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Best podcasts about Pivotal

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Latest podcast episodes about Pivotal

The Producer's Perspective Podcast with Ken Davenport
252 - Places, Please Series: Part 2 with T. Oliver Reid and Bret Shuford

The Producer's Perspective Podcast with Ken Davenport

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:26


One of the most fun and most productive events we had this year was our “Take Charge of Your '21” Challenge in January. Over 500 TheaterMakers joined us to hear tips and strategies on how to have your best year yet from super successful people in the business. We learned how to crush writer's block, how to squeeze a few more hours into each day for your REAL work (not that day job work), how to increase your confidence . . . and more. We got such great feedback on this free event that we decided to do it again! But better. 

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
GHS - Chaim Bloom on a tough loss in game 4 and a pivotal game 5 tonight 10-20-2021

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 21:24


Red Sox CBO Chaim Bloom joined the show to discuss the Sox rough night and his thoughts on the Astros series.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
GHS - Rob Bradford discussed the Sox pivotal game 5 at Fenway; The News with Courtney 10-20-2021

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:09


Hour 2: Bradfo joined the show and was full of life and Laz Diaz.  Courtney once again handled the news.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Grand Tamasha
Joanna Slater on the Pivotal Stories She Covered in India for the Washington Post

Grand Tamasha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:39


Joanna Slater is a veteran journalist who served as the Washington Post India bureau chief based in New Delhi from 2018-2021. She was posted there during one of the most consequential periods in recent Indian history—covering the 2019 general elections, the abrogation of Article 370 in Kashmir, the COVID-19 pandemic, the Pegasus hacking revelations, and much more. This week on the show, Joanna joins Milan to talk about her tenure in New Delhi and what she learned on the job.The two discuss Joanna's long history with India, the constraints journalists face while carrying out their jobs, and what it was like to cover some of the biggest stories in recent years from the ground. Plus, the two discuss how Joanna met her future husband on the set of a Bollywood hit movie starring Aamir Khan and the India story that Joanna still dreams about.“Niha Masih on Reporting on India's COVID-19 Crisis,” Grand Tamasha, June 15, 2021.Joanna Slater and Niha Masih, “The spyware is sold to governments to fight terrorism. In India, it was used to hack journalists and others,” Washington Post, July 19, 2021.Joanna Slater and Shams Irfan, “Inside a Delhi hospital, oxygen runs fatally short as covid cases mount,” Washington Post, April 24, 2021.Niha Masih and Joanna Slater, “They were accused of plotting to overthrow the Modi government. The evidence was planted, a new report says,” Washington Post, February 10, 2021.Joanna Slater, “A young Indian couple married for love. Then the bride's father hired assassins,” Washington Post, August 19, 2019.Joanna Slater, “In Modi's move on Kashmir, a road map for his ‘new India,'” Washington Post, August 15, 2019.Joanna Slater, “In the world's biggest election, India's Narendra Modi pushes fear over hope,” Washington Post, April 11, 2019.

