Podcasts about Mojave Desert

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Desert in southwestern United States

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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 29, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Mojave Desert

Latest podcast episodes about Mojave Desert

American Indian Airwaves
Manzanar Diverted, & Beyond Missions: The History of the Chumash Nation, PT 1, Segment 2”

American Indian Airwaves

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 58:45


Part 1 From the majestic peaks of the snow-capped Sierras to the parched valley of Payahuunadü, “the land of flowing water,” (Owens Valley, CA) Manzanar Diverted: When Water Become Dust is a brand new documentary having its national broadcast premiere on PBS's POV on July 18th, 2022. The film recounts more than 150 years of history, showing how Payahuunadu (Owens Valley, CA) is tied to the city of Los Angeles and how the forced removals of two peoples -the Nüümü (Paiute) and the Newe (Shoshone) who were marched out of the Valley in the 1860s and the Japanese Americans who were forcibly brought to Manzanar from their West Coast homes and incarcerated in a World War II concentration camp are intergenerationally connected. In addition, the film's central character is piyah (water) and the film's narrative weaves the intergenerational telling of settler colonialism violence, stolen waters from the Nüümü (Paiute) and the Newe (Shoshone) nations, cultural genocide, and more given the severe drought impacting Mother Earth and all that she provides. Payahuunadu (Owens Valley, CA) is beginning point of the Los Angeles Aqueduct that channels water to Los Angelenos. Tune in for this and more. Today's panelists discuss not only the film's importance but also how it relates to the ongoing water and environmental issues to protect all life that Mother Earth provides. In addition, there is a July 17th, 2022, Day of Action Impact: Remembering Forced Removals; Uplifting Water and Land Protectors. For information, visit the Manzanar Diverted website. Guests: • Kathy Bancroft (Nüümü [Paiute] Nation), and Anne Kaneko, director and producer of Manzanar Diverted: When Water Become Dust, and Jin Yoo-Kim join us for the first segment of today's program to provide listeners an critical and in-depth and intergenerational history of water in relationship to the Nüümü (Paiute) and the Newe (Shoshone) nation, Japanese Americans incarcerated at Manzanar, the City of Los Angeles, the importance of water as life, the corresponding day of action, and where listeners can watch the film. Part 2 For close to over 50 years, Dr. John M. Anderson has been researching into and writing on the Chumash history and culture since the early 1970s at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His includes the Tejon Reservation in CA and the Treaty with the Castake, Texon, Etc., of 1851 between several California Indigenous nations whose lands range from presently what is known as Santa Maria to Lompoc to Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Long Beach — and stretching eastward into the Mojave Desert to a point between Barstow and Las Vegas. Marcus Lopez, Chumash nations, and executive director and co-host of American Indian Airwaves starts with part one of our continuing series titled “Beyond Missions: The History of the Chumash Nation” starts with Dr. John M. Anderson. For more information on the Chumash, visit https://johnandersonlibrary.org/ Guest: Dr. John M. Anderson, PhD in Philosophy, historian, and archivist. He has been researching into and writing on the Chumash history and culture since the early 1970s at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Click here for archived American Indian Airwaves programs on the KPFK website within the past 60-days only or click on (below) after 8pm for today's scheduled program. Soundcloud Apple Podcast Google Podcast iHeartRadio Pocket Casts Spotify Podcast Stitcher Podcast Tunein Podcast

Blood and Dust : Wild West True Crime
Part 2 of 3 - Olive Oatman

Blood and Dust : Wild West True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 40:22


Olive Oatman was an American woman celebrated in her time for her captivity and later release by Native Americans in the Mojave Desert region when she was a teenager. While traveling from Illinois to California, her family was attacked by a small group from a Native American tribe. They clubbed many to death, left her brother Lorenzo for dead, and enslaved Olive and her younger sister Mary Ann, holding them captive for one year before they traded them to the Mohave people, where they were well treated. While Lorenzo exhaustively attempted to recruit governmental help in searching for them, Mary Ann died from starvation and Olive spent four years with the Mohave. Five years after the attack, she was repatriated into American society. The story of the Oatman Massacre began to be retold with dramatic license in the press, as well as in her own memoir and speeches. Novels, plays, movies, and poetry were inspired, which resonated in the media of the time and long afterward. She had become an oddity in 1860s America, partly because of the prominent blue tattooing of her face by the Mohave, making her the first known white woman with Native tattoo on record. Much of what actually occurred during her time with the Native Americans remains unknown.

AutoConverse :: Mobility & Connectivity
Inflation Days, Travel Armageddon, and Frictionless Auto Shopping

AutoConverse :: Mobility & Connectivity

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 45:04


In this episode…President Biden is scrambling to find ways to reduce gas prices; Travel Armageddon in the Airline industry continues; Toyota introduces home storage battery system based on EV battery technology; Toyota Rolls Out First Battery Electric Car In Cautious Debut As Rivals Go Full-Throttle; Tesla Building The World's Largest Supercharger Station in the Mojave Desert; Plus…A conversation with AskOtto CEO about Frictionless Auto Shopping. See show notes and complete video replay at AutoConverse.com. 

A Duck in a Tree
A Duck in a Tree 2022-06-18 | Light Layers, Thunder Polarity

A Duck in a Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 58:51


    The 519th of a series of weekly radio programmes created by :zoviet*france:   First broadcast 18 June 2022 by Resonance 104.4 FM, and CJMP 90.1 FM   Thanks to the artists included here for their fine work.   track list 00 Katja Institute - Intro 01 Simon Herbert - Apple Valley, Mojave Desert (18 Freeway) California Thursday 26th 6.39.10pm PST 02 The Utopia Strong - The Islanders 03 Florian Von Ameln - Disjunct Displaced Reprise 04 Carlos González Bolaños - On Patterns I 05 Ryan Maguire - Carrauntoohil 06 Natural Snow Buildings - Nuclear Winter / (Dispatches) 07 Elizabeth Veldon - How Can We Escape a Culture Which Enfolds Us 08 Darksmith of California - Spit and Image 09 Ausgesuchtestenohren / :zoviet*france: - Hidden-by-the-Wall (Haunting Remix) 10 Pablo Diserens - Barbiano (IT), 04/25/2022, 6.32 pm 11 Barry Chabala - 68221050pm featuring James Connell 12 Norah Lorway - In Spring ++ Katja Institute - Outro    

Murder Sisters
43: The Disappearance of April Pitzer

Murder Sisters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 47:06


This episode covers the unsolved disappearance of April Beth Pitzer who went missing from the Mojave Desert town of Newberry Springs, CA on June 28th 2004 under suspicious circumstances. In the years prior to her disappearance, April had worked as a police informant and was responsible for putting away over 30 individuals tied to a meth ring in her home state of Arkansas. Could her disappearance somehow be connected to her work as an informant? https://disappearedblog.com/april-pitzer/ https://missingsouls.com/april-pitzer/ https://thecasesthathauntme.home.blog/2019/06/12/missing-april-beth-pitzer/ https://en.everybodywiki.com/Disappearance_of_April_Pitzer https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2020/07/dark-days-and-the-desert-the-haunting-vanishing-of-april-pitzer/April Pitzer Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Cause/Missing-April-Beth-Pitzer-203568679736761/ 

Blood and Dust : Wild West True Crime
Part 1 of 3 - Olive Oatman

Blood and Dust : Wild West True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 33:20


Olive Oatman was an American woman celebrated in her time for her captivity and later release by Native Americans in the Mojave Desert region when she was a teenager.While traveling from Illinois to California, her family was attacked by a small group from a Native American tribe. They clubbed many to death, left her brother Lorenzo for dead, and enslaved Olive and her younger sister Mary Ann, holding them captive for one year before they traded them to the Mohave people, where they were well treated. While Lorenzo exhaustively attempted to recruit governmental help in searching for them, Mary Ann died from starvation and Olive spent four years with the Mohave. Five years after the attack, she was repatriated into American society. The story of the Oatman Massacre began to be retold with dramatic license in the press, as well as in her own memoir and speeches. Novels, plays, movies, and poetry were inspired, which resonated in the media of the time and long afterward. She had become an oddity in 1860s America, partly because of the prominent blue tattooing of her face by the Mohave, making her the first known white woman with Native tattoo on record. Much of what actually occurred during her time with the Native Americans remains unknown.

Uncle (the podcast)
Porkins guest, The Uncle Top Gun Maverick Special, Utp#263

Uncle (the podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 56:41


Perhaps even more anticipated than the release of Top Gun Maverick, was the coming of Uncle's review of the film. The day finally came, and Uncle welcomed back Pearse Redmond to help him break down this major movie event.  Topics include: Porkiny Boy, release of Top Gun Maverick, Mojave Desert, better than first movie, Goose and Rooster, Jennifer Connelly, Kelly McGillis, YouTube premiere videos, F18 manual in trash, Tom Cruise as the teacher, Ice Man, Val Kilmer, choosing wingman, Hang Man, San Diego, roof come off building, emotional storyline better, original movie, 80s silliness, senior discount movie days, 1-10 rating

California True Crime
The Murder of Idema Cerney

California True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 57:01


Idema Cerney was found murdered in the Mojave Desert in 1932. After identifying her using Bertillion measurements it would be a short time before investigators honed in on a suspect, her husband, Gus Cerney, a gin runner during prohibition. To bring justice in this case they tracked Cerney across the United States in a manhunt that finally ended in Chicago, Illinois.

Aquarium Drunkard - SIDECAR (TRANSMISSIONS) - Podcast

This week on Transmissions: producer, television music maker, radio host, and overall interesting guy Ben Vaughn. His new album is called The World of Ben Vaughn. It was released physically on vinyl back on Record Store Day and digitally earlier this month. Rooted in gentle strums,much of its sweetly traditional songcraft was recorded out in Vaughn's Relay Shack studio in the Mojave Desert, and it echoes the most rustic of selections he plays on his great radio show The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn.  Ben's produced albums by Arthur Alexander, Nancy Sinatra, Charlie Feathers, and more—as well as collaborating with Alex Chilton and Alan Vega. For this episode, we spoke about the new album, his work as a Hollywood television music maker, producing Ween's irreverent cult classic 12 Golden Country Greats and much more. Thanks for listening to the show. If you enjoyed this program, please consider leaving a rating or review. Transmissions is part of the Talkhouse Podcast Network. 

