Podcasts about Newcastle University

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Best podcasts about Newcastle University

Latest podcast episodes about Newcastle University

New Books in Policing, Incarceration, and Reform
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Policing, Incarceration, and Reform

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Really Interesting Women
Professor Jenny Martin

Really Interesting Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 41:15


Ep. 87 Professor Jenny MartinJenny Martin is a dual-trained clinical pharmacologist and practicing general physician, has studied politics and health economics at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, is serving as Chair of Clinical Pharmacology in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle and is the Director of Australian Centre for Cannabinoid Clinical and Research Excellence (ACRE),On principle she resigned from Newcastle University's council in protest over the appointment of former deputy Prime Minister and Chair of Whitehaven Coal, Mark Vaile to the position of Chancellor of that University. Such was the feeling in the community, his appointment did not go ahead and she was reappointed to the position by popular demand. So, as a practicing physician, teacher, researcher, multiple committee and editorial board member, and mother of four, you might wonder where she finds the time to join me in conversation. I'm certainly curious. Oh… I nearly forgot, she's due in 2023 to also take up the position of President of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Have a listen to Professor Jenny Martin's episode on Really Interesting Women. 

New Books Network
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Critical Theory
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in African American Studies
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Sociology
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in British Studies
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in European Studies
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Public Policy
Adam Elliott-Cooper, "Black Resistance to British Policing" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Public Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:13


As police racism unsettles Britain's tolerant self-image, Black Resistance to British Policing (Manchester UP, 2021) details the activism that made movements like Black Lives Matter possible. Adam Elliott-Cooper analyses racism beyond prejudice and the interpersonal - arguing that black resistance confronts a global system of racial classification, exploitation and violence. Imperial cultures and policies, as well as colonial war and policing highlight connections between these histories and contemporary racisms. But this is a book about resistance, considering black liberation movements in the 20th century while utilising a decade of activist research covering spontaneous rebellion, campaigns and protest in the 21st century. Drawing connections between histories of resistance and different kinds of black struggle against policing is vital, it is argued, if we are to challenge the cutting edge of police and prison power which harnesses new and dangerous forms of surveillance, violence and criminalisation. Black Resistance to British Policing is a must read for all those who are interested in the history of the British Empire, its enduring legacies, and anti-colonial and anti-racist resistance. Adam Elliot-Cooper is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Public and Social Policy at Queen Mary University of London. He is also co-author of Empire's Endgame: Racism and the British State (Pluto Press, 2021). He sits on the board of The Monitoring Group, an anti-racist organisation challenging state racisms and racial violence. Deniz Yonucu is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology at Newcastle University. Her work focuses on counterinsurgency, policing and security, surveillance, left-wing and anti-colonial resistance, memory, racism, and emerging digital control technologies. Her book, Police, Provocation, Politics Counterinsurgency in Istanbul (Cornell University Press, 2022), presents a counterintuitive analysis of policing, focusing particular attention on the incitement of counterviolence and perpetual conflict by state security apparatus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

Perth Live with Oliver Peterson
Does the rise in 'true crime' entertainment glamorise criminals?

Perth Live with Oliver Peterson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 10:38


True crime has become one of the most popular entertainment genres in today's times. However, series like Netflix's new serial killer drama Dahmer, that follows the story of the infamous monster murderer, has raised concerns around the ethics of these shows and whether they glorify criminals. Xanthe Mallett, Criminologist from the Newcastle University told Mark Gibson on Perth Live that there is a high risk in creating these true crime shows especially for the families who were affected by these horrible crimes.  "Whilst many of us feel this need to understand the offenders - there is always that danger that it becomes voyeuristic and a path through the worst things that happened in a families life rather than something that is going to educate and move a case forward," she told Mark. "There is a fine path to tread so it doesn't just become pure entertainment at other people's loss. "You forget that there are families that every time these stories are told, it re-traumatises the events for them."See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Is Nashville
Exploring what it means to be ‘Nashville nice'

This Is Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 50:38


When it comes to manners and etiquette, every city has its local quirks. So we explore the question: What is “Nashville Nice”? This is the South, so you're likely to hear a good old fashioned “bless your heart” on a regularly basis. But there's more to unpack. So we explore some of the origins and nuances of Music City's social graces with our panel — as well the potential downsides of keeping up an appearance of niceness. But first, it's our weekly @Us segment. Guests: Freda Player, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools Board of Education, District 7 Dr. Carole Bucy, Davidson County historian Tracey Hughes Royal, principal of Tracey Royal Communications and CEO business mentor for Pinnacle Global Network Vali Forrister, co-founder and producing artistic director, Actors Bridge Ensemble Benjamin Houston, senior lecturer at Newcastle University; author of The Nashville Way: Racial Etiquette and the Struggle for Social Justice in a Southern City

EACCNY Pulse: Transatlantic Business Insights
10. Future of Finance: The Power of Sanctions

EACCNY Pulse: Transatlantic Business Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 23:11


This episode of “A look into the Crystal Ball on the Future of Finance,” features Bill Rhodes, Former Chairman & CEO of CITIBANK, and current President & CEO of WILLIAM R. RHODES GLOBAL ADVISORS, and Dr. Stuart P.M. Mackintosh, Executive Director of the GROUP OF THIRTY. They will be discussing the Power of Sanctions. Can the use of Sanctions in lieu of Military action really make a difference? If so, will the difference be significant enough? William R. Rhodes, Former Chairman & CEO, Citibank, and President & CEO, William R. Rhodes Global AdvisorsMr. Rhodes gained a reputation for international financial diplomacy in the 1980s as a result of his leadership in helping manage the external-debt crises that involved developing nations and their creditors worldwide. During that period and in the 1990s, he headed the advisory committees of international banks that negotiated debt-restructuring agreements for Argentina, Brazil, Jamaica, Mexico, Peru, the Republic of Korea, and Uruguay. He has since served as a trusted advisor to governments, financial officials and corporations worldwide.He has received decorations and honors from various governments and institutions in recognition of his contributions to international banking and finance.Dr. Stuart P. M. Mackintosh, Executive Director, GROUP OF 30Stuart P.M. Mackintosh is the Executive Director of the Group of Thirty an international financial think tank comprised senior figures from central banking, the financial sector, and academia.  His research focus centers on climate change, macroeconomic and systemic risks, global governance issues, and the international political economy.Dr. Mackintosh has served as President of the National Association for Business Economics (NABE), the largest professional organization of economists in the United States. He is an elected member of the Conference of Business Economists, comprised of the leading economists in North America. He is a certified Business Economist.Dr. Mackintosh has a B.A. and Ph.D. from Newcastle University and a M.Sc. from the University of Edinburgh. In 2018 Dr. Mackintosh was appointed a non-resident Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University.