Screaming in the Cloud
Works Well with Others with Abby Kearns

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:53


About AbbyWith over twenty years in the tech world, Abby Kearns is a true veteran of the technology industry. Her lengthy career has spanned product marketing, product management and consulting across Fortune 500 companies and startups alike. At Puppet, she leads the vision and direction of the current and future enterprise product portfolio. Prior to joining Puppet, Abby was the CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation where she focused on driving the vision for the Foundation as well as  growing the open source project and ecosystem. Her background also includes product management at companies such as Pivotal and Verizon, as well as infrastructure operations spanning companies such as Totality, EDS, and Sabre.Links: Cloud Foundry Foundation: https://www.cloudfoundry.org Puppet: https://puppet.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/ab415 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Once upon a time, I was deep into the weeds of configuration management, which explains a lot, such as why it seems I don't know happiness in any meaningful sense. Then I wound up progressing into other areas of exploration, like the cloud, and now we know for a fact why happiness isn't a thing for me. My guest today is the former CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation and today is the CTO over at a company called Puppet, which we've talked about here from time to time. Abby Kearns, thank you for joining me. I appreciate your taking the time out of your day to suffer my slings and arrows.Abby: Thank you for having me. I have been looking forward to this for weeks.Corey: My stars, it seems like things are slow over there, and I kind of envy you for that. So, help me understand something; you went from this world of cloud-native everything, which is the joy of working with Cloud Foundry, to now working with configuration management. How is that not effectively Benjamin Button-ing your career. It feels like the opposite direction that most quote-unquote, “Digital transformations” like to play with. But I have a sneaking suspicion, there's more to it than I might guess from just looking at the label on the tin.Abby: Beyond I just love enterprise infrastructure? I mean, come on, who doesn't?Corey: Oh, yeah. Everyone loves to talk about digital transformation, reading about books like a Head in the Cloud to my children used to be a fun nightly activity before it was formally classified as child abuse. So yeah, I hear you, but it turns out the rest of the world doesn't necessarily agree with us.Abby: I do not understand it. I have been in enterprise infrastructure my entire career, which has been a really, really long time, back when Unix and Sun machines were still a thing. And I'll be a little biased here; I think that enterprise infrastructure is actually the most fascinating part of technology right now. And why is that? Well, we're in the process of actively rewritten everything that got us here.And we talk about infrastructure and everyone's like, “Yeah, sure, whatever,” but at the end of the day, it's the foundation that everything that you think is cool about technology is built on. And for those of us that really enjoy this space, having a front-row seat at that evolution and the innovation that's happening is really, really exciting and it creates a lot of interesting conversation, debate, evolution of technologies, and innovation. And are they all going to be on the money five, ten years from now? Maybe not, but they're creating an interesting space and discussion and just the work ahead for all of us across the board. And I'm kind of bucketing this pretty broadly, intentionally so because I think at the end of the day, all of us play a role in a bigger piece of pie, and it's so interesting to see how these things start to fit together.Corey: One of the things that I've noticed is that the things that get attention on the keynote stage of, “This is this far future, serverless, machine-learning Kubernetes, dingus nonsense,” great is—Abby: You forgot blockchain. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah blockchain as well. Like, what other things can we wind up putting into the buzzword thing to wind up guaranteeing that your seed round is at least $200 million? Great. There's that.But when you look at the actual AWS bill—my specialty, of course—and seeing where the money is actually going, it doesn't really look that different, as far as percentages go—even though the numbers are higher—than it did ten years ago, at least in the enterprise world. You're still buying a bunch of EC2 instances, you're still potentially modernizing to some of the managed services like RDS—which is Amazon's reimagining of what a database could be if you still had to manage the finicky bits, but had no control over when and how they worked—and of course, data transfer and disk. These are the basic building blocks of everything in cloud. And despite how much we talk about the super neat stuff, what we're doing is not reflected on the conference stage. So, I tend to view the idea of aspirational architecture as its own little world.There are still seasoned companies out there that are migrating from where they are today into this idea of, well, virtualization, we've just finally got our heads around that. Now, let's talk about this cloud thing; seems like a fad—in 2021. And people take longer to get to where they think they're going or where they intend to go than they plan for, and they get stuck somewhere and instead of a cloud migration, they're now hybrid because they can redefine things and declare victory when they plant that flag, and here we are. I'm not here to make fun of these companies because they're doing important work and these are super hard problems. But increasingly, it seems that the technology is not the thing that's holding them back or even responsible for their outcome so much as it is people.The more I work with tech, the more I realized that everything that's hard becomes people issues. Curious to get your take on that, given your somewhat privileged perspective as having a foot standing very deeply in each world.Abby: Yeah, and that's a super great point. And I also realized I didn't fully answer the first question either. So, I'll tie those two things together.Corey: That's okay, we're going to keep circling around until you get there. It's fine.Abby: It's been a long week, and it's only Wednesday.Corey: All day long, as it turns out.Abby: I have a whole soapbox that I drag around behind me about people and process, and how that's your biggest problem, not technology, and if you don't solve for the people in the process, I don't care what technology you choose to use, isn't going to fix your problem. On the other hand, if you get your people and process right, you can borderline use crayons and paper and get [laugh] really close to what you need to solve for.Corey: I have it on good authority that's known as IBM Cloud. Please continue.Abby: [laugh]. And so I think people and process are at the heart of everything. They're our biggest accelerators with technology and they're our biggest limitation. And you can cloud-native serverless your way into it, but if you do not actually do continuous delivery, if you did not actually automate your responses, if you do not actually set up the cross-functional teams—or sometimes fondly referred to as two-pizza teams—if you don't have those things set up, there isn't any technology that's going to make you deliver software better, faster, cheaper. And so I think I care a lot about the focus on that because I do think it is so important, but it's also—the reason a lot of people don't like to talk about it and deal with it because it's also the hardest.People, culture change, digital transformation, whatever you want to call it, is hard work. There's a reason so many books are written around DevOps. And you mentioned Gene Kim earlier, there's a reason he wrote The Phoenix Project; it's the people-process part is the hardest. And I do think technology should be an enabler and an accelerator, but it really has to pair up nicely with the people part. And you asked your earlier question about my move to Puppet.One of the things that I've learned a lot in running the Cloud Foundry Foundation, running an open-source software foundation, is you could a real good crash course in how teams can collaborate effectively, how teams work together, how decisions get made, the need for that process and that practice. And there was a lot of great context because I had access to so much interesting information. I got to see what all of these large enterprises were doing across the board. And I got to have a literal seat at the table for how a lot of the decisions are getting made around not only the open-source technologies that are going into building the future of our enterprise infrastructure but how a lot of these companies are using and leveraging those technologies. And having that visibility was amazing and transformational for myself.It gave me so much richness and context, which is why I have firmly believed that the people and process part were so crucial for many years. And I decided to go to a company that sold products. [laugh]. You're like, “What? What is she talking about now? Where is this going?”And I say that because running an open-source software foundation is great and it gives you so much information and so much context, but you have no access to customers and no access to products. You have no influence over that. And so when I thought about what I wanted to do next, it's like, I really want to be close to customers, I really want to be close to product, and I really want to be part of something that's solving what I look at over the next five to ten years, our biggest problem area, which is that tweener phase that we're going to be in for many years, which we were just talking about, which is, “I have some stuff on-prem and I have some stuff in a cloud—usually more than one cloud—and I got to figure out how to manage all of that.” And that is a really, really, really hard problem. And so when I looked at what Puppet was trying to do, and the opportunity that existed with a lot of the fantastic work that Puppet has done over the last 12 years around Desired State Configuration management, I'm like, “Okay, there's something here.”Because clearly, that problem doesn't go away because I'm running some stuff in the cloud. So, how do we start to think about this more broadly and expansively across the hybrid estate that is all of these different environments? And who is the most well-positioned to actually drive an innovative product that addresses that? So, that's my long way of addressing both of those things.Corey: No, it's a fair question. Friend of the show, Matt Stratton, is famous for saying that, “You cannot buy DevOps, but I sure would like to sell it to you,” and if you're looking at it from that perspective, Puppet is not far from what that product store look like in some ways. My first encounter with Puppet was back around 2009, 2010 or so, and I was using it in an environment I was working within and thought, “Okay, this is terrible, and it's crap, and obviously, I know what I'm doing far better than this, and the problem is the Puppet's a bad product.” So, I was one of the early developers behind SaltStack, which was a terrific, great way of approaching the problem from a novel perspective, and it wasn't crap; it was awesome. Right up until I saw the first time a customer deployed it and looked at their environment, and it wasn't crap, it was worse because it turns out that you can build a super finely crafted precision instrument that makes a fairly bad hammer, but that's how customers are going to use it anyway.Abby: Well, I mean, [sigh] look, you actually hit something that I think we don't actually talk about, which is how hard all of this shit really is. Automation is hard. Automation for distributed systems at scale is super duper hard. There isn't an easy way to solve that problem. And I feel like I learned a lot working with Cloud Foundry.Cloud Foundry is a Platform as a Service and it sits a layer up, but it had the same challenges in that solving the ability to run cloud-native applications and cloud-native workloads at scale and have that ephemerality to it and that resilience to it, and the things everyone wants but don't recognize how difficult it is, actually, to do that well. And I think the same—you know, that really set me up for the way that I think about the problem, even the layer down which is, running and managing desired state, which at the end of the day is a really fancy way of saying, “Does your environment look like the way you think it should? And if it doesn't, what are you going to do about it?” And it seems like, in this year of—what year are we again? 2021, maybe? I don't know. It feels like the last two years of, sort of, munged together?Corey: Yeah, the passing of time is something it's very hard for me to wrap my head around.Abby: But it feels like, I know some people, particularly those of us that have been in tech a long time are probably like, “Why are we still talking about that? Why is that a thing?” But that is still an incredibly hard problem for most organizations, large and small. So, I tend to spend a lot of time thinking about large enterprises, but in the day, you've got more than 20 servers, you're probably sitting around thinking, “Does my environment actually look the way I think it does? There's a new CVE that just came out. Am I able to address that?”And I think at the end of the day, figuring out how you can solve for that on-prem has been one of the things that Puppet has worked for, and done really, really well the last 12 years. Now, I think the next challenge is okay, how do you extend that out across your now bananas complex estate that is—I got a huge data estate, maybe one or two data centers, I got some stuff in AWS, I got some stuff in GCP, oh yeah, got a little thing over here and Azure, and oh, some guy spun up something on OCI. So, we got a little bit of everything. And oh, my God, the SolarWinds breach happened. Are we impacted? I don't know. What does that mean? [laugh].And I think you start to unravel the little pieces of that and it gets more and more complex. And so I think the problems that I was solving in the early aughts with servers seems trite now because you're like, I can see all of my servers; there's eight of them. Things seem fine. To now, you've got hundreds of thousands of applications and workloads, and some of them are serverless, and they're all over the place. And who has what, and where does it sit?And does it look like the way that I think it needs to so that I can run my business effectively? And I think that's really the power of it, but it's also one of those things that I don't feel like a lot of people like to acknowledge the complexity and the hardness of that because it's not just the technology problem—going back to your other question, how do we work? How do we communicate? What are our processes around dealing with this? And I think there's so much wrapped up in that it becomes almost like, how do you eat an elephant story, right? Yes, one bite at a time, but when you first look at the elephant, you're like, “Holy shit. This is big. What do I need to do?” And that I think is not something we all collectively spend enough time talking about is how hard this stuff is.Corey: One of the biggest challenges I see across the board is this idea of conference-ware style architecture; the greatest lie you ever see is someone talking about their infrastructure in public because peel it back a little bit and everything's messy, everything's disastrous, and everything's a tire fire. And we have this cult in tech—Abby: [laugh].Corey: —it's almost a cult where we have this idea that anything that isn't rewritten completely within the last six months based upon whatever is the hot framework now that is designed to run only in Google Chrome running on the latest generation MacBook Pro on a gigabit internet connection is somehow less than. It's like, “So, what does that piece of crap do?” And the answer is, “Well, a few $100 million a quarter in revenue, so how about you watch your mouth?” Moving those things is delicate; moving those things is fraught, and there are a lot of different stakeholders to the point where one of the lessons I keep learning is, people love to ask me, “What is Amazon's opinion of you?” Turns out that there's no Ted Amazon who works over there who forms a single entity's opinion. It's a bunch of small teams. Some of them like me, some of them can't stand me, far and away the majority don't know who I am. And that is okay. In theory; in practice, I find it completely unforgivable because how dare you? But I understand it's—Abby: You write a memo, right now. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. Companies are people and people are messy, and for better or worse, it is impossible to patch them. So, you have to almost route around them. And that was something that I found that Puppet did very well, coming from the olden days of sysadmin work where we spend time doing management [bump 00:15:53] the systems by hand. Like, oh, I'm going to do a for loop. Once I learned how to script. Before that, I use Cluster SSH and inadvertently blew away a University's entire config file what starts up on boot across their entire FreeBSD server fleet.Abby: You only did it once, so it's fine.Corey: Oh, yeah. I'm never going to screw up again. Well, not like that. In other ways. Absolutely, but at least my errors will be novel.Abby: Yeah. It's learning. We all learn. If you haven't taken something down in production in real-time, you have not lived. And also you [laugh] haven't done tech. