became an extremely large user on our platform. When we saw this, we tried to contact them so we did a couple of things. First, we went through our own private networks. Asked investors, "Hey, is this you or do you know who this is?" Didn't get any success there. The next thing we tried was sending an on-chain message and posting on Twitter a public announcement like "Hey, is this anyone out there, please reduce your position." IBrian (09:33):I remember seeing some of your tweets saying, "We're trying to reach you about your car's extended warranty jokes."Rooter (09:39):Definitely tried to use some humor to make it go more viral so that we could have a better chance of getting in contact with them. And the issue is that they're borrowing so much that their liquidation price was $22.30 cents, and SOL was trading at $26 and had just come DAOn from $100 just a month ago or something. If it continued to go DAOn, as was a trend, what we were worried about is that they would get liquidated which would cause such a massive amount of SOL to come onto the market in a sudden way that we were really concerned about the side effects of that. Specifically, on Solend, generally, the way that liquidations work is, there are bots that will liquidate someone and sell the assets on chain in one transaction. Basically, if that transaction is not profitable they're just not going to do it. If it is, then they will.Rooter (10:37):And typically this is fine because Solend has partial liquidations of 20% so only up to 20% of your position can get liquidated. And usually, positions are relatively small so it gets handled with ease. But this would be an unprecedented size of liquidation where basically, around $120 million would become liquidable in around $21 million chunks, which if you try to market sell $20 million, especially on DEXs on Solana, you're just going to crush the market.Brian (11:09):There's no liquidity to support that.Rooter (11:11):Exactly. If you try to sell one to $2 million, there would be 5% slippage. At 20 there's just no liquidity or tank it by maybe 50%, and doing this over and over again would cause a lot of issues. A couple of things there. One, it's a super lucrative liquidation transaction that Boss will be incentivized to spam so much to try to win, right. And two, it would create a very large arbitrage opportunity on the DEXs for people to ARVE between other venues. Both these combined would cause such incentive for a lot of bot activity that we were worried that it would potentially overload the Solana network. At the time, Solana was experiencing a lot of network issues, transactions would fail.Brian (12:00):This is the pre-1.10 release.Rooter (12:04):It's gotten so much better since then, thankfully.Brian (12:06):Was there any risk at this time to say just your average depositor in Solend, "I have a couple hundred USDC, I just want to deposit in Solend for a yield? Was I at risk here based on this mega whale's actions or failure to respond?"Rooter (12:22):So usually other users are not at risk, but given the size of this user and the fact that they could move the market with their liquidation, then other users were at risk because what could potentially happen is the Solana network could go DAOn, and in the worst case it would go DAOn for a couple hours. And in the worst case, the price of SOL would also continue to drop, and so liquidations would not be able to occur, or even if they did they potentially wouldn't be able to happen fast enough which would leave bad bet on the platform. Basically, when the collateral is not worth enough to cover the loan then there's a mismatch in liabilities and that would mean basically that some users who withdraw last would not be able to withdraw. Solend has an insurance fund to repay these bad debts, but there's a chance that our insurance fund of $20 million would get depleted, and on top of that users would lose a bunch of money.Rooter (13:20):Basically, what we were looking at is, do something about it and avoid gambling for the outcome where users would lose maybe $100 million dollars and Solend's treasury gets depleted and basically spells the end for the land potentially, or do nothing and hope for the best. We're being proactive, and we looked at this situation and felt that it would make sense to do something about it. The solution that we came to was basically a very large market sale is extremely hard to do on chain but it's a lot more routine to do so OTC. So we made a governance proposal of this so then one, and basically the proposal was to liquidate these assets OTC, over the counter, to minimize flippage, get better execution, et cetera. Minimize impact to the market rather than doing so on chain. There was a lot of controversy around that.Brian (14:20):And I just want to set the stage here a little bit because I think this is a really fascinating case study for everyone who's interested in decentralized governance. I've been in the space for a couple of years now. Maybe thinking back to March 2020, but even then having governance issues that were so important. Solend being the lifeblood of the lending ecosystem on Solana, this being like you said, a potential existential question, but then also the fact that it's time sensitive. Can you just recap real quick how long you guys had from essentially finding out that this was an issue to turning out your first governance proposal?Rooter (14:56):So I think we first noticed this on June 15th, and a couple tweets trying to get in contact the 16th and around that. And then it was a couple days later that this proposal happened. And basically, we were looking at the sold charts and it's a very volatile asset, right. It actually dipped to $25, and I think in the high 25s for some time, which meant that only around a 15% drop would cause liquidations to happen, and doomsday scenario could happen. For SOL which dropped 80% in a very short period of time, a little 15% dip is not unfathomable, right.Brian (15:41):Walk us through some of the strategies here. You mentioned the first governance proposal involved taking control of the user's account in the event of a liquidation to handle this over OTC. The thinking being that OTC desk can provide better rates than the liquidity that's available latently on decentralized exchanges, there'd be less impact on users. Walk us through that proposal and then some of the subsequent proposals that followed.Rooter (16:08):That was essentially the proposal is to temporarily move the assets such that they can get liquidated over the counter and then move them back into the user's account. One common misconception is, people thought that we were taking their funds or stealing them or what whatnot, which is definitely not the case. Basically, they were just to get liquidated. And that money is still their own money it's just would be converted from SOL to USDC with the best execution that we could find. Better than what would be on Dex's. Of course, there's a lot of controversy around the method of doing that. Following that, there's a ton of controversy. And thankfully actually, the price of SOL started to recover which bought us some time. And re-evaluating the situation we thought okay, now that we have more time we can consider some other options potentially.Rooter (17:01):We made a second proposal, which rolled back the first one. We were listening to our community and the general community at large of crypto. It was definitely unpopular. Although one interesting fact actually is, it was definitely very controversial in the general sphere, but for our users that had money stuck in the platform and who were just waiting for a train to come and hit them, they really wanted us to do something about it. And we would get a lot of messages like F the haters, just do something. Don't listen to them. Just try to appease a bunch of people on Twitter and let us lose our money.Brian (17:41):And these are messages on Realms, the voting platform, is that right?Rooter (17:44):Realms and in our Discord just talking to users directly. One additional piece that I forgot to mention earlier was that, due to the utilization of the pool being so high because all of the USDC in the platform was borrowed out. That meant that people couldn't withdraw their USDC anymore because basically, the funds are not within the platformBrian (18:08):They're not available. Right.Rooter (18:10):Users were stuck in their position. They were frozen in and they couldn't exit so that was an additional thing that was exacerbating. The whale was causing real problems, it wasn't just potential.Brian (18:20):The borrow rates must've been crazy then.Rooter (18:24):I think USDC was at 60% APR and USCT went up to 200 something.Brian (18:31):Wow.Rooter (18:31):It was quite crazy. Some people were happy to collect that interest, but definitely, I think most people were sweating a little bit.Brian (18:40):Understandably so. Okay. You mentioned that the first proposal was around the OTC liquidations, in the event it came to that. Luckily, it didn't come to that, the price rebounded, then you guys initiated a second proposal which essentially gave your team more time to reevaluate, introduce the minimum one-day voting period. And then you guys also launched a third proposal which passed. Can you walk us through a little bit about what that third proposal entailed?Rooter (19:07):So the third proposal basically implemented new liquidation rules for extremely large accounts so basically, it capped the borrows of any account to $50 million. It would start off the cap at $120 million and gradually decrease it by around 500,000 per hour. Two things there. One is we don't want any single user to be a systemic risk for the platform and so there should be some sort of cap. I think this makes sense and there's pressing for it.Rooter (19:39):If you go to a bank and you ask for 100X leverage on a trade, or if you go to a crypto exchange like FDX or Binance, for a very long time you could do 100X leverage if you had say $100 dollars in your account. It's just a gamble, it's a lottery ticket or whatever. But if you go to them and you have $100 million and you tell them, "I want to get 100X leverage," they're going to tell you no, right. They're not just going to give anybody that crazy amount of leverage so you have to consider size. In the same way here, we don't want extremely large users until the platform can absorb it. As Solend grows, we can increase these caps.Rooter (20:16):And then the second part was this gradual reduction. Basically, the intent there was to spread out the liquidation over time so that we don't get a sudden $20 million sale that could cause chaos. We have them in much smaller chunks, such that the liquidations could get absorbed. If you sell a little bit on the decks it'll cause some slippage but not a crazy amount, and then it can get armed with centralized exchanges and other parties. It'll happen over the course of a couple days rather than just a couple hours or less.Brian (20:48):This third proposal passed as well, this was the latest proposal. Thankfully in hindsight, none of this actually had to come to the test. SOL rebounded, I assume the whale is no longer in imminent risk of liquidation. But I'm curious because you mentioned throughout this, one of your guiding principles is doing right by your users. You guys have done a number of different initiatives outside of that to prove that. And then you also mentioned your users were among the most vocal asking for you guys to take action here. I'm curious, where does governance come into play? What is a good time for enacting governance as a protocol founder? What decisions can you guys make as a team? What times do you actually need to bring in the community vote in situations like these?Rooter (21:32):One last thing to wrap up the whale thing. In the end, we actually were able to get in contact with them. Basically, they heard the news and someone had reached out to the Binance team ... Or, we had reached out to some people who helped us get in touch with the Binance team who then forwarded our message along to the whale. Shortly after proposing SLND3, we got in contact and talked about some mitigation strategies. In the end, they reduced their position on Solend and the price of SOL rebounded, as you mentioned. We were in the clear after that. Moving on to the question about decentralization. Basically, my thinking there is that it's better to build something worth decentralizing than to decentralize nothing. And it takes time to get to that point where you have something valuable that's worth decentralizing. My thinking basically is, if you're fully decentralized from day one it makes things extremely hard.Rooter (22:26):I don't know if you've participated in many DAOs, but if you have you would know how extremely inefficient they can be and how oftentimes there's a lot of this bystander effect where people do nothing, just stand around waiting for others to do something. I believe that there needs to be some spearheading entity that gets things done and then gets it to a point where it can be decentralized to the community and governed by the community later on. But the whole startup maze of discovery and pivoting to find product market fit and reacting to changing market environments, that's very hard to navigate as a DAO.Rooter (23:04):I don't remember who put it out at the beginning, but this idea of decentralization over time, and we're embracing that. We are working on a decentralization roadmap, which we're going to release soon. And basically, it'll outline what are the milestones on the way to decentralization? And what are the steps that we're going to take? I mean, even Bitcoin wasn't decentralized on day one, right. At the beginning, most of the hash power was owned by Satoshi and his associates and whatnot, his friends, and, it took a while for the hash power to be, as we would call it, sufficiently decentralized.Brian (23:42):Is there anything that you would do differently looking back on this whole situation?Rooter (23:46):That's a very tough question. Looking back in the situation that we were at, we were in between a rock and a hard place, and we were faced with a real-life trolley problem where one option is we gamble with our users' funds and potentially let them lose hundreds of million dollars and the life of Solend. And the other is doing something controversial that doesn't sit well with a lot of people. It was very tough and definitely hope to never have to make this decision again, but I think what we would do is we would always put our users first I think. Having users lose money is the worst thing that could happen so we would do everything we can to prevent that from happening.Brian (24:28):I commend you for your composure in responding to that situation. A lot of people like to chirp on Twitter. I think a lot of people who are working in Web 3.0 or founders of projects know what it's like to be in the arena there, and definitely don't envy your position but also, I think it's great that you guys have that principle of doing right by your users.Rooter (24:50):That was definitely tough. There was a lot of criticism directed directly at us as well. And the frustrating thing was, none of these people were users. None of them had ever touched Solend's, maybe never even touched Solana, but they were just criticizing from the sidelines. A lot of them had something to gain sort of. Maybe they were maxis or they have a platform where controversy and engagement drives metrics for them. It's an ugly reality of things.Brian (25:23):One last point on this. For any founders who are thinking about starting their own project in Web 3.0, generally, maybe listening to this podcast, is there anything you would tell them about governance as a whole or what you've learned so far in your time at Solend?Rooter (25:37):It definitely helps to be proactive and to set things up, and discuss things with people as early as possible. But at the same time, I think if you're just starting out a project, I wouldn't suggest to spin up a DAO immediately unless it's a DAO-specific project like X DAO or whatever. NOODLE's DAO or some fan club. If you're working on a startup, which happens to be crypto-powered, I would definitely suggest to figure out your place in the market first, figure out some product market fit before spending too much time decentralizing. Because if you spend all of your time and effort on the DAO piece and your startup ends up failing because it can't find product-market fit, then what's the point? That would be my advice.Brian (26:25):Well said. I want to switch gears here. I know we've been talking a lot about your guys' plans with decentralization over time. I think that's really exciting. You guys also have a number of other product launches though related to Solend. And recently, you guys announced the launch of your isolated pools product. Can you give us a quick overview of what these isolated pools are? I know STEPN has been a big example here. Can you walk us through how end user might interact with some of these pools?Rooter (26:51):An isolated pool is basically a separate pool of assets that can be cross-lent and borrowed. And this is in contrast to the main pool that we have on Solend, which was the first one that we launched with, and every time we list an asset it would go into that main pool. But the problem with that is, if you list an asset with low liquidity that is, therefore, more easily manipulatable, it opens up the entire pool to attack, not just that asset. To take one simple example. Let's say there's some token and an attacker was able to manipulate the price such that Oracle's believe that it's a million dollars a coin, then a user could deposit some of these tokens and borrow millions of dollars worth of assets against it. Millions of dollars worth of USCC, SOL, et cetera, and then just let the price fall back DAOn to say pennies and just walk away with the debt not intending to ever repay it.Rooter (27:50):Basically, yes, you need to be very careful about which assets you list. And everything in the main pool has to be of extremely high-quality, and not manipulable, and not just mintable willy-nilly. If someone could just print an infinite amount and deposit and borrow against it, that's also a big issue that we want to avoid. What isolated pools does is, we can set up these separate pools that we can then list riskier assets. And if there is an issue, it would be isolated to that pool. So we're not saying there's not going to be any issues ever, potentially at some point there would be issues, but users are opting into that risk when they enter into an isolated pool.Rooter (28:30):Some of the interesting things that we've done with these in the past is one, it's called the Turbo SOL pool so it's a pool with only SOL and USDC in it. And basically, since we have only these two really high-quality assets, we're able to increase the loan-to-value ratios for these assets. So rather than being 75%, so you can only borrow 75% of the value against your collateral, here you can borrow 95% which lets you get 10X leverage. So that's a pretty interesting use case. If you only want to leverage trade SOL versus USCC then you're better off using the Turbo SOL pool where you can get higher leverage or you can just have a lower liquidation price.Rooter (29:13):And then the other side is, listing long tail assets. One very interesting one as you mentioned was a STEPN pool. We have this pool where there's GST, which is the token that you earn from walking, and GMT, which is the STEPN governance project token. This has been an extremely popular one where it was growing a lot. The number of users in this isolate pool was our fastest growing for some time. And it opened up some interesting use cases which showcases the power of DeFi and composability. So basically, STEPN just launched their token, they don't have anything to do with lending markets or whatnot, but we are able to just launch that permissionlessly and provide a product for users to use to do a couple of things.Rooter (30:01):One is, they can hedge their entry to STEPN. Rather than paying $500 for a pair of shoes to start walking, you can borrow a bunch of GMT or GST and sell it to US dollars and then buy the shoe with that. And what that does is, if STEPN as a whole doesn't do well, for whatever reason, and the price of its shoes go DAOn, probably the price of GST and GMT is going to go DAOn as well so you end up saving that money since you didn't make such a big upfront investment so you can hedge your entry costs. And another interesting thing you can do is you can borrow GST to level up your shoes and pay it off later so it's level up now pay later. Buy now pay later.Brian (30:49):Buy now pay later but for STEPN.Rooter (30:50):Exactly.Brian (30:52):That's awesome. How have you guys seen this DeFi component fitting in with the general onboarding funnel for something like STEPN? I think STEPN's fairly unique. It brought in maybe a lot of users who weren't familiar with crypto for the first time. Do you see this as something that's more of an advanced feature today or could this potentially, in its own way, be a bit of a gateway drug to onboarding on the DeFi directly getting new users who might not have ever had a wall before to open up wallet and deposit in Solend because of the yields that they see?Rooter (31:24):It's definitely a more advanced feature. Users that use this have to be aware of their liquidation risk and they have to manage that which is pretty tricky and ideally would understand how markets work. What's an order book? Just those basics. I think a lot of people in crypto take it for granted because they've been just breathing it, eating it for breakfast every day for so long, but it does take some time to learn these concepts. The one beginner feature is you could just deposit your GST or GMT and lend it out for yield, that's pretty simple. It's good to understand the risks involved as well, but that's a much simpler product than borrowing against and managing liquidation.Rooter (32:04):And, by the way, the interest rates on GST and GMT were historically extremely high, something like 500% API which made it very exciting. And that definitely brought on a lot of people, which a lot of them were beginners to DeFi, hadn't really used crypto products much but were attracted by those very high yields, especially those that were holding GST anyway because maybe they were saving up for the next big purchase and why not earn 500% API per year?Brian (32:33):That makes a lot of sense. 500% though, I think that starts to ... Maybe some folks who aren't familiar with crypto, that starts stirring a too good to be true. For those who were around in DeFi Summer, that's small fry numbers. I think a natural extension of this concept of an isolated pool gets at something that you guys have hinted a little bit called permissionless pools. Is there anything that you guys can share about this?Rooter (32:58):As I mentioned a while ago, when I was using lending protocols and then DeFi Summer, there are a bunch of things that I wish there were lending markets for. I really wish that I could just list my own, but it's a lot of work to start a whole lending protocol, and get usage, and get network effects, and whatnot. As you mentioned, the natural next step from isolated pools is allowing anyone to list their own. And this has been something that I've wanted to get to for a very long time and so it's very cool to finally be seeing this come to fruition. Basically, quite soon, maybe by the time this pod airs, we're launching permissionless pools, which anyone can list whatever asset they want. I think it's quite a powerful concept since on day one that an asset list gets launched you can have a lending market for it so you can short anything on day one, you can leverage long anything on day one, you can use anything as collateral for a loan on day one, all powered by the community.Rooter (33:57):Going back to isolated pools, we've been launching one isolated pool about once a week, but even then we only have ... Right now we have 40 something assets and around 16 different isolated pools, but it's going to take us forever to list everything in Solana ecosystem, right, there's thousands of tokens. And at this rate of once a week, even though that's a pretty decent rate we're just never going to get to everything. I guess borrowing some lessons from Uniswap, they have permissionless listings and it made sense that they could list everything under the sun without having to spend any engineering time on it.Rooter (34:34):And in contrast to that, centralized exchanges like buying that through Coinbase, they have to spend maybe a week of engineering's time to set everything up, especially if they have legacy systems that are not designed from the start to be rapid listing machines. Coinbase, for example, as a startup, it was only for buying Bitcoin, and then they added Ethereum later on. And then now there's hundreds of assets but it took a really long time to get there, and it takes up a lot of engineering time. In this way, we're able to provide a market for everything on Solana, and we're removing ourselves as a gatekeeper and as a blocker for having these markets.Brian (35:13):That's really cool to hear. I do think that is one of the main selling points of a decentralized protocol like this is just capturing the long tail of all assets in a really efficient way. I think this dovetails pretty nicely too with what you mentioned with this hint at what your guys' plans are for decentralizing long term. I guess looking ahead, what are you most excited to build with Solend? What do you envision is the end state for how Solend fits into the broader Solana ecosystem?Rooter (35:40):One of the big parts that we're encouraging is developer usage. Solend at the end of the day is a platform. We have Sea Tokens that make it extremely easy to integrate with. Sea Tokens are just like any other SPL token that represent your deposit. And basically, we want Solend to be pretty deeply integrated into the ecosystem and be used across various different use cases. Lending is a core primitive of DeFi and it's a building block that should be used as much as possible. I really see ourselves at the base layer of Solana as a primitive that's used in many different other products.Brian (36:21):That's awesome. Well, I think you guys are definitely well on your way to being there. Rooter, this is a great discussion. Thanks for your time. One last question we ask to all our guests. Who is a builder that you admire in the Solana ecosystem?Rooter (36:34):I really admire the Orca team. Yutaro and Grace inspired me to build Solend right at the beginning because ... I knew Yutaro from his Orion days and I knew he was a very talented dev. Seeing him jump into Solana was definitely a factor for me to take a second look at it. If you haven't already had them, I would definitely recommend them.Brian (36:58):Couldn't agree more. We had Orion for I believe our third episode that we launched. They do a really great job of setting the UX bar very high in crypto, especially when it comes to DeFi projects, as you guys do as well. Well, Rooter, this is great. Thanks so much for your time. Where can people go to learn more about you and to learn more about Solend?Rooter (37:18):So for myself, you can follow me on Twitter, I'm at 0xrooter, most active there. For Solend, Solend.fi is the website and Solendprotocol on Twitter where you can find all of our updates. From there you can find all the links to everything else like our documentation and whatnot. Developer, portal, and whatnot.Brian (37:38):Perfect. Thank you, Rooter.Rooter (37:39):Thank you.