The Unfinished Print
Lucy May Schofield - Printmaker: Light, Time, Process

The Unfinished Print

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 94:30


The time and dedication that it takes to make mokuhanga is well known. And if it isn't then it really should be. It feels that it's easy to follow social media, and watch the pretty prints come out of nowhere, but behind all those nice pictures is a lot of hard work, and dedication. One person who is a prime example of this hard work, dedication and passion for the craft, is Lucy May Schofield. Based in England, Lucy has been making mokuhanga for some time. She has travelled the world, using her environment, and her passion to create mokuhanga that is expressive and powerful.  On this episode of The Unfinished Print, I speak with Lucy about how she discovered mokuhanga, her time at MI Lab, Lucy's love of bokashi,  and her mokuhanga relationships; those that have helped her along the way. Lucy also speaks on the Mokuhanga Sisters Collective, how grants and scholarships assist in Lucy's artistic pursuits, as well as how her other artistic endeavours affect her mokuhanga. Lucy's is a story which explores independence, pilgrimage, freedom, and how it affects a persons life.  Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own mokuhanga work on Instagram @andrezadoroznyprints Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com  Artists works follow after the note about them. Notes: may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase. Artists works follow after the note. Lucy May Schofield - website, Instagram Rebecca Salter - is the President of The Royal Academy of Arts, in London, England. She is also an artist who has written two books about Japanese woodblock printing, Japanese Woodblock Printing (2001), and Japanese Popular Prints (2006). She worked with the Satō Woodblock Print Workshop, documenting their process. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Untitled 2015-14 (2015) Royal Academy of Arts - is an English art institution which as been in operation for 250 years. More info, here.  Fukuoka, Prefecture, Japan - is a Prefecture in the second most southern part of the Japanese archipelago.  It is known for is temples, hot springs, and natural beauty. Fukuoka tourist website, here. kotatsu - is a low table, electrically heated by an internal heater underneath the table itself, more info, here.  Munakata Shikō (志功棟方) - (1903-1975) arguably one of the most famous modern printmakers, Shiko is famous for his prints of women, animals, the supernatural, and Buddhist deities. He made his prints with an esoteric fervour where his philosophies about mokuhanga were just as interesting as his print work.  Hizakura no Saku (1978) colour lithograph New Year Card - called nengajo (年賀状) in Japanese, these cards have been traditionally passed from person to person  since the Heian Period (794-1185). Mokuhanga practitioners make them as well, creating a new one every year focusing on the zodiac sign of the year as a theme. shina - is a type of wood used in mokuhanga. It is part of the linden family of trees. This wood is produced in various parts of the world, such as Japan and Russia. Not all shina is created equal so buyer beware. magnolia wood - a straight grained hard wood located in North America and Asia. more info, here. washi paper - (和紙) is a type of Japanese paper made with the fibres of either gampi, mitsumata, or mulberry. It is versatile and can be used in many ways.  International Mokuhanga Conference - is a bi-yearly conference dedicated to mokuhanga which started in 2011 by the International Mokuhanga Association. Each conference is themed. The latest conference was in 2021, delayed a year because of the pandemic. More information can be found, here.  Ralph Kiggell (1960-2022) -  was one of the most important mokuhanga practitioners to have made work. Originally from England, Ralph lived and worked in Thailand. Ralph pushed the boundaries of mokuhanga with extremely large pieces, jigsaw carving, and by using fantastic colour for his work. He also worked with the International Mokuhanga Conference to promote mokuhanga around the world. He will be greatly missed. Ralph's work can be found, here. His obituary in The Guardian can be found, here. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. Pool Diver (1996) Keiko Hara - is an artist who works, and teaches in Walla Walla, Washington. She is a painter, and printmaker in various relief mediums, such as mokuhanga.  Untitled (2019) Keiko Kadota - (d. 2017) was a director of MI Lab and of Nagasawa Art Park, previously. She was a mentor to many mokuhanga practitioners and helped to promote mokuhanga around the world. MI Lab - is a mokuhanga residency located in Kawaguchi-ko, near Mount Fuji. More info can be found, here.  Kate MacDonagh - is an Irish mokuhanga printmaker based in Dublin, Ireland. Kanreki was an exhibition curated by Kate MacDonagh at The Model, Sligo. Kate's website. Katsutoshi Yuasa - is a printmaker and artist based in Tokyo, Japan. His work tends to be large scale, and created through photography, bits, and focuses on the overall "image" itself. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. website, Instagram I-know-not-what (2022) oil-based mokuhanga kirazruri  - is a style of printing which uses mica to give a silver, glittering tone to the print. Mica is used as a lovely addition to your print. You can find more information, here.  Hiroki Satake - is a mokuhanga printmaker, and instructor based in Japan. He has taught at MI Lab, as well as given demonstrations regarding tool sharpening, around the world.  Carol Wilhide Justin - is a mokuhanga printmaker based in London, England. Her work focuses on the natural world and the process of making mokuhanga. Carol's interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Asemic Writing  Tochigi, Prefecture - is a Japanese Prefecture sandwiched between Saitama, Ibaraki, Fukushima, and Gunma Prefectures. It is famous for its autumnal leaves,  temples, and UNESCO World Heritage Site, Nikkō. More info, here.  Nishijin - is an area in Fukuoka City known for its shopping district.  inaka (田舎) - is a Japanese word for “country-side.” Kurokawa Onsen (黒川温泉) - is a hot spring town located on the island of Kyushu, near Mount Aso, the largest active volcano in Japan. It is famous of its traditional style inns, hot springs, baths, and food. More info, here.   Beppu (別府市) - is a hot spring town located in Kyushu. More info, here. matsuri (祭り)- is the Japanese word for “festival.” Japan is a country famous of it's festivals. Each Prefecture, city, town, municipality has a special festival for their area, connected to the seasons, gods, or harvests.  Itoshima (糸島市) - is a city in Fukuoka Prefecture, popular for its beaches, surfing, and nature.  Northumberland, Britain - is a county located in the northernmost area of Britain. It shares a border with Scotland. It is known for its nature, industry, castles, and history. https://www.visitnorthumberland.com cyanotype -  a type of work which uses iron compounds, and when exposed to UV light creates various blues. More info, here.  Indigo dyeing - made famous in the Edo Period (1603-1968), indigo dyeing has been a part of Japanese handicrafts for a long time. Shikoku is famous for it, towns such as Mima, Wakimachi, Tokushima, amongst others continue to produce hand dyed garments of indigo.More info can be found, here, and here.  Awagami -  is arguably the largest paper making company in Japan at the moment. With a large International name, Awagami sponsors, and promotes its paper all over the world. More information can be found on its website, here.  88 Temple Pilgrimage - associated with the Buddhist priest Kōbō Daishi (Kūkai) [774-835]. It is one of the few circular pilgrimages in the world. You can walk, or drive the pilgrimage. You can also see it in parts, called kuguri-uchi. Essentially you can walk this pilgrimage in order, backwards or frontwards as they are all temples associated with Kūkai. If you do make the pilgrimage by foot, it is a commitment, but extremely rewarding. Pilgrims are called ō-henro. More info, here.   Ō-settai - are gifts, such as lodging, food, money, or clothing. They are given by non-pilgrims to pilgrims on they journey of the 88 Temples. More info can be found, here. QEST - is the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust, and is given to British craftspeople who are given money to pursue training and education in their specific field and medium.  More info, here.  kōzo - is a paper made from the bark of the mulberry bush. It is used in mokuhanga frequently, and comes in various weights. YInMn - is a blue colour discovered by Professor Mas Subramanian in 2009.  Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) -  was an American abstract impressionist painter who enjoyed experimenting, discovering new ways of expression through paint. More info, here.  Echizen - is a region in Fukui Prefecture, Japan associated with Japanese paper making. It has a long history of paper making. There are many paper artisans in the area. One famous person is Iwano Ichibei whom Megan mentions in this episode. He is a Living National Treasure in paper making, and the ninth generation of his family still making paper today. More info can be found here in English, and here in Japanese.  Paul Furneaux - is a Scottish born mokuhanga printmaker and teacher who uses the medium of  mokuhanga in order to create pieces of work that are third dimensional, and abstract.  The Mokuhanga Sisters - are a mokuhanga collective consisting of Yoonmi Nam, Mariko Jesse, Lucy May Schofield, Melissa Schulenberg, Kate MacDonagh, Katie Baldwin, Mia-O, Patty Hudak, and Natasha Norman. Instagram Yasuyuki Sato - is the Chair of Center for the Science of Human Endeavor/CfSHE, and Director of the Mokuhanga Conference.  Yoonmi Nam (b. 1974) - is a contemporary mokuhanga printmaker, lithographer, sculptor, and teacher, based in Lawrence, Kansas. Her work can be found, here. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. More Beer...For Instance (2013) Katie Baldwin - a woodblock printmaker, letterpress, screen printer. website, Instagram Raft (shore) #2 (2013) Mariko Jesse - is an illustrator, and mokuhanga printmaker based in Tōkyō, London, and California. Her work can be found, here. Mariko is also a part of the collective, wood+paper+box, which can be found, here.  Between Times - folded screen with mokuhanga wood+paper+box - is a collaborative art group made up of Katie Baldwin, Mariko Jesse, and Yoonmi Nam. It is based on their experiences at Nagasawa Art Park, the precursor of MI Lab.  Patty Hudak - is an American artist who splits her time between Vermont and NYC, who works in installation, and mokuhanga. She has travelled the world, and is a part of three artist collectives. Patty's interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.    Melissa Schulenberg - is a woodblock printmaker and professor of Art and Art History at St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY. Some of her work can be found, here.  Newcastle University - is a public research university located in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Britain. London College of Printing - now called the London College of Communication, is an art college associated with the University of the Arts London.  Toshio Sayama - is an instructor at MI Lab as well as on the MI Lab Committee Board.  Borderless scroll - is the Mokuhanga Sisters collaborative scroll. Shown in Nara during the International Mokuhanga Conference, as well as at the Southern Vermont Art Center. nori - is a type of paste made from starch. It is usually used when making mokuhanga. You can make nori from any type of material made of starch. For instance, paste can be made with tapioca,  rice, corn, even potato. You can purchase nori pretty much anywhere but making it is more environmentally friendly. Laura Boswell has a great recipe, here.  bokashi -  is a Japanese term associated with the gradation of water into ink. There are several types of bokashi. For more information regarding these types of bokashi please check out Professor Claire Cuccio's lecture called “A Story in Layers,” for the Library of Congress, and the book Japanese Printmaking by Tōshi Yoshida, and Rei Yuki. Below are the following types of bokashi. This is from the Yoshida book: ichimonji bokashi - straight line gradation ichimonji mura bokashi - straight line gradation with an uneven edg. Ō-bokashi - a gradual shading over a wide area atenashi bokashi - gradation without definition futairo bokashi - two tone gradation Utamaro - A Prelude To Desire Series - is a series created by Kitagawa Utamaro (1750-1806) in 1799. His designs changed the whole perspective of shunga, erotic prints. Below is as print as designed by Utamaro and Lucy's self-produced print, Prelude To Desire IV.  shunga (春画)- is a type of mokuhanga which is connected with the ukiyo-e period of the Japanese print. The theme is sexuality, whether male-female, or male-male. Many print designers helped to create these prints, and were very popular.  Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858) - born in Edo, Hiroshige is famous for his landscape series of that burgeoning city. The most famous series being, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (1856-1859), and the landcape series, Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō (1833-1834). His work highlights bokashi, and bright colours. More info about his work can be found, here.  Ōmayagashi - from One Hundred Famous Views of Edo Northumberland National Park - is a park in Northumberland , England. It is considered a “dark skies” park where the night sky is preserved by having no artificial lighting in the area. Holbein -  is a pigment company with offices located in Japan, The United States, and Canada. They offer high end gouache, watercolour, and pigment pastes.  scrolls - called kakemono 掛物 or emakimono 絵巻物  in Japanese. These scrolls contain many different types of themes and subjects. More info can be found, here.  The Legend of Gisho Turner Design Gouache - is a company based in Osaka, Japan. The make acrylic and design (water based) gouache.  Oak gall - is a type of plant swelling, which can be found in various plants. Oak gall is made by the Gall Wasp. The ink and pigment made form oak gall has been used for centuries. hanshita - is a thin sheet of gampi paper that is pasted, reverse side, on a piece of wood. This is a guide, carved onto the block and is generally used for the key block and subsequent colour blocks. Methods such as acetate with water based pigment, can also be used rather than the thin gampi paper, which can cause misregistration if not pasted correctly. The Japanese Paper Place - is a Toronto based Japanese paper store servicing the Mokuhanga community for many years.  Interview with the Nancy Jacobi of the JPP can be found, here. Ozuwashi -  is a brick and mortar paper store located in the Nihonbashi district of Tōkyō. More info here. You can purchase all types of paper that Lucy mentions ion her interview, such as pansion, and sekishu. Chine-collé - is a two layered printmaking process where the paper is  placed onto an inked metal plated run through a press. More info, here.  © Popular Wheat Productions opening and closing musical credit - The Smiths - The Headmaster Ritual from the album Meat Is Murder (1985) logo designed and produced by Douglas Batchelor and André Zadorozny  Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podcast without shooting me an email and getting my express written or verbal consent. I'm friendly :) Слава Україну If you find any issue with something in the show notes please let me know. ***The opinions expressed by guests in The Unfinished Print podcast are not necessarily those of André Zadorozny and of Popular Wheat Productions.***    