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you either haven't been allowed close enough to anything that's important enough to be able to take down, you're lying to me, or thirdly—and this is possible, too—you're not yet at a point in your career where you're allowed to have access to the breaky parts. And that's fine. I mean, my argument has always been about why I'd be a terrible employee at Google, for example, is if I went in maliciously on day one, I would be hard-pressed to take down google.com for one hour. If I can't have that much impact intentionally going in as a bad actor, it feels like there'd be how much possible upside, positive impact can I have what everyone's ostensibly aligned around the same thing?It's the challenge of big companies. It's gaining buy-in, it's gaining investment in the idea and the direction you're going in. Things always take longer, you have to wind up getting multiple stakeholders on board. My consulting practice is entirely around helping save money on the AWS bill. You'd think it would be the easiest thing in the world to sell, but talking to big companies means a series of different sales conversations with different folks, getting them all on the same page. What we do functionally isn't so much look at the computer parts as it is marriage counseling between engineering and finance. Different languages, different ways of thinking about things, ostensibly the same goals.Abby: I mean, I don't think that's a big company problem. I think that's an every company problem if you have more than, like, five people in your company.Corey: The first few years here, it was just me and I had none of those problems. I had very different problems, but you know—and then we started bringing other people in, it's like, “Oh, yeah, things were great until we hired people. Ugh, mistake. Never do that.” And yeah, it turns out that's not particularly sustainable.Abby: Stakeholder management is hard. And you mentioned something about routing around. Well, you can't actually route around people, unfortunately. You have to get people to buy in, you have to bring people along on the journey. And not everybody is at the same place in the way they think about the work you're doing.And that's true at any company, big or small. I think it just gets harder and more complex as the company gets bigger because it's harder to make the changes you need to make fast enough, but I'd say even at a company the size of Puppet, we have the exact same challenges. You know, are the teams aligned? Are we aligned on the right things? Are we focusing on the right things?Or, do we have the right priorities in our backlog? How are we doing the work that we do? And if you're trying to drive innovation, how fast are we innovating? Are we innovating fast enough? How tight are our feedback loops?It's one of those things where the conversations that you and I have had externally with customers are the same conversations I have internally all the time, too. Let's talk about innovators' dilemma. [laugh]. Let's talk about feedback loop. Let's talk about what does it mean to get tighter feedback loops from customers and the field?And how do you align those things to the priorities in your backlog? And it's one of those never-ending challenges that's messy and complicated. And technology can enable it, but the technology is also messy and hard. And I do love going to conferences and seeing how pretty and easy things could look, and it's definitely a great aspiration for us to all shoot for, but at the end of the day, I think we all have to recognize there's a ton of messiness that goes on behind to make that a reality and to make that really a product and a technology that we can sell and get behind, but also one that we buy in, too, and are able to use. So, I think we as a technology industry, and particularly those of us in the Bay Area, we do a disservice by talking about how easy things are and why—you know, I remember a conversation I had in 2014 where someone asked me if Docker was already passe because everybody was doing containerized applications, and I was like, “Are they? Really? Is that an everyone thing? Or is that just an ‘us' thing?” [laugh].Corey: Well, they talk about it on the conference stages an awful lot, but yeah. New problems that continue to arise. I mean, I look back at my early formative years as someone who could theoretically be brought out in public and it was through a consulting project, where I was a traveling trainer for Puppet back in 2014, 2015, and teaching people who hadn't had exposure before what Puppet was about. And there was a definite experience in some of the people attending class where they were very opposed to the idea. And dig down a little bit, it's not that they had a problem with the software, it's not that they had a problem with any of the technical bits.It's that they made the mistake that so many technologists made—I know I have, repeatedly—of identifying themselves with the technology that they work on. And well, in some cases, yeah, the answer was that they ran a particular script a bunch of times and if you can automate that through something like Puppet or something else, well, what does that mean for them? We see it much larger-scale now with people who are, okay, I'm in the data center working on the storage arrays. When that becomes just an API call or—let's be serious, despite what we see in conference stages—when it becomes clicking buttons in the AWS console, then what does that mean for the future of their career? The tide is rising.And I can't blame them too much for this; you've been doing this for 25 years, you don't necessarily want to throw all that away and start over with a whole new set of concepts and the rest because unlike what Twitter believes, there are a bunch of legitimate paths in this industry that do treat it as a job rather than an all-consuming passion. And I have no negative judgment toward folks who walk down that direction.Abby: Most people do. And I think we have to be realistic. It's not just some. A lot of people do. A lot of people, “This is my nine-to-five job, Monday through Friday, and I'm going to go home and I'm going to spend time with my family.”Or I'm going to dare I say—quietly—have a life outside of technology. You know, but this is my job. And I think we have done a disservice to a lot of those individuals who for better or for worse, they just want to go in and do a job. They want to get their job done to the best of their abilities, and don't necessarily have the time—or if you're a single parent, have the flexibility in your day to go home and spend another five, six hours learning the latest technology, the latest programming language, set up your own demo environment at home, play around with AWS, all of these things that you may not have the opportunity to do. And I think we as an industry have done a disservice to both those individuals, as well in putting up really imaginary gates on who can actually be a technologist, too.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Gatekeeping, on some level, is just—it's a horrible thing. Something I found relatively early on is that I didn't enjoy communities where that was a thing in a big way. In minor ways, sure, absolutely. I wound up gravitating toward Ubuntu rather than Debian because it turned out that being actively insulted when I asked how to do something wasn't exactly the most welcoming, constructive experience, where they, “Read the manual.” “Yeah, I did that and it was incomplete and contradictory, and that's why I'm here asking you that question, but please continue to be a condescending jackwagon. I appreciate that. It really just reminds me that I'm making good choices with my life.”Abby: Hashtag-RTFM. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. In my case, fine, its water off a duck's back. I can certainly take it given the way that I dish it out, but by the same token, not everyone has a quote-unquote, thick skin, and I further posit that not everyone should have to have one. You should not get used to personal attacks as a prerequisite for working in this space. And I'm very sensitive to the idea that people who are just now exploring the cloud somehow feel that they've missed out on their career, and that so there's somehow not appropriate for this field, or that it's not for them.And no, are you kidding me? You know that overwhelming sense of confusion you get when you look at the AWS console and try and understand what all those services do? Yeah, I had the same impression the first time I saw it and there were 12 services; there's over 200 now. Guess what? I've still got it.And if I am overwhelmed by it, I promise there's no shame in anyone else being overwhelmed by it, too. We're long since past the point where I can talk incredibly convincingly about AWS services that don't exist to AWS employees and not get called out on it because who in the world has that entire Rolodex of services shoved into their heads who isn't me?Abby: I'd say you should put out… a call for anyone that does because I certainly do not memorize the services that are available. I don't know that anyone does. And I think even more broadly, is, remember when the landscape diagram came out from the CNCF a couple of years ago, which it's now, like… it's like a NASCAR logo of every logo known to man—Corey: Oh today, there's over 400 icons on it the last time I saw—I saw that thing come out and I realized, “Wow, I thought I was going to shit-posting,” but no, this thing is incredible. It's, “This is great.” My personal favorite was zooming all the way in finding a couple of logos on in the same box three times, which is just… spot on. I was told later, it's like, “Oh, those represent different projects.” I'm like, “Oh, yeah, must have missed that in the legend somewhere.” [laugh]. It's this monstrous, overdone thing.Abby: But the whole point of it was just, if I am running an IT department, and I'm like, “Here you go. Here's a menu of things to choose,” you're just like, “What do I do with this information? Do I choose one of each? All the above? Where do I go? And then, frankly, how do I make them all work together in my environment?” Because they all serve very different problems and they're tackling different aspects of that problem.And I think I get really annoyed with myself as an industry—like, ourselves as an industry because it's like, “What are we doing here?” We're trying to make it harder for people, not only to use the technology, to be part of it. And I think any efforts we can make to make it easier and more simple or clear, we owe it to ourselves to be able to tell that story. Which now the flip side of that is describing cloud-native in the cloud, and infrastructure and automation is really, really hard to do [laugh] in a way that doesn't use any of those words. And I'm just as guilty of this, of describing things we do and using the same language, and all of a sudden you're looking at it this says the same thing is 7500 other websites. [laugh]. So.Corey: Yep. I joke at RSA's Expo Hall is basically about twelve companies selling different things. Sure, each one has a whole bunch of booths with different logos and different marketing copy, but it's the same fundamental product. Same challenge here. And this is, to me, the future of cloud, this is where it's going, where I want something that will—in my case, I built a custom URL shortener out of DynamoDB, API Gateway, Lambda, et cetera, and I built this thing largely as a proof of concept because I wanted to have experience playing with these tools.And that was great, not but if I'm doing something like that in production, I'm going with Bitly or one of the other services that provide this where someone is going to maintain it full time. Unless it is the core of what I'm doing, I don't want to build it myself from popsicle sticks. And moving up the stack to a world of folks who are trying to solve a business problem and they don't want to deal with the ten prerequisite services to understand the cloud, and then a whole bunch of other things tied together, and the billing, and the flow becomes incredibly problematic to understand—not to mention insecure: because we don't understand it, you don't know what your risk exposure is—people don't want that. They—Abby: Or to manage it.Corey: Yeah.Abby: Just the day-to-day management. Care and feeding, beyond security. [laugh].Corey: People's time is free. So, yeah. For example, do I write my own payroll system? Absolutely not. I have the good sense to pay a turnkey company to handle that for me because mistakes will show.I started my career running email systems. I pay for Google workspaces—or GSuite, or Gmail, or whatever the hell they're calling it this week—because it's not core and central to my business. I want a thing that winds up solving a business problem, and I will pay commensurately to the value that thing delivers, not the individual constituent costs of the components that build it together. Because until you're significantly scaled out and it is the core of what you do, you're spending more on people to run the monstrous thing than you are for the thing itself. That's always the way it works.So, put your innovation where it matters for your business. I posit the for an awful lot of the things we're building, in order to achieve those outcomes, this isn't it.Abby: Agreed. And I am a big believer in if I can use off-the-shelf software, I will because I don't believe in reinventing everything. Now, having said that, and coming off my soapbox for just a hot minute, I will say that a lot of what's happening, and going back to where I started around the enterprise infrastructure, we're reinventing so many things that there is a lot of new things coming up. We've talked about containers, we've talked about Kubernetes, around container scheduling, container orchestration, we haven't even mentioned service mesh, and sidecars, and all of the new ways we're approaching solving some of these older problems. So, there is the need for a broad proliferation of technology until the contraction phase, where it all starts to fundamentally clicks together.And that's really where the interesting parts happen, but it's also where the confusion happens because, “Okay, what do I use? How do I use it? How do these pieces fit together? What happens when this changes? What does this mean?”And by the way, if I'm an enterprise company, I'm a payroll company, what's the one thing I care about? My payroll software. [laugh]. And that's the problem I'm solving for. So, I take a little umbrage sometimes with the frame that every company is a software company because every company is not a software company.Every company can use technology in ways to further their business and more and more frequently, that is delivering their business value through software, but if I'm a payroll company, I care about delivering that payroll capabilities to my customer, and I want to do it as quickly as possible, and I want to leverage technology to help me do that. But my endgame is not that technology; my endgame is delivering value to my customers in real and meaningful ways. And I worry, sometimes, that those two things get conflated together. And one is an enabler of the other; the technology is not the outcome.Corey: And that is borderline heresy for an awful lot of folks out there in the space, I wish that people would wake up a little bit more and realize that you have to build a thing that solves customer pain, ideally, an expensive customer pain, and then they will basically rush to hurl money at you. Now, there are challenges and inflections as you go, and there's a whole bunch of nuances that can span entire fields of endeavor that I am hand-waving over here, and that's fine, but this is the direction I think we're going and this is the dawning awareness that I hope and trust we'll see start to take root in this industry.Abby: I mean, I hope so. I do take comfort in the fact that a lot of the industry leaders I'm starting to see, kind of, equate those two things more closely in the top [track 00:31:20]. Because it's a good forcing function for those of us that are technologists. At the end of the day, what am I doing? I am a product company, I am selling software to someone.So clearly, obviously, I have a vested interest in building the best software out there, but at the end of the day, for me, it's, “Okay, how do I make that truly impactful for customers, and how do I help them solve a problem?” And for me, I'm hyper-focused on automation because I honestly feel like that is the biggest challenge for most companies; it's the hardest thing to solve. It's like getting into your auto-driving car for the first time and letting go the steering wheel and praying to the software gods that that software is actually going to work. But it's the same thing with automation; it's like, “Okay, I have to trust that this is going to manage my environment and manage my infrastructure in a factual way and not put me on CNN because I just shut down entire customer environment,” or if I'm an airline and I've just had a really bad week because I've had technology problems. [laugh]. And so I think we have to really take into consideration that there are real customer problems on the other end of that we have to help solve for.Corey: My biggest problem is the failure mode of this is not when people watch the conference-ware presentations is that they're not going to sit there and think, “Oh, yeah, they're just talking about a nuanced thing that doesn't apply to our constraints, and they're hand-waving over a lot of stuff,” it's that, “Wow, we suck.” And that's not the takeaway anyone should ever have. Even Netflix doesn't operate the way that Netflix says that they do in their conference talks. It's always fun sitting next to someone from the company that's currently presenting and saying something to them, like, “Wow, I wish we did things that way.” And they said, “Yeah, I wish we did, too.”And it's always the case because it's very hard to get on stage and talk for 45 minutes about here's what we completely screwed up on, especially at the large publicly traded companies where it's, “Wait, why did our stock price just dive five perce—oh, my God, what did you say on stage?” People care [laugh] about those things, and I get it; there's a risk factor that I don't have to deal with here.Abby: I wish people would though. It would be so refreshing to hear someone like, “You know what? Ohh, we really messed this up, and let me walk you through what we did.” [laugh]. I think that would be nice.Corey: On some level, giving that talk in enough detail becomes indistinguishable from rage-quitting in public.Abby: [laugh].Corey: I mean, I'm there for it. Don't get me wrong. But I would love to see it.Abby: I don't think it has to be rage-quitting. One of the things that I talk to my team a lot about is the safety to fail. You can't take risk if you're too afraid to fail, right? And I think you can frame failure in a way of, “Hey, this didn't work, but let me walk you through all the amazing things we learned from this. And here's how we used that to take this and make this thing better.”And I think there's a positive way to frame it that's not rage-quitting, but I do think we as an industry gloss over those learnings that you absolutely have to do. You fail; everything does not work the first time perfectly. It is not brilliant out the gate. If you've done an MVP and it's perfect and every customer loves it, well then, you sat on that for way too long. [laugh]. And I think it's just really getting comfortable with this didn't work the first time or the fourth, but look, at time seven, this is where we got and this is what we've learned.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to wind up speaking to me about things that in many cases are challenging to talk about because it's the things people don't talk about in the real world. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, who you are, et cetera, where can they find you?Abby: They can find me on the Twitters at @ab415. I think that's the best way to start, although I will say that I am not as prolific as you are on Twitter.Corey: That's a good thing.Abby: I'm a half-assed Tweeter. [laugh]. I will own it.Corey: Oh, I put my full ass into it every time, in every way.Abby: [laugh]. I do skim it a lot. I get a lot of my tech news from there. Like, “What are people mad about today?” And—Corey: The daily outrage. Oh, yeah.Abby: The daily outrage. “What's Corey ranting about today? Let's see.” [laugh].Corey: We will, of course, put a link to your Twitter profile in the [show notes 00:35:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Abby: Hey, it was my pleasure.Corey: Abby Kearns, CTO at Puppet. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me about the amazing podcast content you create, start to finish, at Netflix.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Producer's Perspective Podcast with Ken Davenport
251 - Places, Please Series: Part 1 with Ken Davenport and Joe Rosko