Best Film Ever
See It Or Skip It? - Top Gun: Maverick

Best Film Ever

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 59:29


FIRST 15:45 are a spoiler-free review with our See It/Skip It verdict AFTER 15:45 it's a full spoiler review This week we're headed to the Mojave Desert and Fightertown U.S.A. with Ian, Liam and Georgia chatting a legacy sequel 36 years in the making.  Did our complaints of the original carry over to the new film? Where are the emotional beats fall? Is this too much of an homage film and what is the right balance anyways? Find out the answers to these questions and more in our "See It or Skip It" review of Top Gun: Maverick and then we tell you whether you should SEE IT or SKIP IT.

American Indian Airwaves
Beyond Missions: The History of the Chumash Nation & Global Civil War PT3

American Indian Airwaves

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 54:37


Part 1 For close to over 50 years, Dr. John M. Anderson has been researching into and writing on the Chumash history and culture since the early 1970s at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His includes the Tejon Reservation in CA and the Treaty with the Castake, Texon, Etc., of 1851 between several California Indigenous nations whose lands range from presently what is known as Santa Maria to Lompoc to Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Long Beach — and stretching eastward into the Mojave Desert to a point between Barstow and Las Vegas. Marcus Lopez, Chumash nations, and executive director and co-host of American Indian Airwaves starts with part one of our continuing series titled “Beyond Missions: The History of the Chumash Nation” starts with Dr. John M. Anderson. For more information on the Chumash, visit https://johnandersonlibrary.org/ Guest: Dr. John M. Anderson, PhD in Philosophy, historian, and archivist. He has been researching into and writing on the Chumash history and culture since the early 1970s at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Part 2 William I. Robinson's new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic, is a big picture synthesis of a global capitalism in a state of deep crisis that is cascading social, political, and cultural conflicts all over Mother Earth with dire implications for not only Indigenous peoples and their respective First Nations, but also the futures of lives unless massive structural changes immediately occur. One major factor to the inordinate concentration of political, economic, and cultural power is a much more advanced digitalization of the entire global economy and society and of the social and political during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic; and Robinson contends the pandemic lockdowns served as dry runs for how digitalization may allow the dominant groups to step up restructuring time and space and to exercise greater control over the global working class. The global capitalist system is now pushing toward expansion through militarization, wars, and conflicts, through a new round of violent dispossession, and through further plunder of the state. All this and more in part one of a three-part interview with William I. Robinson on Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic (2022). Guest: William Robinson, professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), affiliated with the Latin American and Iberian Studies Program, and with the Global and International Studies Program at UCSB. He is the author of the new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic (2022), and The Global Police State (2020), Global Capitalism and the Crises of Humanity (2014) and We Will Not Be Silenced (2017). Robinson joins us for the first part of three-part interview on his brand-new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic (2022). American Indian Airwaves programs are also available on the KPFK website within the past 60-days only or click on (below) after 8pm for today's scheduled program. Soundcloud Apple Podcast Google Podcast iHeartRadio Pocket Casts Spotify Podcast Stitcher Podcast Tunein Podcast

All Damn Night
Free Sneak Peak:HOKC Extras: Jed Smith & The Mojave

All Damn Night

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022


Check out this free trial episode of our “Episode Extras” series! In 1827, a bedraggled group of mountain men made their way in a long train of humans and pack animals through the Mojave Desert in what is today South Eastern California. As temperatures soared and water supplies dwindled, the leader of the party, Jedediah Smith, hoped to make contact with the tribe who had saved him when he passed through this same territory a year ago. The tribe, who gave the desert it's name, were known as the Mojave.Join us for a deep dive into the humanizing and terrifying experience this event was for all parties involved. CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBECLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE AUDIBLE TRIAL

90 Miles From Needles with Chris Clarke and Alicia Pike
S1E10: Remembering Phil Klasky and Ward Valley

90 Miles From Needles with Chris Clarke and Alicia Pike

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 46:02


From the mid-1980s until the first months of the 21st Century, a coalition of desert tribes and non-Native activists worked to keep the state of California from siting a low-level nuclear waste dump in the Mojave Desert, on land sacred to at least five tribes, above an aquifer that drains into the Colorado River. Philip Klasky, an instructor at San Francisco State and a resident of the desert in San Bernardino County, played a crucial role in that campaign, which succeeded against all odds. Phil's story is a lesson in how people working together can beat those odds. He also taught us at 90 Miles from Needles the importance of Native peoples taking the lead in land-based campaigns. Phil died unexpectedly earlier this year. We are grateful to The Mojave Project for allowing us to use their recorded interview with Phil, and to our friend Matthew Leivas of the Chemehuevi Tribe for sharing with us the Salt Songs he sang at Ward Valley in May to honor Phil. Support us!: https://90milesfromneedles.com/patreon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

You're Gonna Die Out There
A Postmortem Portrait

You're Gonna Die Out There

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


Hey Nature Nerds! This week Megan talks about some proposed new menstruation legislation in Spain and Jen tells us the story of Olive Oatman! Thanks to listener Tracy Simpson from Minnesota for this story recommendation! Organization to Support: www.honorspiritmountain.org Sign the petition! The proposed Avi Kwa Ame (Ah-VEE kwa-meh) National Monument spans nearly 450,000 acres of public land in Southern Nevada contains some of the most visually stunning, biologically diverse, and culturally significant lands in the entire Mojave Desert. The entire area is considered sacred by ten Yuman speaking tribes as well as the Hopi and Chemehuevi Paiute. Energy developers recently tried to build a large, 30,000-acre wind farm in the heart of this dramatic landscape and newly proposed project has heightened efforts to protect the region. Such development would forever scar these valuable lands and degrade their world-class habitat and nationally recognized cultural resources.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
19 May 2022 | Tesla Privately Offers Texas Model Y's To Customers

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:56


Show #1472 Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily, you trusted source of EV information. It's Thursday 19th May, it's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to.  HYUNDAI MOTOR GROUP PLANS TO INVEST $16.5 BILLION IN S.KOREA EV BUSINESS - Hyundai Motor Group said on Wednesday it plans to invest a total of 21 trillion won ($16.54 billion) through 2030 for the expansion of its electric vehicle (EV) business in South Korea. The South Korean auto group, which houses Hyundai Motor Co and Kia Corp, plans to annually build 1.44 million units of EVs in South Korea by 2030. The 1.44 million units of EV production volume in South Korea would account for about 45% of a combined global EV production capacity of 3.23 million EV units in 2030, the auto group said in a statement. Original Source : https://www.euronews.com/next/2022/05/18/hyundai-motor-electric-southkorea TESLA MODEL Y STANDARD RANGE WITH 4680 CELLS OFFERED TO CUSTOMERS NEAR GIGA TEXAS - Tesla sent out emails to reservation holders near Giga Texas, giving them the option to change their order to the new Model Y All Wheel Drive. The Model Y AWD variant is the first to feature Tesla's structural battery pack and 4680 cells. - Tesla customer @mmsganesh shared a sample of the email reservation holders are receiving from the company. Tesla shared that deliveries for the latest Model Y configuration are weeks away in the email. - The new Model Y AWD configuration with Tesla's 4680 battery cells can go up to 279 on a single charge and accelerate 0-60 in 5.0 seconds. Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-y-standard-range-4680-cells-giga-texas-delivery/ TESLA CHARGING HUB IN BARSTOW TO HAVE 100 STATIONS, MOST IN US - Electric car manufacturer Tesla Inc. is building the United States' largest electric car charging hub in Barstow, a remote Mojave Desert town at the midpoint between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. - Mayor Paul Courtney revealed the world's most valuable carmaker is already months into construction of Superchargers - during a Barstow City Council meeting Monday while praising the city staff's dealmaking skills. - It will be the largest charging station in the United States, the mayor said. The current largest U.S. charging station is a 70-space location - A fence currently obscures the early-stage Supercharger site confirmed by Courtney. It sits on roughly four acres of desert, which connects to the Holiday Inn Express & Suites Barstow, spanning the area between the western end of the hotel's parking lot and the eastern barrier of I-15. - The Daily Press couldn't identify references to the new Supercharger project in any news releases or financial disclosures from Tesla or from Edison, nor in any past public agendas of the Barstow City Council or of the Southern California Association of Governments, or SCAG, a broader entity Courtney cited as having behind-the-scenes involvement on the public-official side of the project. Original Source : https://eu.vvdailypress.com/story/news/2022/05/17/tesla-building-united-states-largest-car-charge-hub-in-barstow-midway-between-los-angeles-las-vegas/9803455002/ BYD SECURES $593 MILLION WORTH OF LITHIUM SUPPLIES FROM LOCAL PRODUCER Original Source : https://cnevpost.com/2022/05/18/byd-secures-593-million-worth-of-lithium-supplies-from-local-producer/ JOLT TO ROLL OUT FREE EV CHARGING IN NEW ZEALAND, STARTING AT MITRE 10 Original Source : https://thedriven.io/2022/05/18/jolt-ev-charging-new-zealand/ VOLVO TRUCKS IS OPENING ITS VERY FIRST BATTERY ASSEMBLY PLANT IN BELGIUM Original Source : https://www.volvotrucks.com/en-en/news-stories/press-releases/2022/may/volvo-trucks-opens-battery-plant-in-belgium.html PRODUCTION IN GRÜNHEIDE STILL BEHIND SCHEDULE - RAMP-UP EXPECTED IN JULY Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/05/17/production-in-grunheide-still-behind-schedule-ramp-up-expected-in-july/ TOYOTA, NISSAN, HONDA ARE LEAST PREPARED FOR ZERO-EMISSION SHIFT, STUDY SHOWS Original Source : https://europe.autonews.com/automakers/toyota-nissan-honda-are-least-prepared-zero-emission-shift-study-shows EXCLUSIVE CHINA IN TALKS WITH AUTOMAKERS ON EV SUBSIDY EXTENSION Original Source : https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/exclusive-china-talks-with-automakers-ev-subsidy-extension-sources-2022-05-18/ QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What's the best way to help educate your friends, family or colleagues about electric cars? Email me any feedback to: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/ OCTOPUS ELECTRIC JUICE - MAKING PUBLIC CHARGING SIMPLE WITH ONE CARD, ONE MAP AND ONE APP MILLBROOKCOTTAGES.CO.UK – 5* LUXURY COTTAGES IN DEVON, JUMP IN THE HOT TUB WHILST YOUR EV CHARGES 

