Podcasts about INaturalist

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Best podcasts about INaturalist

Latest podcast episodes about INaturalist

Nature's Archive
#59: Alison Pollack - Finding and Photographing Slime Molds

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 63:51 Transcription Available


Slime molds (Myxomycetes) are beautiful, weird, and amazing organisms. Often mistaken for fungi, they are actually single celled, yet they grow and efficiently move in search of food, can start and stop their life cycle based on environmental conditions, and even change colors several times during their brief life cycle. They can be beautifully colored, frequently iridescent, and can be ornately shaped. And better still, they can be found in much of the world - maybe even in your yard.My guest today, Alison Pollack, is a renowned slime mold photographer and unabashed enthusiast of slime molds and their habitats. If you follow nature photographers on Instagram, perhaps you count yourself as one of her nearly 50,000 followers.Today, Alison tells us what exactly a slime mold is - and no, it is not a mold or fungi. She describes a typical lifecycle, where they grow, and how to find them. Alison then tells us about her astonishing macro photography of slime molds - both in the field and in her home studio. She walks through her process, technique, and equipment she uses to create her acclaimed photos. If you do nothing else, follow her on Instagram @marin_mushrooms, or check the photos below to get a hint of the beauty of the slime molds, and Alison's artistic skill in capturing them.Find Alison on Facebook, and on iNaturalist at iNaturalist.FULL SHOW NOTESPeople, Groups, OrganizationsAlison's interview with Allan Walls and Rik LittlefieldThe Art of Mushroom Photography - Madeline Island School of the Arts photography class Alison is co-teaching with Alan RockefellerDamon Tighe - Episode 36 talking FungiNikon Small World 2022 WinnersSlime Mold Identification and Appreciation - Facebook GroupBooks, Camera Equipment, and Morelinks may be affiliate linksAll the Rain Promises and More by David AroraLaowa ultra macro lens - there are models for each major camera manufacturer.Les MyxomycètesMyxomycetes - A Handbook of Slime Molds by Steven StephensonNOVA Slime Mold episodeOlympus Tough TG-6 - highly recommended pocket camera for naturalistsRaynox DCR-250Where the Slime Mould Creeps by Sarah LloydThe following music was used for this media project:Music: Spellbound by Brian Holtz MusicFree download: https://filmmusic.io/song/9616-spellboundLicense (CC BY 4.0): https://filmmusic.io/standard-licenseArtist website: https://brianholtzmusic.com Support the show

Just the Zoo of Us
171: Chimney Swifts w/ Ralph Crewe!

Just the Zoo of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 56:14


Join Ellen & science communicator, birder and professional nerd Ralph Crewe for a review of a little bird with the loftiest ambitions: chimney swifts. We talk about competitive birding, planetariums, and what it's like to eat, sleep, and bathe entirely midair.Links:Check out Ralph's YouTube channel, Isn't That Something, and his work on Practical Engineering. Local to Pittsburgh? Check out Nerd Nite! Follow Ralph on Twitter and Facebook.Cover photo: Jonathan Irons via iNaturalist 

CORE Education
LEARNZ Ahuahu archaeology Podcast 2 of 3

CORE Education

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 40:47


The following questions from schools are answered by NZ historians and archaeologists: 1. Out of all the plant life and animal life, how native is Great Mercury Island? 2. With the 23 pā sites discovered, there must have been a lot of people living on the island, are there estimated numbers of the amount of early settlers? 3. How have argentine ants affected Ahuahu? 4. With archaeologists from the museum and Auckland University examining Tūhuru Ahuahu have they been able to answer questions for the local tangata whenua about their past? And vice versa? Tangata whenua being able to give insight to the researchers about what they know about their past. 5. How can you trust that all visitors keep their boats clean and pest free? 6. With the findings from the garden areas, were there any findings to suggest the early Māori settlers trialled having gardens at different places around the island or were the gardens all generally in the same areas i.e up high etc? 7. What is the most interesting thing you have found out about early human habitation on Ahuahu? 8. Was kūmara indigenous to New Zealand or did it come over from Polynesia? 9. How are excavation sites on Ahuahu protected from being damaged? 10. How do archaeologists know where to start looking for artefacts? 11. Have you found any signs of musical instruments in your archaeological digs and, if so, what are they? 12. How many stone tools have you found on Ahuahu? 13. How do they train the dogs to detect different pest animals and plants? 14. Citizen Science is important to projects like iNaturalist, where people can record wildlife. How can citizens help archaeology if it is not appropriate or damaging to go looking for artefacts?

Journaling With Nature
Episode 106: Sarah Reid – Teaching and learning in nature

Journaling With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 72:26


Sarah has a deep connection with nature in her local area. As a lifelong learner and natural-born teacher, Sarah enjoys exchanging with others in her community and online, sharing knowledge, curiosity and enthusiasm for the natural world.Listen to hear more about:Making creativity simple and accessible to everyone.The California Naturalist Program.Actively contributing to citizen science through iNaturalist.What it is to be a naturalist.The significance of horses in Sarah's life and family history.Nature journaling alongside others who are not journaling.Sarah's favourite paint colours and the colours of her landscape.Learning from other artists and developing a style.Accessing nature while managing chronic pain.The benefit of online presentations, workshops, and conferences.Sarah mentioned that she finds community and connection with people online through The Nature Journal Club Facebook group.The online nature journaling events that Sarah talked about were the Wild Wonder Nature Journaling Conference and International Nature Journaling Week.In this video you can see Sarah Reid discussing regrowth after wildfire in the Trione-Annandel State Park.-----------------Sign-up for Journaling With Nature's Newsletter to receive news and updates each month.You can support Journaling With Nature Podcast on Patreon, Your contribution is deeply appreciated.Thanks for listening!

Natural Connections
238 - Firefly Fall

Natural Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 5:44


The larvae of all fireflies are bioluminescent, and I was eager to see if the iNaturalist database would confirm my hunch. Sure enough, Photuris genus was the only ID suggestion that popped up. A firefly larva!  