3 Old Geeks
Issue 124 - Killzone!

3 Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 58:55


In a special Saturday Night edition of Kung Fu Theater, the Geeks finally watched a movie that Lance had been seeking, the fantastic SPL aka Kill Zone! The Worst Movie Ever This Week is indeed one of the worst in The Great Alligator! The World Famous Top 3 List features the boys' favorite comic book deities! The broadcast is capped off with a spoilerific review of Episode 5 of Star Trek: Strange New Worlds! Thanks for listening and Keep On Geekin' On! Timestamps 5:08 Top 3 comic deities 20:10 The Great Alligator (River) 33:45 SPL aka Kill Zone 48:42 Star Trek: Strange New Worlds Episode 5 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/3oldgeeks/message

OceanFM Ireland
"We knew we were just as good as them" - Aidan Keena on Euro win

OceanFM Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 0:51


Ocean FM's Player of the Match Aidan Keena gives Donal Ryan his postmatch reaction following Thursday night's 2-0 win over Motherwell (3-0 on agg), which sent the SPL side tumbling out of Europe.

Hawksbee and Jacobs Daily
The Goodwood Screamer

Hawksbee and Jacobs Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 56:06


Paul Hawksbee and Charlie Baker are joined in the pod by the Daily Telegraph Chess correspondent Malcolm Pein to chat about a robot breaking a child's finger as well as Scottish comedian and SPL podcaster Ray Bradshaw. Plus the guys brought you racing from glorious Goodwood with Rupert Bell, Lizzie Kelly and the Goodwood Screamer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Learn English Podcast - English Danny Channel
English Pronunciation: Syllable Stress in English Sentences - Word Stress- Episode 4

Learn English Podcast - English Danny Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 3:26


I will teach you syllable stress in sentences that will help you understand syllable stressed and unstressed in English.