CPD Junkie Podcast
Dr Michael Burgess

CPD Junkie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 63:15


MEET DR MICHAEL BURGESS He is a Maxillofacial Surgeon in Brisbane, who completed his Dentistry at Sydney Uni. in 2004 and worked with his Dad in Newcastle for 2 years before beginning his pathway into Maxillofacial Surgery; completing Medicine at Newcastle University, and then Intern and Residency in the Hunter/New England region. Now working in Brisbane with subspecialty interest in TMJ surgery and running private practice as well as working at the Mater Public and the Queensland Children's Hospital. Enjoy as Dr Laurence Doan chats with Dr Michael Burgess! _________________________________________________________________________________ Socials: Website: www.drmichaelburgess.com.au Check out our website: www.cpdjunkie.com.au Music: Dreams - Bensound | Support by RFM - NCM #dentalCPD #dentistry #australiandentist #dentistryaustralia #dentalCE #continuingeducation #photography #radiology #prosthodontics #implants #endodontics #sleepapnoea #aestheticdentistry #oralsurgery #orthodontics #2021events #dental #dentalschool #dentistrystudent #australia #sydney #melbourne #dentalevents #dentaleventsaustralia #dentaleducation _________________________________________ DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE COPY OF THE CPD JUNKIE EXCLUSIVE ANTERIOR COMPOSITE RESTORATION CHEAT SHEET BY RENOWNED AESTHETIC DENTIST DR. CLARENCE TAM https://www.cpdjunkie.com.au/aestheticscheatsheet/

IOE insights, debates, lectures, interviews
Dilemma-based facilitation: experienced facilitators share what goes wrong for them… and what they do about it | ECF Staffroom

IOE insights, debates, lectures, interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 38:04


Stephanie Bingham is the Regional Lead for ECF for Newcastle University and the North-East Teaching School Partnership. Stephanie works with dozens of schools and school induction leads, and she shares her insights about successful implementation of the ECF programme. Full show notes, links and transcript: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/news/2022/aug/dilemma-based-facilitation-experienced-facilitators-share-what-goes-wrong-them-s01e02 --- The ECF Staffroom series speaks to Early Career Teachers, mentors and participants at all levels of the UCL Early Career Teacher Development programme.

That Triathlon Show
Neuromuscular fatigue - mechanisms and applications with Callum Brownstein, PhD | EP#355

That Triathlon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 60:50 Very Popular


Callum Brownstein, PhD, is a lecturer in exercise physiology at Newcastle University. Callum has conducted extensive research in fatigability, and the mechanisms of neuromuscular fatigue in (among others) endurance exercise. In this interview, we dive deep into the mechanisms and applications of neuromuscular fatigue in an endurance sports context.  IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN ABOUT: -What is fatigue?  -Differentiating between impairments in contractile function ("peripheral fatigue") and voluntary activation ("central fatigue") -How can fatigue and its underlying mechanisms be measured?  -Different fatigue mechanisms in cycling vs. running -Differences in magnitude of fatigue and fatigue mechanisms between the different intensity domains -The impact of exercise duration on fatigue -Practical applications for triathletes and endurance athletes SHOWNOTES: https://scientifictriathlon.com/tts355/ SCIENTIFIC TRIATHLON AND THAT TRIATHLON SHOW WEBPAGE: www.scientifictriathlon.com/podcast/ SPONSORS: ROKA - Exceptional quality triathlon wetsuits, trisuits, swimskins, goggles, performance sunglasses as well as prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses.  Online vision test for prescription updates and home try-on options available for eyeglasses. Ships from the US, UK and EU. Trusted by world-leading athletes such as  Lucy Charles-Barclay, Javier Gómez Noya, Flora Duffy, Morgan Pearson, Summer Rappaport and others in triathlon, cycling, speed skating, and many more. Visit roka.com/tts for 20% off your order. ZEN8 - The ZEN8 Indoor Swim Trainer is a one of a kind swim bench for time-crunched triathletes looking to improve their swim technique, power and propulsion, and consistency of swim training. It is very affordable, about the price of a pair of running shoes, and Zen8 offer free shipping in the US and the UK. Best of all, you can try it risk-free. If you don't love it after two weeks, send it back and get a full refund. Get 20% off your order at zen8swimtrainer.com/tts. LINKS AND RESOURCES: Callum's Twitter and Research Gate Disparate Mechanisms of Fatigability in Response to Prolonged Running versus Cycling of Matched Intensity and Duration - Brownstein et al. 2022 Power Output Manipulation from Below to Above the Gas Exchange Threshold Results in Exacerbated Performance Fatigability - Brownstein et al. 2022 Neuromuscular responses to fatiguing locomotor exercise - Brownstein et al. 2022 Durability in endurance sports with Ed Maunder, PhD and Stephen Seiler, Phd | EP#295 Carbohydrates - science and practice with Tim Podlogar, PhD | EP#354 VLaMax, Polarised training, Fatigue and Complexity with Mark Burnley, PhD | EP#331 Muscle and Exercise Physiology - book by Jerzy Zoladz RATE AND REVIEW: If you enjoy the show, please help me out by subscribing, rating and reviewing: www.scientifictriathlon.com/rate/ CONTACT: Want to send feedback, questions or just chat? Email me at mikael@scientifictriathlon.com or connect on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter.

Table Talk
313: The crucial role of nutrition in reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 38:32


The World Health Organization says there are four-times as many people with Type 2 Diabetes today than there were just 30 years ago. Type 2 Diabetes is often called a “lifestyle disease”, with inactivity and an unhealthy diet greatly increasing the risk of developing it.   Food is a central part of the cause and appears to be a major part of the solution.      So what role has the food industry played in the huge rise in cases, and what role it might be able to play in bringing them down? This episode also delves into the advice given to people to avoid developing Type 2 Diabetes and looks at the work being done to reverse the condition in those who have it. For both of the above, we ask: Is general advice applicable to everyone, or do we need to adopt a more personalised approach? Listen to the full episode to find out what happens deep within someone's body when they go intro remission, how much is known about diabetes in people in all populations, and where anyone worried about Type 2 Diabetes can go for support and advice. Roy Taylor, Professor of Medicine, Newcastle University Roy Taylor qualified in medicine at the University of Edinburgh, and is Professor of Medicine at Newcastle University. He was formally Professor of Medicine at Newcastle Hospitals NHS Trust. He founded the Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre in 2006 to develop innovative research techniques ‘looking' at structure and function actually inside the living body. In 2011, he showed that Type 2 Diabetes was a simple, reversible condition of excess fat within liver and pancreas. Subsequent he has clarified what causes Type 2 Diabetes and how it works. This has led to practical application in the NHS with the NHS remission programme now well underway. Between 1986 and 2000, Professor Taylor developed the system now used throughout the United Kingdom for screening for diabetic eye disease, with major reduction in blindness due to diabetes across the UK. He has published books in lay language explaining Type 2 Diabetes, including "Life Without Diabetes", as well as training books on retinal screening. He has been invited to deliver named lectures including the 2012 Banting Lecture 2015, Harry Keen Lecture (Diabetes UK), the 2016 Samuel Gee Lecture (Royal College of Physicians of London) and Sir Robert W Philip Lecture of The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh 2021).