MARGARET ROACH A WAY TO GARDEN
Galls and Mines With Charley Eiseman A Way to Garden With Margaret Roach October 3, 2022

MARGARET ROACH A WAY TO GARDEN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 27:26 Very Popular


Since I took a walk with today's guest about 10 years ago, I've adopted a whole different way of looking at what I might have once seen as imperfections in plants. Now when I spy a squiggle in a columbine leaf or what looks like a green Ping-Pong ball on an oak, instead of thinking “What's wrong with my plant!” I instead think “I wonder who made that—and why?”  Curiosity has replaced panic, thanks to naturalist Charley Eiseman, co-author of the field guide “Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates,” who's here today to decode some of nature's beautiful little mysteries for us. Charley Eiseman is a freelance naturalist, and when he's not conducting biodiversity surveys for conservation groups and other clients, he devotes himself to learning more about the natural world—through an e-book he's created on leafminers, and a North American leafminer project on iNaturalist.org he started that has some 50,000 sightings submitted, and more.

Backyard Ecology
Galls: Amazingly Diverse and Fascinating Plant Growths

Backyard Ecology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 73:19 Very Popular


Have you ever found a leaf with weird little balls or spiky things attached to it? Or found a plant with a weird growth on its stem or a dense clump of leaves growing out of an odd place? Chances are those were galls. Going into this conversation, I knew a little bit about galls, but not much. However, what I knew was pretty interesting. So I wanted to learn more, and I thought you might be interested in learning more about them too. My mind was almost instantly blown. Galls are so much more diverse, interesting, and amazing than I ever dreamed of. Louis Nastasi joined me for this conversation. Louis is a PhD candidate at Penn State's Frost Entomological Museum which is Penn State's research collection of insects and other arthropods. His research is looking at gall wasps in prairie plants, particularly Silphiums, of the Midwest. At its most basic level, a gall is a piece of plant tissue that has been modified by the activity of another organism. However, in reality, galls are so much more than that implies. They can be formed by a variety of different organisms, although most of the ones we think about and encounter are formed by different types of insects. They can also be found in a variety of different places on the plant, including hidden inside the stem in such a way that you would never know it was there unless you cut the stem open. Louis and my conversation touches on all kinds of topics related to galls. We start out talking a little about what galls are and the types of organisms that can form them, then focus more on insect-induced galls. From there our conversation covers topics like why insects might choose to form a gall in this plant over that plant, the importance of galls and the ecosystem, and how little we actually know about galls. This was a really fun and educational conversation. I learned so much and am completely intrigued. I could have kept discussing and learning more about galls for much longer because they are so much more complex and interesting than I realized. I hope you find the conversation as interesting and educational as I did. I also encourage you to check out the resources that Louis shared with us. Links: Louis's contact info: Email: LFN5093@PSU.edu Twitter: https://twitter.com/toomanywasps Louis's wasp I.D. course: https://waspidcourse.wordpress.com An example of a new state record of a gall wasp that was posted on i-Naturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/117815477 Other resources Louis recommends: Gall Formers: https://gallformers.org/ Gall wasp page on BugGuide: https://bugguide.net/node/view/14878 i-Naturalist: https://inaturalist.org/ Related Backyard Ecology articles and episodes: The Goldenrod Gall Fly: An Insect with a Fascinating Life History and Valuable Role in the Ecosystem: https://www.backyardecology.net/the-goldenrod-gall-fly-an-insect-with-a-fascinating-life-history-and-valuable-role-in-the-ecosystem/ An Introduction to iNaturalist with Maddy Heredia: https://www.backyardecology.net/an-introduction-to-inaturalist-with-maddy-heredia/ Backyard Ecology Website: https://backyardecology.net Backyard Ecology YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/backyardecology Backyard Ecology Blog: https://www.backyardecology.net/blog/ Backyard Ecology Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/backyardecology Subscribe to Backyard Ecology emails: https://www.backyardecology.net/subscribe/ Episode image: A gall on a leaf. Photo credit: Andy Deans, all rights reserved