The Zeitgeist
Steven Laver - Solana Mobile Engineering Lead, Ep. 5

The Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 41:09


Steven Laver (Solana Mobile Engineering Lead) joins The Zeitgeist to discuss how Solana Mobile Stack and the Saga phone will enable the user experiences and rich ecosystem that we need for the future of Web3.Show Notes00:05 - Intro00:45 - Background01:27 - Before Solana02:24 - Why mobile and SMS?04:12 - What is SMS ?06:15 - Seed Vault08:39 - ARM TrustZone10:06 - Security with Seed Vault11:44 - Restrictions with Seed Vault12:46 - Importing and exporting keys15:02 - Mobile wallet adapter21:39 - Plans for deep linking23:27 - The dApp store27:31 - Plans for Solana pay31:18 - Saga33:16 - Expanding SMS to other devices and blockchains38:54 - Working with TJ from Mountain Pay40:18 - Where to connect with Steven and SMS41:14 - OutroTranscriptBrian (00:06):Hey, everyone. And welcome to the Zeitgeist, the show where we highlight the founders, developers, and designers who are pushing the Web 3.0 space forward. I'm Brian Friel, developer relations at Phantom, and I'm super excited to introduce my guest Steven Labor. Stephen is the lead software engineer for a suite of new Solana developer tools known as SMS. The Solana mobile stack. SMS was unveiled recently at NFT NYC alongside a flagship smartphone that will be powered by this new suite of technologies. Stephen, welcome to the show.Steven (00:37):Thanks Brian. Excited to be here.Brian (00:39):Thanks for coming on. We have a lot of ground to cover today. Couple really great announcements that you guys just released, but before we dive into all that, could you give us a brief background of who you are and how you became involved with building mobile software for so Solana?Steven (00:52):Sure. So I have been doing professional engineering now for round about 20 years, but about 15 of those have been spent working on phones in one fashion or another. Right after college, I kind of fell backwards into a job. I just crossed the road rom my university and started working for research in motion and back then worked on Blackberries back when they were cool. And since then I've had a long career building, all kinds of phones and software for phones. Few forays out into some other areas of consumer electronics, but I keep seeming to be dragged back into phones. So I must love it.Brian (01:28):Right before Solana. What were some of the companies you were just working at?Steven (01:31):When, when I took the call from Anatoly for this cool new, exciting opportunity for Solana mobile, I was sitting in a beige conference room at a very large company that likes to make very monochromatic products. And when he started selling me on what Solana labs was building here and the what the vision for the SAGA device was at the time under a very cool code name, but I was pretty quickly sold on that. And previous to that, I spent a few years working at Google, working on the Android products there. So like I said, long background, lots of different smartphones and phone software in there, but this is the most excited I've been about a phone project in a long, long time.Brian (02:09):Oh, that's awesome to hear. Most people who interact with crypto today do so on a desktop from a browser extension. Maybe they're signing with a ledger, maybe they're signing with a web wallet like Phantom. And on Solana specifically, mobile wallets only launched a little over six months ago. Why is the time right now for push into mobile and why SMS specifically?Steven (02:29):So this is actually exactly what the problem statement that convinced me that I should join Solana labs and help build this awesome product. Our phones are everything to us. They're our web browsers. They are cameras. We watch TV on them. We play games on them. They're the first place we go to for everything, they're even our alarm clocks now. And the fact that the Web 3.0 ecosystem just isn't present on our phones the same way it is on our desktops. That to me, is what really gets me excited and got me interested in building this. We're really at the square one here, as far as building for a rich ecosystem for Web 3.0 and for Solana on mobile devices. And we get to use this at use SAGA and use SMS. This is our stake in the ground.Steven (03:13):This is us saying, this is how we should be building for mobile devices. These are the user experiences we need to offer. These are the technologies we need to offer. And being on the ground floor of that, getting to build these fundamental building blocks and then giving them to the community. So the community can then go build all the great, amazing ideas that are honestly, things I would never have thought of. But when I look back at them, I'm like, wow. We have such a rich and exciting community of builders for Solana. That's what I'm most excited about for building SAGA and building the Solana mobile stack.Brian (03:45):That's awesome. Yeah. From Phantoms side, we've seen just in the last six months that even though that foundation for building mobile apps, isn't really there today, SMS hopefully will be able to lay this great foundation. Like you said, we've seen that mobile has been our fastest growing segment by far. So we're super excited for this as well. SMS covers a lot of new developer features here. It's kind of this umbrella term for this whole suite of products that you guys are building in your own words, what is SMS and how should developers be thinking about this new suite of tools?Steven (04:17):I think of it from two angles. So first of all, let me talk about it just briefly from a consumer angle. Or Web 3.0 ecosystem for consumers. Many of us are very in the know about what that means, but for some others, they may be a little less so. They're new to the space, they're still learning it. There's a lot of words and phrases and sayings and memes that are very unique to this ecosystem that people take a little while to get onboarded with. From a consumer perspective, SMS really allows them to understand what a phone offers in terms of its capabilities with Solana. And so it's really by participating in an ecosystem or on a device that has the SMS technologies on it, to a certain extent, they know what they're going to get there. They know they're going to get a device that is going to work well and is they're going to be able to fully participate in the Solana ecosystem.Steven (05:06):For developers, SMS is a collection of technologies, the big ones being, we have Seed Vault for secure key custody. We have mobile wallet adapter for connecting adapts to wallets. We have deeper richer integrations with the OS for Solana Pay, and then the Solana DAP store, which people are really, really excited about.Steven (05:25):And so from the developer perspective, we have this collection of tools which will continue to grow over time. We're going to put more libraries in there. We're going to have more samples for developers, and we're going to keep expanding on this initial set of technologies. And I'm happy to talk about each of those in detail, but as far as SMS for developers, we've got an SDK out now and we're going to be continuing to enhance that. And each of those technology offerings within SMS has value to offer to a different slice or a different segment of our developer ecosystem.Brian (05:55):That's awesome. They're very complimentary as well. Let's dive into each of them. So you mentioned four of those there. We have the Seed Vault. We have the mobile wallet adapter, the DAP store that you guys are launching and then better integrations around Solana Pay, which you guys recently unveiled earlier this year. Let's start with the Seed Vault. I feel like this is the foundation upon which everything else is built. Can you describe a little bit of more, like, what is the Seed Vault? Is it related to what a secure enclave is on iOS or a key store? How should people be thinking about this new term?Steven (06:25):So there's a pretty big gap between the level of security that a hardware wallet offers. Something like a device like a ledger or a treasure. Those are great devices, they're purpose built hardware, and they offer the maximum level of security for users. I think they do a fantastic job with that, but ultimately they are a little bit limited by the fact that they're a separate device. It needs to be connected to your wallet. It's got a very limited user interface in terms of LCD displays or buttons, et cetera. Whereas on the other end of the spectrum, we have the software wallets running on Android or iOS devices, like Phantom for example. User experience is top notch, but the environment that they're running in the Android or iOS high level operating systems, they are general purpose operating systems. They're connected to the network. They run other user code on them.Steven (07:15):And so while they can offer that great user experience because of the environment they operate in, they don't have that quite that same level of security as a hardware wallet would. Seed Vault allows us to bring a lot of those benefits that a hardware wallet is able to, in terms of custody of keys, in terms of taking advantage of extremely secure hardware on mobile phones. And bring those to the software wallets. And so I think that's actually an important point for Seed Vault. We aren't actually building any new or novel hardware into phones to bring this technology up to wallets. Instead, we're taking advantage of the very high secure elements that already exist on phones. And we're integrating those into the system layer and we're integrating Solana blockchain operations into the system to support these functionalities. So as a concrete example, when your seeds are sort of the root of all your secrets on the Solana blockchain, all your wallet accounts, all your private keys, everything is derived from those seeds.Steven (08:13):We use a secure element on SAGA to secure your seeds in a way that's very protected, even down to the level of forensic attacks. Those are the kind of attacks that would go on in like a lab. And they take your device apart and use all kinds of equipment to try to extract your secrets from that device. So we use the secure element, specialized hardware, very similar to the secure enclave that you would hear about on an iOS device, for example. And then we combine that with a very secure operating environment that is available on most Android devices. So it's called Arm Trust Zone, and it's an environment that is running below the level of Android. So everything the user sees and is used to seeing in terms of the Android operating system, there's actually another operating system running below that on the device, it's a very specialized environment.Steven (09:02):It's very secure and it's called Arm trust zone. We run a trusted application within that environment that cooperates with the secure element to do all of your signing operations. So all of your key derivations from that initial seed and all of the secure signing operations, based on that. Design transactions on behalf of the wallets that are running in the Android OS. We make use of a bunch of specialized secure technologies, such as secure input and secure display. So if you have a password associated with your seed, when you type in that password, you're actually not even typing that into Android. You're typing that into a specialized OS, highly secure. It actually takes over the display temporarily. And so that when you enter your password, it's only going into environment that is secure and ready to accept it. And then once we sign a transaction on behalf of the user, we hand that back to the wallet, for example, Phantom running in the Android operating system, and then Phantom takes that and is able to submit it to the Solana blockchain for processing.Brian (10:04):That's a great overview. Thanks for that. So is it safe to say from like an end user's perspective, is this a Seed Vault, essentially bringing the same security guarantees or even more than a traditional hardware wallet would, but with kind of an added ease of use component being that it's directly embedded into your phone.Steven (10:21):So the hardware wallets are designed from the ground up to be the most secure wallets possible. And so certain design choices that they've made such as not having network connectivity on them, their air gap devices and being designed with very, very optimized hardware specifically for security means that those are pretty much the perfect devices for the security of seed storage. But as we all know, the trade off comes in terms of the user experience.Steven (10:48):Seed Vault gets us most of the way there. We get to take advantage of secure elements for seed encryption and specialized processing environments. It's still running inside a general purpose device, which does have network connectivity, although the secure environments themselves on the device, don't. So cold storage wallets are definitely going to still have a place in the ecosystem for very, very secure storage of high value assets, high value wallets, for example, but Seed Vault gets us a substantial distance closer to that on phones. And it also does it in a way that remains readily available and easy for users to use. So this is Seed Vault is very much a day to day technology that will allow the users to bring a huge amount of security to their seeds and their keys while still maintaining all the usability of an Android device.Brian (11:37):That's fantastic. I think anyone who's been around in crypto long enough deeply understands that problem between security and ease of use trade off. Can this Seed Vault handle all types of signing or is it restricted in any way as to what types of transactions or messages this can sign?Steven (11:53):For the initial launch we're focused on the Solana chain. All the operations that are built into Seed Vault are all designed, are all the cryptographic operations that are necessary for key generation, key storage, and transaction signing on. That said, like I said before, we're not building any new hardware into phones to support this. We're making use of hardware, very, very secure hardware that was already present. This is a systems integration problem. And so we're building this really, really secure and specialized system deep into the OS below the level of Android so that users can have a secure Solana experience. But there's nothing that would stop us in the future from expanding this as well. So what I would say to users is, go to Solanamobile.com. We have a wait list there, but you can also leave comments as well. So please, if other chains are an area you have an interest in, that would be a great place to let us know about it.Brian (12:45):That's fantastic. And one final point on the Seed Vault, is it possible to import or export your keys to another phone or is this sea fault tied to essentially one device?Steven (12:56):So the Seed Vault will support the standard BIT 39 seed phrases. So those 12 or 24 word seed phrases that we're all intimately familiar with. A big part of key custody is understanding the importance of protecting your own keys. And so for users who... We strongly believe in self custody of keys and secrets with the SAGA device. And so when you first set up the device, the user will be guided through a process to either create a new seed or to import an existing seed. As part of that process, we'll be guiding the user to back up, write down in some, for example, a reference card, all of the words in their seed phrase. And store that somewhere safe and secure. That seed phrase can be used to recover your seed later. If you were to get another SAGA device, it could be used to import your seed into that other device.Steven (13:47):Or if you do already have wallets elsewhere, you can use that seed to import those other wallets into the SAGA. There is a security caveat that comes with that, which is that your seed is only as secure as the least secure place you've ever stored it. So our recommendation will be for users to go and create a brand new seed when they get the SAGA device. We've built this great Seed Vault, super high secure storage capabilities. And we would really like for users to add, to create new seeds. But we also understand that users may already have many accounts set up and they may want to add existing seeds into their Seed Vault to facilitate the transfer of their assets, to a brand new seed for the device. And so we will support both importing and exporting seeds on the SAGA device.Brian (14:30):So I think that does a really great job of laying the foundation for the Seed Vault. You mentioned SAGA, the flagship phone upon all this is built. There's three other technologies though that you guys have also bringing the market here as part of SMS.Brian (14:43):One of the next ones which I want to cover is the mobile wallet adapter. I think anyone who's used Solana both from a development perspective, or if they're just an end user is very familiar with the wallet adapter that we have on web. Does a great job of normalizing all the different wallets on Solana, making it really easy to just click and you see a drop down menu and it's easy to connect to your favorite wallet. What is the mobile wallet adapter? How do you say it differs from the web wallet adapter and what can users expect to be seeing when they interact with one of these?Steven (15:12):First of all, mobile wallet adapter is actually the one technology in all of SMS that I'm personally most excited about. It's the least flashy. It's something that users will hopefully never even know exists because it's such a fundamental and basic thing that users will assume that this is just how things are supposed to work. Mobile wallet adapter is an analog of the wallet adapter on the web that we all have come to know and love. It's the communication fabric by which we're going to bind dApps and wallets on mobile devices together. So on the web, you're used to visiting some DAP, clicking that connect wallet button, seeing a popup of the available wallets that you have installed in your browser. And just picking one and just getting this seamless transaction signing experience. Unfortunately, the same thing doesn't exist today on mobile devices, either on Android or on iOS devices for the Solana chain.Steven (16:04):And that I think is the number one thing that is holding back broad mobile adoption for Solana and for Web 3.0 on mobile devices. So just like we built a protocol and a plug-in interface for wallet adapter on the web. We're building something very similar on mobile devices. We're going to have a web socket based communication protocol that allows for dApps to connect to wallets wherever they are for signing transaction purposes. And that wherever they are, I think is the big key difference between transaction signing on mobile devices versus transaction signing on laptops or desktops. With the traditional wallet adapter, there's one environment that everything operates in, the web browser. And it's a great sandbox. It's a super rich set of tools. But on mobile devices, the ecosystem is a little bit broader there. We have dApps that will run in your web browser.Steven (16:57):Any mobile friendly dApps should be able to work on your mobile Chrome, just like they would work in desktop Chrome. You've got native applications that have run on the device as well, whether those are written in Kotlin or Java on an Android device, or a cross platform framework like Darden fluter or like react native. And then you also, a natural extension from there is saying, well, we've built this great wallet on these SMS devices with Seed Vault. Why can't this be my only wallet? Why do I even need to have a different wallet on every platform that I want to use dApps on? And so part of what we're building with mobile wallet adapter is the concept of remote signing as well. We got this phone, you've got a wallet on there. It has network connectivity. It is a great user interface.Steven (17:42):This should be able to act as a remote wallet for dApps that are running on other nearby mobile devices, or even on your nearby laptops and desktops. So mobile wallet adapter is a protocol and it's a fabric that's going to bind all of these things together with the initial release of SMS. We have a reference implementation that we've built for Android, but this is an area we see expanding beyond Android as well. So the mobile wallet adapter protocol was designed to be agnostic to the platform on which it's running. Any platform that has some of these standard web technologies like web sockets, for example, would be able to participate in the mobile wallet, adapter protocol.Brian (18:19):Yeah, that's fantastic. That's super exciting for us. You hit on a couple of things there. One of which I think I could sense your excitement over, was the ability to do this remote signing on your phone. You're interacting with a web app, either on another mobile device or potentially on your laptop. Is this similar to what wallet connect is on Ethereum? I know we haven't really had wallet connect yet on Solana on a major DAP. How is this essentially handling this connection? Is there some middle man server involved? How are you guys thinking about that?Steven (18:49):In principle, it is similar to the functionality provided by wallet connect. Though, I think, we've definitely made some design decisions in the mobile wallet adapter space to make it very suitable for operation on mobile devices. We've really optimized it for local use cases. And as part of that, one of the design decisions we've made is that we shouldn't have to reach out to an intermediate server during the signing process, if the operations that you're performing are those that can be done entirely locally on the device. And so let's just to give a concrete example, you have the Phantom wallet installed on the device. Let's say you wanted to use magic Eden through your Chrome web browser on that same device, because they're both running locally, there's no reason we should have to reach out to an intermediate server to make that connection between those two parties.Steven (19:38):And so we've split up the process into two phases. The first of which we call association, which answers the question of, well, how does the magic Eden running in the browser, how does it even know what wallets are available on the device? How does it start up the wallet so that it's in front of the user and the user has