The Producer's Perspective Podcast with Ken Davenport

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 40:36


One of the most fun and most productive events we had this year was our “Take Charge of Your '21” Challenge in January. Over 500 TheaterMakers joined us to hear tips and strategies on how to have your best year yet from super successful people in the business. We learned how to crush writer's block, how to squeeze a few more hours into each day for your REAL work (not that day job work), how to increase your confidence . . . and more. We got such great feedback on this free event that we decided to do it again! But better. 

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. Dexcom and Garmin partner, faster insulin tested, once a week basal and more...

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:59


Top stories this week include: a new adjunct therapy is being tested for type 1, Dexcom and Garmin will officially work together (no more DIY needed), once weekly basal insulin study, can psychedelic drugs prevent type 2?! and Australia bets on Rugby for diabetes education Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below:  Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and I am on location this week. I'm at the She Podcasts LIVE conference.. but the news doesn't wait. So.. these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story.. There's a lot of buzz these days around adjunct therapy for diabetes.. basically another treatment along with insulin. Earlier this year, a drug so far just named TTP-399 got FDA breakthrough therapy approval. A new study shows it works well to keep people with type 1 out of DKA. This was small study, 23 people. They found that TTP-399 can help lower blood glucose without increasing the risk of DKA. It's important because other adjunct therapy.. such as S-G-L-T-2 inhibitors do help lower blood glucose, but the FDA has said they cause too much of a risk of DKA in people with type 1. Those are brand names like Invokana and Jardiance. Pivotal trials of TTP-399 begin later this year. https://www.biospace.com/article/vtv-therapeutics-type-1-diabetes-drug-shows-promise/ XX New partnership announced today - Dexcom and Garmin. You will still need your phone.. I knew you were going to ask.. but with the new Dexcom Connect IQ apps you can now see your Dexcom G6 info on your compatible Garmin smartwatch or cycling computer. Jake Leach, chief technology officer at Dexcom says.. Garmin is the first partner to connect through the real-time API, which we told you about a few months back. Basically, you'll be seeing more connectivity without having to use a third party, community sourced work around which a lot of people do now. The name here is interesting, right? Connect IQ, very similar to Tandem's Control IQ. But since Dexcom owns a bit of Tandem, maybe that's no coincidence. I've requested an interview with Dexcom so maybe we'll find out. garmin.com/newsroom, email media.relations@garmin.com, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garminnews, instagram.com/garmin, youtube.com/garmin or linkedin.com/company/garmin. XX New study about time in range, hybrid closed loop systems and faster insulins. The headline here is that using Fiasp with the Medtronic 670g system resulted in greater time in range. How much? The Fiasp group spend 82 point 3 percent time in range.. the Novolog group spent 79.6 percent time in range. This was over 17 weeks and the participants mostly bolused AT meal times, not before, no prebolusing. The researchers echo what I was going to say here, quote – “While the primary outcome demonstrated statistical significance, the clinical impact may be small, given an overall difference in time in range of 1.9%.” So just a heads up if you see headlines screaming about how much faster Fiasp is because of this study. https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/fast-acting-insulin-aspart-versus-insulin-aspart-closed-loop-type-1-diabetes/ XX People who have tried a psychedelic drug at least once in their lifetime have lower odds of heart disease and diabetes. This is a University of Oxford study published in Scientific Reports. These researchers examined data from more than 375-thousand Americans who had taken part in an annual survey sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Participants reported whether they had ever used the classic psychedelic substances including LSD, mescaline, peyote or psilocybin. They also reported whether they had been diagnosed with heart disease or diabetes in the past year. The researchers found that the prevalence of both conditions was lower among psychedelic users. While no one is recommending you start taking mushrooms to avoid diabetes.. there's a growing push to start serious research to investigate the link between psychedelics and cardio-metabolic health. https://www.psypost.org/2021/10/psychedelic-use-associated-with-lower-odds-of-heart-disease-and-diabetes-study-finds-61958 XX Update on the once a week basal insulin I've been reporting on for a while.. both Lilly and Novo Nordisk are testing their own version of this.. this most recent study looks at the Lilly version called Tirzepatide. These researchers found it to be safe and effective with lower rates of hypoglycemia and slightly lower A1Cs than daily basals like Lantus or Tresiba. Lots of studies ongoing here, for both brands of potential once a week dosing, including a large phase 2 program that includes people with type 1. https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20211012/novel-onceweekly-basal-insulin-safe-effective-in-type-2-diabetes XX More to come, including how rugby and diabetes education may go together.. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it's usually after school or late night. Ugh.. do your teens eat breakfast? You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… -- Getting out of the doctor's office and into something that people can actually relate to.. Diabetes Australia is using rugby to teach men about the risks of type 2 diabetes. League Fans in Training (League-FIT) is based on a Scottish initiative that used football teams to deliver exercise and nutritional advice to overweight and obese men. The program includes education and goal setting and a rugby league-based exercise session, delivered by coaches and some of the club's players. What I really like about this is that -from what I can tell - they're focusing on small changes and not telling these guys to give up everything they like to eat and drink or that they have to become professional players to get a little bit more fit. Imagine if NFL players had a clinic for fans to come and learn a little bit about fitness and nutrition? Again, not to be pros.. just to live a little better and lower risks of type 2. https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/news -- On Diabetes Connections this week, we're talking to a mom with type 1 who has had two children during the pandemic. One last summer and the other just a few days before our interview! That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Intelligence Matters
CIA Chief Historian David Robarge on Pivotal Global Events

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:30


In this episode of Intelligence Matters, host Michael Morell speaks with David Robarge, Chief Historian at the CIA, about the agency's performance during some of the most important global issues of the last 50 years. Morell and Robarge discuss the insight and warnings CIA provided at pivotal moments during the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the first Gulf War, and the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Robarge explains why the CIA has at times struggled to provide adequate tactical warnings of significant developments. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Jordy Culotta Show
In Scott We Must Trust, As LSU Football Is At A Pivotal Point In Its History. Mikie Mahtook Joins The Set To Rehash LSU‘s Loss To Kentucky, Then We Do Our Own Version Of The RedZone Channel.