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 636 (9-12-22): Two Shorebirds That Stand Out on Their Yellow Legs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-9-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of September 12 and September 19, 2022. SOUNDS – ~2 sec – short examples of calls by Greater Yellowlegs (first) and Lesser Yellowlegs (second). In this episode, we feature two shorebirds whose long, colorful legs are a distinctive mark.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds and see if you can guess the name shared by these two species that's based on that characteristic.  And here's a hint: the name rhymes with what a person eats when they get two scrambled for breakfast. SOUNDS  - ~21 sec If you guessed yellowlegs, you're right!  You heard, first, the Greater Yellowlegs, and second, the Lesser Yellowlegs.  Both are known as “marsh sandpipers” or simply “marshpipers” because they're in the family of shorebirds called sandpipers and they prefer marshes or other wetland habitats.  Greater Yellowlegs are also sometimes called “tattlers” because of their noisy alarm calls.  The two species are the only tall sandpipers in North America with legs colored bright yellow or sometimes orange.  They're distinguished from one another by the somewhat larger size of the Greater Yellowlegs, by that species' bigger and slightly upturned bill, and by differences between their calls.  Both species breed in the tundra or forests of Canada and Alaska, and both then migrate to spend winter in the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, or South America.  The Lesser Yellowlegs is typically found in Virginia only during migration, but the Greater Yellowlegs can be found wintering along Virginia's coast.  These birds hunt in shallow water and on mud flats for their prey of fish, frogs, and a variety of invertebrate animals, such as insects, worms, snails, and shrimp. If you're visiting coastal Virginia between fall and spring and you're watching the birds, here's hoping you encounter some yellow-legged ones wading in shallow waters to find their food. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the yellowlegs' sounds, from the Stokes' Field Guide to Bird Songs, and we let the Greater Yellowlegs have the last call. SOUNDS – ~5 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds of the Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Greater Yellowlegs, photographed at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia, August 11, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user kenttrulsson, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/132685927(as of 9-12-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Lesser Yellowlegs, at Virginia Beach, Va., May 3, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user hikerguy150, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/116695303(as of 9-12-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREATER YELLOWLEGS AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS The following information is excerpted from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Yellowlegs,” text by Richard Carstensen (undated), updated by David Tessler in 2007, online (as a PDF) at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/yellowlegs.pdf. “Mixed assemblages of small shorebirds combing our coastal wetlands in spring are likely to be accompanied by several yellowlegs, immediately recognizable by their greater size. As the “peeps” scurry over the mud and along the waters edge, the yellowlegs, with a more careful, heron-likeelegance, wade out into ponds and sloughs in search of different prey.“General description: Yellowlegs can be distinguished from other shorebirds by the long, straight oralmost imperceptibly upturned bill and the very long, bright yellow legs.  The neck is longer and moreslender than that of most shorebirds. ...Distinguishing betweenthe two...species of yellowlegs is more difficult.  Plumage of the two birds is nearly identical.  None of the following distinctions are completely reliable by themselves, and if possible they should be used in conjunction with each other.  When seen together, as often occurs in migration, the greater yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) stands9-10 inches high (0.25 m), taller than the lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes).  The greater yellowlegs has a somewhat thicker bill than the lesser, and it may turn upward very slightly, while that of the lesser yellowlegs is slighter and quite straight.  The calls of the two species are distinctive.  The greater yellowlegs has a louder and clearer call, often uttered in a three- or four-note sequence, ‘kyew kyew kyew,' with a falling inflection to each syllable.  The lesser yellowlegs tends to call once or twice.  Both species of yellowlegs have a ‘yodeling' song in addition to the better known sharp alarm calls.  This song is given either from the ground or during display flights and has been variously interpreted as ‘toowhee, toowhee,' ‘tweda, tweda,' or ‘whee-oodle, whee-oodle.'  It is heard both on the breeding grounds and in migration. ... “Life history: ...Fall migration begins in late July and lasts through September.  Primary routes are midcontinental (mostly west of the Mississippi River) in spring and both midcontinental and along the Atlantic coast in fall.  Wintering yellowlegs are scattered along the coasts from South America through California and Oregon.  In South America, birds concentrate where shallow lagoons and brackish herbaceous marshes lie adjacent to the outer coast.  Flooded agricultural fields, especially rice fields, have also become important.  In mild years greater yellowlegs winter as far north as southern Vancouver Island. “Behavior and feeding: The exaggerated legs of the Tringa genus are best explained by the custom of feeding in the water, often wading out beyond the belly depths of less elevated relatives.  Among shorebirds, long bills usually accompany long legs for the same reason.  The greater yellowlegs is an accomplished fisher, at times preying almost exclusively on small estuarine fishes such as sticklebacks and sculpins.  Sometimes groups of feeding yellowlegs will form lines, wading abreast to corner fish in the shallows.  Both yellowlegs, particularly the lesser, also eat invertebrates.  Adults and larvae of aquatic insects such as water boatmen, diving beetles, dragonfly nymphs, and flies are important in the diet, as are sand fleas and intertidal amphipods.  Terrestrial invertebrates such as ants,grasshoppers, snails, spiders and worms are also taken.  In spite of the length of the yellowlegs bill, it is rarely used for probing in sand or mud.  The greater yellowlegs will swing its bill from side to side in the water; the lesser yellowlegs does not. “Both yellowlegs breed in the boreal forest and the transitions between forest and tundra in wet bogs and open muskegs. During migration, both species frequent brackish tidal sloughs and mudflats, as well as the edges of freshwater lakes and ponds.  Lesser yellowlegs occasionally swim, an unusual practice amongshorebirds.  The lesser yellowlegs seems somewhat more gregarious than the greater, although both are seen in loose flocks.” SOURCES Used for Audio Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Yellowlegs,” text by Richard Carstensen (undated), updated by David Tessler in 2007, online (as a PDF) at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/yellowlegs.pdf. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/greater_yellowlegs; there was no entry for Lesser Yellowlegs (as of 9-9-22). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/; the Lesser Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Lesser_Yellowlegs/. Hugh Jennings, “Bird of the Month: Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs,” Eastside Audubon, August 23, 2018, online at https://www.eastsideaudubon.org/corvid-crier/2019/8/26/greaterlesser-yellowlegs. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19244; the Lesser Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040131&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19244. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin,” online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/.  This site and its accompanying mobile app allow identification of birds by photo or sound.Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here

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The FizzicsEd Podcast
BackyardBio & iNaturalist with Jesse Hildebrand

The FizzicsEd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 26:39


Imagine bringing citizen science to your students & contributing your images of local wildlife globally in an effort to help educate and inspire the next generation of wildlife explorers! We chat with Jesse Hildebrand from Exloring by the Seat of your Pants to learn more. Hosted by Ben Newsome from Fizzics Education About Jesse Hildebrand Jesse Hildebrand is the VP of Education for Exploring By The Seat of Your Pants, a global education non-profit that connects scientists and explorers to kids through 40+ monthly live, free, interactive programs (exploringbytheseat.com). Their full library of 2500 past programs featuring divers, mountaineers, conservationists, astronauts and more is on Youtube athttps://www.youtube.com/c/Exploringbytheseatofyourpants/videosJesse is the lead on their BackyardBio global nature campaign run every May, which gets kids outdoors observing, documenting and sharing all the local wildlife that lives near them through social media (#backyardbio), INaturalist and through direct international teacher connections facilitated through their website Extra links https://www.backyardbio.net/ https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/backyardbio-2023 https://www.youtube.com/c/crashcourse https://www.youtube.com/c/inanutshell https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/seek_app Recommended books Regeneration Drawdown  Under a White Sky (for adults) An Immense World  A Short History of Nearly Everything Hosted by Ben Newsome from Fizzics Education With interviews with leading science educators and STEM thought leaders, this science education podcast is about highlighting different ways of teaching kids within and beyond the classroom. It's not just about educational practice & pedagogy, it's about inspiring new ideas & challenging conventions of how students can learn about their world! https://www.fizzicseducation.com.au/ Know an educator who'd love this STEM podcast episode?  Share it!The FizzicsEd podcast is a member of the Australian Educators Online Network (AEON )http://www.aeon.net.au/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Using iNaturalist community to keep an eye on urban sprawl

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 10:05


iNaturalist NZ is an ever-growing community of over 42,000, who collectively have made almost 1.5 million observations to date.  iNaturalist research associate Colin Meur talks to Jesse about what else this community can report on.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 634 (8-15-22): Coyotes and Frogs Call Out on a Virginia Summer Night