context of what's happening. And then how does it create an encrypted channel through which communications can happen? And so on Android, we've done that through an intent based scheme and then a Diffy helmet key exchange, but we've built the protocol in a flexible way so that we can add additional types of association in the future.Steven (20:13):For example, we have the ability to use QR codes for association. You can imagine scanning a QR code from your mobile phone, and that would encode all the information necessary to inform the two parties of each other. Or alternatively there're other standards we want to explore like web Bluetooth, which gives you a great way to only connect to devices that are in proximity with you.Steven (20:35):So in terms of security, it means that you can have a connection that also has a locality element to it, which would be really interesting when it comes to making use of very highly secure operations, like signing with your private keys for your wallet accounts.Steven (20:50):The second half of the protocol is connections, and we use web sockets. We create an encrypted channel, and then all of the operations that a user would make use of through wallet adapter today, authorizing adapt, signing transactions, sending transactions across the network. All of that has been created in the mobile wallet adapter protocol as well. And so that said, all together, whole bunch of technology running, hopefully invisibly to the user. And we're even building a plugin for regular wallet adapter, so that dApps are able to get support from mobile wallet adapter with just extremely, extremely small amount of work. Rebuild, select the right plugins for wallet adapter, make sure your DAP is mobile web friendly, and you'll be ready to go on day one.Brian (21:34):That's great. That's very elegant too, getting rid of the middleman server in that using just the local network. Personally having been at Phantom for a while. We've sensed the frustration in the mobile scene. A little bit, a lot of wallets today are kind of forced to have these in-app browsers, just given the state of mobile phones and given the state of the mobile phone industry. One thing that Phantom has done to get around this in particular, in interacting with native dApps is deep linking. Does mobile wallet DAP have any plans for deep linking? How are you guys thinking about handling those deep linking protocols?Steven (22:07):Yep. So I think number one, I think the deep linking protocols are a very elegant solution to getting over this problem of how do we break out of the world of browsers inside of wallets? I think that the browsers inside of wallets, I believe is a very expedient solution, but I believe it's a stepping stone on the way to having dApps in wallets, as full participants on a mobile device, using the user experience, paradigms and patterns that users are used to. So standalone native applications that are able to directly communicate with each other.Steven (22:41):The deep linking protocols, I think do a great job. They're very straightforward and do a great job for the use cases local to the device. And so I view those as a complimentary to mobile wallet adapter. Mobile wallet adapter is designed to handle both those use cases as well, but also the broader use cases of on and off device. And so I think that is where mobile wallet adapter can take the ecosystem even one more step forward is through separation of the transport layer from the association layer. We're able to design for use cases that extend beyond the device and extend beyond what the deep linking protocols are currently able to accomplish today.Brian (23:21):That's great. So we hit a lot here with the mobile wallet adapter that will be impacting how dApps and wallets interact with one another. You guys are also releasing another initiative that'll be impacting dApps. You guys are dubbing at the DAP store. The big takeaway here is that there won't be these rent extracting fees of 30% of all commerce in apps from some of the big players that we all know and love. Can you touch a little more on what this DAP store is? What some of the plans are for this and how current DAP developers should be thinking about this DAP store?Steven (23:53):Sure. So I have received more questions on the DAP store. It just goes to show how excited developers are for this. We're all very, very intimately familiar with some of the difficulties that are posed by the current app store ecosystems for mobile devices, Google Play store for Android and the App Store for apple. And they primarily fall into two categories. There is the policies aspect, what am I allowed to do? What am I not allowed to do? Is my app going to be approved for the store? Or am I going to be rejected for what often feels like an arbitrary reason? And then the second part of it is the economic angle. A 30% cut of fees is a pretty hard pill to swallow. And especially when we come to some of the use cases like purchases of digital goods, 30% fee pretty much is a nail in the coffin of trying to do, for example, an NFT like an auction house or a marketplace on a device like an iPhone, for example.Steven (24:51):And the Solana DAP store... This is our opportunity to change that. Our north star on this is that once DAP is installed the any further interactions between that DAP and the user are a matter between that DAP and the user, we're not going to be getting involved with like ongoing fees or anything of that nature. And in fact, we're making our DAP store no fee. So there won't be transaction fees in the store if users want to purchase apps or applications from the store. And like I said, once it's installed any further relationships are between the DAP and the user. We're very much building this in the model of a permissionless Web 3.0 experience.Steven (25:32):Now that said, I do want to touch on one really important area, which is the curation of the catalog. In my background, I did work for a couple years on an app store for mobile devices when I was at Microsoft. And I was a young, slightly naive engineer at that point. And I didn't really think that the curation problem would be that substantial. And I think that in fact, the trust and safety aspect of app stores is probably the single most important topic to look into. So at the beginning, we are going to be curating the contents of the app store, and we're going to be doing that to make sure that the contents are both useful to users, but also there's a huge amount of trust that goes into users when they use an app store into, who is the publisher and what are they doing to protect me.Steven (26:21):And so Solana labs will be curating the contents at the initial release, but we do have aspirations to involve the community in the curation of this app catalog. The community's involvement is always a huge area for Web 3.0 in areas like DAOs, for example, and we have the same aspirations for the Solana mobile and the Solana mobile DAP store.Brian (26:45):That's great. I think that's really important that you emphasize that from the start, setting expectations like that. In our experience, crypto can be really exciting. It's this new world, but also it's very permissionless and that is a sword that cuts both ways. We've seen that firsthand being a wallet. We actually now run, I believe the biggest block list of all spam NFTs and essentially scam domains on Solana. It's a huge, huge issue. It really is important to kind of nip that in the bud, especially for new users when they're just getting acquainted with this ecosystem. And we found in our experience we turned that block list, open source. We get community contributions from that, especially every day now. And I think whenever you're able to kind of leverage the power of the end users here, the community that's using this every day, that's a really great way to handle it.Brian (27:33):So we hit on a lot here. We just covered the DAP store. We also went over the Seed Vault, which leads the foundation for SMS, and then the mobile wallet adapter, which you're super excited about. We're super excited about that as well. There's one final component to this, which is Solana Pay. I think most people are familiar with Solana Pay at this point. It was unveiled earlier in Q2, I believe of 2022. There's a couple great use cases, around this around making point of sale, a lot easier, using SPL tokens on Solana, getting rid of middleman fees once again.Brian (28:04):But I also think Solana Pay might at this point, be a bit of a misnomer. I've seen some really great use cases leveraging Solana Pay with NFT ticketing. I know the mountain pay guys have built this great photo booth where you can snap a photo and then scan with your Phantom wallet and it mints into an NFT right on your phone. And that's all running on Solana Pay behind the scenes. What do you guys have planned for Solana Pay as it relates to mobile and SMS? What can you tell us about that today?Steven (28:32):Mobile devices, we carry them everywhere with us and they've in the last few years, people have really, really started to use mobile payment technologies. You've got, on Android devices you have Google Pay for example. And so we have these perfect devices that you carry with you and people are already used to interacting with in the real world to effectuate payments. And that's really what we're looking at for SMS and Solana Pay. We're actually not making any protocol changes at all to Solana Pay with the SMS stack. Instead, what we're doing is providing guidance on how wallet should integrate Solana Pay into the Android system. For many wallets, there's actually almost nothing to do here. Wallets like Phantom, do a great job of already integrating some of these best practices into Android devices. But by providing a set of best practices, we can really make sure that there's a standardized way by which users can expect their phone to work with Solana Pay. In terms of snapping QR codes, in terms of tapping your phone on NFC readers or in terms of interacting with Solana Pay links that are generated from within the mobile web browser.Steven (29:40):And so, by providing that set of best practices and providing samples on how to integrate Solana Pay, those best practices will give us a foundation by which we can expect that all of these real world Solana Pay interactions that users are going to be using with their phones will be consistent across devices. And by making it consistent, we give to the other side of the equation, those who are working on merchant terminals, for example, we give them an understanding or a base, if you will, on which they know that if they develop some of these Solana Pay technologies, for example, QR codes or NFCS in merchant terminals. They know that there's a base of devices that can take advantage of those.Steven (30:21):And so, so much of the Solana Pay is going to be building out this whole network of providers, software providers, both on the merchant side, as well as on mobile devices to make sure that users can pay with Solana Pay in the real world. Just like they're used to paying with say their credit cards using Google Pay. And quick note, Google pay will also be supported on the SAGA device. And so users should expect that their SAGA device will be their mechanism by which they can effectuate real world payments, whether it's through Solana Pay or through traditional payment networks.Brian (30:56):That's super exciting. So I think this is a great kind of overview we just did of SMS, the whole suite of developer tools that you guys are unveiling. You've hit on this a couple times though, though, there is a flagship phone that you guys are releasing, SAGA. This is separate from SMS, but it will be powered entirely by SMS, as well as traditional things you would expect from Android devices like Google Pay, which you mentioned.Brian (31:20):Let's talk a little bit more about SAGA. What is it like? I saw Anatoli up there on stage flashing it to the crowd. It looked pretty sleek. Would you say this is something that's purely for crypto natives, can ordinary people continue to use this for their favorite apps, say like TikTok or Instagram without noticing much of a difference. How would you characterize this phone broadly?Steven (31:40):We've designed the phone for crypto natives in mind, but it is a standard Android device in every other way. And so it's going to be a full GMS device, meaning it has Chrome. It has Gmail, it has the Google Play store. It has everything that users expect an Android device to do with the SMS stack added on top. And so there's a huge amount of value here that we're going to be able to give to the Sal Solana ecosystem to degens who live and breathe their Web 3.0 in crypto. But it's also going to be a flagship Android device. It's got 12 gigs of RAM five, 12 gigs of flash. It's got the latest and greatest Qualcomm snap drag and chip set, beautiful 6.67 inch O led display everything about this looks and feels like a flagship phone.Steven (32:31):We got that device in just before the event. And so he was able to hand it around a little bit, show some people, let them touch and feel it in person. And it's an impressive device. We have a great partner in Awesome in helping us build this device. And I am thrilled. I think that I don't know that there's any other hardware partner other than Awesome, who could have helped us realize this vision the way we've been able to realize it for the SAGA device. I've had the good fortune to have a prototype. I've been working on that for the last few months and I am thrilled for when people are able to get this device and hold it in their hands. It really does feel like a super, super premium, top end deviceBrian (33:13):Jealous. You're one of the lucky few that has the actual incarnation of this right now in their hand. What is the plan to expand SMS to additional devices though? We have SAGA, I saw, there's actually a huge backlog of pre-orders on this thing. But I'm sure a lot of people are kind of thinking themselves, well, I already have this Android phone, maybe a Google Pixel or Samsung device. Or maybe there're others who there's a lot of folks probably listening to this who are on iOS devices. What is that timeline like? Is this something you think could be running on iOS one day? How are you guys thinking about rolling this out kind of across broadly across the smartphone market?Steven (33:50):So we started our conversation on SMS talking about the collection of technologies. And that's, I think is really the point to hit on here, is that SMS isn't just one technology. It's a whole series of them. And each of them have slightly different applications and slightly different system needs in terms of integrating them. So all the way at one end of the spectrum, we have Seed Vault. For example, Seed Vault really needs the phone manufacturer to be directly involved in the systems integration process. It needs access to the secure element. It needs a trusted application that can run within the secure execution environment, arm trust zone, for example. And then it needs UI baked right into the system image, privileged UI that's able to make use of those lower layers that in the secure execution environments of the device.Steven (34:40):On the other end of the spectrum, we have technologies like mobile wallet, adapter and mobile wallet adapter actually doesn't have any hardware requirements at all. It's purely a protocol system between wallets and dApps for binding them together. And so mobile wallet adapter, the specification is currently in draft for that one. We're working with our wallet and DAP partners to finalize that, make sure we can take all of the ecosystem feedback so that when we do release it, it serves as broad a set of use cases as possible.Steven (35:10):But mobile wallet adapter will actually be available and ready to use before the SAGA launches. And so over time, what it means to be an SMS device really comes down to how many of these SMS technologies are integrated into that particular device. As I was saying, some of them do need deep integration. We would have to work directly with hardware manufacturers, the Seed Vault being the primary one of those. So it's a little bit hard to from a user standpoint, SMS has a certain branding associated with it, but from a technology standpoint, there's a whole spectrum of what an SMS device could look like.Steven (35:45):In terms of specific devices, I can't comment on that other than the fact that Awesome is an amazing partner. And we just view SAGA as the first step in many steps towards bringing all of SMS to mobile users. So that Web 3.0, really has a home with the Solana ecosystem on mobile devices. And then I just did also want to hit quickly on iOS. iOS is not as open a platform as Android is. And so some of these technologies, we just don't have the capability to independently build those into an iOS device.Steven (36:18):But we do also know how much consumers love iOS devices. And there's many people who we'd have to pry their fingers apart to get their iPhones out of their hands. And so technologies like mobile wallet adapter, we're designing them to make sure that they're not Android specific. There's things in there that we can do to make sure that becomes the fabric by which dApps and wallets communicate wherever they are, including on iOS devices. And so we're not forgetting about iOS and we want to make sure that as much of SMS as possible works on as many devices as possible, whether those are Android devices or iOS devices.Brian (36:53):Well, as speaking as somebody who's had a death grip on their iOS device for probably the last decade, I have to say, I am pre-ordering one. You guys have done a great job of convincing me. So I'm going team Android just for this. I'm super excited about it.Steven (37:07):That is great news. I want to hear your entire audience find me on Twitter and tell me the exact same thing. You'll make my week.Brian (37:13):That's great. So you hit a lot here about the plan for rolling SMS. Each of the four components broadly out across the smartphone market. You did a couple times though in our conversation hint at the idea that even though this is called SMS Solana mobile stack, really this could be applicable to a broad number of blockchains across the Web 3.0 ecosystem. How are you guys thinking about that problem? Are you guys going to be focused on Solana, is your core team focused on Solana for the time being, and you're inviting others in because it's open source? Is that the general framing of that? How are you guys thinking about unveiling this to Ethereum and potentially Bitcoin one day and more broadly across the Web 3.0 space?Steven (37:52):So we have a literal mountain of work to do to deliver the best Solana experience that we can on mobile devices. And so the Solana ecosystem remains firmly our goal right now. That said, I think I'll answer your question in two ways. This is an open phone and we would never try to prevent another chain for example, from being installed on this device. So while we are focusing on Solana, this is an Android device, everything that works on Android would work here. And we would never try to stop any of the other chains from participating on this device in all the normal ways.Steven (38:26):And then the other thing I would say there is, we're always interested to hear from the community. And so I think I mentioned it earlier in the podcast, but if you do have an interest, you can always go to Solanamobile.com, please while you're there place a pre-order, that would be awesome. But you can also register your interest in other things you would like to see on this device, whether those be features for the Solana chain or if you have interest in other chains, we'd love to hear about it.Brian (38:50):That's great. And one closing question, I think this is a good segue that we always ask to our guests, given your guys' focus on the Solana ecosystem, who is a builder that you admire in the Solana ecosystem?Steven (39:02):Oh, that's a good one. So there's someone that I've had an opportunity to work with TJ from Mountain Pay and he has been contributing to the Solana Pay side of the ecosystem. And as crazy as it seems some days when I wake up and say, oh, all we're doing is taking on the mobile phone industry by building SAGA. I think of what TJ is doing. He's just looked around and he looks at all the incumbents in the payment space and says, yeah, I think I want to go head on in this space.Steven (39:30):So he's a great guy. Every time I've had the opportunity to chat with him, I've always left thinking like, wow, I didn't even think about that. And he's like... So I really admire him that both for the work he's doing and as well as for the guts to take on the space that he's taking on.Brian (39:48):Yeah. I couldn't agree more. His energy is pretty electric. I don't know how he does it. He's around at all the hacker houses at Mountain Dow, he's in the crowd and then he's got his headphones on banging away on his laptop and still shipping code. But yeah, he's got a great infectious energy and I think there's no one better to be taking on the Stripes and the PayPals and the big payments giants of the world. He's someone I would want to have in my corner for sure.Brian (40:13):Well, Steven, this has been a really great conversation. Thank you for going deep on SMS. I'm super excited about it. I'm ready to pre-order my SAGA right now. Where can people go to learn more, both about SMS and yourself? You mentioned your Twitter. I want to make sure that people can find you and ping you with their stories of how you're prying their iOSs out of their hands right here.Steven (40:35):To find out more about the SAGA and about SMS hit up Solanamobile.com. We've got links in there to the Solana mobile Twitter, our discord community, discord.gg/solanamobile, as well as you can find a link to the mobile stack SDK, which is all in the open on GitHub. So I would say those are the best places to go to learn more about SMS and SAGA. Please join us in discord. We're a friendly community. I'm there. I hang out there. I answer questions there. Lots of people from my team as well. So looking forward to seeing all kinds of people from your audience, join our discord and help us build a really cool community around SMS and SAGA.Brian (41:16):I can't wait. Steven Laver. Thank you for your time. This has been great.Steven (41:20):Thank you, Brian. Thanks for having me.