The Jordy Culotta Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 132:50


Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions
Kip Ludwig on some of the more controversial neurotech ideas

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 39:01


Dr. Ludwig leads the Bioelectronic Medicines Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, with the goal of developing next-generation neuromodulation therapies that use minimally invasive strategies to highjack the nervous system to treat circuit dysfunction and deliver biomolecules to target areas with unprecedented precision. Prior to Wisconsin, Dr. Ludwig served as the Program Director for Neural Engineering at the National Institutes of Health. He co-led the Translational Devices Program at NINDS, led the NIH BRAIN Initiative programs to catalyze implantable academic and clinical devices to stimulate and/or record from the central nervous system, and led a trans-NIH planning team in developing the ~250 million dollar S.P.A.R.C. Program to stimulate advances in neuromodulation therapies for organ systems. Dr. Ludwig also worked in Industry as a research scientist, where his team conceived, developed, and demonstrated the chronic efficacy of a next-generation neural stimulation electrode for reducing blood pressure in both pre-clinical studies and clinical trials. Through his industry work, he oversaw Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) and non-GLP studies enabling clinical trials in Europe and the United States, as well as participated in the protocol development and execution of those trials, leading to approval for sale in seven countries and a U.S. Pivotal trial. Top 3 Takeaways "We actually don't definitively know what we're stimulating for effects in most of our largest markets for neuromodulation therapy. "Don't ever date electrical stimulation. It will cheat on you. It's very promiscuous. It also creates a lot of effects in non-neuronal cells. That may be important... electrical stimulation is very dirty. There's no way around it" "A lot of things we don't consider as one of the startup company fails. Now we've got a piece of hardware in my neck and I've got nobody who knows how to maintain it." 1:00 "Do you wanna introduce yourself?" 2:00 You've been in academia, industry, and government, what's that like? 5:00 "Before we started recording, you were talking about, drug-resistant drug coatings on neural devices. Why might not that be a good one?" 12:30 "Everybody uses rat models, but that might not be very accurate because humans and rats are different, right?" 15:00 "So what's the solution? Use more human testing?" 18:30 "What's the solution. How did people gain this perspective?" 22:45 "Is this something that we need to wait for AI to be able to solve?" 26:45 "But is that bad? So for me, I'm more engineering-minded, more practical. It's just if it works, it works, right?" 33:45 "The small percentage that makes it through the phase one and I wonder how many, good therapies were out there that just because of chance, fell through.?" 37:15 "So we have to redo statistics, is that what you're saying?" 37:45 " Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"  

Hacking the Hustle
64. Why Podcasting and Parenting are Pivotal with Leyla Sarper

Hacking the Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:53


Leyla Sarper is the host of the Life with Leyla podcast. Based in Denver, Colorado, Leyla is an emerging thought leader on the topics of mental health and living life without regrets. On this episode of Hacking the Hustle (HTH), Benjamin and Leyla talk about podcasting itself and having a "why" for creating educational or entertaining content, as well as the growth of NFTs and the importance of good parenting for future entrepreneurs. This is an authentic conversation about today's pop culture in America. Enjoy!

New York's #2 Sports Podcast
Incredible Moments Allow Yanks To Beat Toronto In Pivotal Series: NYY vs. TOR (9/28 - 9/30)

New York's #2 Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 28:06


Yankees win a hugely important, playoff-like series at Toronto! NYY's magic number is 2, in order to clinch and host the AL Wild Card game. Aaron Judge has been a man on a mission and the bullpen has had a strong resurgence. The Yanks return home to finish up the regular season vs Tampa.   New York's #2 Sports Podcast is an Influencer Audio production.

BMB Pirates
Chapter 1026 - The Pivotal Clash!

BMB Pirates

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 75:19


The BMB Pirates are back with another chapter review! This week Mikey sailed off on his own adventure, but we are joined by the very special guest...MOOSE! This chapter was action packed and moved very quickly. The biggest panel from this chapter has got to be THE FREAKIN SKY SPLITTING!!! ENOUGH TEXT... LET'S DISCUSS!!!!

Devil's Junkie Podcast
A pivotal Pac-12 South showdown awaits ASU at the Rose Bowl

Devil's Junkie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 30:02


In the 2021 college football season that has already seen a plethora of upsets, especially in the Pac-12, a team such as the Sun Devils does not have to apologize for dominating last Saturday, perhaps the weakest team in the entire conference in the Colorado buffaloes. Yet when you literally slice like a hot knife through butter against such an opponent, how much do you really learn about yourself, especially on the doorstep of one of your toughest League games all season, a road trip to UCLA?   Episode rundown (30 minutes)   (1:00) Even a dominating win over Colorado did reveal some areas of concern alongside some encouraging signs. We review ASU's 35-13 win in the Pac-12 opener and share our takeaways. (16:21) It may have taken longer than expected, but head coach Chip Kelly finally has the Bruins on the right track vying for a division championship. Analyzing this matchup with the Sun Devils reveals some intriguing battles between units that have performed very well in 2021 but may now encounter their most formidable test this year.

OTB Football
Andy Mitten on a pivotal week for Manchester United | THE FOOTBALL SHOW

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


Andy Mitten of United We Stand joins Joe to preview a massive night of European action at Old Trafford tomorrow.

HR Hardball
Pivoting with Andrea Butcher

HR Hardball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 57:40


What a great idea...spend a couple of years speaking to leaders around the country and ask them to recall those seminal moments in their respective career which eventually turned into a career-changer.Meet my friend and leadership whisperer Andrea Butcher. On her podcast Being at [Work], Andrea does just that. Going into year three, Andrea has 100 episodes that are a combination of interviews and "Daily Doses" of leadership principles using real stories from real people as they describe the moment(s) in their past which proved to be pivotal. As the President and grand poobah of the HRD Advisory Group, Andrea has been collecting and sharing these principles since 2017 and today she's going to share some of the secrets she's uncovered. In this episode of HR Hardball, we discuss the trends and common themes that weave through these stories. We talk about the term "pivotal moment" - what does that mean? What makes it "pivotal?" Do you realize you're in a pivotal moment in real-time or only in retrospect? Is your moment self-initiated or were you thrust into a situation where action was demanded and it was your response that became your "moment." Must there be risk involved? Get your ears on and listen to me "Pivot" with Andrea Butcher - Adventurer & Explorer - Mom & Wife - Host of the Being [at Work] Podcast - Co-Founder of Next Gen Talent - President at HRD - Leadership Development Facilitator - Executive Coach - Speaker & Author.Are you an HR Professional looking to get professional and personal development? Check out Next Gen Talent and consider applying for this unique learning experience. https://www.ngtalent.com/ 

Papa & Lund Podcast Podcast
9-27 Greg Papa explains why last nights 49ers loss to the Packers was a pivotal one for the season

Papa & Lund Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 9:38


Greg Papa explains why last nights 49ers loss to the Packers was a pivotal loss for the season See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tragedy Academy
Special Guest: Jaymes "The Face" Anthony

The Tragedy Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 54:48


Summary:In today's episode of The Tragedy Academy, Jay speaks to Jaymes The Face Anthony. Jaymes is the host of the YouTube show Jaymes Kickback, where he interviews celebrities, influencers, and artists to showcase their art and get to know them personally. Jaymes brings us on his self-discovery path and how he went from a sheltered child to live his most authentic life.Key Points:

The 5 Minute Basketball Coaching Podcast
Ep: 185 Pivotal Coaching Moment

The 5 Minute Basketball Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 3:56


Coach Collins Talks Basketball Also Check out.  [Teachhoops.com](https://teachhoops.com/) 14 day Free Trial [Facebook Group . Basketball Coaches](https://www.facebook.com/groups/basketballcoaches/) [Facebook Group . Basketball Drills](https://www.facebook.com/groups/321590381624013/) Want to Get a Question Answered? [ Leave a Question here](https://www.speakpipe.com/Teachhoops) Check out our other podcast [High School Hoops ](https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/high-school-hoops-coaching-high-school-basketball/id1441192866) Check out our Sponsors [HERE](https://drdishbasketball.com/) Mention Coach Unplugged and get 350 dollars off your next purchase basketball resources free basketball resources Coach Unplugged Basketball drills, basketball coach, basketball workouts, basketball dribbling drills,  ball handling drills, passing drills, shooting drills, basketball training equipment, basketball conditioning, fun basketball games, basketball jerseys, basketball shooting machine, basketball shot, basketball ball, basketball training, basketball camps, youth basketball, youth basketball leagues, basketball recruiting, basketball coaching jobs, basketball tryouts, basketball coach, youth basketball drills, The Basketball Podcast, How to Coach Basketball, Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode 320: You Don't Get Ahead Unless You Are the Wolf with Diana Lee

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 25:51


Diana and her 100 plus employees have just moved into the One World Trade Center and are projected to hit $40M in just their 5th year of business, Constellation Agency's CEO tells us about the pivotal moment in her life that help set up the foundation to her digital marketing career. She also discusses how she found success in studying her customers beforehand and specialized their presentations.  • Lessons from traveling the country for 15 years to analyze companies for Cars Direct and doing consulting for innovating companies.  • At 47 her husband said, “You're never going to do it, so do it now or never.” • Launched as first salesman – prospecting 15-18 hours a day.  • She made all the presentations about the customer – personalized to their situation.  • Make sure your contracts are simple with very little legalese.  • https://constellationagency.com  TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [7:40] Pivotal job. [15:00] Started with the idea. [19:59] Start small.

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

This is pivotal because it will now give NFL fans an idea of who has a good chance of making it to the playoffs. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Lead with Jake Tapper
U.S. COVID deaths surpasses 675,000; Higher than 1918 flu pandemic; Critical week for Pelosi to unite party, get Biden agenda passed; Biden's domestic agenda enters pivotal time on Capitol Hill;

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 36:18


Pfizer: vaccine is safe for children 5-11, generated “robust” antibody response; Ex-FDA chief: vaccine for younger kids may be available by late October; DC mayor mandates vaccines for all teachers, daycare providers; San Francisco mayor defiant after breaking city's mask rules; U.S. averaging 147K+ new infections and 1,900+ deaths a day; Pfizer now accounts for nearly 70% of all COVID shots given in U.S.; DOW sinks as Wall Street fears turn to China; Biden admin to ease travel restrictions on vaccinated foreigners flying to U.S., land crossings still closed; Rep. Ocasio-Cortez insists she's a “no” vote on $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill if larger $3.5T package not included; Moderate Sen. Manchin urges democrats to slow down on $3.5T economic package; Biden facing a growing number of domestic & global issues; Biden faced with foreign policy turmoil ahead of U.N. speech; Biden's approval rating falls to lowest point in his term; New book explores the rise of anger division in us politics; Psaki: Biden, Macron to speak “in the coming days”; France: we were never informed U.S. was doing sub deal; Source: U.S. officials surprised by French submarine outrage; Right now: Canadians voting in race pushed by Prime Minister Trudeau as his poll numbers drop; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Pikes Peak Christian Church Sermon Podcast
Ignite Part 2: Worship - A Pivotal Decision

Pikes Peak Christian Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 36:58


When you're at a fork in the road, how do you know which way is Gods's way and which way is the Devil's? Worship!