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-12-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 15 and August 22, 2022. MUSIC – ~19 sec – instrumental. That's part of ‘To the Wild,” by the Virginia band The Steel Wheels.  It opens an episode about a chance hearing of two very different kinds of wild animals, and how they might be similar or different, including in relation to water.  Have a listen to their calls for about 20 seconds and see if you know these two types of animals.  And here's a hint: one's in a scientific family with, and the other rhymes with, dogs. SOUNDS  - ~21 sec. If you guessed coyotes and frogs, you're right!  You heard barks and other sounds from coyotes, along with calls of Gray Treefrogs.  This lucky recording on the night of July 5, 2022, in Blacksburg, got your Virginia Water Radio host exploring potential connections and contrasts between this terrestrial mammal in the dog family, and this partially aquatic amphibian.  Here are seven areas of note. 1.  Like other living things, both coyotes and frogs are largely made of water and require it for biological functions.  Unlike coyotes, frogs can absorb water through their naked skin, that is, skin without scales, feathers, or fur. 2.  As amphibians, Gray Treefrogs breed in water, which of course coyotes don't. 3.  Like other mammals, coyotes keep a constant body temperature, and they evaporate water through panting to cool themselves.  Frogs' body temperature fluctuates with the environment; having naked skin that's permeable to water, frogs are at risk of drying out if their habitat isn't moist. 4.  Coyotes and adult frogs both have lungs for exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, but, in frogs, gas exchange also occurs across their skin. 5.  Both are notable for their sounds.  Coyotes use barks, howls, and other sounds to communicate to family members and to potential competitors, and frog males use calls to attract females, signal their presence to other males, and perhaps to startle away predators. 6.  These animals appear together in at least three Native American legends, including one from the Kalapuya people of Oregon, called “The Coyote and the Frog People.”  In this story, the coyote sneakily digs through a dam the frogs use to hold all of the world's water for themselves; this then creates all the rivers, lakes, and waterfalls and ends the frogs' water hoarding. And 7.  Both coyotes and Gray Treefrogs show remarkable adaptability to human environments.  Coyotes are noted for occupying habitats near humans, such as city and suburban parks.  Gray Treefrogs, meanwhile, can also be found in human spaces, such as in swimming pools or on house walls or decks.  One wildlife biologist consulted for this episode said that in his Virginia county coyotes seem to “saunter by houses like they own the place”; in the frog world, noted another biologist, Gray Treefrogs have a somewhat similar reputation. Thanks to several Virginia Tech faculty members for providing information for this episode.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use their music, and we close with about 30 more seconds of “To the Wild.” MUSIC - ~30 sec – Lyrics: “I'm gonna run to the wild.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Mark Ford, Kevin Hamed, and James Parkhurst, all in the Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, for contributing information to this episode. The Coyote and Gray Treefrog sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on July 5, 2022, at approximately 10:15 p.m. “To the Wild,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the 2017 album “Wild As We Came Here,” used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 490, 9-16-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (If not otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Coyote, photographed in Virginia Beach, Va., February 27, 2016.  Photo by Shawn Dash, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13877118(as of August 15, 2022) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internbational.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.Gray Treefrog on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., September 23, 2009.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT ANIMALS IN THIS EPISODE The following information is excerpted from “Coyote” and “Gray Treefrog” entries of the Virginia Department of Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources' (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries) “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Coyote entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Taxonomy&bova=050125&version=19215; the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Taxonomy&bova=020007&version=19215. Coyote (Scientific name: Canis latrans) Occurrence“Coyotes are thought to have started being seen in the 1950's and the 1960's here in Virginia, particularly in the western part of the state, and they now have an established population throughout the state.  Current occurrence throughout the state is attributed to the steady eastward migration of this species, which is due to the elimination of other large carnivores, such as red wolves, from their former ranges and to coyotes being highly opportunistic feeders and thus are highly adaptable to many habitats.” Physical Description“The males are generally larger than the females...with a body length of 1.0-1.35 meters, and a tail length of 400 millimeters.  The coat color and texture shows geographic variation, but usually the coat color is a grey mixed with a reddish tint.  ...This species is generally smaller than the grey wolf.  ...The track (70mm by 60mm) is more elongated than the domestic dog but shorter than either the gray or red wolf.” Reproduction“Yearling males and females are capable of breeding.  The percentage of yearlings breeding is controlled by food supply.  Gestation lasts 63 days.  The mean litter size is 5.3 and is affected by population density and food supply.” Behavior“The home range size of the males is 20-42 kilometers (km), and for females 8-10 km.   The female home ranges do not overlap whereas male home ranges do.  The average daily travel is reported as 4.0 km, with dispersal movements of 160 km not uncommon.  Favorable den sites include brush-covered slopes, steep banks, thickets, hollow logs, and rock ledges.  The dens of other animals may be used.  ...Dens may be shared and used for more than one year. ...Coyotes use visual, auditory, olfactory and tactile signals for communications.  They eat mostly rodents and rabbits but also take berries fruits and carrion.  They are primarily nocturnal and their howls can be heard for miles.” Gray Treefrog (Scientific name: Hyla versicolor) Occurrence“In Virginia, this species is distributed in the mountains north of the New River drainage, in the Blue Ridge, and in the Piedmont.” Physical Description“This species is identical in appearance to Hyla chrysoscelis [Cope's Gray Treefrog] but they do not interbreed.  These two species can be distinguished by chromosome number and by male mating call. ...Both species are well camouflaged.  They are usually gray but coloration ranges from gray to whitish to brown to green dependent upon environment and activities.  There is a whitish mark beneath the eyes and a bright orange or yellow on the concealed surfaces of the hind legs.  The dorsal skin is warty.  This species ranges in length from 32 to 62 milllimeters (1.25-2.5 inches).” Reproduction“Males call between March and August.  ...Breeding generally occurs from March to June.  The female lays clumps of 10 to 40 eggs per group on the surface of shallow ditches, puddles, and ponds  ...Eggs typically hatch in 4 to 5 days, and metamorphosis occurs in 45 to 64 days.” Behavior“This species is not often seen on the ground or near the water's edge except during the breeding season.  It tends to forage while in small trees or shrubs near to or standing in water.  This species is an opportunistic feeder focusing primarily on larval Lepidoptera [butterflies and moths], Coleoptera [beetles], and other arthropods.” Limiting Factors“This species is fairly arboreal, foraging from trees and shrubs in the vicinity of water. ...In general, this species requires shallow ponds with fallen branches or herbaceous growth on the water's edge.” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“This species is typically associated with the following forest types: black willow, sweet gum-willow oak, white oak-red oak-black oak and mixed pine-hardwood.  They are frequently found in recently disturbed areas with shrub and herbaceous cover.” SOURCES Used for Audio Atlanta Coyote Project, “Coyote Activity Patterns, Ranges, and Vocalizations,” online at https://atlantacoyoteproject.org/coyote-activity-patterns-ranges-vocalizations/. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, “Animal Fact Sheet: Coyote,” online at https://www.desertmuseum.org/kids/oz/long-fact-sheets/coyote.php. Burke Museum [Seattle, Wash.], “All About Amphibians,” online at https://www.burkemuseum.org/collections-and-research/biology/herpetology/all-about-amphibians/all-about-amphibians. Epic Ethics, “Coyote Returns Water from the Frog People—A Native Kalapuya Tale,” online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=six1kVQS_tw. First People of North America and Canada, “Native American Legends,” online at https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/. Kevin Hamed, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, personal communication, August 11, 2022. Richard W. Hill, Comparative Physiology of Animals: An Environmental Approach, Harper & Row, New York. 1976. Internet Sacred Text Archive, “The Coyote and the Frog,” identified as a Hopi contained in The Traditions of the Hopi, by H.R. Voth (1905), online at https://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/hopi/toth/toth065.htm. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Bureau of Wildlife Resources Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries [now Department of Wildlife Resources], Richmond, Va., 2011. Lane Community College [Eugene, Ore.], “Kalapuya: Native Americans of the Willamette Valley, Oregon,” online at https://libraryguides.lanecc.edu/kalapuya. Miami [Fla.] Children's Museum, YouTube video (4 min./39 sec.) of “The Coyote and the Frog People,” celebrating Native American Heritage Month, November 3, 2020, online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9q4km_HDGeI. Brian R. Mitchell et al., “Information Content of Coyote Barks and Howls,” Bioacoustics: The International Journal of Animal Sound and its Recording, Vol. 15, pages 289–314 (2006); online (as a PDF) at https://www.uvm.edu/~bmitchel/Publications/Mitchell_Information_content.pdf. National Geographic, “Coyote,” undated, online at https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/facts/coyote. National Parks and Recreation Association, “Coyotes Have Moved into Parks Across the United States—Now What,” by Richard J. Dolesh, Parks & Recreation, April 6, 2018, online at https://www.nrpa.org/parks-recreation-magazine/2018/april/coyotes-have-moved-into-parks-across-the-united-states-now-what/. New Hampshire PBS, “NatureWorks/Gray Treefrog,” online at https://nhpbs.org/natureworks/graytreefrog.htm. Oregon Encyclopedia [Oregon Historical Society], “Kalapuyan Peoples,” by Henry Zenk, undated, online at https://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/kalapuyan_peoples/#.YvPg_RzMJPY. James Parkhurst, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, personal communication, August 11, 2022. Roger Powell et al., Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston, Mass., 2016. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources [formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries],“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Coyote entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=050125&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19215; the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19215. Ya-Native, “Coyote Takes Water From the Frog People—A Plains Legend,” online at