Signal To Noise Podcast
160. Matt Meyer, FOH / TM / MON

Signal To Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 72:08


On episode 160, the hosts are joined by Matt Meyer. They discuss the topic of being "the only person an artist has", from being a FOH, TM, and more all at once for the artists. Matt talks about being an intention of the artist's brand and reputation, working well as a support act on shows, and more.Matt is a FOH, Monitor Engineer, TM, or a combination  for artists such as Emotional Oranges, Chiiild, Broken Social Scene, and more Episode link - Michael Lawrence joined the Talking Ears Podcast to talk about SPL, loudness, and the audio engineer's responsibility when it comes to exposure risk at live sound events. This episode is sponsored by Audix and Allen & Heath.Join our Discord Server and our Facebook Group, Follow us on InstagramPlease check out and support The Roadie Clinic, Their mission is simple. "We exist to empower & heal roadies and their families by providing resources & services tailored to the struggles of the touring lifestyle."The Signal To Noise podcast series on ProSoundWeb is hosted by Live Sound/PSW technical editor Michael Lawrence and pro audio veterans Kyle Chirnside, Chris Leonard, and Sam Boone

The Anfield Index Podcast
Media Matters: Hunter & Northcroft Talk Calvin Ramsay

The Anfield Index Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 54:40


Two of football journalism's heavy hitters join Gags Tandon to discuss Calvin Ramsay's transfer to Liverpool FC: Graham Hunter and Jonathan Northcroft!Jonathan and Graham are both Aberdeen fans so Gags gets their thoughts on the deal and what it means for Aberdeen.They quickly move onto the strengths and weaknesses of Ramsay, his performance in the SPL in the last year and when Liverpool's interest actually came to the fore.The trio also discuss how this could affect Trent's position in the long run and then move onto England's treatment of Trent too.Finally both awesome writers transition from the Trent chatter to have their say on the English National team and how they look ahead of a World Cup.All this and more on the Media Matters Podcast!Prefer to listen to our shows without the ads? We've got your back, just head on over to http://anfieldindexpro.com and supercharge your listening experience.Chat and debate 24/7 with other Reds, join our FREE Discord community at https://bit.ly/3geu605Follow us on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3u9gYShFind us on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3KWFxbdSubscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3KXImsjFREE iOS app: https://apple.co/3KSqdMGFREE Android app: https://bit.ly/32KMxqmSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/theanfieldindex. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Signal To Noise Podcast
Talking Ears Podcast - SPL and Concert Safety

Signal To Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 65:21


Michael Lawrence joined the Talking Ears Podcast to talk about SPL, loudness, and the audio engineer's responsibility when it comes to exposure risk at live sound events. Expressed through his work as a system engineer and senior instructor at Rational Acoustics, he brings humanity to the technical aspects and numbers when balancing a concert's perceived loudness and the safety of all involved.This episode features music by Audiologist and Talking Ears producer, Juan Vasquez and his band The Absolute Threshold.