BK & Ferrario
The Best of BK & Ferrario - September 13, 2021 - A pivotal week for the Cardinals & reactions to NFL Week 1

BK & Ferrario

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 147:31


10:00 -The Cardinas finally got the Nolan Arenado they need 10:15 - Mizzou and Illinois each had a bit of a wake up call this weekend 10:30 - Katie Woo on this week being a defining week for the Cardinals 10:45 - Which NFL teams did we learn the most about in Week 1? 11:00 - Yadi and Nolan had infectious energy this weekend 11:15 - College Football Whip-Around 11:30 - David Schoenfield on who he likes for that final Wild Card spot 11:45 - Questions & Answers 12:00 - Does this change your thoughts on the shortstop market? 12:15 - NFL Rapid Reactions 12:30 - Are Dakota Hudson and Jack Flaherty going to factor into the Cardinals' plans? 12:45 - The Junk Drawer 1:00 - If the Cardinals are going to make the playoffs, they will do so on the back of Nolan Arenado 1:15 - In or Out 1:30 - NFL Quick Hitters 1:45 - The Crossover

Dadbod Outdoors
Pivotal Defense

Dadbod Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 59:44


Matt, Mitch and Rick sit down with owner/operator of Pivotal Defense Clayton Schlosser. Pivotal Defense is a USCCA certified business that specializes in firearms self defense courses. This is one of our favorite episodes, so sit back and enjoy. Facebook- Pivotal DefenseInstagram- Pivotal_defenseEmail- Pivotaldefense@gmail.comPhone- 7632322123-Permit to carry-Private classes-Group classes-Basic Fundamental classes -Tactical Response Alumni-No Other Choice Firearms Alumni

Pikes Peak Christian Church Sermon Podcast
Ignite Part 1: Pivotal Decisions

Pikes Peak Christian Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 36:34


Today begins a new series about fueling your faith. In Pt 1, Pastor Darrin shares how major decisions can deeply impact the direction of our lives.

Combat Story
Combat Story (Ep 41): Chris VanSant [Part 2] Delta Force | Ranger | All Secure | TYR Tactical

Combat Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 93:05


UPCOMING EVENT: If you'd like to attend a Q&A session with Combat Story's Ryan Fugit, please fill out this form (https://tinyurl.com/552ewmu5). Today we complete the second segment of our Combat Story with Chris VanSant, a retired Army infantryman, Ranger, Green Beret, and Operator in 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment - Delta (1st SFOD-D). You can hear the first round with Chris at https://youtu.be/tdSA8O_T6mE. We left our first interview with Chris at the height of his career: in the Unit, combat rotations, and close friends. We pick up in round two where things start to get more difficult and the optempo, intensity, and constant fighting begin to take a toll. Chris describes how he overcame some very dark days that many can relate to and found new opportunities he never would have imagined. He's gone on to become the Chief Operating Officer of TYR Tactical and is a board member for Tom and Jenn Satterly's All Secure Foundation, both of which continue to protect those in need. I hope you enjoy this deep dive into combat and recovery from a very humble Tier 1 operator as much as I did. Find Chris Online: Instagram @vansanttyrtactical Website TYR Tactical Board Member at All Secure Foundation (Tom Satterly's organization) Instagram @allsecurefoundation Find Ryan Online: Follow on Instagram @combatstory Follow on Facebook @combatstoryofficial Email ryan@combatstory.com Learn more about Ryan Intro Song: Sport Rock from Audio Jungle Video Edited by: Owen Fugit Show Notes 0:00 - Intro 1:00 - Guest bio 1:52 - Interview begins 2:37 - Chris' thoughts on Afghanistan 14:18 - Where does the exhaustion come from? 17:18 - What are some other interesting fear responses? 17:24 - “Fight or flight is the first response when someone thinks they may die.” 20:11 - The next deployment 30:00 - Tactics and Procedures 32:40 - Different ways to attack a building. 36:23 – When did the trauma and stress start 43:33 – Early Indicators that will help others 48:25 – Pivotal moments during combat 57:39 - “You got to understand the individuals in your charge to get the best out of them; you got to know what motivates them, what makes them tick.” 58:48 – Starting to change 1:09:04 - Key things in your journey that you try to make sure a wider audience hears 1:10:05 - “Open up. Talk to the people that matter to you. It doesn't have to be a lot. It just has to be a few.” 1:13:13 – Getting fired from the Unit 1:18:53 – Pushing yourself 1:19:11 - “There are winners and losers. A loser is just a winner that tried one more time.” 1:22:40 – Pieces of advice 1:31:11 – Getting in touch with Chris

Lord of The Rings Sentence
25. Old Man vs Old Holman (With Clint Page)

Lord of The Rings Sentence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 30:12


A few weeks ago, I wanted to have a Purely Nostalgia Reunion, but Clint couldn't make it. But now he can! Clint is on to talk about a PIVOTAL sentence from The Lord of the Rings. In which, Old Holman is introduced. Follow Clint: @TheClontMan Follow the show: @LOTRSentence Follow TMBC: @ThatMightBeCool

Locked On Cardinals - Daily Podcast On The St. Louis Cardinals Podcast
Another Pivotal Series with Reds this Weekend

Locked On Cardinals - Daily Podcast On The St. Louis Cardinals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 30:33


We're basically in mid-September, no time to waste as the St. Louis Cardinals are looking for a playoff push. They send Jon Lester, Miles Mikolas and J.A. Happ to the mound this weekend looking to find success against the Reds. Can the Cards still find their way in to October? WANT MORE DAILY ST. LOUIS CARDINALS CONTENT? Follow & Subscribe to the Podcast on these platforms…

RowingChat
Tony O'Connor

RowingChat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 58:07


Coach of the New Zealand Olympic gold medal winning eight - Tony talks to us about his journey as a coach. Timestamps 01:00 My journey as a coach - Trinity College Dublin women and novices squads. I became a better rower because of having coached. 03:30 Coaches speak a lot of rubbish. I learned quickly not to say anything that doesn't add value. My little notebook of ideas. 06:50 Rowing drills - your only limit is your imagination The Steve Fairbairn influence 09:30 Do all athletes become coaches? Being a learner and a teacher is different 13:30 My final race as an athlete was 2002 LM2- I became the coach of the national team alongside Thor Nilsen. I felt guilty about jumping to the top of coaching to justify myself in I coached novices 2017 I coached the New Zealand junior - Alan Cotter and Barrie Mabbett invited me to discuss my future 19:30 I got approached again in 2019 for an eight to qualify for Tokyo - a 3 month engagement. 21:00 Qualifying didn't happen in 2019. We need to move together better. Finding the middle ground to get a boat moving. 25:00 If the crew had qualified in 2019 I don't think we would have won the Olympic gold medal. The project almost came to a halt. Sending a crew to Final Qualification Regatta - we were closer to the gold medal standard than others who had medaled and qualified in 2019 27:00 We instilled a better culture in the team The women's team were our shining light - everything they did with positivity and honesty. Pivotal discussions, arguments, tears, shouting matches - we did them all. The tight team - teach the rower to teach themselves. Tom Macintosh is 22 and he stood up and said wha he thought which took courage. 32:00 Know who you are working with - put your dreams in their hands 34:00 seating decisions. We weren't happy at selection. We took 21 days and we tried everything. In any crew there is a magical seating that can gain you distance 39:00 Moving Shaun Kirkham from 3 to 7 seat. 45:00 In Tokyo we went into the repecharge - this was a key moment. You can put some mistakes to bed in a repecharge. The 250-500m section of the race was scratchy. Rate 41 and really in our head 2nd was a good result behind the Dutch. We agreed to chat tonight. It was a "schoolmaster moment". Our next time of the water before the Tokyo Olympic final we did 2 drills - in pairs doing feathered rowing to feel the boat work. And slap catches - try to break the oar to tire out the shoulders make the crew more relaxed. We practiced hitting 38 in our pieces. We had re-iterated our rhythm,. We had to live or die by our rhythm. 50:00 In the final we called stride twice firstly fro 47 down to 42 and the cox Sam Bosworth called it 3 times in the final. 54:00 Sean Colgan told us that the best time to attack is when everyone else is buggered. Tony did not watch the olympic Final but he managed to see the crew come across the line. I don't watch rowing races.....

Wolverine Confidential
Key storylines heading into pivotal Washington matchup

Wolverine Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 24:16


The Wolverines have a lot riding on Saturday's night game at Michigan Stadium. MLive's beat writers preview the matchup against Washington and why it's a pivotal early-season matchup.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cincinnati Edition
New Book Explores Ohio's Role In A Pivotal Civil War Battle

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 17:42


The Battle of Antietam in 1862 was America's deadliest single day on the battlefield. In his new book, Daniel Welch explores Ohio's role in the pivotal clash.