High Intensity Business
379 - Does Velocity-Based Training Produce More Strength, Power and Speed?

High Intensity Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 53:41


Sam Orange, PhD (sam.orange @ newcastle.ac.uk) is a Lecturer in Exercise Physiology and Deputy Director of Research in the School of Biomedical, Nutritional, and Sports Sciences at Newcastle University. His research focuses on finding the best ways to support cancer survivors in helping them become physically active and whether physical activity can improve some of the side effects of cancer. In this episode, Sam talks us through his research paper Comparison of the effects of velocity-based vs. traditional resistance training methods on adaptations in strength, power, and sprint speed: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and quality of evidence appraisal which discusses velocity-based training, the effectiveness of using velocity feedback to regulate resistance training load on changes in muscle strength, power, and speed, and much more.   Learn client acquisition tactics from successful studio owners  This episode is brought to you by StrengthPortal You need a single software platform that enables your trainers to deliver consistent, high quality workouts, track client progress, and scale your business. The problem is you're still using pen and paper or basic spreadsheets to run your business, which leads to poor client experiences, inaccurate tracking, and prevents you from growing your business, making you feel frustrated. StrengthPortal understand your challenge and have worked closely with the HIT industry to create a software platform to manage and scale your niche business. You can integrate with Mindbody, manage a standardized exercise and workout library for your team, track workouts effectively, and produce client reports at the click of a button. StrengthPortal is used by multiple businesses in the High Intensity Strength Training community, namely Discover Strength, Smart Strength Austin, MedX Precision Fitness, and more. Starting with StrengthPortal is super simple: Sign up for the best package for your business Let Strength Portal take the load off and help onboard your business onto the platform. Start delivering consistent workout experiences, and scale your business to the next level. To help support the podcast, go to StrengthPortal.com/highintensitybusiness, and sign up now, so you can stop feeling frustrated about your business, and start to scale your business to its true potential. For all of the show notes, links and resources - Click Here

Medical Humanities podcast
Body Talk: “Corporeal Pedagogies”

Medical Humanities podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 27:26


In this month's podcast, Brandy Schillace talks to Dr Sally Waite and Dr Olivia Turner, of Newcastle University. They discuss "corporeal pedagogy", a form of learning and teaching that suspends conventional modes of Western education, particularly within a university setting, to facilitate embodied and haptic learning and production of knowledge. A blog post containing the transcript of this podcast is available here: https://blogs.bmj.com/medical-humanities/2022/08/18/body-talk-corporeal-pedagogies-with-dr-sally-waite-and-dr-olivia-turner. Subscribe to the Medical Humanities Podcast in all podcast platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. If you enjoy our podcast, please consider leaving us a review and a 5-star rating on the Medical Humanities Podcast iTunes page (https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/medical-humanities-podcast/id961667204). Thank you for listening!

Physician's Weekly Podcast
An inDEPTH Look at Prevention: CVD in Women & Colorectal Cancer

Physician's Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 22:17


 Welcome to this episode of Physician's Weekly podcast. I am your host, Dr. Rachel Giles, from Medicom Medical Publishers, in collaboration with Physician's Weekly. The phrase "prevention is better than a cure" is often attributed to the Dutch philosopher Erasmus around 1500 AD.  But in the US, most people are more familiar with Benjamin Franklin telling Philadelphians in 1736 that  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” One hundred years later, Thomas A. Edison said “The doctor of the future will give no medication but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, diet and in the cause and prevention of disease". For the last 50 years, preventative medicine has been gaining tremendous ground, and we are steadily learning more using clinical research.Today's episode features two interviews with an inDEPTH look at prevention. Professor John Mathers from Newcastle University, UK, discusses just-published data from the groundbreaking CAPP2 study that puts an interesting twist on how aspirin could prevent colorectal cancer. Also, Dr. Nanette Wenger, clinical cardiologist and professor emerita at Emory University School of Medicine has “buckets of research” to share on cardiovascular disease prevention in women, beyond the more than 1,300 scientific papers she's had published.   Enjoy listening!Additional readingBurn J, et al. Cancer prevention with aspirin in hereditary colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome), 10-year follow-up and registry-based 20-year data in the CAPP2 study: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2020 Jun 13;395(10240):1855-1863. Mathers JC, et al. Cancer Prevention with Resistant Starch in Lynch Syndrome Patients in the CAPP2-Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial: Planned 10-Year Follow-up. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2022 Jul 25:OF1-OF12.Wenger NK, et al. Call to Action for Cardiovascular Disease in Women: Epidemiology, Awareness, Access, and Delivery of Equitable Health Care: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2022 Jun 7;145(23):e1059-e1071Oliveira GMM, Wenger NK. Special Considerations in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women. Arq Bras Cardiol. 2022 Feb;118(2):374-377. 

The Alnwick Castle Podcast
16 - Alnwick Castle and China - with Emily Xu

The Alnwick Castle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:57


This episode of the Alnwick Castle podcast goes global, as we look into one of the castle's biggest worldwide audiences - visitors from China. Host Daniel speaks to Shanghai-based translator and interpreter Emily Xu to talk about the differences between Chinese castles and those in England, and some of the unique challenges that come from translating the language of castles and stately homes for the benefit of tourists from a different culture. Emily also shares some favourite memories of the time she spent as a Mandarin-speaking guide at Alnwick Castle earlier in her career.During this podcast we mention Newcastle University, whose Translation & Interpretation MA programme students have been extremely helpful in developing the opportunities for Chinese visitors to Alnwick Castle. Please visit the Newcastle University website for more information on the programme.If you enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a rating or review wherever you get your podcasts, subscribe to receive every single episode, and share it with anybody you can think of. Thank you!

The Longevity Forum's Podcast
The Biological Challenge of Ageing Well with Andrew J Scott and Tom Kirkwood

The Longevity Forum's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 51:28


Tom Kirkwood, a biologist and the associate dean of ageing for Newcastle University discusses with our co-founder Andrew J Scott how the concept of studying ageing emerged as a malleable challenge in biology. The study of longevity has evolved into not just looking at the cellular level but also thinking about what we can learn from growing older. https://thelongevityforum.com 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.05.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:47