Troubled Men Podcast
TMP201 INSIDE THE WORLD OF BEN VAUGHN

Troubled Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 80:06


He’s known for his work scoring music for hit TV shows “That 70s Show” and “3rd Rock from the Sun,” his records with Alan Vega, Alex Chilton, Charlie Feathers, and Nancy Sinatra, his long-running syndicated radio show, “The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn,” and a 40-year career as a solo artist. With a new solo record, “The World of Ben Vaughn,” coming out, Ben drops in to catch up with the Troubled Men before his tour of Spain. Apparently the rain there falls mainly on the plain. Topics include a Jazz Fest recap, a Daniel Lanois set, triangle sandwiches, porch parties, the Chili Peppers, the heat, WEVL, WXPN, a Big Star story, “Like Flies On Sherbet,” “Cubist Blues,” Suicide, “Rambler ’65,” a record collection, early dance bands, Duane Eddy, early recording, disgusting percussion, Roland Janes, moving to L.A., Pulp Fiction, surf guitar, session work, John Lithgow, the Mojave Desert, Tom Haden, Dave Catching, Dash Rip Rock, Sinatra’s “Watertown,” Bob Gaudio, the Four Seasons, and much more. Intro music: Styler/Coman Break and outro music: “Wayne Fontana Was Wrong” and “Blind Alley” from “The World of Ben Vaughn” by Ben Vaughn Support the podcast: Paypal or Venmo Join the Patreon page here. Shop for Troubled Men’s Shirts here. Subscribe, review, and rate (5 stars) on Apple Podcasts or any podcast source. Follow on social media, share with friends, and spread the Troubled Word. Troubled Men Podcast Facebook Troubled Men Podcast Instagram Iguanas Tour Dates René Coman Facebook Cubist Blues YouTube Ben Vaughn Homepage Ben Vaughn Facebook The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn Facebook

Skylight Books Author Reading Series
LIVE ON CROWDCAST: Catriona Ward, ”SUNDIAL” w/ Caroline Kepnes

Skylight Books Author Reading Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:48


All Rob wanted was a normal life. She almost got it, too: a husband, two kids, a nice house in the suburbs. But Rob fears for her oldest daughter, Callie, who collects tiny bones and whispers to imaginary friends. Rob sees a darkness in Callie, one that reminds her too much of the family she left behind. She decides to take Callie back to her childhood home, to Sundial, deep in the Mojave Desert. And there she will have to make a terrible choice. Callie is worried about her mother. Rob has begun to look at her strangely, and speaks of past secrets. And Callie fears that only one of them will leave Sundial alive… The mother and daughter embark on a dark, desert journey to the past in the hopes of redeeming their future.   Join us for a conversation between author Catriona Ward and Caroline Kepnes, recorded live on our Crowdcast channel on March 18, 2022. _______________________________________________   Produced by Natalie Freeman, Lance Morgan, & Michael Kowaleski. Theme: "I Love All My Friends," an unreleased demo by Fragile Gang. Visit https://www.skylightbooks.com/event for future offerings from the Skylight Books Events team.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
SHIPWRECKS & TREASURES Dr. Spence / WORLD 3 AFTER Sean Patrick Hazlett

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 126:02


Dr. Spence Shipwrecks And Sunken Treasures Dr. Spence is an internationally known expert on shipwrecks and sunken treasures. His bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies was perhaps the first accredited academic degree ever awarded in the United States for any program in marine archaeology. He also received one of the first five doctorates (Doctor of Marine Histories, College of Marine Arts, 1972) ever awarded for marine archaeology anywhere in the world and he has long been considered one of the founding fathers of marine archaeology. His work has been funded by such institutions as the Savannah Ships of the Sea Museum, CRIL (the Caribbean Research Institute Ltd., Colombia, South America), the College of Charleston, the South Carolina Committee for the Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. In the early 1990s he served as Chief of Underwater Archaeology for Providencia Y San Andres, a 40,000 square mile archipelago in the Western Caribbean. He has authored more than two dozen books, and has served as an editor for a number of nationally distributed magazines. He is also an award winning cartographer and has published a number of maps and charts dealing with shipwrecks and treasure. Always an adventurer, Spence has traveled to a wide range of exotic places in the Far East, Europe, Central and South America. He has explored castles, palaces, shipwrecks, ancient ruins, secret tunnels, and subterranean and underwater caves. He has dived in the Great Lakes, the Atlantic, the Pacific, the Mediterranean, and the Caribbean. He has been shot at, buried in cave-ins, tangled in fishing nets, pinned under wreckage, run out of air, lost inside a wreck, and bitten by fish while pursuing his quests. Although Dr. Spence has discovered numerous historically significant shipwrecks, including the Civil War blockade runner Georgiana and the Confederate submarine Hunley, he hasn't only made discoveries underwater. He considers his identification of Charleston born banking and shipping magnate George Trenholm as the “Real Rhett Butler” to have been his most interesting non-shipwreck discovery. Trenholm's fleet of fast steamers earned today's equivalent of over one billion dollars running munitions, medicines, and merchandise through the Federal blockade. By the end of the Civil War, Trenholm was a major figure in the Confederate government. The United States actually charged Trenholm with treason and claimed he had made off with and concealed hundreds of millions in Confederate assets. Trenholm died without revealing his secrets. Spence is currently trying to uncover them. The State of South Carolina's claim of ownership to the Civil War submarine Hunley was based on Spence's 1970 discovery of that vessel and his subsequent gift of his salvage rights to it to the State. Spence's gift of his rights was made in September of 1995 at the official request of the Attorney General of South Carolina and the South Carolina Hunley Commission. In 2013, Dr. Spence announced his discoveries at Cape Romain of the 1894 wreck of the SS Ozama and the 1881 wreck of the SS United States. As an historian, Spence believes the biggest key to success on any expedition is the archival research that precedes it. Spence calls historical research “his drug of choice” and says, “In today's world, time is the most expensive part of a salvage expedition. Man-hours spent in the archives can cut hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of time from the field phase of most projects.”5/12/22 Sean Patrick Hazlett World War 3 Aftermath Sean Patrick Hazlett is an Army veteran and former captain, speculative fiction writer and editor, and finance executive in the San Francisco Bay area. He was born in Wilmington, Delaware, but trekked across the country to pursue an AB in history and BS in electrical engineering from Stanford University on an ROTC scholarship. He earned a Master in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government where he won the 2006 Policy Analysis Exercise Award for his work on policy solutions to Iran's nuclear weapons program under the guidance of future secretary of defense Ashton B. Carter. While at the Harvard Kennedy School, he worked on the Harvard-Stanford Preventive Defense Project. He also holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School, where he graduated with Second Year Honors.As a cavalry officer in the elite 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Seam trained various units for war in Iraq and Afghanistan. While at the National Training Center in the Mojave Desert, he became an expert in Soviet doctrine and tactics, leading a Motorized Rifle Battalion. He has also published a Harvard Business School case study on the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and how it exemplified a learning organization.Sean has worked in various roles in finance. He was an investment banker, an equity analyst covering industries ranging from cleantech to semiconductors to enterprise software. His seminal equity research report on the smart grid was cited in The Economist magazine. He has also worked in various corporate finance roles in Silicon Valley companies ranging from cybersecurity to hardware to enterprise software.Sean is a 2017 winner of the Writers of the Future Contest. Nearly fifty of his short stories have appeared in publications such as The Year's Best Military and Adventure SF, Year's Best Hardcore Horror, Robosoldiers, Worlds Long Lost, Terraform, Galaxy's Edge, Writers of the Future, Grimdark Magazine, Vastarien, and Abyss & Apex, among others. He is the editor of the Weird World War III and Weird World War.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
HAUNTED GRREN COUNTY P.A. Kevin Paul / WORLD WAR 3 Patrick Hazzlett

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 62:56


Paul Paranormal In Green County Pennsylvania Born and raised in the corner of the Keystone State, Kevin Paul is no stranger to the lifestyle andspiritual beliefs of the Appalachian hills and hollows. His ancestors were among the first from Europe toset foot in what is now Greene County PA, and he was fortunate enough to hear not only their historybut folklore as well. The traditional and distinctive spiritual beliefs of Appalachia are an excellent lensthrough which to observe and focus upon the spirit world surrounding us.A lifetime of paranormal experiences led Kevin to examine the unexplored corners of his community andhas yielded unexpected rewards. He believes we live on and are part of an Interdimensional Earth thatincreasingly reveals itself to those who are sensitive to it or have opportunity and take time to look.Relying upon low tech methods, intuitive work, and research in place of electronics has revealed a rich,uncharted spirit world within Greene County--and no doubt your community as well--densely populatedby cryptids, apparitions, and unusual entities.Decades of farming and related agricultural pursuits have not only helped Kevin appreciate theconnection between paranormal events, people, and the land, but have kept him grounded as well.Sean Patrick Hazlett World War 3 Aftermath Sean Patrick Hazlett is an Army veteran and former captain, speculative fiction writer and editor, and finance executive in the San Francisco Bay area. He was born in Wilmington, Delaware, but trekked across the country to pursue an AB in history and BS in electrical engineering from Stanford University on an ROTC scholarship. He earned a Master in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government where he won the 2006 Policy Analysis Exercise Award for his work on policy solutions to Iran's nuclear weapons program under the guidance of future secretary of defense Ashton B. Carter. While at the Harvard Kennedy School, he worked on the Harvard-Stanford Preventive Defense Project. He also holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School, where he graduated with Second Year Honors.As a cavalry officer in the elite 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Seam trained various units for war in Iraq and Afghanistan. While at the National Training Center in the Mojave Desert, he became an expert in Soviet doctrine and tactics, leading a Motorized Rifle Battalion. He has also published a Harvard Business School case study on the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and how it exemplified a learning organization.Sean has worked in various roles in finance. He was an investment banker, an equity analyst covering industries ranging from cleantech to semiconductors to enterprise software. His seminal equity research report on the smart grid was cited in The Economist magazine. He has also worked in various corporate finance roles in Silicon Valley companies ranging from cybersecurity to hardware to enterprise software.Sean is a 2017 winner of the Writers of the Future Contest. Nearly fifty of his short stories have appeared in publications such as The Year's Best Military and Adventure SF, Year's Best Hardcore Horror, Robosoldiers, Worlds Long Lost, Terraform, Galaxy's Edge, Writers of the Future, Grimdark Magazine, Vastarien, and Abyss & Apex, among others. He is the editor of the Weird World War III

Best Book Club with Shanna and Jen
Sundial by Catriona Ward

Best Book Club with Shanna and Jen

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 82:32


This week we are talking about the new book from Catriona Ward, Sundial! If you missed it, we are reading The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet  by Becky Chambers for book club so pick up a copy, read along with us, and get ready to join the discussion on Instagram and Facebook starting on May 18!We are affiliated with  Libro.fm  and if you use any of our links to sign up for a membership or buy a book, you are not only supporting your local independent bookstore but also this podcast! Libro.fm.best_bookclub@outlook.comPatreonwww.bestbookclub.caInstagram

UBC News World
Get A Camper Van In Las Vegas, NV To See Red Rock Canyon In The Mojave Desert

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 2:10


Outdoor adventurers can rent a fully-stocked camper van from VegasCampers in Las Vegas, NV, for the best way to enjoy the exciting outdoor recreation in Red Rock Canyon, just outside Las Vegas. Visit https://vegascampers.com (https://vegascampers.com) for more information.