Leaders With Babies
Ian Dinwiddy - Supporting Dads to Make Brave Decisions, Removing Barriers Around Shared Parental Leave & Why Gender Equality at Home Influences Work

Leaders With Babies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 41:23


'Dadvocate' Ian Dinwiddy is the founder of Inspiring Dads, a platform designed to help dads balance the complexities of modern life and fatherhood.Management Consultant Ian and his partner Lisa (a lawyer) have made what some might view as bold decisions regarding their parenting setup. When their daughter Freya was born they took the decision that Ian would step back from his career to look after her and he has gone on to become the main carer for their two children. We discuss:How dads can be brave and go beyond social expectationsHow to deal with the inevitable judgement from yourself and your peers when you challenge expectations Gender equality at home and work and how they influence each other What organisations can do support dads to take shared parental leave and how to remove barriers What men really talk about and why most men are more supportive of change than you might think Why when you connect men together to share stories and experiences it's incredibly powerful The one thing every dad can do to move closer to the work/home setup they'd really likeThe huge pressure faced by dads who are the main breadwinner but who also want to be present parentsThis was such a powerful and valuable conversation and we hope you enjoy it.You can find out more about the Inspiring Dads platform at www.inspiringdads.co.uk. Connect with Ian on LinkedIn and Twitter. Find out more about the work of Leaders Plus, including details of our award-winning Fellowship Programme and our latest events by signing up to receive our emails at leadersplus.org.uk/newsletter.If you'd like to submit a question to the Big Careers, Small Children podcast please record it here https://www.speakpipe.com/BigCareersSmallChildren

Talking Ears
Michael Lawrence - talking SPL and concert safety

Talking Ears

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 65:22


Michael Lawrence (co-host of the Signal To Noise Podcast), joins us to talk about SPL, loudness, and the audio engineer's responsibility when it comes to exposure risk at live sound events. Expressed through his work as a system engineer and senior instructor at Rational Acoustics, he brings humanity to the technical aspects and numbers when balancing a concert's perceived loudness and safety of all involved.    This episode features music by Audiologist and Talking Ears producer, Juan Vasquez and his band The Absolute Threshold.

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Strata Protocol & Metaplex Ep #68