HEALTH NEWS   Hyaluranic acid, a naturally occurring compound, awakens stem cells to repair damaged muscle 'A banana a day': Starch supplement may reduce the risk of some hereditary cancers Running reduces risk of death regardless of duration, speed Eating processed foods is hurting your brain, study says: Even '2 cookies' can affect health Sharing memories with toddlers helps their well-being into adulthood What the Amish can teach us about health and happiness   Hyaluranic acid, a naturally occurring compound, awakens stem cells to repair damaged muscle University of Ottawa (Ontario), August 4 2022 A new study published in the journal Science reveals a unique form of cell communication that controls muscle repair. In damaged muscle, stem cells must work together with immune cells to complete the repair process, yet how these cells coordinate to ensure the efficient removal of dead tissue before making new muscle fibers has remained unknown. The scientists have now shown that a natural substance called hyaluronic acid, which is used in cosmetics and injections for osteoarthritis, is the key molecule that manages this fundamental interaction. "When muscles get damaged, it is important for immune cells to quickly enter the tissue and remove the damage before stem cellsbegin repair," said Dr. Jeffrey Dilworth, senior scientist at the University of Ottawa and senior author on the study. "Our study shows that muscle stem cells are primed to start repair right away, but the immune cells maintain the stem cells in a resting state while they finish the cleanup job. After about 40 hours, once the cleanup job is finished, an internal alarm goes off in the muscle stem cells that allows them to wake up and start repair." Dr. Dilworth and his team identified hyaluronic acid as the key ingredient in this internal alarm clock that tells muscle stem cells when to wake up. When muscle damage occurs, stem cells start producing and coating themselves with hyaluronic acid. Once the coating gets thick enough, it blocks the sleep signal from the immune cells and causes the muscle stem cells to wake up. "Interestingly, aging is associated with chronic inflammation, muscle weakness and a reduced ability of muscle stem cells to wake up and repair damage,. "If we could find a way to enhance hyaluronic acid production in the muscle stem cells of older people it might help with muscle repair." 'A banana a day': Starch supplement may reduce the risk of some hereditary cancers Universities of Newcastle and Leeds (UK), August 4, 2022 Resistant starches (RS) are carbohydrates that pass undigested through the small intestine and are digested, or fermented, in the large intestine. They are present in plant-based foods including beans, oats, breakfast cereals, rice, cooked and cooled pasta, peas, and slightly unripe bananas. RS forms part of dietary fiber, which is known to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and many other non-communicable diseases. Researchers at Newcastle University and the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom found that a RS powder supplement may help prevent cancer in people with Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome, an inherited condition, predisposes people to colon cancer, gastric cancer, and several other cancers. The experts ran a multinational trial involving almost 1,000 people with Lynch syndrome. They gave the participants a 30g dose of RS for an average of two years. The supplementation did not affect colorectal cancers as expected. However, unexpectedly, its protective potential was most apparent in the upper digestive tract, where cancers are aggressive and not usually caught early.The  trial analyzed the long-term effects of aspirin and RS on cancer onset in patients with Lynch syndrome. The dose used was equivalent to eating one slightly unripe banana daily. Bananas at this stage resist breakdown in the small intestine, reaching the large intestine and feeding the microbiome there. They found no difference in the number of colorectal cancer cases. However, fewer participants receiving the supplement developed non-colorectal LS cancers compared to those taking the placebo.   Running reduces risk of death regardless of duration, speed Iowa State University,  July 29, 2022   Running 5 minutes daily can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease-related death   Running for only a few minutes a day or at slow speeds may significantly reduce a person's risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to someone who does not run, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.    Researchers studied 55,137 adults between the ages of 18 and 100 over a 15-year period to determine whether there is a relationship between running and longevity. In the study period, 3,413 participants died, including 1,217 whose deaths were related to cardiovascular disease. In this population, 24 percent of the participants reported running as part of their leisure-time exercise.    Compared with non-runners, the runners had a 30 percent lower risk of death from all causes and a 45 percent lower risk of death from heart disease or stroke. Runners on average lived three years longer compared to non-runners. Also, to reduce mortality risk at a population level from a public health perspective, the authors concluded that promoting running is as important as preventing smoking, obesity or hypertension. The benefits were the same no matter how long, far, frequently or fast participants reported running. Benefits were also the same regardless of sex, age, body mass index, health conditions, smoking status or alcohol use.   The study showed that participants who ran less than 51 minutes, fewer than 6 miles, slower than 6 miles per hour, or only one to two times per week had a lower risk of dying compared to those who did not run. Runners who ran less than an hour per week have the same mortality benefits compared to runners who ran more than three hours per week. Thus, it is possible that the more may not be the better in relation to running and longevity.      Eating processed foods is hurting your brain, study says: Even '2 cookies' can affect health Yale University, August 3, 2022 Although it's obvious that a diet of hot dogs and ice cream won't lead to a healthy physical life, new research illuminates how ultra-processed foods can also cause a significant decrease in brain function. Research presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in San Diego outlined how foods such as instant noodles, sugary drinks and frozen meals all play a factor in a faster rate of cognitive decline. "Just 100 calories of processed foods can affect your physical health. So, that's two cookies." Research has linked ultra-processed food consumption to health problems like obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancers.  That's because they cause inflammation, which can affect neurotransmitters in the brain. Processed foods also operate on a micro level with billions and billions of bacteria cells that (impair) functioning." The findings found that participants who were getting 20% or more of their daily calories from ultra-processed foods saw a far faster decline in cognitive performance over the span of six to 10 years versus people with diets containing few processed foods.   Sharing memories with toddlers helps their well-being into adulthood University of Otago (New Zealand), August 3 2022 How mothers share memories with their children during toddlerhood impacts mental health and well-being in early adulthood, a University of Otago study has shown. Researchers found 21-year-olds told more coherent stories about turning points in their lives if their mothers were taught new conversational techniques two decades earlier. These adults also reported fewer symptoms of depression and greater self-esteem compared to adults in the study whose mothers interacted with them as usual. The study, published in Journal of Research in Personality, is a long-term follow-up of a reminiscing intervention in which 115 mothers of toddlers were assigned to either a control group or taught to use elaborative reminiscing for a year. Elaborative reminiscing involves open, enriched, and responsive conversations with children about shared experiences of everyday events. This is the first study to show long-term benefits of mother-child reminiscing for emerging adult development.   What the Amish can teach us about health and happiness University of Tennessee, July 29, 2022  Often viewed as outcasts by mainstream society, the Amish may seem downright bizarre to the average American. Foregoing technological advancements that many of us would be lost without, the Amish have created a way of life that fosters a connection with the land and environment, while also cultivating an impressive sense of community. And they are healthy -- exceedingly so. The Amish rarely experience disorders like cancer or cardiovascular disease, seemingly able to bypass illness altogether. What's their secret?   One of the most striking aspects of the Amish is how they lead their lives, free from modern inventions like electricity, telephones, cars and the myriad of gadgets most of us consider so essential for our productivity and happiness. This high level of daily physical activity helps to keep their obesity rates low and cardiovascular health in top form.    "The Amish were able to show us just how far we've fallen in the last 150 years or so in terms of the amount of physical activity we typically perform. Their lifestyle indicates that physical activity played a critical role in keeping our ancestors fit and healthy."  One of the main contributors to stress is the speed at which we move, think and process. We are bombarded with sensory information at every turn.    Not so with the Amish. Their communities are based on patience and a slower way of being. Competition is frowned upon, while cooperation and harmony are respected. Social support is strong. Through traditional gender roles, each person has a valued part to play within the community.   The study published in Scientific Research discovered that mental health is enhanced by the structure of Amish society. Martial stability, mutual support, a secure parental base and care for the elderly were found to be contributing factors in cultivating happiness and contentment.   Moreover, the Amish tend to have low vaccination rates. Instead, they rely on clean living and a healthy diet of homegrown, organic produce, raw dairy and nourishing fats to keep immunity strong.

Dementia Researcher
AAIC 2022 - Day Two

Dementia Researcher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 30:39


Coverage from the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) bringing together four attendees to chat over coffee, and share their highlights. In todays show, we welcome back Dr Isabel Castanho to take her first turn in the hosts chair, with special guests and show newcomers Dr Annalise Rahman-Filipiak from University of Michigan, Dr Connor Richardson from Newcastle University and Dr Bhargav Teja Nallapu from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Sharing highlights from the second day of the worlds largest dementia conference. Follow the conference live at #AAIC22 You can find out more about our panellists, and their work on our website. There you will also find a full transcript: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk -- Like what you hear? Please review, like, and share our podcast - and don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode. This podcast is brought to you in association with Alzheimer's Research UK and Alzheimer's Society, who we thank for their ongoing support.

Dementia Researcher
AAIC 2022 - Day One

Dementia Researcher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 34:32


For the first time since 2019, we're back at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in-person – which means we can bring together attendees to chat over coffee, and share their highlights. In todays show, long-time listener and contributor, Sarah Gregory from the University of Edinburgh is our guest host, talking with Dr Ríona McArdle, from Newcastle University, Dr Lillian Hung from University of British Columbia and Dr Sarah-Naomi James from University College London. Sharing highlights from the Tech and Dementia Preconference session and the first day, with a focus on equality, diversity and inclusion, and co-production. Follow the conference live at #AAIC22 You can find out more about our panellists, and their work on our website. There you will also find a full transcript: www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk -- Like what you hear? Please review, like, and share our podcast - and don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode. This podcast is brought to you in association with Alzheimer's Research UK and Alzheimer's Society, who we thank for their ongoing support.

Worry Less, Wag More: The Behavior Vets Podcast
Dr. Kathy Murphy Dives into the Effects of Pain on the Brain, Nervous System and Behavior