90 Miles From Needles with Chris Clarke and Alicia Pike
S1E9: Saving the Western Joshua tree

90 Miles From Needles with Chris Clarke and Alicia Pike

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 47:38


Joshua trees, the iconic species of the Mojave Desert, are in serious danger of becoming extinct across most of their range... and yet the state of California is recommending against granting the trees permanent protection. We talk to desert botanist Christina Sanchez and Brendan Cummings of the Center for Biological Diversity about the dangers the trees face, and what we can do to stop California from stripping the trees' protections. Plus, C&A visit a Joshua tree forest threatened by unsustainable development, Support us!: https://90milesfromneedles.com/patreon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Valley Edition Podcast
Valley Edition - May 6, 2022 - Dr. Janine Nkosi, Mojave Desert naval base, One Oh One podcast

Valley Edition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 316:15


Plus, a new pilot program from the city of Fresno equips street vendors with cameras in an effort to protect them against attacks or robberies. This comes a year after street vendor Lorenzo Perez was murdered on the job. Listen to this story and more on the podcast above.

The BraveMaker Podcast
150: Writer, Showrunner + Author: Niceole Levy

The BraveMaker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 47:30


https://twitter.com/niceolecookies After growing up near China Lake Naval Weapons Center in the middle of the Mojave Desert, Niceole escaped to the bright lights of Los Angeles. While studying acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, she realized her true love was writing stories, not playing them out. She worked as a police dispatcher to pay her way through USC undergrad and then completed the Master of Professional Writing program, also at USC. An alum of the CBS Writers Mentoring Program, NBC's Writers on the Verge, and the WGAW Showrunner Training Program, Niceole has written on “Ironside,” “Allegiance,” “The Mysteries of Laura,” “Shades of Blue,” "Cloak & Dagger," “Fate: the Winx Saga,” “S.W.A.T,” and “Graymail.” She also co-wrote a feature, "The Banker," with former “Allegiance” showrunner and director George Nolfi, available on AppleTV+, and is now writing “Spark,” a film inspired by the life of Claudette Colvin. Niceole is currently a co-executive producer on “Empire of Mali,” which will air on Netflix, and has several TV and feature projects in development. Her first book, “The Writers' Room Survival Guide,” will be released in October of this year. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bravemaker/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bravemaker/support

The Truck Show Podcast
Ep. 224 - BONUS: Tour of California's Mitchell Caverns

The Truck Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 66:25


Lightning heads deep underground on an OLAF-assembled VIP tour of Mitchell Caverns in California's Mojave Desert.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Nantiinaq; Portlock, Alaska and Other Ghost Towns