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 37:27


Noah Prince (Co-Founder/ CEO, Strata Protocol) and Austin Adams (Lead Protocol Dev, Metaplex Studios) sit down with Austin Federa to discuss the integration of Strata's Dynamic Pricing Mint tool into the Metaplex Program Library.00:51 - What is Strata?02:12 - Challenges when launching a token04:43 - Why is Strata more successful than competitors?06:15 - Fundraise and the changing use cases of tokens on Solana08:47 - Changing mentalites around the function of tokens10:48 - How is Metaplex's approach different11:51 - Description of the flow using Strata13:25 - Mechanisms of dynamic pricing15:12 - Tools for dynamic pricing / Collusion19:06 - Metaplex and additional tooling21:54 - Optimizing Metaplex's architecture for the community25:05 - Advantages and drawbacks with metaplex's architecture29:44 - Metaplex and backward compatibility32:39 - Pitch for using dynamic pricing DISCLAIMERThe information on this podcast is provided for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only, without any express or implied warranty of any kind, including warranties of accuracy, completeness, or fitness for any particular purpose.The information contained in or provided from or through this podcast is not intended to be and does not constitute financial advice, investment advice, trading advice, or any other advice.The information on this podcast is general in nature and is not specific to you, the user or anyone else. You should not make any decision, financial, investment, trading or otherwise, based on any of the information presented on this podcast without undertaking independent due diligence and consultation with a professional broker or financial advisor. Austin Federa (00:10):Welcome to The Solana Podcast. I'm Austin Federa. Today we're talking about a new partnership between Metaplex, the NFT implementation on Solana, and Strata Protocol, a toolkit that helps developers launch tokens. They've built some new tools to help creators set dynamic pricing for NFT mints and these change the economic incentives around NFTs which will hopefully reduce the botting of NFT mints. We're joined by Noah Prince, the co-founder, and CEO of Strata Protocol, and Austin Adams, a software engineer and lead protocol developer at Metaplex. Gentlemen, welcome to the Solana Podcast.Noah Prince (00:42):Thanks, Austin.Austin Adams (00:42):Thanks for having us.Noah Prince (00:43):Glad to be here.Austin Federa (00:44):Great. So let's go ahead and start out today with just an overview of, Noah, what is Strata and what are you guys trying to do in the space?Noah Prince (00:52):So Strata Protocol at its core is a protocol for launching tokens and managing the liquidity around those tokens. So we have a variety of different auction mechanisms, and we can launch tokens anywhere from small tokens that you don't really know who the counterpart of the trade is, there's not going to be much volume, all the way up to large tokens where you want to do a large offering and then eventually put those on a DEX. How we ended up getting into this space is just that our auction mechanisms for tokens also offer a solution for the NFT botting situation. So we thought long and hard about how to keep bots from botting the token launches that we have. And if you launch one of those tokens and then put it as the entry price to a Candy Machine, you get a dynamic pricing Candy Machine.Austin Federa (01:39):So let's talk a little bit just to kind of roll back to what Strata really is trying to accomplish here. You mentioned it's a solution for launching tokens and providing initial liquidity for those tokens. What are the challenges that people run into when actually launching a token? I think if you look across the space, you'd see that there are hundreds of different tokens run by hundreds of different projects across the Solana ecosystem, the majority of which were not launched with something like a launchpad or basically a protocol to help them go through that process. What are the challenges that people are facing when they're actually looking at launching a token?Noah Prince (02:12):Yeah. So I think token launching kind of comes in a few steps, right? The very first step is the ideation phase, where you're trying to figure out what your token is, do you have multiple tokens? What are the tokenomics? And somewhat in that same phase is where legal comes in. And to a lot of degrees, that is the hardest spot is where you're going to figure out what your token does. But a lot of times for people launching a token, there's this kind of big okay, we know what we want to do, but how do we physically create that token? And then how do we go and do things like auction that token off? I want to sell some of that token to investors. I want to sell some of that token to all of my community, how do we actually distribute that thing?Noah Prince (02:54):And then after that, there's the step where you've distributed it, you've collected some money for the token that you can use to bootstrap the project. And then you also want it to be tradable on a DEX or on an AMM. And then you go and set that up. So Strata is really there to help with the creation part of the token and for really small tokens, we also manage the liquidity. So if you don't want to even care about what is an AMM, what is a DEX, who is the counterparty to a trade? We have a way you can launch a token and it's basically one click. The protocol just takes care of all of it for you.Austin Federa (03:30):Yeah. So if you think about maybe a year ago, when someone was trying to launch a token, there was lots of technical components in actually creating and launching that token, but you'd have to go and submit something to the Solana token registry. You'd have to then go ahead and set up a permissionless pool on something like Serum. You'd have to go ahead and try and get it verified to get it actually listed there so it would show up in the list. Someone didn't have to add it as a custom market and all these things are functionally automated through you guys at this point, correct?Noah Prince (03:56):Yep. So for the most part, those things are automated. You still need to go and set it up on a AMM after you bootstrap the liquidity, but yeah, we're basically making it permissionless to go and do this. So the idea was to make it as easy to launch a token on Solana as it is right now to launch an NFT which Metaplex has kind of done a great job of.Austin Federa (04:16):And so there's been a lot of organizations that have tried to create launchpads or create basically systems of easier onboarding on the Solana blockchain. And a number of them haven't really gone anywhere, or they've been sort of overrun with, I would say very low-quality projects that are just trying to find a quick way to launch a token. What's the reason you think that Strata has had a bit more success here and not fallen into some of those traps?Noah Prince (04:43):Well, I think the first big trap there is talking about projects that are obviously disingenuous, they're trying to cash grab. They're not actually a real project. And when you talk about creating something permissionless, you want to get away from that, right? The barrier to entry should be low so that anybody can do it because tech is tech, but we don't want to be the ones that are creating the list of all the different tokens that we think that people should buy, right?Noah Prince (05:12):Equally, Metaplex isn't doing that. Metaplex doesn't go out and tell you which projects to buy. There are plenty of Launchpads that have their own lists that'll tell you who they think you should buy, and there are plenty of Twitter influencers who will tell you that as well. So that's one way that we're doing it. And then the other way that we're doing it is trying to make it easier for these projects that are smaller and maybe don't have all the idea of how to do everything that's complicated with launching a token, they just want a simple token. Things like social tokens are like little community chat projects, making it easier for those.Austin Federa (05:47):Some of the interesting things you guys have done in addition to the ability to create a new token or sell an existing token bootstrap liquidity is this idea of a fundraise and the dynamic pricing of NFT mints. On the fundraising side, what did you see in the changing ways people wanted to use tokens or the changing use cases of tokens on Solana that really led to the idea of a fundraise being something that a launchpad protocol should build tooling for.Noah Prince (06:14):Yeah. Fundraise was inspired deeply by ConstitutionDAO, which if you didn't see it, was this thing where a bunch of people on Eth just banned together, they said they were going to buy a copy of the Constitution of the United States of America. There was an open bidding that happened. I think they raised like $30 or $40 million and ended up getting outbid, but it was still this example of a community coming together and bootstrapping a ton of liquidity to do something cool. And the idea was that there will be shared ownership of the Constitution, or at least this copy of it after the bidding was done.Noah Prince (06:49):And so how you do that mechanically is just, you're collecting money into a pool that somebody then uses for the bid. And then as you're collecting money, people are getting a token that represents their share of that pool. And so even after you've used the money, they still have the token. And so with the ConstitutionDAO you had the people token. And that's just one of many ways to launch a token and why a launchpad is formatted like a wizard because we want it to be like a no-code tool where it asks you the questions that you need to answer to get towards launching your own token.Austin Federa (07:20):It's super interesting to think about the implications for some of the stuff for the intersection of real-world assets like something like a constitution and then the intersection of the ability to have full liquidity through something like a token mechanism for this. So I think that's a very interesting use case for it. And one of the great things I think about ConstitutionDAO when we saw that all happen is it's still going, right? There's still a community there. It's still passionate about this thing that they failed to create, but now is turned into something else which is in a large part, a lot of the story of NFTs on Solana as well, is that they start with one mission and suddenly something changes and Trash Pandas are now fighting plastic in the oceans, and all these other projects are building real community service kind of components into them.Austin Federa (08:05):When you're looking at the idea of a no-code solution here, what was the reasoning for something like that for more complex protocols? I guess the thing that I'm trying to tease out here is there's an assumption from a lot of folks that if someone's not sophisticated enough to figure out how to launch a token, they're probably not sophisticated enough to launch a project on a blockchain. That's obviously not necessarily the case, but that is part of why you've seen launchpads in general, or less code solutions be something that tends to have a lower quality project coming out of it in general. How do you respond to some of that criticism or look at the different ways that we just need to change our mentality around what a token's meant to be used for?Noah Prince (08:47):Yeah, I think there is that tendency, but as a dev, it's all about tools, right? For me, it's how can I get something done with the least effort possible that meets all the requirements. And so when you give tools to devs so that they can launch a token really easily, the devs can spend time focusing on the things that matter and not the things that don't. So part of it is that but also you need this primitive and you need this primitive to be easy because we're in the infancy of tokens right now, right? There's just one token. We're starting to see more complex systems like STEPN pop up where you have systems of tokens where that's just two tokens, all the way up to things like WOMBO, and BitClout, and Rally, where you have hundreds and hundreds of social tokens. And these things all start to interconnect together, and you can start to do really cool things when you can create systems of tokens. And that's something that you couldn't do in the past without this kind of primitive.Austin Federa (09:43):Yeah, it's fascinating. So, Austin, let's talk a little bit about the interface here with Metaplex NFT initial mints. So one of the things that we've observed over the last few months is that the increasing demand for NFT is on Solana. And also I would say real success of projects in building a strong community pre-launch has created situations where there is both a high incentive to bot the launch of an NFT, but also there's just extremely high demand for these things when they're coming up for initial mint. Some of that's driven by expectations that they might be able to flip them, but a lot of this is just organic community demand for a project that they feel very excited and interested in.Austin Federa (10:22):There's been a few attempts to create systems that would either increase the fairness or would try and reduce the incentives for botting. One of these was the Fair Launch Protocol which was created as sort of an extension of the Candy Machine toolkit, but Fair Launch Protocol never really caught on from a community standpoint. So what is sort of different in the approach here that you think is going to be successful in creating better incentives and dynamics?Austin Adams (10:48):I think the reason that this will be more successful is we will market it a lot harder than we marketed Fair Launch, but also the mechanics of Fair Launch weren't really, and they could have been changed they weren't really a great experience having to wait and then not knowing if you were going to get things. The NFT minter, once that sort of casino-style experience, they pull the lever, they get the thing they know right away, they're having fun, it's addicting. With the dynamic price mint coming in we get that addicting and fun feeling while still getting some technical protection against bots and making it a little bit more advantageous for creators. If they've created demand, they're getting rewarded for that demand.Austin Federa (11:38):Yeah. That's super interesting. So let's walk through, I guess, from both of you, what is the flow that both a creator and a user goes through if the project that they're trying to mint is using this new dynamic pricing powered with Strata?Noah Prince (11:52):Yeah. So the flow right now is a little bit broken up and that's kind of the point of this partnership, but right now you launch a normal Candy Machine through Metaplex, you grab the ID of that Candy Machine, and then Strata has a UI where you can plug in that ID and it converts it to a dynamic pricing Candy Machine. Now from a user standpoint, this looks pretty much exactly like the usual mint interface that you're looking, they're used to, right?Noah Prince (12:18):You just click a mint button, but the price is changing. So the price is just slowly ticking down and occasionally it bumps up when somebody purchases something and you can also switch tabs and you can go look at a price history plot. But as a user, you're trying to figure out at what point do you want to enter, right? At what price do you want to pay? And bots are playing the same game which is an unsolvable game. When do you enter a live market is a question that nobody knows the answer to. So it feels very much like a normal mint it's just that the price is moving and it's a game of who flinches first.Austin Adams (12:53):That's the current experience but as I'm sure you'll get to, we hope to create a deeper integration together that can utilize Strata's tech and Metaplex's tech for the entire experience without needing to go from one place to the other but using our new UIs and CLI tools, they can create a dynamic price Candy Machine that also gives us even more bot protections than we had before without having to go from one website to another.Austin Federa (13:25):So what is the dynamic pricing set based on? What are the mechanics that go into actually setting what that amount should be and how much volatility do you expect to see throughout the course of a typical 10,000 mint that might sell out in the course of several minutes?Noah Prince (13:43):Yeah. So generally, you want to establish what is basically the order of magnitude of the price. So something that's going to be in the 0.01 SOL range versus something that's going to be in the 10 SOL range, they're pretty different and it would be hard for any system to account for that. So generally what you're doing is you're setting kind of a range that you expect. So in the case of Divine Dogs, they were one of the very first ones that we did this with, they were minting an NFT that they thought would probably sell for two SOL. Now they're associated with the gods. And so 3.33 is a magic number for them. And so they actually set the starting price at 3.33 SOL and the minimum price at 1.1 SOL.Noah Prince (14:24):And so the idea was the minimum that they were willing to take as a project to get the funding to do what they needed to do was 1.1 SOL and they thought that people would pay up to 3.3 but probably not much more. And so what happened with that was I think the average price ended up being 2.32. But generally, you want the prices start slightly higher than what you think people will enter at so that bots don't have an advantage to spamming, they're just waiting for it to fall down and then it'll hit some fair price and it just oscillates around the fair price.Austin Federa (14:57):You mentioned a few things there where it sounds like projects have to do a bit of estimation around what they expect to see. What are the either software or just like human tools that someone should be looking at when they're trying to figure out where do they start with dynamic pricing?Noah Prince (15:13):Yeah. I mean, I think to a lot of degrees this is similar to right now people are just deciding a fixed price for their mint which is even more dangerous. You have no idea if it's going to sell out for that fixed-price or not. If you're a really hyped project, it probably will as long as you set it less than 10 SOL. But there's also a stigma, right? SolBears came out and set it to 10 SOL and people got pretty mad about it. So I think for most projects, this range of I mean, it depends what SOL's current prices, but right? This range of 1 to 5 SOL is generally reasonable. If you get really far off on the price, it can go above the starting price but we haven't seen that happen in practice. Usually, projects have a pretty good idea of what they're going to sell for or at least like a ballpark. They don't know exactly but they know a range.Austin Federa (16:05):Yeah, just because this was one of the first prominent uses of the Fair Launch Protocol where the community of degenerate Trash Panda Minters banded together and actually crashed the price. They all basically colluded against the project owners to mint at 0.1 SOL when the pre-mint tokens had been trading at 3 or 4 SOL on the exchanges and obviously, the price has gone up from there, but it's a very interesting dynamic when you give the community the tools to set their own pricing, you do open yourself up to a certain amount of collusion which I think is fascinating. No one would've thought that in a free market open system you'd be able to get a bunch of degens who are trying to optimize for the most value they can create to all band together and try and basically drive down the mint price of an NFT.Noah Prince (16:52):They also got to change their vote in the second half which made it a little less risky to bid small.Austin Federa (16:57):Yes. That's true. So that sort of one-tiered system is part of the dynamics here that you think make it more robust to get something like that.Noah Prince (17:06):Oh yeah. I mean, so we've done a couple of mints with it now and every single time in the Discords I actually hope that someone proves me wrong because it would be kind of interesting from a psychology perspective. But usually, there's a band of people in the Discord that are like, "Nobody buy. Nobody buy. We're going to let the price fall really low, like the bid small." But because it's so real-time, what ends up happening is it hits a number that's really, really good and it's just like a prisoner's dilemma. A few people defect and then everybody sees that a few people defect and all of a sudden the faction that was trying to hold back and not buy everyone starts buying and the price starts ripping because it's the lowest price that they're going to see.Austin Federa (17:47):Yep. Totally. It's really interesting the way those dynamics play out.Noah Prince (17:51):Yeah. Honestly, if your project gets hit by this and the people actually manage to do a prisoner's dilemma experiment where nobody defects, you have an amazing community, I don't even know that you need the money. Your community is incredible.Austin Federa (18:04):Yeah. It's worth noting that for the more successful projects out there, they have made many multiples of the initial mint revenue on secondary sale royalties. So it's kind of this interesting dynamic where you really want to bring the strongest community possible into an NFT project but the same time you need to fund appropriately for whatever your medium-term goals are to make sure you can actually deliver on any roadmap you've sort of laid out as a project which is really interesting. So when we're looking at some of the underlying architecture here and how it interfaces with Metaplex, I know there's a whole bunch of work on Metaplex that's been rebuilding a lot of the way that some of these contracts work. There's a whole expansion of what's possible on Metaplex coming soon. Austin, how are you thinking about additional tooling like Strata and other types of partnerships that will make it easier for a lot of this work that's being done to actually be deployed and usable? So the difference between reference implementation engineering and actually production engineering.Austin Adams (19:06):I think on a case-by-case basis, we always look at where we can stay generic and composable meaning one contract calls into the Metaplex contracts and the Metaplex contracts stay as this secure core that we audit very frequently and we're taking care of all that nonsense for the community. But in other cases, we identify a piece of technology that's really good and the composable way of doing it doesn't give us the guarantees necessarily that we want. And so we look at a deeper level of integration. The recent gains in shipping velocity that Metaplex is getting are coming more from CICD and looking at ways to improve our software stability so we are not scared to ship.Austin Adams (20:00):And I think that's what Metaplex is moving into as we're stabilizing and as we're trying to remain the base infrastructure for NFTs as well as move into some exciting new landscapes. So with this specifically, we do have some big changes coming to canning machines soon. We have some big changes coming to optional changes for everyone coming soon, but this one here falls right in line with our anti-botting work. And so we're heavily invested in making this as deep of a integration as it needs to be and shipping it as soon as possible, as well as shipping it not just in the contract level, but shipping it in our UIs and CLIs that are coming out or are out.Austin Federa (20:44):Yeah. Interesting. So I'd actually love to dig in a little bit more on how you're thinking about multiple layers of contracts or interoperable contracts that all can, I guess, give optionality in terms of how someone wants to deploy something. What are those different components and how are you thinking about... So classically, every time you have a contract talk to another contract, you've created an attack vector. This is most of the hacks that you see across DeFi and on Solana and on other places in Solana are non-validated fields. There's some ability for someone to inject something into the contract at a point that someone thought wasn't injectable that ends up creating an outcome that's not desirable for the users of that protocol or that contract.Austin Federa (21:28):That's like a very standard attack vector. So not to go too far into the security of this because of course that's maybe a separate conversation, but when you're thinking about that sort of multiple contract architecture, talking back to one central contract, what are the types of things you are thinking about or the Metaplex protocol is really thinking about from an architecture standpoint to make that secure, stable, but also upgradeable and able to respond to the needs of the community quickly?Austin Adams (21:53):Yeah, that's a great question. So I do believe it does depend on what the contract does in a large part, but generically, when we think about Web 2.0 land, when we've all created public APIs that take in user input, we can think about those as if they're analogous to we're allowing someone to direct their digital plumbing pipe at our digital plumbing pipe to use the euphemism or the saying that we're just all digital plumbers. I think I like that. One of the ways that we approach this is just being extremely careful on validating the input and being very restrictive with what specific instructions and what specific things a transaction can do when calling into our contracts.Austin Adams (22:47):So for example, with Candy Machine, although it is not as composable as other programs may be, we restrict the specific programs that can call out to Candy Machine and we restrict what they can do. We look at the instruction data using the instructions this far. For those who are non-technical that just means we can inside of the instruction or inside of the program, we can look at the instructions that are coming in and we can validate the input that's coming in. But for other programs such as AuctionHouse, we actually have purpose-built it to be composed over. And the way that we handle that is by bringing all the things that we want to make sure always stay secure into the contract.Austin Adams (23:33):So the token account creation, the mint creation, for example, the transfers, all of those are in the core AuctionHouse transaction protocol, but we've created this other system of composability called Auctioneer where people can put their additional logic such as token gating, timed auctions, even dynamic priced auctions via Strata can be done at that layer. So like I've said in summary, it does depend on the contract for Candy Machine because it's such a target for bots. We are very restrictive but we hope to find additional ways to loosen those things to allow more contracts to compose over it while still getting more bot, anti-botting guarantees.Austin Federa (24:20):It's kind of an interesting question here. When you think about on most layer ones or layer twos, the implementation of an NFT is something that's sort of done, I guess you called it the L1 or L2 level at the protocol level, as opposed to at the application level. Metaplex is a little bit different in its architecture, right? The tokens that are built are fundamentally still SPL-compatible tokens. And they're built more like an application level. And by application, I mean, it's not hard coded into the base Solana code. It's actually running on top of it which is a little bit different of an architecture than you see on something like Ethereum. What are the both advantages and challenges that both of you have run into because of that difference in architecture?Noah Prince (25:05):Yeah. So I did a deep dive at one point on composability on Solana versus Eth. Fundamentally, the NFTs on Eth and even the tokens that are on Eth are just following an interface. So it looks a lot like interfaced extension. I'm going to get real deep in engineering if I don't be careful here.Austin Federa (25:23):No, no, no, let's do it. This is the back half of the podcast.Noah Prince (25:26):Cool. Okay. Yeah. So it looks a lot like interfaced extension and classical object-oriented programming. So you think Java is the big example of object-oriented programming. Now Solana actually ends up looking a lot more like functional programming where you've got these contract endpoints that are effectively functions that operate over some state and then output a state. And then the next function can take that state and do something with it. Now, a lot of people will tell you when they're learning functional programming coming from object-oriented programming, it's scarier at first. It's like chewing glass. It's a little bit more complicated, but there's a lot more that you can do with it. And so like my example of composability actually is the current state of the integration with Metaplex where you talk about how there are different security vulnerabilities with checks, but a token is the absolute interface between us and Metaplex and that's the only interface.Noah Prince (26:26):The single check is whether or not you have the token that allows you to mint this Candy Machine and we just output that token. So we are a function that takes in some SOL and outputs a token. They are a function that takes in a token and outputs an NFT. And actually, they don't have to know about each other at all. It's only the user interface that knows about it. So this is how we generally deal with composability on Solana and why I like this model a little bit better, but I am a little bit of a functional programming maxi, so …Austin Federa (26:57):Austin, what about you?Austin Adams (26:59):Yes. I believe that the Metaplex model for NFTs is actually quite brilliant. And I'll talk about the pros first and maybe the cons second. I believe one of the reasons for our enormous growth is because our contracts are like APIs. You don't need to deploy your own contract. You don't need to manage that. You don't need to have everything that can be known about your implementation done ahead of time and then deploy an immutable contract. You can iterate and fail and try again and do new things on top of our programs without having to, one, manage the security of the program. Two, without having to really be an expert. And I know that you don't have to be an expert to launch an Ethereum NFT series because there's some great tools. But I think that's one of the reasons people choose Solana. Devs choose Solana, creators choose Solana to run their NFT projects is because the Metaplex contracts were brilliantly designed as APIs whereas they could have been designed in an interface model.Austin Adams (28:07):Now the cons of that are the Metaplex development team now needs to look at backward compatibility every single day. Any change that we make we have to micromanage that aspect all the time because we don't want to break anybody's use of the system. And through our DAO we need to ensure that what we're doing is reflective of what the community wants. So another con would be that some people see it as less decentralized, but in reality, because it's a community project, it doesn't seem so decentralized when you can build right on top of it and do whatever you need to because we try to keep the protocol light and do less things. I see that we can move into both areas. We can produce an interface-like system while getting these contracts as API feel. And I think that's some of the backbone of some things that you'll see coming out of Metaplex soon.Austin Federa (29:07):So when you think about something like backwards compatibility, what does Metaplex see as its sort of role and responsibility there, right? So famously for a number of years, Android had like seven different versions of the Android API that Google had to support because folks just would not update their apps. And Windows still has backwards compatibility with stuff that was probably about when most of us were born. What are you guys thinking about when you look at that sort of backwards compatibility and how long or what kind of functionality needs to persist for X amount of time?Austin Adams (29:44):So what we try to do is never break you unless it's security-related. If it's security-related, we fix it as soon as we can and we announce as quickly and as widely as we can. That hasn't happened very often and currently, we think that... We kind of take the semantic versioning approach where we will give you a long amount of time. Now we don't have a rigorous set amount of time yet. We're very new as a project if you think about it, but we will always provide you a new instruction and deprecate the old instruction and it works perfectly fine for a long time. And it's very rare. In fact, it's only happened once where we will remove old instructions. Part of that is looking at our contracts as APIs. And when you look at microservice patterns because that's how we think about them kind of is our contracts are microservices.Austin Adams (30:43):Look at the traffic of your instruction. If you're seeing it the traffic go down, people have moved to the other one, you're in safe territory to start announcing that, "Hey, we're going to start moving on from this specific instruction." But if you see it holding steady, that's a good signal from your community that that thing still needs to live or you need to educate and do more work. And that's how we'd like to see it. I think in the future, we'll see probably more rigorous guidelines around how long we're going to keep things out. But right now it's we'd be nothing without the people using it. So they're our top priority when we're shipping new things, we don't want to break anyone.Noah Prince (31:22):Yeah. I think at least how we've been approaching it with Strata is that I am very, very bearish on the idea that I'm never going to have to change anything. And so actually every one of our smart contract endpoints, every one of our arguments, every one of our piece of state has a V0 next to it. Some of them actually have a V1 already. And then in SDK land, so like in JavaScript, we wrap these calls with things that don't include V0 and we wrap them in interfaces such that if we ever have to change anything, we just bump it to V1 at the protocol level, change the interfaces, leave the V0 endpoints around for a while and then like Austin said, watch the traffic and then slowly deprecate them. But yeah, I mean, I think you kind of have to accept that these things are living, breathing things and like most APIs, you just have to version them. Now, a lot of people who don't have V0 next to their things, don't worry, you can put V1 next to anything.Austin Adams (32:19):It's okay.Noah Prince (32:19):And V0 is just the lack of a tag. It's okay.Austin Federa (32:22):So all of this depends of course, on creators and people launching NFT projects actually adopting and using the dynamic pricing tools. What's your pitch for why someone who's launching an NFT project should do it this way as opposed to doing it the way that's currently done.Noah Prince (32:37):Yeah. So one of the big things, I mean, even if you watch Frank, he is talking all the time about how he wants people who are long-term his project. He doesn't want paper hands. He doesn't want flippers, right? So right off the gate, you've got to acknowledge that having people that are just buying the project to flip it immediately aren't really good for your project long term anyway. I mean, if you were going to overprice your fixed price mint, you just weren't going to sell out. And so this will help you sell out which is ideally what you want, right?Noah Prince (33:09):Because you're picking the quantity of the mint so that you have a certain size of community. Now, if you had underpriced your fixed price meant, this actually means that you're going to get more funding to do what you want to do, right? And that's what matters is that you can actually execute on your roadmap. Now it's not like that price discovery isn't happening, right? It is still happening. If you price your mint at 2 SOL and the NFT is actually worth 10 SOL, it just drives up to 10 SOL on the secondary. But you know who makes that money? People who are flipping it and don't care about the project. So I would rather have that money go to the team than people who are flipping it any day of the week.Austin Federa (33:49):I'd love to hear from the Metaplex side what the pitch is to use it that isn't just it doesn't break the network.Austin Adams (33:55):Then I get nothing.Austin Federa (33:56):Because this is the thing is like one of the things about crypto is we have to assume everyone is a evil self-interested actor at all times who cares primarily about what they're trying to accomplish from a financial standpoint and isn't a altruistic actor trying to make the world's best-decentralized computing environment possible or else all of the assumptions of how blockchain works start to break down. So I think that's one of those questions that if either of you have something addressing that sort of side of things and-Austin Adams (34:25):Yeah, totally. I'll go with Metaplex's side of why I use dynamic price mint. So from the Metaplex side, we realize that Candy Machine has been botted so badly and we want to increase fairness for the collectors, creators, and the community. Just like Noah said earlier, we want to incentivize long-term holders, people to be a part of the project because NFTs are showing us they're more about community than they are really like a financial mechanism. They are a financial mechanism, but they've exposed this incredible new, psychological phenomenon.Austin Adams (35:01):For collectors, we've seen click farms, and bots, and extensions, not even if it hurts the network, but just hurting the experience. So one way that dynamic price mint helps is by making these click farms and botters, I mean, have to think twice, have to actually do some calculation, and have to do it in a fast and real-time manner. So this helps them be able to take part in the project even if they didn't get into the discords or other things like that at the right time, it's also going to help us move past this whole allow list trend in the community where you have to do all these specific things to get a spot and then you get a spot and you get a chance to mint, but then you don't actually get to mint. And so, hopefully, this makes the work that's required just being a part of the community and having the desire and the funds to mint.Noah Prince (36:01):Well said.Austin Federa (36:01):Awesome. Well, I think that does it for today. Thank you both for joining us to talk about this new launch of a Stratus support for dynamic pricing on Metaplex and creating new tools for creators to be able to actually implement this. If folks want to read more about it or want to consider using this for their next drop, where should they go to find more information?Noah Prince (36:22):Yeah. So for now it's actually, if you go to app.strataprotocol.com and you have a Candy Machine ID, you can launch one directly right there. We also have on docs.strataprotocol.com. We have extensive documentation on how to set up one of these dynamic pricing mints and a YouTube video on how to do one and even do one with a white list. In the future, we hope that this is directly on Metaplex's documentation and kind of more built as a first-class citizen into the Candy Machine and Metaplex's new UIs such that you don't need to be bouncing around from Strata to Metaplex. It's just there for you.Austin Adams (36:59):Yeah. 100% stay tuned on the Metaplex Docs and on our blog, Twitter, radio station. Oh wait, we don't have a radio station.Noah Prince (37:08):Yet.Austin Adams (37:09):Yet.Austin Federa (37:09):Great. Well, thank you both for joining us today.Austin Adams (37:13):Thank you, Austin.Noah Prince (37:14):Thanks for having us.