Worry Less, Wag More: The Behavior Vets Podcast

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 63:45


In this episode, Dr. Kathy Murphy (BVetMed, DPhil, CVA, CLAS, MRCVS ) discusses how pain is frequently overlooked as an important component of behavior problems. Don't miss this episode. We discuss:The challenges of understanding and treating pain in animalsTakeaways from the landmark Mills et al. (2020) study "Pain and Problem Behavior in Cats and Dogs"Direct and indirect effects of pain on the nervous system and behaviorHow to be a "pain detective" to help your vet diagnose medical issuesDr. Murphy's bio:Dr Kathy Murphy (BVetMed, DPhil, CVA, CLAS, MRCVS) is a veterinary surgeon and neuroscientist. She graduated from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons UK in 1999, initially working in mixed clinical practice before studying for two post graduate clinical qualifications with the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, in Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia, and Laboratory Animal Science.In 2009 she was awarded a highly prestigious Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship to study for her PhD, in Behavioral Neuroscience, at The Queens College, University of Oxford, UK. She subsequently worked in the USA as Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Anesthesiology at the Icahn School of Medicine NYC, where her research into the long term effects of anesthesia on learning and memory contributed to a change to the safety advice for the use of general anesthesia in children. She moved back to the UK in 2013, to take up clinical-academic positions at the University of Oxford and subsequently Newcastle University, and concurrently completed a Residency in Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia with the European College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia, during which she became increasingly interested in how pain re-models the nervous system and this can manifest as behavioral problems in pets.Dr Murphy founded, and is now Director of, Barking Brains Ltd (a neuroscience outreach platform for the animal behavior and training community), which focuses on translating neuroscientific information into practical and useful information for people interested in animal behavior. In order to maximize the impact of her diverse interests and skill set, Dr Murphy teamed up with Behavior Vets LLC in 2022 as the new Chief Scientific Officer. She is now able to focus on her new found passion for science communication and providing evidence based, up to date, accessible, scientific information to clinicians, animal professionals and their clients, about subjects related to pain, behavior, neurobiology and the many interrelated factors.In addition to Dr Murphy's primary career roles she was Trustee and Veterinary Advisor to the Rottweiler Welfare Association for 14 years; is co-founder of Ethics First (a collective which lobbies for ethical decision making in clinical practice); is an Oversight Committee Member for the UK Dog Behaviour and Training Charter; sits on numerous National and International boards, working groups and ethical review panels; is an ad-hoc reviewer for neuroscience, veterinary medicine and anesthesia and pain journals; and continues to collaborate on research projects. Dr Murphy lives in the UK with her husband Elliot (ex Search and Rescue handler and now scentwork and mantrailing trainer) and their 5 dogs: Dennis a Yorkshire Terrier mix, Nancy a Rottweiler mix, Zebedee and Nela the German Shorthaired Pointers and Albi a Weimaraner.Links:Pain Rewires the Brain SeriesMills et al. 2020. Pain and Problem Behaviors in Cats and DogsBarking BrainsTheme music composed and performed by Andy Sells

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 07.26.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 58:50 Very Popular


First trial to prove a diet supplement can prevent hereditary cancer Newcastle University (UK), July 25, 2022 A trial in people with high hereditary risk of a wide range of cancers has shown a major preventive effect from resistant starch, found in a wide range of foods such as oats, breakfast cereal, cooked and cooled pasta or rice, peas and beans, and slightly green bananas. An international trial—known as CAPP2—involved almost 1000 patients with Lynch syndrome from around the world, and revealed that a regular dose of resistant starch, also known as fermentable fiber, taken for an average of two years, did not affect cancers in the bowel but did reduce cancers in other parts of the body by more than half. This effect was particularly pronounced for upper gastrointestinal cancers including esophageal, gastric, biliary tract, pancreatic and duodenum cancers. The astonishing effect was seen to last for 10 years after stopping taking the supplement. "We found that resistant starch reduces a range of cancers by over 60%. The effect was most obvious in the upper part of the gut," explained Professor John Mathers, professor of Human Nutrition at Newcastle University. "This is important as cancers of the upper GI tract are difficult to diagnose and often are not caught early on. "Resistant starch can be taken as a powder supplement and is found naturally in peas, beans, oats and other starchy foods. The dose used in the trial is equivalent to eating a daily banana; before they become too ripe and soft, the starch in bananas resists breakdown and reaches the bowel where it can change the type of bacteria that live there. "Resistant starch is a type of carbohydrate that isn't digested in your small intestine; instead it ferments in your large intestine, feeding beneficial gut bacteria—it acts, in effect, like dietary fiber in your digestive system. This type of starch has several health benefits and fewer calories than regular starch. We think that resistant starch may reduce cancer development by changing the bacterial metabolism of bile acids and to reduce those types of bile acids that can damage our DNA and eventually cause cancer. However, this needs further research."   New study finds lowest risk of death was among adults who exercised 150-600 minutes/week Harvard School of Public Health, July 25, 2022 An analysis of more than 100,000 participants over a 30-year follow-up period found that adults who perform two to four times the currently recommended amount of moderate or vigorous physical activity per week have a significantly reduced risk of mortality, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation. The reduction was 21-23% for people who engaged in two to four times the recommended amount of vigorous physical activity, and 26-31% for people who engaged in two to four times the recommended amount of moderate physical activity each week. In 2018, the United States Department of Health and Human Services' Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended that adults engage in at least 150-300 minutes/week of moderate physical activity or 75-150 minutes/week of vigorous physical activity, or an equivalent combination of both intensities.  The analysis also found: Participants who met the guidelines for vigorous physical activity had an observed 31% lower risk of CVD mortality and 15% lower risk of non-CVD mortality, for an overall 19% lower risk of death from all causes. Participants who met the guidelines for moderate physical activity had an observed 22-25% lower risk of CVD mortality and 19-20% lower risk of non-CVD mortality, for an overall 20-21% lower risk of death from all causes. Participants who performed two to four times above the recommended amount of long-term vigorous physical activity (150-300 min/week) had an observed 27-33% lower risk of CVD mortality and 19% non-CVD mortality, for an overall 21-23% lower risk of death from all causes. Participants who performed two to four times above the recommended amount of moderate physical activity (300-600 min/week) had an observed 28-38% lower risk of CVD mortality and 25-27% non-CVD mortality, for an overall 26-31% lower risk of mortality from all causes. In addition, no harmful cardiovascular health effects were found among the adults who reported engaging in more than four times the recommended minimum activity levels. Previous studies have found evidence that long-term, high-intensity, endurance exercise, such as marathons, triathlons and long-distance bicycle races, may increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery calcification, atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death.   Treating dementia with the healing waves of sound Ultrasound applied to the brain could help treat patients with dementia. Tohoku University (Japan), July 20, 2022 Ultrasound waves applied to the whole brain improve cognitive dysfunction in mice with conditions simulating vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The research, conducted by scientists at Tohoku University in Japan, suggests that this type of therapy may also benefit humans. The team, led by cardiologist Hiroaki Shimokawa, found that applying low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to the whole brain of the mice improved blood vessel formation and nerve cell regeneration without having obvious side effects. "The LIPUS therapy is a non-invasive physiotherapy that could apply to high-risk elderly patients without the need for surgery or anaesthesia, and could be used repeatedly," says Shimokawa. The Tohoku University team found that cognitive impairment markedly improved in mice with conditions similar to vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease when LIPUS was applied to the whole brain three times a day for 20 minutes each time.    Study: ADHD drugs do not improve cognition in healthy college students University of Rhode Island, July 19, 2022 Contrary to popular belief across college campuses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications may fail to improve cognition in healthy students and actually can impair functioning, according to a study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island and Brown University. Study co-investigators Lisa Weyandt, professor of psychology and a faculty member with URI's George and Anne Ryan Institute for Neuroscience, and Tara White, assistant professor of research in behavioral and social sciences at Brown University, had anticipated different findings. "We hypothesized that Adderall would enhance cognition in the healthy students, but instead, the medication did not improve reading comprehension or fluency, and it impaired working memory," she said. "Not only are they not benefitting from it academically, but it could be negatively affecting their performance." This first-ever multisite pilot study of the impact of so-called "study drugs" on college students who do not have ADHD comes at a time when use of prescription stimulants such as Adderall, Ritalin and Vyvanse is common among young adults who believe the drugs will improve their academic performance.  Results of the study, published in the journal Pharmacy, show that the standard 30 mg dose of Adderall did improve attention and focus -- a typical result from a stimulant -- but that effect failed to translate to better performance on a battery of neurocognitive tasks that measured short-term memory, reading comprehension and fluency. Weyandt has a theory about why working memory would be adversely affected by the medication. Brain scan research shows that a person with ADHD often has less neural activity in the regions of the brain that control executive function -- working memory, attention, self-control. For people with ADHD, Adderall and similar medications increase activity in those regions and appear to normalize functioning. "If your brain is functioning normally in those regions, the medication is unlikely to have a positive effect on cognition and my actually impair cognition. In other words, you need to have a deficit to benefit from the medicine," Weyandt said.         Guanabana: the cancer killer big pharma doesn't want you to know about Northeastern University, July 16, 2022  Guanabana is known by a variety of names -- including soursop, cherimoya, custard apple, Brazilian paw paw and graviola. As far back as the 1970s, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigated the merits of guanabana, and discovered the stems and leaves of the tree were successful in destroying cancer cells. "Inexplicably, the results [of the NCI research] were published in an internal report and never released to the public. Since 1976, guanabana has proven to be an immensely potent cancer killer in 20 independent laboratory tests, but as of now, no double-blind clinical trials," reports Christopher Lane, Ph.D., in Psychology Today. Moreover, this study found that a compound derived from the leaves of guanabana was "selectively cytotoxic for the lung (A-549), colon (HT-29), and pancreatic (PACA-2) cell lines with potencies equal to or exceeding those of Adriamycin." And research in the Journal of Natural Products discovered that extracts of guanabana demonstrated pesticidal, antimalarial, antiviral and antimicrobial properties. Likewise, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center states that guanabana shows anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Revered for centuries in South America and Southeast Asia, the bark, leaves, root, seeds and fruit have been used to tame heart disease, asthma, liver issues and arthritis. Guanabana is also helpful for treating sleep disorders, fevers and cough. According to the article, "Guanabana--Medicinal Uses?" extracts of the plant: Attack cancer safely and effectively with an all-natural therapy that does not cause extreme nausea, weight loss and hair loss. Protect the immune system. Boost energy and outlook on life. Effectively target and kill malignant cells in 12 types of cancer -- including colon, breast, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Proved to be up to 10,000 times stronger in slowing the growth of cancer cells than Adriamycin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug. Selectively kill only cancer cells, unlike traditional chemotherapy treatments.  *A word of caution: Excessive consumption of guanabana can lead to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration with symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease. Consult with a qualified practitioner before taking guanabana on a daily basis.     High-strength cannabis linked to addiction and mental health problems University of Bath (UK), July 25, 2022 As the strength or potency of cannabis products has increased internationally over the years, so have rates of people being treated for cannabis addiction, say the authors of a new study. Researchers from the Addiction and Mental Health Group at the University of Bath (UK) have systematically analyzed the relationship between the types of cannabis people use and their addiction and mental health problems. Their work draws on 20 studies involving almost 120,000 people. The new study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, suggests that people who use high-potency cannabis are more likely to experience addiction than those using low-potency products. It also suggests that people using high-potency cannabis are more likely to experience a psychotic disorder, such as schizophrenia. These findings may help to explain why more people have received treatment for cannabis problems over recent years. Data from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction show a 76% increase in people entering treatment for cannabis addiction in the past decade.