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 110:53


Portlock Alaska & Other haunted ghost towns   Today we're talking about a ghost town in Alaska that is rumored to have been abandoned because of…. Wait for it….a killer bigfoot!! dun dun duuuuuuuuuuun!!! We're going to look at Portlock Alaska and after that maybe take a look at other haunted and creepy ghost towns!    History of Portlock: As per wikipedia   Portlock is a ghost town in the U.S. state of Alaska, located on the southern edge of the Kenai Peninsula, around 16 miles south of Seldovia. It is located in Port Chatham bay, after which an adjacent community takes its namesake. Named after Nathaniel Portlock, Portlock was established in the Kenai Peninsula in the early-twentieth century as a cannery, particularly for salmon. It is thought to have been named after Captain Nathaniel Portlock, a British ship captain who sailed there in 1786. In 1921, a United States Post Office opened in the town.  The population largely consisted of Russian-Aleuts, indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands. Both the Aleut people and the islands are divided between the US state of Alaska and the Russian administrative division of Kamchatka Krai.   In the early 1900s there were a series of deaths and disappearances in the town. Many people started to blame this on a killer cryptid! It is said that this big bad beast is the reason behind the town being abandoned and left to become a legend.   Nantiinaq:   First off let's talk about the cryptid that is believed to be the cause of all of this mess.   Nantinaq is a large Bigfoot-like creature that is believed to be a key factor in the abandonment of the Alaskan fishing village Portlock. Elders from the nearby town of Nanwalek have kept oral traditions of the creature alive since Portlock's abandonment in 1950. Stories differentiate Nantinaq from the North American Sasquatch or Bigfoot through its abilities, which many believe to be supernatural and evil in nature.   The earliest descriptions and accounts of Nantinaq can be traced back to European expedition logs in the 1700's. When Native Alaskans began inhabiting the Portlock area stories and encounters with a mysterious creature began occurring with increasing regularity.   In the early 20th century, as Portlock's population grew, local and national sources began to record unexplained occurrences in the area. An abnormally high number of disappearances, catastrophes, and deaths eventually lead to village elders to move the population to nearby Nanwalek.    The physical characteristics of Nantinaq are typically described to be similar to the North American Sasquatch. Eye witnesses and historians describe the creature as being upwards of 8 feet tall and being covered in dark fur. Sharp claws capable of ripping mammals with ease have also been identified.   Despite the creatures imposing physical characteristics, many locals identify Nantinaq more through its invisible traits. Strange illnesses, smells and noises have all been recorded in the Portlock area with no known explanation. This has led many locals and elders to believe Nantinaq is spiritual in nature.   The craziness: Even before Portlock had even existed there had long been sinister stories told by the Natives of the area. They had long told of a creature stalking the wildernesses of the region, which they referred to as a Nantiinaq, roughly translating to “half man- half beast.” The Natives were apparently terrified of these creatures, and would avoid any area in which they were known to lurk. At first Portlock seemed safe, but whether the Nantiinaq had anything to do with it or not, strange things began happening in and around the area, not long after its settlement. In 1900, a group of hair-covered creatures ran at a prospector who had climbed a tree in an attempt to get his bearings near Thomas Bay. The prospector said they were, “the most hideous creatures. I couldn't call them anything but devils…” The prospector, upon seeing the creatures advancing on him, was able to drop down out of the tree, get to his canoe and make his escape in the nick of time. He had no doubt in his mind that, had he not seen the creatures when he did, they would have made short work of him. Another bizarre incident allegedly happened in as early as 1905, just a few years after the cannery had opened. At this time, many of the workers at the cannery suddenly stopped coming to work and refused to come back, but this wasn't due to poor pay or working conditions, but rather because the men were deeply spooked. They claimed that there was “something in the woods,” commonly reported by the men as being large dark shapes that would stare at them from the tree line at the shore and sometimes display menacing behavior. The workers were eventually convinced to come back the following season, but this was not the end of the town's problems.   In the 1920s and 30s there were several mysterious deaths in the area that seemed to have been caused by something very large and powerful. The first was a local hunter by the name of Albert Petka, who was out hunting with his dogs in the 1920s when he came across a massive hairy creature that materialized from the trees to strike him in the chest, sending him flying. Petka's dogs allegedly managed to chase the beast off, and when rescuers arrived he explained what had happened, before dying from his wounds later. Natives at the time saw this as a bad sign, believing it to be evidence that a Nantiinaq had come to haunt the area. Rumors like this persisted for years, only further perpetuated by stories of miners, loggers, hunters, or cannery workers finding huge tracks in the woods, or of seeing fleeting large dark shapes and sometimes hearing eerie howls at night. Making it even more ominous is that there were some reports from frightened Natives that there was a ghostly entity in the area as well, which took the form of a woman wearing a long black dress and who would appear at the top of the cliffs near town to scream and moan before vanishing.   Brian Weed is the co-founder of a group called Juneau's Hidden History that primarily keeps track of things through their Facebook page. He has traveled all over Juneau and many other Alaskan towns in search of natural history and stories. His group plans frequent hikes in the area to places that have some sort of story to tell or just to see the natural beauty of the state. He related another story of a mysterious death.                       "A logger was out working and something or someone hit him over the head with a huge piece of logging equipment, something that one man couldn't have lifted. When they found his body, there was blood on the equipment and there was no way that one person could have done it. He was a good ten feet from the logging equipment, so it's not like he slipped, fell, and hit his head. It looked more like someone picked it up and bonked him over the head."           In 1940 it was reported that a search party had been sent out to look for one such missing hunter, which would claim that they had come across his body in a creek, mutilated and torn apart in a way not consistent with a bear attack. Other bodies would reportedly be found as well, apparently washed down from the mountains into a nearby lagoon, with others still discovered washed up on the shores of Port Chatham, all of them ripped apart and maimed as if by some immensely powerful animal. At the time there were so many people turning up in that lagoon dead that it began to truly freak out the locals, to the point that they spent much time cowering indoors away from those creepy ass woods.   By the 1950s, locals were sick and tired of living in fear so they completely fled the town and left it abandoned. Years later when hunters returned, it is said that they reported seeing 18-inch long human-like footprints with patterns similar to a deer or wolf.   Former Portlock resident Malania Helen Kehl was interviewed by Naomi Klouda of the Homer Tribune back in October of 2009 and said things in Portlock started out well enough but degenerated to such a point that the family left their home and fled to Nanwalek.The family had endured the murder of Malania's godfather, Andrew Kamluck in 1931. Kamluck was the logger who was killed when someone, or something, hit him over the head.           "We left our houses and the school and started all new here (Nanwalek),” said Kehl.   Port Graham elder, Simeon Kvasnikoff told of the unexplained disappearance of a gold miner near the village during this time.   “He went up there one time and never came back,” said Kvasnikoff. “No one found any sign of him.”   Another interesting aspect of the Portlock story was relayed to Klouda by an Anchorage paramedic who preferred to remain anonymous.   “In 1990, while I was working as a paramedic in Anchorage, we got called out on an alarm for a man having a heart attack at the state jail in Eagle River. He was a Native man in his 70s, and after I got him stabilized with IVs, O2 and cardiac drugs, my partner and I began to transport him to the Native Hospital in Anchorage.” En route to the hospital, the paramedic and the Native man, an “Aleut'' from Port Graham, talked about hunting. The paramedic had been to DogFish Bay and was once stuck there due to bad weather.   “This old man sat up on the gurney and grabbed me by the front of my shirt. He got right up to my face and said, ‘Did it bother you?' Well, with that question, the hair just stood up on the back of my head. I said, ‘Yes.' “Did you see it?” was his next question. I said, “No, did you see it?” He said “No, but my brother seen it. It chased him.”   Ok so that's pretty jacked up….a killer bigfoot! That's one hell of a story. The town had been abandoned ever since and sightings continue to this day. In fact there is a TV series about this place called Alaskan Killer Bigfoot! The series followed a 40 day expedition to the area to try and see if they can get to the bottom of all the mystery! Moody hasn't watched it yet but I'm sure he'll get high and binge it soon.    So on the side of fairness we do have to disclose an interview we found. The interview was with a woman named Sally Ash. Sally is Sugpiaq of Russian-Aleut descent. She has lived in Nanwalek for most of her life and continues to speak her native language Sugt'stun. Her mother was born in Dogfish Bay, near Port Chatham.            “Our people were nomadic, went by the seasons, whatever was in season they would move from one place to another. They went through Port Chatham, Dogfish Bay, Seldovia, Homer, even to Kodiak.”               "Portlock was kind of a creepy place,” she admitted.  “They'd tell us don't go out on a foggy day.  That's when he's walking around. You could run into him and you never know what he might do.”   The ‘he' that she is talking about is their local form of Sasquatch, known as Nantiinaq.  Nantiinaq pronounced ‘non-tee-nuck,' is not your typical, everyday Sasquatch brute. Nantiinaq is more of a supernatural being.      “I think he is part-human,” Sally describes. “He lived with people and then didn't want to be around them anymore so he moved to the forest; away from everybody. He started growing hair and he looked like a bigfoot — scary… My uncles, my grandfathers, they all talked about him. They'd tell us they live far away from people. They don't mix with people.”   “My brother went up to the lake. He was tying off his skiff. He started smelling something really bad in the bushes, so he opened it, moving the branches. Something's going on here.  Then he looked in there and there was a man with his hands — in the back way (turned around). It looked like a man, but he was all hairy and he looked really scary. So he and our cousin took off running and didn't want to be up there.  He wasn't sure if it was a bigfoot, but there was a horrible smell,” she said.   “I think it's a he; he has been living for a long time,” Sally says. “He's old, he's tall, he's strong, he's hairy.  It lives in the woods and you can tell when he's getting near. You can smell him.  My mom used to talk about it a lot.  She'd tell stories of the bigfoot, like in Dogfish area, her and her brother would talk about how bigfoot was around. They were getting too close to him and they would be nice to him. Respect him. Keep distance. They live with him but not so close. He moved around — he was quick.”   Sally served as translator for her cousin, Malania Kehl during her historic interview for the Homer Tribune in 2009, that has since taken the bigfoot-believing world by storm. Malania told the reporter that the entire town evacuated Port Chatham in 1949 due to this murderous Nantiinaq. Her story has been perceived as being factual by authors, documentarians, and bigfoot buffs.   Buuuuuuuuttttttt…..   “My cousin Malania was being interviewed and we were sitting with her,” Sally recalls. “Malania kind of made up a story, because she was getting tired of people asking if this (story) is true. She made up this story about how Bigfoot was killing people. It wasn't true.  Everybody knows that, but it was not our place to say nothing. We all knew but we couldn't just stop her. We were brought up in a way where we can't tell our elders they are wrong.”   "And that was her story,” Sally giggles…  “we knew it. There was me and my sisters and my cousins and we all just sat there. We couldn't tell her, ‘Don't say that Malania,'  because she might get mad at us. We were younger than her and we were not allowed in front of her to say anything like that… Malania knew that we knew about her story that she made up and we all had a laugh about it with her.”   Sally said the reason for the exodus from Port Chatham was more practical in nature.   “People would see Nantiinaq, but that wasn't the reason why people moved this way to Seldovia and Nanwalek. They moved because of the economy, schools and the church.  There really was no killing of people.”     Well…that's disappointing…but we here at The train are gonna stick to the fact that there's a killer bigfoot to blame!   Wow so that's fun! But you know what…it's not enough. We strive to bring you the best in podcast entertainment here so we're going to do some of our patented quick hitters and throw in some more crazy ghost towns for ya!  Let's roll!   First up we're off to Italy. The ghost town of Craco to be more specific.    Craco is a ghost town and comune in the province of Matera, in the southern Italian region of Basilicata.    Haunted, surreal and moving, it's not surprising that the Craco ghost town and the beautiful surrounding landscape was chosen as the setting for several movies such as Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ and 007 Quantum of Solace.   The first written evidence of the town's existence shows that it was under the possession of a bishop named Arnaldo in 1060 A.D. The town's oldest building, the tall Torre Normanna, predates the bishop's documented ownership by 20 years.   From 1154 to 1168, after the archbishop, the nobleman Eberto controlled the town, establishing Feudalistic rule, and then ownership passed onto Roberto di Pietrapertos in 1179.   A university was established in the 13th century and the population kept growing, reaching 2,590 in the year 1561. By this time, the construction of four large plazas was completed. Craco had its first substantial landslide in 1600, but life went on, and the monastery of St. Peter went up in 1630.   Then, another tragedy hit. In 1656, the Black Death began to spread. Hundreds died and the population dipped.   But Craco wasn't down for the count quite yet. In 1799, the town successfully overthrew the feudal system — only to then fall to Napoleonic occupation. In 1815, a still-growing Craco was divided into two separate districts.   After Italy's unification in the mid-19th century, the controversial gangster and folk hero Carmine Crocco briefly conquered the village.   Mother Nature had more in store for Craco. Poor agricultural conditions caused a severe famine in the late 19th century. This spawned a mass migration of the population — about 1,300 people — to North America.   Then came more landslides. Craco had a series of them — plus a flood in 1972 and an earthquake in 1980. Luckily, in 1963, the remaining 1,800 inhabitants were transferred down the mountain to a valley called Craco Peschiera.   Not everyone was willing to move, however. One man native to the tiny town resisted the relocation, choosing to live the rest of his more than 100 years in his native land.   Some houses still hold traces of the life that once was: old appliances, abandoned tools, a lonely chair in the middle of a room where no one will ever sit anymore. A few facades still bear the signs of their past beauty in what has remained of their decorations.   And of course there are the tales of hauntings that come with most ghost towns. While there isn't a whole lot on a cursory search, if you dig a little you can find some stories of late night expeditions finding some interesting things. There are stories of groups seeing shadow people and apparitions. People hearing strange sounds. Pictures containing orbs and other anomalies. It's a great looking place, definitely check it out.   Next up is Rhyolite Nevada.   The ghost town of Rhyolite and its remnants are definitely a popular destination among those who like seeking out Nevada's abandoned places. Home to many of the town's original and now crumbling buildings, it's a fascinating place to see and think about Nevada's past.    According to the national parks service This ghost town's origins were brought about by Shorty Harris and E. L. Cross, who were prospecting in the area in 1904. They found quartz all over a hill, and as Shorty describes it “... the quartz was just full of free gold... it was the original bullfrog rock... this banner is a crackerjack”! He declared, “The district is going to be the banner camp of Nevada. I say so once and I'll say it again.” At that time there was only one other person in the whole area: Old Man Beatty who lived in a ranch with his family five miles away. Soon the rush was on and several camps were set up including Bullfrog, the Amargosa and a settlement between them called Jumpertown. A townsite was laid out nearby and given the name Rhyolite from the silica-rich volcanic rock in the area.   