america music relationships new york university game canada children earth education college guide water state change zoom living research tech government wild oregon north america current environment fish normal natural web dark va rain mcdonald ocean animals museum snow behavior mass weather citizens native americans recording agency stream parks richmond priority frogs plants biology vol native environmental bay traditions lives images wash dynamic eggs grade cope bio bureau national geographic recreation index national parks menu processes pond chemical signature virginia tech chapel hill pueblo arial scales coyote accent atlantic ocean life sciences coyotes natural resources virginia beach males carolinas adaptations breeding compatibility colorful reproduction populations msonormal ls times new roman ore sections mammals lakota watershed zoology organisms chesapeake reptiles salamanders piedmont wg policymakers taxonomy favorable dens toads ranges blue ridge hopi new standard blacksburg acknowledgment occurrence marine science amphibians first people wildlife conservation willamette valley north carolina press cambria math native american heritage month style definitions worddocument usi summer night virginia department stormwater gestation houghton mifflin harcourt saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin inaturalist defjc wrapindent howls intlim narylim marine mammals attribution noncommercial share alike defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority voth qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused bmp latentstyles table normal united states history canis new river amphibia in virginia cripple creek name title fourth edition name strong name normal name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis reay herpetology powhatan yearling vocalizations living systems grades k biotic wildlife resources space systems hyla steel wheels name e cumberland gap mark ford lepidoptera name list light accent dark accent colorful accent miami fla name date name plain text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text inland fisheries virginia institute roger powell michigan museum peterson field guide arizona sonora desert museum mammalia coleoptera audio notes kalapuya msobodytext tmdl water center 20image donotshowrevisions virginia standards
Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 118- The World of Carnivorous Plants Part 2