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast
HF in Rail - An interview with David Golightly

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 59:46


David Golightly is a lecturer at Newcastle University and works in the field of cognitive ergonomics, understanding the factors that make technology and systems fit for the intended user's needs and cognitive abilities. In this episode he talks with Barry about the broad range of work he has been involved in across the rail industry, with a strong emphasis on the passenger experience and understanding the complexity of the rail network.

Nature Works
Episode 6 - Guy Hayler on The Business of Doing Right for the Planet

Nature Works

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 61:06


Guy is a founder of Wavelength Ventures and commercial director of Wavelength Media. Keen surfer and outdoor enthusiast, he spent years travelling to the Globes most remote surf breaks, dreaming up businesses. Graduating from Newcastle University with a degree in Geography, Guy went on to work in the financial sector before working for Crowdfunder and more recently for Wavelength Media and Ventures.Wavelength originally started out as a magazine that dates back to 1981. Leveraging the creativity side of the original magazine, Wavelength evolved to build  a community of outdoor enthusiasts. More recently, Guy has moved Wavelength into the venture capitalist sector, funding businesses that align to values and ethos.Guy's love for the great outdoors has driven his pursuit to place sustainability at the epicenter of doing business. In helping fund purposeful businesses to become successful and profitable, they can grow to have a bigger impact. In the last two years his company has helped raise £75 million for 23 businesses, all of which align to an ethos of inspiring healthy living, the power of the outdoors and a sustainable mindset.Sitting at the heart of Wavelengths ethos, is a new event that was launched last year.  The Blue Earth Summit is a 2-day event that brings together a dynamic mix of communities that share a love for the great outdoors and who strive to see business as a force for good.SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE Linkedin Twitter Blue Summit Tweet Carbon offsetting tweet – Ecologi OTHER RELATED LINKS Ticket to Ride – Camps, Tours, Adventures and Instructor Courses (tickettoridegroup.com) https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/blue-earth-summit-podcast/id1599254405 https://wavelengthmag.com/author/guy-hayler/

EduFuturists
Edufuturists #183 - Schools Won't Exist with Sugata Mitra

EduFuturists

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 62:16


On this episode we are joined by the 2022 winner of the Edufuturists Outstanding Achievement Award sponsored by C-Learning. Sugata Mitra is a world leading educational innovator. Professor Emeritus, NIIT University, Neemrana, Rajasthan, India (Retd. 2019) Professor of Educational Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK (Former 2012) Visiting Professor, MIT Media Lab, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA Winner of the Dewang Mehta Prize for Innovation in IT, 2003 Winner of the first ever USD 1 million TED Prize, 2013 #Education #TED #Exams --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/edufuturistspodcast/message

The Bitey End of the Dog
Dr. Kathy Murphy

The Bitey End of the Dog

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 76:58 Transcription Available


What does the study of neuroscience have to do with aggression in dogs? A lot. In this episode I take a deep dive into what happens in the brain with none other than Dr. Kathy Murphy. Kathy always has amazing insight about what happens when a dog might be barking, lunging, growling, snarling, or biting, from a neurobiological perspective. And we also discuss what we can do to help dogs from this neuroscience perspective during the show, and I think you will gain some nice takeaways from this episode. For additional resources on helping dogs with aggression, visit:https://aggressivedog.comIf you want to take your knowledge and skills for helping dogs with aggression to the next level, check out the Aggression in Dogs Master Course and get a FREE preview here:https://aggressivedog.thinkific.com/courses/aggression-in-dogsDon't miss out on the third annual Aggression in Dogs Conference  9/30-10/2/22:https://aggressivedog.com/conference/Woof Cultr swag!https://woofcultr.com/collections/the-aggression-in-dogs-conferenceAbout Dr. Kathy Murphy:Veterinary surgeon and neuroscientist; (veterinary degree in London, 2 post graduate clinical qualifications - anaesthesia and pain management, and laboratory animal science - from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, and a PhD in Behavioural Neuroscience at the University of Oxford)Founder and Director of Barking Brains Limited - a science-outreach platform for the behaviour and training communityCo-Founder of Ethics-First, a clinical research think-tankOversight Committee Member for the UK Dog Behaviour and Training CharterShe is currently transitioning from her clinical-academic position as Director of the Comparative Biology Centre at Newcastle University, UK, to focus on her role as Chief Scientific Officer at Behavior Vets LLC.https://behaviorvetsnyc.com/webinars/https://www.facebook.com/neuroscienceisawesome/Support the show

Woman's Hour
On Weekend Woman's Hour: Kate Bush, Olivia Harrison, Amanda Blanc, Althea Gibson, frozen embryos and women in comedy

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 56:52


In a world exclusive, Kate Bush speaks to Emma Barnett about being discovered by a new generation and making it to number 1 in the UK singles charts 44 years after her first chart-topper Wuthering Heights. Running Up That Hill was first released in 1985 and its use in the Netflix hit series Stranger Things has made Kate Bush a social media and streaming sensation. The physical and emotional challenges of in vitro fertilisation, or IVF, never fade from your memory - whatever the outcome. But what happens when you have been lucky enough to have a child or children and you still have frozen embryos in storage you are sure you will not use? You can donate to another couple in need, to science, let them be discarded or continue to preserve them. Alison Murdoch, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Newcastle University and two women who have faced this join Emma. The comedians Katherine Ryan and Sara Pascoe have been making headlines in recent weeks following comments they made on Katherine's new TV show. Both revealed instances when they've worked with men they believe to be predatory and despite complaining these men have not been reprimanded. Emma is joined by Kathryn Roberts who quit comedy because of her experiences and also by Chloe Petts who will be performing her show Transience at the Edinburgh Fringe this summer. Olivia Harrison has penned a book of poetry called "Came the Lightening" to celebrate her husband, George Harrison's life, more than twenty years after his death.. As lead guitarist of The Beatles, his most famous songs included While My Guitar Gently Weeps, and Here Comes the Sun. What prompted her to share her memories in poetry? She tells Emma. As Wimbledon is set to begin on Monday, we discover the story behind Althea Gibson the first Black woman to win Wimbledon in 1957 and 1958. Writer and performer Kemi-Bo Jacobs was so inspired by her that she has written a one-woman play, 'All White Everything But Me' about her. She joins Anita to tell her more. The Treasury's Women in Finance Charter has published its annual review looking at gender diversity within the financial sector in the UK for 2021. Amanda Blanc is CEO of Aviva, the UK's leading insurer and leads the Women in Finance Charter and speaks to Emma about the review as well as her experiences of sexism as one of a handful of female FTSE 100 bosses.