There were over 2000 claims covering everything in a 30 mile area from the Bullfrog district. The most promising was the Montgomery Shoshone mine, which prompted everyone to move to the Rhyolite townsite. The town immediately boomed with buildings springing up everywhere. One building was 3 stories tall and cost $90,000 to build. A stock exchange and Board of Trade were formed. The red light district drew women from as far away as San Francisco. There were hotels, stores, a school for 250 children, an ice plant, two electric plants, foundries and machine shops and even a miner's union hospital.   The town citizens had an active social life including baseball games, dances, basket socials, whist parties, tennis, a symphony, Sunday school picnics, basketball games, Saturday night variety shows at the opera house, and pool tournaments. In 1906 Countess Morajeski opened the Alaska Glacier Ice Cream Parlor to the delight of the local citizenry. That same year an enterprising miner, Tom T. Kelly, built a Bottle House out of 50,000 beer and liquor bottles.   In April 1907 electricity came to Rhyolite, and by August of that year a mill had been constructed to handle 300 tons of ore a day at the Montgomery Shoshone mine. It consisted of a crusher, 3 giant rollers, over a dozen cyanide tanks and a reduction furnace. The Montgomery Shoshone mine had become nationally known because Bob Montgomery once boasted he could take $10,000 a day in ore from the mine. It was later owned by Charles Schwab, who purchased it in 1906 for a reported 2 to 6 million dollars.   The financial panic of 1907 took its toll on Rhyolite and was seen as the beginning of the end for the town. In the next few years mines started closing and banks failed. Newspapers went out of business, and by 1910 the production at the mill had slowed to $246,661 and there were only 611 residents in the town. On March 14, 1911 the directors voted to close down the Montgomery Shoshone mine and mill. In 1916 the light and power were finally turned off in the town.   Today you can find several remnants of Rhyolite's glory days. Some of the walls of the 3 story bank building are still standing, as is part of the old jail. The train depot (privately owned) is one of the few complete buildings left in the town, as is the Bottle House. The Bottle House was restored by Paramount pictures in Jan, 1925.   And according to only on your state, It also happens to be home to one of Nevada's spookiest cemeteries. After all, nothing says "creepy" like a ghost town graveyard! Known as the Bullfrog-Rhyolite Cemetery, it definitely looks the part of a haunted destination you probably shouldn't visit at night.   The Bullfrog-Rhyolite Cemetery was actually shared between two towns. Home to just a handful of rugged graves, including some that look like nothing more than a human-shaped mound of rocks, it definitely has a serene type of beauty to it...during daylight, that is.   There's no telling what kind of creepy experiences you could have in Rhyolite once the sun sets. In fact, paranormal enthusiasts make trips out here to challenge just that! Disembodied voices and orbs are often reported in this area. And while most of the action seems to be centered on this area there are also reports of the same strange goings on in the town itself. Strange sounds and voices and orbs, as well as strange shadows and apparitions. Sounds awesome to us!   Next up we head to Calico California.   Calico is a ghost town and former mining town in San Bernardino County, California, United States. Located in the Calico Mountains of the Mojave Desert region of Southern California, it was founded in 1881 as a silver mining town, and was later converted into a county park named Calico Ghost Town. Located off Interstate 15, it lies 3 miles (4.8 km) from Barstow and 3 miles from Yermo. Giant letters spelling CALICO are visible, from the highway, on the Calico Peaks behind it. Walter Knott purchased Calico in the 1950s, and architecturally restored all but the five remaining original buildings to look as they did in the 1880s. Calico received California Historical Landmark #782, and in 2005 was proclaimed by then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to be California's Silver Rush Ghost Town.   In 1881 four prospectors were leaving Grapevine Station (present day Barstow, California) for a mountain peak to the northeast. After they described the peak as "calico-colored", the peak, the mountain range to which it belonged, and the town that followed were all called Calico. The four prospectors discovered silver in the mountain and opened the Silver King Mine, which was California's largest silver producer in the mid-1880s. John C. King, who had grubstaked the prospectors who discovered the silver vein (the Silver King Mine was thus named after him), was the uncle of Walter Knott founder of Knott's Berry Farm. King was sheriff of San Bernardino County from 1879 to 1882. A post office at Calico was established in early 1882, and the Calico Print, a weekly newspaper, started publishing. The town soon supported three hotels, five general stores, a meat market, bars, brothels, and three restaurants and boarding houses. The county established a school district and a voting precinct. The town also had a deputy sheriff and two constables, two lawyers and a justice of the peace, five commissioners, and two doctors. There was also a Wells Fargo office and a telephone and telegraph service. At its height of silver production during 1883 and 1885, Calico had over 500 mines and a population of 1,200 people. Local badmen were buried in the Boot Hill cemetery   An attempt to revive the town was made in about 1915, when a cyanide plant was built to recover silver from the unprocessed Silver King Mine's deposits. Walter Knott and his wife Cordelia, founders of Knott's Berry Farm, were homesteaded at Newberry Springs around this time, and Knott helped build the redwood cyanide tanks for the plant.   The last owner of Calico as a mine was Zenda Mining Company. After building Ghost Town at Knott's Berry Farm in the 1940s, Walter Knott, his son, Russell, and Paul von Klieben, who was Knott's art director, made a road trip to Calico. The three of them came back filled with enthusiasm. If they could build an imaginary ghost town at Knott's Berry Farm, would it not be possible to restore a real ghost town? In 1951, Walter Knott purchased the town of Calico from the Zenda Mining Company and put Paul von Klieben in charge of restoring it to its original condition, referencing old photographs.   Using the old photos, and Walter's memory and that of some old-timers who still lived in the area, von Klieben was able to not only restore existing structures, but also design and replace missing buildings. Knott spent $700,000 restoring Calico. Knott installed a longtime employee named Freddy "Calico Fred" Noller as resident caretaker and official greeter. In 1966 Walter Knott decided to donate the town to San Bernardino County, and Calico became a County Regional Park.   The site is now a thriving tourist attraction, and is quite interesting to visit despite being neither original nor very atmospheric, as only about four of the buildings are largely unchanged from the mining era, and the whole place is rather commercialized. Some of the replica houses have only a frontage, as if part of a movie set.    The best part?…yup…its friggin haunted. You can take ghost tours through the town to find out for yourself!    According to Haunted Rooms. Com, Amid the claims of paranormal activity, there are 3 main entities who have been identified as residing in Calico Ghost Town and these are the ones that visitors should be on the lookout for.   One of the most commonly spotted entities haunting Calico Ghost Town is said to be a woman by the name of Lucy Lane. History suggests that Lucy ran Calico's General Store alongside her husband John Robert Lane. Just like so many of the residents, the Lanes moved away from Calico when the town began rapidly depopulating. However, they ended up returning in 1916 after the town was abandoned and live the rest of their days in the town. Lucy was well into her 90s when she finally passed.   It seems only natural then that she would want to stick around in the town where she lived and died. Visitors to Calico Ghost Town have frequently reported seeing Lucy walking between what was once her home and the General Store. She is easily recognizable by her attire – the beautiful black lace dress in which she was buried. Although most of the reports describe seeing Lucy Lane walking from her home to the General Store, there have also been sightings of her inside both buildings as well. Her former home is now a museum dedicated to Lucy and John Robert Lane and she is sometimes seen sitting in a rocking chair slowly rocking back and forth. Some visitors also claim to have seen Lucy behind the counter in the General Store.   Another of the paranormal hotspots in the Calico Ghost Town is definitely the schoolhouse! The names of the teachers have long since been lost, but it is said to be their spirits who are responsible for the plethora of paranormal activity happening in the old schoolhouse. There are frequent reports that the teachers like to stand in the windows of the schoolhouse peering out at those passing by on the outside! There are also reports of a red ball of light moving around inside the schoolhouse. This phenomenon has been witnessed by many visitors to Calico Ghost Town.   The former teachers are certainly not the only ones who are up to mischief! There have also been reports of various ghostly students in the schoolhouse as well. These children's spirits can be seen flitting around inside the building. They do seem to keep themselves to themselves most of the time, but there is one girl aged around 11 or 12 who is far more outgoing. However, she is most likely to appear to children and teens who will often comment on seeing her only for their parents to turn around and the girl to vanish!   The most prominent ghost that roams around Calico Ghost Town is probably the entity known as ‘Tumbleweed' Harris. He is actually the last Marshal of Calico and it seems as though he has not yet stepped down from his duty! He is often seen by the boardwalks on Main Street and you will be able to recognize him by his large frame and long white beard. If you do visit Calico Ghost Town be sure to stop by Tumbleweed's gravestone and thank him for continuing to keep Calico's peace even in death.   And finally we double back and head back to Alaska for one more ghost town. Kennecott Alaska is our final destination.   In the summer of 1900, two prospectors, "Tarantula" Jack Smith and Clarence L. Warner, a group of prospectors associated with the McClellan party, spotted "a green patch far above them in an improbable location for a grass-green meadow." The green turned out to be malachite, located with chalcocite (aka "copper glance"), and the location of the Bonanza claim. A few days later, Arthur Coe Spencer, U.S. Geological Survey geologist independently found chalcocite at the same location.   Stephen Birch, a mining engineer just out of school, was in Alaska looking for investment opportunities in minerals. He had the financial backing of the Havemeyer Family, and another investor named James Ralph, from his days in New York. Birch spent the winter of 1901-1902 acquiring the "McClellan group's interests" for the Alaska Copper Company of Birch, Havemeyer, Ralph and Schultz, later to become the Alaska Copper and Coal Company. In the summer of 1901, he visited the property and "spent months mapping and sampling." He confirmed the Bonanza mine and surrounding by deposits were, at the time, the richest known concentration of copper in the world.   By 1905, Birch had successfully defended the legal challenges to his property and he began the search for capital to develop the area. On 28 June 1906, he entered into "an amalgamation" with the Daniel Guggenheim and J.P. Morgan & Co., known as the Alaska Syndicate, eventually securing over $30 million. The capital was to be used for constructing a railway, a steamship line, and development of the mines. In Nov. 1906, the Alaska Syndicate bought a 40 percent interest in the Bonanza Mine from the Alaska Copper and Coal Company and a 46.2 percent interest in the railroad plans of John Rosene's Northwestern Commercial Company.   Political battles over the mining and subsequent railroad were fought in the office of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt between conservationists and those having a financial interest in the copper.   The Alaska Syndicate traded its Wrangell Mountains Mines assets for shares in the Kennecott Copper Corporation, a "new public company" formed on 29 April 1915. A similar transaction followed with the CR&NW railway and the Alaska Steamship Company. Birch was the managing partner for the Alaska operation.   Kennecott Mines was named after the Kennicott Glacier in the valley below. The geologist Oscar Rohn named the glacier after Robert Kennicott during the 1899 US Army Abercrombie Survey. A "clerical error" resulted in the substitution of an "e" for the "i", supposedly by Stephen Birch himself. Kennecott had five mines: Bonanza, Jumbo, Mother Lode, Erie and Glacier. Glacier, which is really an ore extension of the Bonanza, was an open-pit mine and was only mined during the summer. Bonanza and Jumbo were on Bonanza Ridge about 3 mi (4.8 km) from Kennecott. The Mother Lode mine was located on the east side of the ridge from Kennecott. The Bonanza, Jumbo, Mother Lode and Erie mines were connected by tunnels. The Erie mine was perched on the northwest end of Bonanza Ridge overlooking Root Glacier about 3.7 mi (6.0 km) up a glacial trail from Kennecott. Ore was hoisted to Kennecott via the trams which head-ended at Bonanza and Jumbo. From Kennecott the ore was hauled mostly in 140-pound sacks on steel flat cars to Cordova, 196 rail miles away, via the Copper River and Northwestern Railway (CRNW).   In 1911 the first shipment of ore by train transpired. Before completion, the steamship Chittyna carried ore to the Abercrombie landing by Miles Glacier. Initial ore shipments contained "72 percent copper and 18 oz. of silver per ton."   In 1916, the peak year for production, the mines produced copper ore valued at $32.4 million.   In 1925 a Kennecott geologist predicted that the end of the high-grade ore bodies was in sight. The highest grades of ore were largely depleted by the early 1930s. The Glacier Mine closed in 1929. The Mother Lode was next, closing at the end of July 1938. The final three, Erie, Jumbo and Bonanza, closed that September. The last train left Kennecott on November 10, 1938, leaving it a ghost town.   From 1909 until 1938, except when it closed temporarily in 1932, Kennecott mines "produced over 4.6 million tons of ore that contained 1.183 billion pounds of copper mainly from three ore bodies: Bonanza, Jumbo and Mother Lode. The Kennecott operations reported gross revenues above $200 million and a net profit greater than $100 million.   In 1938, Ernest Gruening proposed Kennecott be preserved as a National Park. A recommendation to President Franklin D. Roosevelt on 18 Jan. 1940 for the establishment of the Kennecott National Monument went nowhere. However, 2 Dec. 1980 saw the establishment of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve.   From 1939 until the mid-1950s, Kennecott was deserted except for a family of three who served as the watchmen until about 1952. In the late 1960s, an attempt was made to reprocess the tailings and to transport the ore in aircraft. The cost of doing so made the idea unprofitable. Around the same time, the company with land rights ordered the destruction of the town to rid them of liability for potential accidents. A few structures were destroyed, but the job was never finished and most of the town was left standing. Visitors and nearby residents have stripped many of the small items and artifacts. Some have since been returned and are held in various archives.   KCC sent a field party under the geologist Les Moon in 1955. They agreed with the 1938 conclusion, "no copper resource of a size and grade sufficient to interest KCC remained." The mill remains however.   Most of this historical info came from an awesome article called A Kennecott Story by Charles Hawley in the University of Utah Press.   So you know we love our history and we thought it was cool cus this was such an important town in Alaska's history and then boom…ghost town. But you know that's not why we're there…it's also haunted!   Reports of paranormal activity along the abandoned train tracks abound and have for decades. That's not all that makes it one of the most haunted places in America. Some claim to have seen old tombstones along the route. The gravestones then vanish by the time the visitors make their return trip. Others have reported hearing disembodied voices and phantom children laughing. Reportedly, a 1990s construction project here halted after workers were scared away by spooky sounds and inexplicable events.   Ok, last little tid bit of fact. There's actually a little town up in the far northwest territory of Alaska called Diomede which is located on the island of Little Diomede in the middle of the Bering Straight. During the winter months the water can freeze and you can actually walk… to Big Diomede … an island in Russia. The stretch of water between these two islands is only about 2.5 miles wide. There are two reported cases of people walking from Alaska to Russia in modern history. The last were Karl Bushby, and his American companion Dimitri Kieffer who in 2006 walked from Alaska to Russia over the Bering Straight in 14 days.   So there you have it…killer bigfoot and some cool haunted ghost towns! Maybe we'll drive into some more ghost towns in a future episode!   Bigfoot horror movies   https://filmschoolrejects.com/bigfoot-horror/