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022


Today we conclude our deep dive into the world of carnivorous plants. Mike has been reigniting his passion for these bug eating botanical wonders. Join us as we finish the tour of families of carnivorous plants and the different types of traps they have.  Roridula dentata in the wild. Photograph by Nick Helme via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Roridula dentata flowering in the wild. Photograph by Nick Helme via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Roridula flower. Note the sticky hairs on the leaves. Photograph by Sönke Haas via Flickr, used under a CC BY-ND 2.0 license.Pamerida bug amongst the sticky tendrils of a Roridula plant. Photograph by tonyrebelo via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-SA 4.0.Pamerida bug and numerous prey captured by a Roridula plant. Photograph by felix_riegel via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0.Close up dorsal view of a Pamerida bug . Photograph by felix_riegel via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0.Cobra lilies. Note the red fishtail appendages. Photograph by pnwdunning via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Cobra lilies growing in a shaded environment. Photograph by paulexcoff via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY 4.0 licenseDarlingtonia growing in the ditch along a gravel road. Photograph by joysavoie via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 licneseThe last thing an insect sees as it enters the trap of a cobra lily. Note how the fenestra allow light to enter the bulbous portion of the trap and make it much brighter compared to the surrounding plant. Photograph by sethberes via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Heliamphora chimantensis grown in culture. Photograph by Andreas Eils via Wikimedia Commons, used under a GNU Free Documentation License.Heliamphora nutans growing on a cliffside. Photograph by thierrycordenos via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Heliamphora nutans growing amonst grasses and other tall competitor plants. Photograph by pfaucher via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Heliamphora pulchella. Note the downward-facing hairs on the inside of the pitchers that help prevent prey from escaping. Photograph by Fernando J. M. Rojas-Runjaic via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Yellow pitcher plants, Sarracenia flava. Photograph by emmatrum vi iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Yawning mouth of a yellow pitcher plant. Photograph by wag4ag via iNaturalist, used under a  CC BY-NC 4.0 license.A field of yellow pitcher plants. Such sights were once common in the Southeastern United States but have become more and more rare in the as the bogs and swamps that pitcher plants need were drained and degraded. Photograph by smoran3030 via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Hooded pitcher plants (Sarracenia minor) have lids that overhang the mouth, which is different from the open mouths of many Sarracenia species. Photograph by celiabyrnes via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Note the fenestrae at the back of this Sarracenia minor pitcher that allow light to shine through and fool insects. This morphology is convergent to the fenestrae of cobra lilies and Albany pitcher plants. Photograph  by florabundance via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Parrot pitcher plants, Sarracenia psittacina. Note the decumbant (lying along the ground) nature of the traps. Photograph by Andrew Lane Gibson via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Parrot pitchers are the only speices of Sarracenia to regularly become inundated by water and catch aquatic prey. The decumbant traps may be a modification to trap such prey. Photograph by adamhull via iNaturalist, used under CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Green pitcher plants (Sarracenia oreophila) are critically endangered in the wild. Photography by Farren Dell via iNaturalist, used unde a CC BY 4.0 license.White pitcher plants (Sarracenia leucophylla) are amongst the largest and most striking species of American pitcher plants. They are commercially harvested for cut flower arrangements and at risk due to poaching. Photograph by stasialr via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Field of white pitcher plants. Photograph by Jared Gorrell via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea) are amongst the shortest Sarracenia species. The upturned, ruffled lids are distinctive. They are the most widespread Sarracenia species and are found througout the eastern United States and across Canada, nearly to Alaska. Photograph by Scott via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Sarracenia × catesbaei, a naturally occuring hybrid between S. flava and S. purpurea. Note the intermediate characteristics this hybrid had between the two parent species. Photograph by Rich Stevenson via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Byblis liniflora, one of the annual rainbow plant species. Photograph by Geoff Shuetrim via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY 4.0 license.Byblis liniflora in bloom. Photograph by colbourn via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Byblis gigantea, one of the perennial rainbow plant species. Both perennial species are critically engangered. Byblis gigantea is only known from five populations in the wild. Photographs by Jean Hort via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY 4.0 license.Flower stalk of Byblis liniflora, which has captured a small fly. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Philcoxia rhizomatosa growing in white quartitic sand. The underground leaves have been partially exposed by wind. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Philcoxia rhizomatosa. The leaves are usually concealed under the sand. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Closeup of the sticky underground leaves of Philcoxia. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.A common butterwort (Pinguicula vulgaris) in bloom. This species occurs across the Northern Hemisphere in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Russia. Photograph by bjohnston5 via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Pinguicula moranensis, one of the Mexican butterwort species. Photograph by Raymundo Perez via iNaturalist, used uder a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Pinguicula longifolia. Note the long leaves, which are not typical for most butterworts and may be an adaptation to this species' habit of living of cliffs. Photograph by carmensolanas via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.The underground trap leaves of Genlisea bifurcate, with the distal ends being corckscrew shaped, hence the common name "corkscrew plant". Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. The corkscrew-shaped underground leaves of Genlisea are only a few cells thick and very fragile. The traps leaves of this Genlisea filiformis have broken off where they bifurcate. Note the small size of the adult plant. Photograph by Thiago RBM via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Genlisea margaretae. Photograph by Thilo Krueger via iNaturalist, used under a  CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Genlisea grow in aquatic to semi-aquatic habitats and are thought to require water indundating the traps for the traps to function. Note how these plants are growing nearly submerged. Photograph by william_hoyer via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Badder trap of Utricularia gibba. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Common bladderworts found in Pennsylvania. Photograph by Michael Skvarla.Aquatic bladderworts. Photograph by brieaspasia via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0.An epiphytic bladderwort. Photograph by  Dr. Alexey Yakovlev via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.Utricularia pubescens can grow terrestrially or lithophyticly (on rocks). Photograph by Padraic Flood  via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ 

Hearts Of Gold
Ep 90 Ella Werre - Save Our Saguaros Girl Scout Gold Award Project

Hearts Of Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 20:47


Full transcription available at http://heartsofgoldpodcast.com/ Ella educating her community about the care of Saguaros and partnered with INaturalist to track the Saguaro population and health. More from Ella: My name is Ella Werre. I've been a Girl Scout for 13 years, I started as a Brownie and continued until I finished the program as an Ambassador. I've always looked up to the older girls in the program who were able to achieve the prestigious Gold Award, so I began to work on achieving some of the lower awards that pave the way to a Gold - the Bronze and the Silver. I'm currently a freshman at Michigan State University. I am majoring in Astrophysics and Arts & Humanities, and have had a lot of fun working with clubs and volunteer organizations in my new community so far! website: https://saveoursaguarosaz.com/ Inaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/save-our-saguaros-a-gold-award-project Share this show with your friends on Twitter. Click to have an editable already written tweet! https://ctt.ac/33zKe Join our Facebook Community https://www.facebook.com/sherylmrobinson/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sherylmrobinson/?hl=en Please subscribe to Hearts of Gold on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/sherylmrobinsonor on your favorite podcast app. Support future Hearts of Gold episodes at https://www.patreon.com/heartsofgold Editing by https://www.offthewalter.com/ Walter's YouTube channel is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0wFZRVaOpUd_nXc_8-4yQ

Naturally Florida
Rat Poisons and Wildlife: What's the Big Deal

Naturally Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 19:02


Nobody likes pests, hence why pesticides were invented. Rodenticides are a specific type of pesticide used to control rats and mice, but they can have impacts throughout the food chain if not used correctly. In this episode, we will explore the science behind rodenticides, the impact of rodenticides, and of course, best management practices when it comes to controlling rodents in our yards and neighborhoods. Learn more: National Pesticide Information Center: What are rodenticides? - http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/rodenticides.html AskIFAS: Rat and Mouse Control - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/DH044 Potential Risks of Nine Rodenticides to Birds and Nontarget Mammals: a Comparative Approach - https://www.fluoridealert.org/wp-content/pesticides/EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0955-0005.pdf How You Can Help: Share what you learned with a friend! Implement integrated pest management (IPM) - http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74106.html If resorting to rodenticides, ensure you read the label and apply correctly - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/PI284 Sources for this Episode: Cornell Wildlife Health Lab: Rodenticide Toxicity - https://cwhl.vet.cornell.edu/disease/rodenticide-toxicity National Pesticide Information Center: What are rodenticides? - http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/rodenticides.html Potential Risks of Nine Rodenticides to Birds and Nontarget Mammals: a Comparative Approach - https://www.fluoridealert.org/wp-content/pesticides/EPA-HQ-OPP-2006-0955-0005.pdf AskIFAS: Rat and Mouse Control - https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/DH044 If you enjoyed this episode, please consider sharing it with a friend who might enjoy learning about Florida's natural areas and the wild things that live here! If you're active on iNaturalist, consider joining our iNaturalist project, Naturally Florida's Listener Observations, here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/naturally-florida-s-listener-observations --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/naturallyflorida/message