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST
The Demonisation of Mick Lynch

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 27:04


Adrian Goldberg's discusses the history of "attack journalism" and the demonisation of Mick Lynch, General Secretary of the RMT rail Union, with Dr Bethany Usher, a former tabloid journalist and now an academic at Newcastle University. Bethany is the author of Journalim and Celebrity.Funded by subscriptions to the Byline Times.Produced in Birmingham by Adrian Goldberg. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Woman's Hour
Decisions about embryos, Female wildlife rangers, Amanda Blanc, Nude images and teens

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:54


The physical and emotional challenges of in vitro fertilisation, or IVF, never fade from your memory - whatever the outcome. But what happens when you have been lucky enough to have a child or children and you still have frozen embryos in storage you are sure you will not use. None of the choices you face are easy – to donate to another couple in need, or to science, to let them be discarded or continue to preserve them. We hear from Alison Murdoch, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Newcastle University and two women who have come to different conclusions about what they will do. A new study of over 5000 teenagers in 46 schools has found that more than a third of teenage girls who sent nude images of themselves had been pressured into doing so. Researchers found that girls felt “shamed” when their nude images were leaked, while boys said that the leaking could lead them to gain social status. It also revealed that 34% of girls were first asked to send a nude when they were 13 or younger. Emma is joined by Soma Sara, the founder of Everyone's Invited - a safe place for survivors to share their stories anonymously - and Ruby Wootton, associate director from Revealing Reality, one of the authors of the study - which was done in collaboration with PHSE, that's the national body for personal, social, health and economic education. Being a ranger in the wild - protecting animals from poachers, leading conservation efforts and sometimes putting yourself in the line of fire - isn't often a job taken on by women. In fact, less than 11% of the global wildlife ranger workforce is female - something many in the sector want to change. Holly Budge is a British adventurer who's founded World Female Ranger Week following a successful World Female Ranger Day last year. Purnima Devi Barman is a conservationist from the state of Assam in north-eastern India who set up her own 'Stork Army' to save one species of bird. They both join Emma on the programme. The Treasury's Women in Finance Charter has published its annual review looking at gender diversity within the financial sector in the UK for 2021. Amanda Blanc is CEO of Aviva, the UK's leading insurer and leads the Women in Finance Charter and speaks to Emma about the review as well as her experiences of sexism as one of a handful of female FTSE 100 bosses.

Peak Performance Life Podcast
EPI 47: Molecular Biologist Shares Research On The Top Anti Aging Molecules Including NMN and NR. Plus Are NAD IV's Worth It? Natural Ways To Increase Your NAD+ Levels, and More. With Dr. Nichola Conlon

Peak Performance Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 50:59


With all of the products you hear about these days that are promising to make you look younger, you may be wondering about the benefits of taking advantage of anti-aging treatments. You may be even more curious about these treatments if you have tried some of the over-the-counter remedies and have been disappointed with the results.   Today Dr. Nichola Conlon, the CEO and Founder of Nuchido, joins me to talk all about anti-aging and the research she's done about it. She also shares her company's new product, Nuchido TIME+, and its benefits.   Nichola is an accomplished molecular biologist specializing in the study of aging as a biologically complex disorder. She received her Ph.D. in Physiology from Newcastle University, home to the largest institute for aging research in Europe. She is also a trained Cosmetic Scientist.    Building on her expertise in molecular biology and years focused on early-stage drug discovery with a leading biotech firm, Nichola co-founded Nuchido with Prof. Malcolm Young to bring potent, life-enhancing scientific discoveries and education to the public with speed and transparency.    Connect with Nichola at: Website: https://nuchido.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nichola-conlon/ In This Episode: [1:27] The basics: why does aging happen? [7:25] What are some of the basic practices to delay aging? [13:15] What kind of foods should people avoid for a healthier lifestyle? [15:02] DNA tests and nutrition [18:17] Biological vs. chronological age [20:40] How can you see where you're at on a cellular level? [26:37] What is the research they've done in her company? [29:35] What are NADs? [33:51] How can you measure NAD levels? [35:45] On the measurable results that they have seen in the product that they developed [39:50] What does she think of the NAD IV craze? [48:44] Where to learn more about Dr. Nichola and Nuchido [50:36] Outro   Links and Resources: Peak Performance Life Peak Performance on Facebook Peak Performance on Instagram

Discovery
The Colour Conundrum

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 27:48


The world is full of colour! But, wonders listener Maya Crocombe, ‘how do we see colour and why are some people colour blind?' Dr Rutherford and Professor Fry set out to understand how special light-sensitive cells in our eyes start the process of colour perception, why people sometimes have very different experiences of colour and whether, in the end, colour is really just ‘in our heads'. Dr Gabriele Jordan from Newcastle University explains why lots of men struggle to discriminate between certain colours and why there were lots of complaints from colour-blind viewers when Wales played Ireland at rugby. Professor Anya Hurlbert, also from Newcastle University, tackles the most divisive of internet images: The Dress! Did you see it as blue-black or yellow-gold? Anya explains why people see it so differently, and why our ability to compensate for available light is so useful. To see the Dunstanborough Castle illusion as described in the episode, check out the Gallery on this page and also on the Discovery homepage.

World Business Report
Four day work week trial under way

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 26:27


The most extensive trial yet of a four day working week is now under way in the UK. More than 3,000 workers at 70 companies will work a day less without having to increase hours over the four remaining days. Edward Siegel is chief executive of Charity Bank, which is taking part in the trial, and tells us why he signed the organisation up. And we hear about some of the possible problems that might be encountered from Abigail Marks, professor of the future of work at Newcastle University. Also in the programme, negotiators from almost 200 countries are meeting in Bonn in Germany for talks to inspire fresh action on tackling climate change. Eddy Perez of campaign group Climate Action Network Canada is one of the attendees, and discusses the mood at the gathering. The budget airline Ryanair is facing criticism in South Africa, where it has been requiring South African nationals to take a test in Afrikaans, amid concerns about the high number of fake passports circulating in the country. The BBC's Nomsa Maseko explains why the move has led to accusations of racial discrimination. Plus, the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on concerns that some older people are getting left behind as banks close branches and move online. Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Nisha Patel, George Thomas and Gabriele Shaw.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
Contemporary Art in Tunisia

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 31:55


Episode 144: Contemporary Art in Tunisia As part of the AIMS Contemporary Art Fellowship, Ignacio Villalón conducted research into the contemporary art scene in Tunisia, exploring private and public cultural institutions, sources of funding, questions of language, and ongoing challenges. This project culminated in a report, written for academic and non-academic audiences alike. In this podcast, Villalón summarises the main findings of his research, focusing on a few select phenomena in the Tunisian art scene.  Ignacio Villalón is a writer, researcher, and journalist with a focus on politics and culture in the Mediterranean region. He received his Master's degree in History from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, for which he conducted research on emigration (hijra) in early 20th century Algeria. As AIMS Contemporary Arts Fellow, he carried out research on the arts scene in Tunisia. He has published articles in "Le Quotidien d'Oran" and "Africa is a Country." Ignacio is currently CAORC Social Sciences Fellow. This interview was recorded on May 13, 2022, via Zoom and led by Katarzyna Falecka, Lecturer in Art History at Newcastle University and Project Coordinator at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) To see related slides, please visit our website:  www.themaghribpodcast.com   We thank our friend Ignacio Villalón, AIMS contemporary art follow for his guitar performance of A vava Inouva of Idir for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.    Edited and Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

New Books Network
Morris Altman, "Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:17


Today I talked to Morris Altman about his book Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance (Routledge, 2021). What sometimes gets overlooked is that Adam Smith not only became the “father of capitalism” by writing The Wealth of Nations; he also wrote The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Empathy matters, and this week's guest Morris Altman argues that sustainable capitalism practices fairness. Too often the basic, economic needs of rank-and-file workers are being overlooked in a global economic where the wealthy are calling the shots. From anti-immigrant rhetoric to events in Ukraine, this is a timely episode that puts the purported move from shareholder capitalism to stakeholder capitalism under the lens for skeptical examination. Want more engaged workers? Make them more truly empowered, and the beneficiaries of reciprocity whereby their input is acted on and rewarded alike. Morris Altman is the Dean of the University of Dundee's School of Business. He's published over 130 referred papers and 17 books. He's also held academic posts at the University of Saskatchewan, Victoria University, Newcastle University, and at Hebrew University, Stanford, Cornell and Duke. Dan Hill, PhD, is the author of nine books and leads Sensory Logic, Inc. (https://www.sensorylogic.com). His new book is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo. To check out his related “Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight” blog, visit https://emotionswizard.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight
Morris Altman, "Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance" (Routledge, 2021)

Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:17


Today I talked to Morris Altman about his book Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance (Routledge, 2021). What sometimes gets overlooked is that Adam Smith not only became the “father of capitalism” by writing The Wealth of Nations; he also wrote The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Empathy matters, and this week's guest Morris Altman argues that sustainable capitalism practices fairness. Too often the basic, economic needs of rank-and-file workers are being overlooked in a global economic where the wealthy are calling the shots. From anti-immigrant rhetoric to events in Ukraine, this is a timely episode that puts the purported move from shareholder capitalism to stakeholder capitalism under the lens for skeptical examination. Want more engaged workers? Make them more truly empowered, and the beneficiaries of reciprocity whereby their input is acted on and rewarded alike. Morris Altman is the Dean of the University of Dundee's School of Business. He's published over 130 referred papers and 17 books. He's also held academic posts at the University of Saskatchewan, Victoria University, Newcastle University, and at Hebrew University, Stanford, Cornell and Duke. Dan Hill, PhD, is the author of nine books and leads Sensory Logic, Inc. (https://www.sensorylogic.com). His new book is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo. To check out his related “Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight” blog, visit https://emotionswizard.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/dan-hills-eq-spotlight

Hack My Age
Women in Menopause, Fighting Fatigue & The Problem with NAD Boosters - Dr. Nichola Conlon

Hack My Age

Play Episode