Greater LA
Black history and humanity are focus of SoFi's Kinsey art exhibit

Greater LA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 25:29


The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection is back in LA. “What we do is about illuminating a fuller scope of Blackness and humanity at large,” says the chief curator. LA artist Phung Huynh honors the kids of Cambodian American immigrants and refugees in her new exhibit, “Donut (W)hole.” High Desert Test Sites' 2022 biennial is titled “The Searchers.” It features nine artists at various locations in the Mojave Desert. 

Running long - A trail & ultra running talk
023. Dora Atim | Increasing diversity in trail running, building a community, working as a Nike Running Coach, running The Speed Project

Running long - A trail & ultra running talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 55:28


Dora Atim is a Nike Running Coach, the founder of Ultra Black Running, an athlete and so much more. We chatted with Dora as she just finished The Speed Project, a relay race from Los Angeles to Las Vegas across the Mojave Desert, with Team Long Distance. TSP is a celebration of running and its community aspect, which Dora represents so well. Check out a sick photo gallery on the Vert Run App! We talk about how she got into running, about her work as a Nike Running Coach, how she plans to increase diversity in trail running and how she's inspiring people of any age, gender, color and walk of life to move and get outside, to feel good about running and sharing it with others. Get inspired, check out Long Distance World, follow Dora on social media, get out for a run and share how awesome it feels! _____________________________ Follow @vert.run on IG Download our app and sign up to our training plans on vert.run You can send us a message with any questions for us or for our guests! https://anchor.fm/vertrun/message Francesco's links: Instagram | Twitter | Strava | Website

StarDate Podcast
Next Life

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 2:14


When a giant radio dish entered service with NASA in 1994, its main job was to track SOHO, a spacecraft that watches the Sun. Today, one of its main jobs is to study the Sun itself. It's the centerpiece of GAVRT — Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope — a project that's turned control of the telescope over to students. The 112-foot dish is in the Mojave Desert. It's part of NASA's Deep Space Network, which stays in touch with spacecraft throughout the solar system and beyond. Network antennas are also used as radio telescopes. And that's the full-time job of this antenna. It retired from the spacecraft-tracking business years ago. It took over for another antenna that had been used for GAVRT. Today, students around the country, from elementary through high school, help select its targets, move the dish, gather data, and analyze the results. There are several main projects for GAVRT. One of them is studying the Sun. The observations can help determine how the Sun generates space weather — interactions between the Sun and Earth's magnetic field. Space weather can knock out satellites, shut down power grids, and cause other problems. Other projects monitor the radio waves produced by jets of particles shooting away from black holes; study the magnetic field of Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet; and even listen for radio signals from other civilizations — big science from a “retired” radio dish.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Whoa Podcast About Horses Horsemanship
Horseman Domenico Sumonte

Whoa Podcast About Horses Horsemanship

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 47:54


Horseman Domenico Sumonte Domenico Sumonte considers himself more of a horse-Man than a horse trainer. I'm lucky enough to have an arena at the End of The Road Ranch where I can work my horses. One trainer that works out of this barn is Domenico Sumonte. In between working our horses, Dom and I struck up a friendship. In our casual conversations, I quickly learned Dom has experienced an exciting life with horses. I wanted to learn more about his life and philosophy. Dom is a self-taught horseman. He builds a relationship with a horse first. One technique Dom uses is to get the horses out on the trail first. The ag fields around the ranch provide a great working area. There is farm equipment, trash, and other things that help him "sack out" his horse. Riding is an adventure for Dom. Dom has ridden horses on the ancient roads of Rome. He has ridden in the mountains of Chile. One of Dom's favorite rides was the Pacific Crest Trail between Los Angeles and the Mojave Desert. I really love these conversations with interesting horsemen. Thanks Dom. Join Us on this Journey We want you to be a part of the show. Tell us about your horse. Share your challenges, triumphs, or just everyday items that make horse ownership unique. Create an audio file using the memo app on your phone. Or contact me and we'll set up a time to talk on Skype or phone. Perhaps what you have to share can help someone in THEIR horse journey. You are an enormous part of why we do a podcast. We really love getting your feedback. Please let us know your thoughts, ideas, and suggestions for the show. Email us at John@WhoaPodcast.com Thanks for listening. John & Ranae Episode #198 Support the Whoa Podcast with this Amazon Link. Checkout My John Harrer & Horses YouTube Channel

The Roundtable
"All My Rage" by Sabaa Tahir

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 11:33


From #1 New York Times bestselling author Sabaa Tahir comes "All My Rage," a brilliant, unforgettable, and heart-wrenching contemporary novel about family and forgiveness, love and loss, in a sweeping story that crosses generations and continents. Sabaa Tahir first gained recognition for her bestselling young adult fantasy series, “An Ember in the Ashes,” which concluded in 2020. Her new novel, “All My Rage,” and is her first foray into young adult contemporary. In it she explores themes of family and forgiveness across generations, Tahir grew up as a Pakistani-Muslim girl in a predominantly white desert town which deepened her desire to tell this story.Sabaa Tahir grew up in California's Mojave Desert at her family's eighteen-room motel. There, she spent her time devouring fantasy novels, raiding her brother's comic book stash, and playing guitar badly. She began writing An Ember in the Ashes while working nights as a newspaper editor.

Desert Horticulture
Buying and Growing Citrus in the Eastern Mojave Desert

Desert Horticulture

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 25:13


I'm not a huge fan of growing citrus at the middle elevations in the Eastern Mojave desert but it can be done. Citrus production is best done in southern Arizona and at lower elevations, warm parts of Southern California such as Riverside and Orange counties and along coastal regions such as the Galveston area of Texas. Citrus in our part of the world is best treated as a hobby; some years you get a good crop and other years you don't. Because of global climate change and Covid, citrus is become very popular for home gardens. This episode of Desert Horticulture focuses on what kind of citrus to buy, wear and how to plant these small to medium-sized fruit trees.Support the show (https://xtremehorticulture.blogspot.com/)

KZMU News
Wednesday March 23, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 7:15


For some locals, warmer weather means one thing – skate season. Skate Moab recently held their first event of the season and has big plans to bring the ‘joy of skating' to the local community the rest of the year. Today on the news, an audio portrait of the person leading Skate Moab events this year, Jazmine Duncan. And later, a new documentary tells the story of the Mojave Desert tortoise as Washington County officials plan to put a road through protected habitat. And, tribes rebuilding bison herds are getting help from an unlikely source. // Show Notes // Photo: Jazmine Duncan wears a lot of hats in the Moab and Castle Valley communities including property manager, mayor, firefighter and – roller skater. Along with a passionate crew, she is leading Skate Moab events this year. // Skate Moab https://www.skatemoab.com // KUER: ‘The Good The Bad & The Slow' tells the story of tortoises in Washington County https://www.kuer.org/arts-culture-entertainment/2022-03-21/the-good-the-bad-the-slow-tells-the-story-of-tortoises-in-washington-county