Arthro-Pod
Arthro-Pod EP 117: The World of Carnivorous Plants Pt. 1

Arthro-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


 Over the next couple of episodes we are going to be dipping into a different group of life than we usually do, the plants. Mike has been getting back into carnivorous plant rearing and wants to share all he knows about the world of plants that eat bugs. How the tables can turn!    Darwin's drawings of the leaves and tentacles of a sundew (Drosera rotundifolia), Figures 1, 4, and 5 from "Insectivorous Plants" (1897), in the public domain.  Aphids and other small insects caught in the sticky trichomes of Nicotiana insecticida, a newly described species of tobacco from Australia. Photograph by Maarten Christenhusz, Figure 1 in Chase & Lambkin (2021).   Phylogeny angiosperm plants with carnivorous taxa indicated by numbered circles. Illustration by Andreas Fleischmann, in Fleischmann et al. (2017) "Evolution of carnivory in angiosperms" in Ellison & Adamec (eds) "Carnivorous Plants: Physiology, ecology, and evolution".A wetland in Loyalsock State Forest, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania that is home to temperate sundews. Photography by Nicholas_T via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.  Tropical swamp in New Caledonia, habitat for Drosera neocaledonica. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Utricularia jamesoniana growing as an epiphyte on a tree. Photography by Dr. Alexey Yakovlev via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 licenseUtricularia corunta growing as a dense matt in an aquatic habitat. Photograph by peupleloup via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.Catopsis berteroniana in the Florida Everglades growing as an epiphyte in the upper branches of mangrove trees. Photograph by  Scott Zona via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license.Albany pitcher plant (Cephalotus follicularis) in culture. Photograph by Lucas Arrrrgh via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Wild Nepenthes mirabilis growing in Hong Kong. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Nepenthes albomarginata growing from on a cliff side above a beach. This species has white trichomes around the rim of the pitcher that are attractive to foraging termites. Photograph by Bernard DUPONT via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.Nepenthes ampularia are a species that have adapted away from carnivory and instead capture leaves that fall from the canopy. Photograph by CIFOR via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.A spoon-leaved sundew, Drosera spatulata. This species has a circumboreal distribution with an isolated population also found in the highlands of Borneo. Photograph by  Boaz Ng via Flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.Forked-leaf sundews (Drosera binata) in the wild. Photograph by Doug Beckers via Flickr, used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license. Oblong-leaved sundews (Drosera intermedia), showing the semi-aquatic habitat of this species. Photograph by Ashley Basil via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Vining sundew showing the round sticky traps along the vine and flowers. Photograph by Jean and Fred Hort via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Wild Venus fly trap in a natural environment. Photograph by NC Wetlands via Flickr, in the public domain.Venus fly traps being sold commercially. Photograph by Mike Mozart via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.A waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa), which have snap traps and are closely related to Venus fly traps. This species is at risk in their native range but have been introduced into North America, where they may be invasive. This specimen was photographed at Fort AP Hill in New York, USA. Photograph by the U.S. Government, in the public domain.Individual Aldrovanda nodes showing the whorl of leaves and snap traps. Photograph by David Short via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.A young dewy pine (Drosophyllum lusitanicum) grown in culture. While this sticky-leaved plant may look like a sundew, they are only distantly related to one another. Photograph by incidencematrix via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Abundant prey captured by a dewy pine. Photograph by incidencematrix via Flickr, used under a CC BY 2.0 license.Young Triphyophylum plants showing the characteristic wavy primary leaves. Photograph by  Carel Jongkind via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.Secondary carnivorous leaves of Triphyophylum. Photograph by Lotus-Salvinia.de via Flickr.Tertiary leaves of Triphyophylum, note the the apical hooks. Photograph by  Carel Jongkind via iNaturalist, used under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Questions? Comments? Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Just the Zoo of Us
152: Rough-Skinned Newt & Pumpkin Toadlet

Just the Zoo of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 56:13 Very Popular


Join the Weatherfords for a weekly animal review! In this week's poisonous amphibian showcase, Christian takes competition to a whole new level with the rough-skinned newt and Ellen takes a leap of faith with the pumpkin toadlet. We discuss an evolutionary grappling match, the drawbacks of being too tiny, and glowing bones.Learn more about how you can help the Atlantic Forest by visiting Copaíba's website.Check out Ellen's guest appearances this week:"Don't Go in the Water: A Guide to the Wonderful & Wacky Animals of Florida" on Pangolin: The Conservation Podcast"Manatees" on Secretly Incredibly Fascinating"Top 10 Most Popular Animals in the World" on the 10ish PodcastFollow Just the Zoo of Us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & Discord! Join Ellen for weekly video game streams on Twitch!Cover photos: Carlos Otávio Gussoni via iNaturalist (pumpkin toadlet), randimal via Getty images (newt)

The Brian Lehrer Show
It's Lightning Bug Season

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 15:34


Rebecca McMackin, director of horticulture for Brooklyn Bridge Park and Pawel Pieluszynski, Brooklyn Bridge Park's wetland gardener, share how they make Brooklyn Bridge Park attractive to wildlife, like the fireflies now appearing at dusk on the Bridgeview Lawn.   You could call a group of fireflies an "illumination" — Bill Bruno🇺🇦 (@Bailyn_DeTVille) July 8, 2022 @BrianLehrer I just went to the firefly sanctuary in New Canaan, Ct. It was spectacular! — Donna Weinstock (@DonnaW5) July 8, 2022 Insect life cycles are often based on temperature, so in warm years, emergence can happen earlier. But right around early July is pretty normal for us. You can actually use this amazing app (iNaturalist) to go observe observations and get a sense of their emergence timing. — Rebecca McMackin (@McmackinRebecca) July 8, 2022 Different species of firefly will display at different times of the evening. But sometimes it can take ages for males to pick which female to mate with. They have to, because some female fireflies (of different species) will trick and then eat them! — Rebecca McMackin (@McmackinRebecca) July 8, 2022 It can be difficult, since both groups love moist environments. But while mosquitoes need (even tiny patches of) open water to breed, fireflies just need wet ground and leaves. So it is possible to have wet areas with no open water but keep an eye on open water is important. — Rebecca McMackin (@McmackinRebecca) July 8, 2022 The fireflies are the same size as individuals (as much as I would LOVE giant beetles in our park) but populations may be larger due to environmental factors like the wet spring we had. — Rebecca McMackin (@McmackinRebecca) July 8, 2022 THE BEST! — Rebecca McMackin (@McmackinRebecca) July 8, 2022

The Climate Daily
FedEx Gets 150 E-Delivery Vans, Climate Champs--The Al-Tarawneh Sisters, iNaturalist App, Listeners' Call to Action!