Preediction
The Backliners: SPL Phase 2 + 9R6 Patch Notes

Preediction

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 66:35


Smite designer, Aggro, and Olympus Bolts backliner, BaRRaCCuDDa, discuss SPL phase 2 play and 9R6 patch notes. To support the show and save a bunch on your cell bill, check out https://mintmobile.com/backliners. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Host Lucie Výborné
Dejdar: V rámci korektnosti si dneska nejde dělat legraci z ničeho. Humor se ze světa vytrácí

Host Lucie Výborné

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 30:00


Ve vršovickém Divadle Mana můžete Martina Dejdara vidět v detektivce Mléčné sklo. To je žánr na divadle velmi neobvyklý. „Splňuje to všechny atributy, které mám rád u divadla a u filmu, že divák je každých deset minut překvapený. Rozhodně nečekejte happy end,“ láká. V novém muzikálu Jana Svěráka a Tomáše Kluse Branický zázrak si zase vychutnává bezdomovce. „Takovou vstřícnost na zkouškách jsem za posledních 30 let nezažil,“ chválí spoluautory představení.Všechny díly podcastu Host Lucie Výborné můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

Footy Prime The Podcast
Eintracht Frankfurt beat Rangers in penalty shootout to win Europa League & Blackpool's Jake Daniels comes out

Footy Prime The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 64:44


One step closer to their double-century episode, James Sharman, Craig Forrest, Brendan Dunlop and Jimmy Brennan react to Eintracht Frankfurt's Europa League title winning penalty shootout in Seville, as Rangers FC suffer European final heartbreak for the fourth time. But with 100k Rangers fans in Seville for the UEL Final, they certainly made their presence felt. This week's news that 17-year-old Blackpool FC forward Jake Daniels is the first active male professional soccer player in Britain to come out as openly gay in three decades has the crew talking about inclusivity in today's game, and acceptance in the locker rooms. Jimmy is over the moon that Riche Laryea's Nottingham Forest will play in the Premier League promotion playoff final at Wembley after beating Sheffield United on penalties. And producer Dan Wong reads your feedback from our favourite new segment "Wonger's Mail Sack".   This podcast has content that may use words and share tales that offend, please feel free to use your best discretion.  Parental discretion is advised. Be advised this episode includes explicit language.

The J-Talk Podcast
Episode 415 - Ange's Triumph, J1 Matchday 13

The J-Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 96:58


It was yet another terrific weekend of J1 action, but there was no where else we could start this episode than in Glasgow, where Ange Postecoglou's Celtic side clinched the SPL title last midweek, and lifted the trophy in front of the Parkhead faithful on the weekend, and Jamie McCourt (who was there to bask in the glory) and Stuart Woodward guest in Part 1 to talk about the remarkable turnaround the former F.Marinos boss has performed at the club, and the impact their four Japanese players have made. We also chat about Yokohama's performances in the ACL group stage, their emphatic weekend win over Shonan, and their embarrassment of attacking riches that makes them strong title contenders in 2022 (to 49:00). Then in Part 2 we run through the other games from J1 Matchday 13, including convincing wins at the top for Kashima and Kawasaki, Kobe breaking their duck in some style at long last, and Maxi's Moan at FC Tokyo (becoming a recurring segment, we know...).