The Engineering Leadership Podcast
Debate! Flat vs. Hierarchical Organizations w/ Farhan Thawar & Jerry Krikheli #60

The Engineering Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 36:05


Welcome to our community's FIRST DEBATE! Farhan Thawar (VPE @ Shopify) & Jerry Krikheli (Sr. Director of Engineering @ Facebook) hash out which org structure should rule them all… Should you go flat? Or should you become a hierarchy? You'll hear how each structure impacts culture, innovation, and velocity! FARHAN THAWAR, VP OF ENGINEERING @ SHOPIFY Farhan Thawar is currently VP, Engineering at Shopify via the acquisition of Helpful.com where he was co-founder and CTO. Previously he was the CTO, Mobile at Pivotal and VP, Engineering at Pivotal Labs via the acquisition of Xtreme Labs. He is an avid writer and speaker and was named one of Toronto's 25 most powerful people. Prior to Xtreme, Farhan held senior technical positions at Achievers, Microsoft, Celestica, and Trilogy. Farhan completed his MBA in Financial Engineering at Rotman and Computer Science/EE at Waterloo. Farhan is also an advisor at yCombinator and holds a board seat at Optiva (formerly Redknee). JERRY KRIKHELI, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING @ FACEBOOK Prior to Facebook, Jerry was VP of Engineering at Houzz where he oversaw all infrastructure, platform, and engineering across Consumer, Marketplace, and Industry Solutions initiatives. Jerry was also an engineering director at Google responsible for developing early versions of the display ad serving infrastructure and launching YouTube ads as well as video ads on mobile apps. He has a passion for building high-performing systems, products, and people. SHOW NOTES The rules of the debate (2:45) Opening Statement: Why hierarchical organizations? (3:39) Opening Statement: Why flat organizations? (6:25) Culture in flat organizations (9:09) Culture in hierarchical organizations (10:55) Culture rebuttals (14:19) Innovation in flat organizations (19:49) Innovation in hierarchical organizations (22:01) Innovation rebuttals (24:57) Velocity in hierarchical organizations (26:05) Velocity in flat organizations (28:42) Closing Statements on Flat vs. Hierarchical (30:16) BROUGHT TO YOU BY... Listen to our Bonus Episode w/ Guillermo Fisher, Director of Engineering, Infrastructure @ Handshake on internal mobility, mission-driven decisions, & self-service infrastructure! Listen HERE: https://spoti.fi/3zdNnXn Special thanks to our exclusive accessibility partner Mesmer! Mesmer's AI-bots automate mobile app accessibility testing to ensure your app is always accessible to everybody. To jump-start, your accessibility and inclusion initiative, visit mesmerhq.com/ELC Looking for other ways to get involved with ELC? Check out all of our upcoming events, peer groups, and other programs at sfelc.com! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/engineeringleadership/message

Locked On Buckeyes
Diving into Three Pivotal Plays in Ohio State's Week 1 Win I 9/7/21

Locked On Buckeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 29:19


Today is the day we begin our first film session of the season. Normally they'll be on Wednesday's, but due to scheduling changes for the week this weeks is on Tuesday. Below you'll find a description for the 3 plays for today's show: - Day helps Stroud get into a groove - Harrison & Mitchell interrupt Ibrahim's plan - Simon perfectly times a blitz Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Kentucky Daily
Episode 273: Kentucky-Missouri to Play Pivotal SEC East Matchup

Kentucky Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 23:03


Shawn Smith (Go Big Blue Country) and Derek Terry (The Cats' Pause/247Sports.com) discuss the upcoming matchup between Kentucky and Missouri at Kroger Field. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Touch 'Em Up!
Episode 179: UFC Vegas 36 Brunson vs Till Predictions and Analysis/BIG UFC FIGHT ANNOUNCEMENTS!! (Riddell vs. Fiziev/Brady vs Chiesa etc).

Touch 'Em Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 85:01


WE'RE BACK!! This Time Breaking Down UFC Vegas 36, Which is Headlined by a Pivotal #1 Contender Fight in The 185lb UFC Middleweight Division Between #5 Ranked Derek Brunson (22-7) and #7 Ranked Darren "The Gorilla" Till (18-3-1)! Who Will Be One Step Closer to Challenging The King at 185lbs? Aside From That, We Discuss Some HUGE Fight Announcements Including A BANGER Between World Class Strikers at 155lbs and a HUGE Step Up In Competition for An Undefeated Welterweight! So, Without any Further a Do, Let's Get This Started and STEP INTO THE RING!!! Donations Accepted Via PayPal: bruceleroyld@aol.com Become a Monthly Supporter!!: https://anchor.fm/marc-m/support UFC, UFC Vegas 36, Darren Till, Derek Brunson --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marc-m/support

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 9/3/2021 (*Encore* Guest: Energy reporter David Roberts on pivotal U.S. climate policy)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 60:00


Independent, investigative news, reporting, interviews and commentary

The Ready State Podcast
Pivotal Coaching: Making the Complex Simple, Connecting the Dots, and Healthy Movement Nutrition

The Ready State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 63:48


Hayley Hollander and Scott Hopson are the co-founders of Pivotal Coaching - a global development company empowering people to fulfill their greatest potential.   Scott is an internationally recognized leader in human performance, coaching and education. In a career spanning 25 years his work has impacted over 100,000 coaches and leaders in more than a 100-countries world-wide. At the heart of his extensive leadership work is the ability to empower and develop people by making the complex simple, to create breakthrough performances. Scott is renowned for his passion and impact in professional coach development and youth coaching. In addition to Pivotal, Scott is co-founder of PTA Global, Education Director for the Gray Institute, a Team EXOS education specialist, and Chairman of the Global Advisory Board at Power Plate.   Over her 20+ year career, Hayley's leadership, programming, and content creation has influenced the masses. She has coached and educated thousands of clients, teams, athletes, and coaches from all over the world. Hayley is renowned for program creation and implementation, and her work can be found in major health club chains, university recreation centers, non-profit wellness centers, and professional sports training centers. In addition to Pivotal, Hayley is the Co-Director of Education for Gray Institute, Precor Master Coach, and Power Plate Master Trainer.   Scott and Hayley join us to talk about connecting with the human inside the human body, rebuilding an industry that is hitting bottom, and healthy movement nutrition.   •   This episode of The Ready State Podcast is sponsored by Paleovalley Beef Sticks. Made from 100% organic grass-fed beef and organic spices, these are hands down our favorite on-the-go protein snack. They are naturally fermented making them shelf stable without chemicals or questionable ingredients, for when you find one in a backpack you haven't used since last summer. For more info and 15% off, go to thereadystate.com/beefsticks   •   This episode of The Ready State Podcast is sponsored by LMNT, our favorite electrolyte drink mix. It was created based on a science-backed electrolyte ratio, with no sugar, no coloring, no artificial ingredients, or any other junk. Everyone needs electrolytes, but if you're an active person and/or on a low-carb diet, you really need electrolytes to feel and perform your best. We drink LMNT every single day and it is our go-to drink for mountain biking. For more info and to get a free sample pack (just pay shipping), go to thereadystate.com/freeLMNT

Uncontested Sports
Yankees Enter Pivotal Stretch, Mets Thumbs Down Fans + NFL Transactions - 8/31/21

Uncontested Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:00


Timestamps:Mets (1:25)Yankees (29:07)News and Notes (48:30)Cam Newton, Deshaun Watson, Bishop Sycamore HS, Trevor Bauer, Islanders, Jets Trades  Follow us!Twitter: @uncontestedpodInstagram: @uncontested_podTikTok: @uncontestedpodJordan DiLuciano: https://twitter.com/JDiluciano15Joe Ibraham: https://twitter.com/joeibrahamMike Ringle: https://twitter.com/mikeringle#uncontestedsports #sportspodcast #newyorksports

KSDK's Sports Plus
Cardinals hit pivotal point of 2021, Mizzou and Illinois football previews and Mike Shannon's curtain call

KSDK's Sports Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 16:11


The Cardinals are clinging to a chance and we're breaking it down. This week on the Sports Plus Podcast Frank Cusumano and Andy Mohler join Corey Miller to take a look at the recent Cardinals' news and how they somehow still have a legitimate shot at making the playoffs. The group also looks at how the 2021-2022 season could shake out for area college football programs Mizzou and Illinois. The spotlight interview this week is Cardinals broadcaster Mike Shannon, who has just a few games remaining before he retires from a 50-year career in the booth. Be sure to download and subscribe to the Sports Plus Podcast as well as rate and review wherever you get your podcasts.