The Climate Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:20


FedEx gets 150 e-delivery vans, plus climate champions, Lina and Dina Al-Tarawneh. The iNaturalist App, and listeners' call to action!

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
KC Legacion on Degrowth, Technology and Social Media

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 42:41


KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia."There's actually an entire subfield of degrowth scholarship that's called degrowth and technology, which looks at technology's role in these sociological transformations pursued by degrowthers.My master's research focuses on looking at social media through a degrowth lens. Specifically, I'm using concepts in the literature called "conviviality", which was first formulated by Ivan Illich, an Austrian-born priest, critic, and philosopher who wrote a number of texts in the 1970s that sharply analyzed industrial ways of life...I collected data on six social media, Facebook, TikTok, Twitter, Decidim, Mastodon, and iNaturalist, and I'm using this lens of conviviality to analyze the different components of social media.”www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Highlights - KC Legacion on Degrowth, Technology and Social Media

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 18:24


"There's actually an entire subfield of degrowth scholarship that's called degrowth and technology, which looks at technology's role in these sociological transformations pursued by degrowthers.My master's research focuses on looking at social media through a degrowth lens. Specifically, I'm using concepts in the literature called "conviviality", which was first formulated by Ivan Illich, an Austrian-born priest, critic, and philosopher who wrote a number of texts in the 1970s that sharply analyzed industrial ways of life...I collected data on six social media, Facebook, TikTok, Twitter, Decidim, Mastodon, and iNaturalist, and I'm using this lens of conviviality to analyze the different components of social media.”KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia.www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Education · The Creative Process
KC Legacion on Degrowth, Technology and Social Media

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 42:41


KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia.“Degrowth as an idea has intellectual roots in the environmental critiques of the sixties and seventies found in landmark works like Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the Club of Rome's Limits to Growth report, Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's The Entropy Law and the Economic Process, which was a seminal piece of economic theory that applied the laws of thermodynamics to the economy and was very influential for ecological economics, which is intertwined with degrowth.Degrowth was first formulated in 1972 by French philosopher André Gorz in a public debate where he used the term décroissance to question whether planetary stability was compatible with capitalism.”www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Education · The Creative Process
Highlights - KC Legacion on Degrowth, Technology and Social Media

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 18:24


“Degrowth as an idea has intellectual roots in the environmental critiques of the sixties and seventies found in landmark works like Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the Club of Rome's Limits to Growth report, Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's The Entropy Law and the Economic Process, which was a seminal piece of economic theory that applied the laws of thermodynamics to the economy and was very influential for ecological economics, which is intertwined with degrowth.Degrowth was first formulated in 1972 by French philosopher André Gorz in a public debate where he used the term décroissance to question whether planetary stability was compatible with capitalism.”KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia.www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

“Degrowth as an idea has intellectual roots in the environmental critiques of the sixties and seventies found in landmark works like Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the Club of Rome's Limits to Growth report, Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's The Entropy Law and the Economic Process, which was a seminal piece of economic theory that applied the laws of thermodynamics to the economy and was very influential for ecological economics, which is intertwined with degrowth.Degrowth was first formulated in 1972 by French philosopher André Gorz in a public debate where he used the term décroissance to question whether planetary stability was compatible with capitalism.”KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia.www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia.“What does degrowth mean for the Global South? There are some thoughts that degrowth in the Global North would facilitate self-determination in the Global South because the Global North would no longer have this extractive relationship. There's also a critique to that, saying that degrowth in the Global North can and will have repercussions on the Global South just given the interconnected nature of our globalized realities.Degrowth was first formulated in 1972 by French philosopher André Gorz in a public debate where he used the term décroissance to question whether planetary stability was compatible with capitalism.”www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
KC Legacion on Degrowth, Technology and Social Media

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 42:41


KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia."Sacrifices mentioned here do not necessarily mean that we need to go through a period of suffering, but rather a process of changing our life's outlook. Buddhist teachings mention how desire and ignorance lie at the root of all suffering. By tuning down our desires, we may be on a journey to discover a spiritual enlightenment in harmony with the planet. Another mistake we make when talking about continuing economic growth is that we often equate it to human wellbeing. We think matter of factly that economic growth means an increase in the human standard of living. However, this runs the risk of replacing our end goal of increased human prosperity with one means of achieving it, which is economic growth to the point that we pour all our resources into cranking numbers, such as GDP, but never question if it actually does improve our lives. I think degrowth offers a new way of thinking, an avenue of self-reflection and making the necessary corrections." –Yansong Li, co-host on this episodewww.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society
KC Legacion on Degrowth, Technology and Social Media

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 18:24


“Degrowth as an idea has intellectual roots in the environmental critiques of the sixties and seventies found in landmark works like Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the Club of Rome's Limits to Growth report, Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's The Entropy Law and the Economic Process, which was a seminal piece of economic theory that applied the laws of thermodynamics to the economy and was very influential for ecological economics, which is intertwined with degrowth.Degrowth was first formulated in 1972 by French philosopher André Gorz in a public debate where he used the term décroissance to question whether planetary stability was compatible with capitalism.”KC Legacion is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate at the University of Pennsylvania. His research presents a reimagined understanding of social media through the lens of degrowth—this project will culminate in a short film set to premiere in September of this year. Outside of their research, KC is a team member of the web collective degrowth.info and a member of a nascent housing cooperative in West Philadelphia.www.degrowth.infowww.kclegacion.comwww.decidim.orgwww.joinmastodon.orgwww.iNaturalist.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info