The 5 Minute Basketball Coaching Podcast
Ep: 165 Pivotal Coaching Moment Coach with Matt Raidbard

The 5 Minute Basketball Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 5:44


Make sure to join us at https://teachhoops.com/ Basketball coach, Basketball workouts, Basketball dribbling drills, Youth basketball, Basketball drills, Youth basketball, Basketball coaching, Basketball jobs, Basketball job, Basketball interview, Basketball program, How to win basketball games, Teachhoops, Teachhoops.com, Teach hoops, www.teachhoops, Basketball podcast, The basketball podcast, Basketball coach podcast, Basketball coaching podcast, Basketball coach unplugged, Basketball coach unplugged podcast, High school hoops podcast, Hardwood hustle, Basketball immersion, Key 5 coaching, Basketball jobs near me, 5 minute basketball coaching podcast, Basketball coaching jobs, Basketball coaching near me, Basketball  immersion podcast, Basketball Drill, Basketball Tip of the day, Basketball tip, Basketball coaching tips, Basketball tip, 5 minute basketball coaching podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

CoIQ with Dr. Roxie
100 conversations: How to spot a pivotal ‘aha' moment w/ Josh Oppenheimer

CoIQ with Dr. Roxie

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 42:09


You have an idea, a solution, a vision! And you know exactly how, when, and where that vision will fit in the market and make a difference. Until you don't. You could have the most pivotal and impactful solution to come to market in decades - but if your market fit isn't right, or is off - even just a little - that could mean failure. Conversations with your customers can be the key to making sure your solution hits the market exactly where it needs to be for your target audience to utilize it. Dr. Josh Oppenheimer can tell you a story or two about the importance of those conversations. (Hint: because if you have 99 of them, the 100th could reveal your ‘aha' moment!) Come hear how Josh and his company built a culture around conversations, and why those conversations - internally and externally - can make all the difference in finding success. Here are the show highlights: 4 lessons to keep in mind when trying to secure a healthcare champion (13:04) What cross-country structuring looks like for a company (17:42) This is how you increase your chances to secure funding (21:19) The regulatory differences between SAMD and traditional medical devices (22:32) Successfully pivot your business model (24:54) Humility, transparency, and collaboration: building the right company culture (28:48) Guest Bio Dr. Josh Oppenheimer is an emergency medicine physician and the co-founder and CEO of Transformative, an AI-based predictive patient monitoring software company. From the start of his career, Dr. Oppenheimer knew he wanted to be more than a physician - he wanted to make a difference and have a positive impact on the healthcare industry. Josh immersed himself in the world of business academia and he further pushed the boundaries of the knowledge he could gain by attending business school in the UK. He earned his AB from Princeton University, his M.D. from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and his MBA from Cambridge Judge Business School. If you'd like to reach out to Dr. Oppenheimer, you can use the contact form on his website at transformative.ai, or you can find him on LinkedIn at Josh Oppenheimer, MD, MBA.

Influence Yourself 1st
Being In Community is Pivotal

Influence Yourself 1st

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 5:34


Being In Community is Pivotal Have you experienced the magic and transformation of being apart of a purposeful community? The concept of community is underrated yet overflowing all over the internet. It was not until I joined an organization that not only empowered me but held me accountable for the goals I set forth. Have you found your tribe? If not, this episode is for you.Your action step: Rate the show HERE  and share what resonated with you in this episode. Chinitha's new video series  MY LIFE IN 365  is available on Facebook and Youtube.  This series is a year long project where she challenges herself by visually tracking her productivity and accountability.Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/chinithajohnson)

Locked On Dolphins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Dolphins
Which 2021 Dolphins Rookie Is The Most Pivotal? (with guest Joe Rose)

Locked On Dolphins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Dolphins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 31:14


Joe Rose joins the show to talk about the Dolphins' OL, the surprise emergence of some Dolphins and which Dolphins rookie is most pivotal to 2021.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 8/13/2021 (Guest: Energy reporter David Roberts on pivotal U.S. climate policy)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 58:17


OverDrive
Gregor Chisholm on pivotal Jays/Sox series, strength of rotation, & more.

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 14:32


Toronto Star Jays Columnist Gregor Chisholm joins OverDrive to discuss how important this weekend's series again the RedSox will be. He chats about the rotation decision and who will shake out as the 5th starter down the stretch. Chisholm then discusses the impact Pete Walker has had on this pitching staff. He also talks about Bo Bichette being the forgotten star on the team despite being a massive piece of the puzzle. An he finishes up the conversation speaking glowingly about the Jays ability to sign George Springer

DawgNation Daily
Episode 1496: Mixed opinions about JT Daniels' outlook ahead of pivotal season

DawgNation Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 61:47


DawgNation Daily -- the daily podcast for Georgia Bulldogs fans Beginning of the show: A look at conflicting opinions regarding how successful UGA QB JT Daniels is likely to be this season. 10-minute mark: A recap of the latest recruiting news -- including thoughts on new Bulldogs commit Dillon Bell, a three-star WR from Texas. 20-minute mark: DawgNation's Connor Riley joins the show. 40-minute mark: I take a look at other SEC headlines including LSU WB Myles Brennan's arm injury. End of show: I award a Golden Shoe winner and update the Gator Hater Countdown.

Typology
Kara Powell Shares the 3 Pivotal Questions We All Should Answer (Enneagram 3) [S04-058]

Typology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 48:53


Wouldn't it be great if you had an arsenal of conversation starters for the young adults in your life?  Today's guest, Dr. Kara E. Powell joins me for an important conversation on how to best communicate with teenagers and young adults.  We explore the 3 pivotal questions to ask young adults and share strategies for developing better, more life-giving answers to those questions.  In their new book, Dr. Kara Powell and Brad Griffin offer 300 conversation starters and connection ideas that are crucial not only for young people to be able to answer but also for our own development and personal growth as adults. Listen as we weave the role of the Enneagram throughout the conversation then share this episode with your friends and family. And as a special offer, visit https://3bigquestionsbook.com/typology to get 40 additional conversation starters PLUS a free chapter of 3 Big Questions to help better connect with teenagers and young adults.    

BEYOND BARRIERS
Episode172: Unleashing The Rare Breed with Sunny Bonnell

BEYOND BARRIERS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 41:51


Have you ever been called obsessed, rebellious, or even hot blooded? Meet our guest, Sunny Bonnell, Co-Author of Rare Breed: A Guide to Success for the Defiant, Dangerous, and Different. Witnessing an alarming lack of acceptance for unique people and “crazy” ideas that don't fit the mold, Sunny co-authored Rare Breed as a manifesto for tearing up the rule book and succeeding on your own terms. In addition to Rare Breed, Sunny Bonnell and co-author Ashleigh Hansberger are also creators of Rare Breed, the popular YouTube series, and founders of the game-changing leadership and brand consultancy, Motto. Named Inc. 30 Under 30, GDUSA Top 25 People to Watch, Sunny and Ashleigh have been featured by Entrepreneur, Yahoo!, Forbes, Wall Street Journal, The Breakfast Club and hundreds more. They have earned their way to the front of a workplace revolution and have devoted their work to inspiring people to think with the Rare Breed Mindset and demand more of themselves, their careers, and their companies. In this episode, Sunny shares the vices for mavericks, oddballs, and visionaries and how there are two sides to each vice. She also shares highlights from her book, advice on shattering the glass ceiling, and why she lives by the mantra, “learn to succeed because of who you are, not despite who you are”. Visit https://www.iambeyondbarriers.com where you will find show notes and links to all the resources in this episode, including the best way to get in touch with Sunny. Highlights: [02:40] Sunny's story [06:42] Building a branding agency [09:53] Pivotal moments in Rare Breed's history [14:52] Highlights from the book Rare Breed [19:30] The two sides to our vices [24:06] What companies should be asking when looking for rare breeds [27:17] Which company has most embraced the rare breeds [30:23] Sunny's advice to shattering glass ceilings [37:35] Sunny's message to the world Quotes: “The leadership & mindset of a company affect culture and brand.” – Sunny Bonnell “Learn to succeed because of who you are, not despite who you are.” – Sunny Bonnell “Show up and make your presence known. Don't sit back with brilliant ideas and hold your tongue because you think you're going to get experience a negative consequence.” - Sunny Bonnell   About Sunny Bonnell: Sunny Bonnell and Ashleigh Hansberger inspire a new kind of leadership thinking which they share in their bold talks and unconventional book Rare Breed: A Guide to Success for the Defiant, Dangerous, and Different. For over fifteen years at their leadership and brand consultancy, Motto, the dynamic duo have been teaching leaders how to dismantle business-as-usual using Rare Breed thinking to deviate from the norm and challenge the status quo. In their book, Sunny and Ashleigh help leaders and those who strive to be leaders, develop a Rare Breed Mindset®, a thought framework based on seven unconventional traits they've identified as the source of radical differentiation and power in business and life. It is this philosophy that has garnered the attention of clients like Google, Microsoft, the NFL, and Hershey's. Witnessing an alarming lack of acceptance for unique people and “crazy” ideas that don't fit the mold, Sunny and Ashleigh responded with their book, Rare Breed, which has become the go-to business manifesto for tearing up the rule book and succeeding on your own terms. In turn, the Rare Breed Mindset® builds stronger, more inspiring, and more innovative companies and teams. Not only do they speak, write, talk, and teach, Sunny and Ashleigh also consult virtually around the globe on how leaders can think, act, and innovate more like a Rare Breed amid the COVID disruption and cultural shifts. When not leading their team of Rare Breeds at Motto, they give inspiring keynotes where they share their audacious story of dropping out of college with $250 in their early twenties to found their award-winning consultancy, as well as provocative advice on how to turn doubt into determination, failure into fuel, and angst into ambition. They've been named Inc. 30 Under 30, GDUSA Top 25 People to Watch, and interviewed by Entrepreneur, Forbes, Yahoo!, Wall Street Journal, The Breakfast Club and hundreds more. They've also spoken at Dale Carnegie's Exceed Culture, Fossil, Small Giants, Inc. GROWCO, The Dallas Society of Visual Communicators, Radio and Audio Summit to name a few.   Links: Website: https://rarebreedleaders.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/rarebreedleaders https://www.linkedin.com/in/sunnybonnell/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rarebreedleaders/ https://www.instagram.com/sunnybonnell/  

The NewsWorthy
‘Pivotal Moment' in Pandemic, Tokyo Opening Ceremony & Alexa's Masculine Side- Friday, July 23rd, 202

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 13:11


The news to know for Friday, July 23rd, 2021! We'll tell you about the CDC director's urgent warning about the delta variant of COVID-19 and why it might be especially tough to figure out how the pandemic came to be. Also, the U.S. mission in Afghanistan now includes both airstrikes and evacuations. We'll explain. Plus, why California is suing a popular video game company, how another internet outage brought down tons of big-name sites, and what you can expect from the Olympics opening ceremony today. Those stories and more in around 10 minutes! Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by Rothys.com/newsworthy and BetterHelp.com/newsworthy Become a NewsWorthy INSIDER! Learn more at www.TheNewsWorthy.com/insider