Echoes From The Void
Echo Chamber - 191 - Part One

Echoes From The Void

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 48:09


This week @EchoChamberFP https://www.instagram.com/echochamberfp/ has only two reviews, BUT, also two fantastic interviews! It's another 'TWO Parter', people! And in 'Part One' we have a new Shudder original, from first time feature director, Sam Walker. Who, was kind enough to stop by for a conversation, and it was just a shame we didn't have more time! 'The Seed' is the new Shudder original, written & directed by Sam Walker Lifelong friends Deidre (Lucy Martin), Heather (Sophie Vavasseur), and Charlotte (Chelsea Edge) are finally getting some time away together, using the upcoming meteor shower to gather more followers for their social media channels. But what starts out as a girls' getaway in the Mojave Desert descends into a battle for survival with the arrival of an invasive alien force whose air of mystery soon proves to be alluring and irresistible to them. Before long the situation devolves into a battle to the death, where the stakes have galaxy-wide implications. In 'Part One' we have: The Seed Watch Review: Here. https://youtu.be/oKP5_hXB6jY Beyond Fest Film Festival Date: 5th October 2021 Digital Release Date: 10th March 2022 Director: Sam Walker Cast: Lucy Martin, Chelsea Edge, Sophie Vavasseur, Jamie Wittebrood, Anthony Edridge, Shirley Pisani Credit: Camelot Films, Hardman Pictures, Shudder Genre: Comedy, Horror, Sci-Fi Running Time: 91 min Cert: 18 Trailer: Here. https://youtu.be/1-_pi6iQf3Q Watch via Shudder: Here. https://www.shudder.com/movies/watch/the-seed/8b25020e838b0e3f Instagram: @theseedfilm https://www.instagram.com/theseedfilm/ ------------ *(Music) 'Let's Go' (feat. MeLa Machinko) by Pharoahe Monch - 2007 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/eftv/message

Truth Be Told
Sonic Geometry

Truth Be Told

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 47:45


Eric Rankin discusses how energy, frequency and form creates the geometric matrix of the Quantum Universe.Eric Rankin has been immersed in the study of frequency for decades. While researching and swimming with dolphins around the world for his bestselling novel The Aquarians, Eric was introduced to the power of vibration, especially as it pertains to revealing “form” to the mind of a dolphin. Currently conducting sonic experiments at the world famous Integratron in California's Mojave Desert, Eric has published many of his findings in the Sonic Geometry video series. Now working alongside some of the world's premier physicists, mathematicians and audio engineers, Eric has been led to a unique geometric pattern he calls the “Genesis Structure,” which he believes could reveal the geometric matrix of the Quantum Universe. He has been featured on Gaia TV for his research linking geometric forms and growth patterns to mathematically perfect major chords, and has been a featured speaker at conferences including Contact in the Desert and Star Knowledge. As the host of the international radio show Awakening Code Radio, Eric has interviewed such luminaries as Dr. Masaru Emoto, Deepak Chopra, Greg Bradden, Marianne Williamson, physicists Menas Kafatos and Nassim Haramein and frequency pioneer Jonathan Goldman.www.sacredsciencesound.com/eric-rankinHost Bonnie Burkert melds the worlds of media and higher consciousness, sharing tools for transformation to find our highest Truth. www.yogibon.com

Re|flections
Mirrors Vol. 51 | Jesse Michael

Re|flections

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 75:08


We have the honor of welcoming Mojave Desert native Jesse Michael to our roster, delivering us a sweet blend of grooving house and stripped minimal records, enjoy! -- Follow @jessemichaeldj www.instagram.com/jessemichaeldj -- "Jesse Michael Is no stranger to dance music. Combining a series of collective sounds acquired throughout a decade of influences. The dark side of the moon of house and minimal selections delivering a mixture of cultivated genres and vibes that transcends beyond the stage. With groove culture at focus, Jesse is able to incorporate true authentic blends and mixes allowing the listener to dive deeper into the experience." -- Tracklist: 1. B1 Zorg - Antimatter 2. A2 TIJN - Miniak 3. A2 Niko Maxen - Consolidate 4. A2 Alci - Heinz 5. A1 Vadim Oslov - Da Gong 6. A1 Giash - Centrum 7. B1 Traumer - Quanta 8. B1 100HZ - Make Believe 9. A1 Len Lewis - Joy 10. A2 Akyra - Bubbles 11. A1 Julien Sandre - Metis 12. A1 Semi Luna - Dubsons 13. A2 Assail Weiss - K06 14. Dubfound - D12 15. A1 Komey - Please Wait ( Per Hammer Remix )

Crime Pays But Botany Doesn't
Undescribed Buckwheats, KILL YOUR LAWN, Limestone Erotica, Rod Blagojevich, etc

Crime Pays But Botany Doesn't

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 83:42


In this episode we talk about the notorious Bristol Mountains Buckwheat which is still formally undescribed despite being known of for a decade and a half. We also talked about limestone geology of the Mojave Desert as well as why people should kill their lawns and why we should film a show about it. This episode also contains a cut at the hilarious Rod Blagojevich Cameo regarding the brad nailer and the $40 for pizza. 

Growing Native
Brittle Bush Spring

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 4:34


Encelia farinosa (brittle bush, incienso) loves rocky hillsides and gravelly desert. And though this native shrub has a large range showing up in the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, for me personally the bright yellow flowers atop the silvery foliage shout, “Sonoran Desert!” If you're interested in ethnobotany (and why wouldn't you be?) this is a good plant to add to your journal with its many uses, from chewing gum to incense. And good native plant nurseries grow and sell this wonderful wide ranging native, so plant or 2 or 3 in your personal habitat to remind you that, “the desert is beautiful.” Yeah it is. I couldn't find any digital photos  of brittle bush in my collection  (35 mm slides, yes, of course), but there are numerous photos on line. Well, of all things, I found and really liked these pics at at a web site about the Mojave Desert called BirdandHike.com. I thank them.

Growing Native
Brittle Bush Spring

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 4:34


Encelia farinosa (brittle bush, incienso) loves rocky hillsides and gravelly desert. And though this native shrub has a large range showing up in the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, for me personally the bright yellow flowers atop the silvery foliage shout, “Sonoran Desert!” If you're interested in ethnobotany (and why wouldn't you be?) this is a good plant to add to your journal with its many uses, from chewing gum to incense. And good native plant nurseries grow and sell this wonderful wide ranging native, so plant or 2 or 3 in your personal habitat to remind you that, “the desert is beautiful.” Yeah it is. I couldn't find any digital photos  of brittle bush in my collection  (35 mm slides, yes, of course), but there are numerous photos on line. Well, of all things, I found and really liked these pics at at a web site about the Mojave Desert called BirdandHike.com. I thank them.

Quotomania
Quotomania 155: Kay Ryan

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 1:31


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Born in California on September 21, 1945, Kay Ryan grew up in the small towns of the San Joaquin Valley and the Mojave Desert. She received both a bachelor's and master's degree from UCLA. Ryan has published several collections of poetry, including The Best of It: New and Selected Poems (Grove Press, 2010), for which she won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 2011; The Niagara River (2005); Say Uncle (2000); Elephant Rocks (1996); Flamingo Watching (1994), which was a finalist for both the Lamont Poetry Selection and the Lenore Marshall Prize; Strangely Marked Metal (1985); and Dragon Acts to Dragon Ends(1983).Ryan's awards include a National Humanities Medal, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Ingram Merrill Award, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Union League Poetry Prize, the Maurice English Poetry Award, and three Pushcart Prizes. Her work has been selected four times for The Best American Poetry and was included in The Best of the Best American Poetry 1988-1997.Ryan's poems and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, The Yale Review, Paris Review, The American Scholar, The Threepenny Review, Parnassus, among other journals and anthologies. She was named to the “It List” by Entertainment Weekly and one of her poems has been permanently installed at New York's Central Park Zoo. Ryan was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets in 2006. In 2008, Ryan was appointed the Library of Congress's sixteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry. Since 1971, she has lived in Marin County in California.From https://poets.org/poet/kay-ryan. For more information about Kay Ryan:“Winter Fear”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=40728“Kay Ryan”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/kay-ryan“Kay Ryan, The Art of Poetry No. 94”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/5889/the-art-of-poetry-no-94-kay-ryanPhoto by Jennifer Loring.

Open Mic with Chuck Tuck
Secrets To Taking Better Wildflower Photos With Award Winning Photographers Rob Badger and Nita Winter

Open Mic with Chuck Tuck

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 50:43


Have you ever wondered how some photos look so good, and others look just average? Well, Rob and Nita share some of their tips and techniques on taking better wildflower photos. Follow their love for wildflower photography and purchase their book at www.wildflowerbooks.com you can also go here to find their book https://amzn.to/3Cawyzb Their giant coffee table book, Beauty And The Beast/California Wildfire and Climate Change makes a great gift for anyone on holiday's like Mother's Day, Easter, anytime. Internationally acclaimed, award-winning photographers Rob Badger and Nita Winter have been life partners, activists and creative collaborators for over three decades. In 1992, they discovered and fell in love with California's spectacular wildflower blooms in the Mojave Desert's Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. This inspired their twenty-seven-year journey photographing wildflowers throughout the West, and, in 2011, their documen­tary art project, Beauty and the Beast: Wildflowers and Climate Change, a project sponsored by Blue Earth Alliance. In 2016, they created their first joint exhibit on California's wildflowers. This beautiful book they created is a companion to the traveling exhibit and was brought to you by WinterBadger Press. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chucktuck/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chucktuck/support

True Crime Bullsh**: The Story of Israel Keyes

In the Mojave Desert, we take a look at a Jane Doe, a missing person's case with multiple ties to Keyes and several of his hotspots, and a fairly high profile disappearance in Las Vegas. This episode was written, produced, and researched by Josh Hallmark. With research assistance by Andrew French, Shana Wilensky, Michelle Tooker, and Kaz. Patreon producers: Alexa Horn, Amy Basil, Casey Jensen-Richardson, Chelsea Collings, Christina Sisson, Dana Keith, Drew Vipond, Hallie Reed, Harrison Bequette, Jennifer, Jessica Alihodzic, Jillian Natale, John O'Leary, Kimberly K, Lauren F, Maegan M., Meggan Capps-Seawel, Shannon Foster, Shelly Brewer, Tuesdi Woodworth, Zack Ignatowicz Warren, and Lydia Fiedler Music by: William Hellfire, Ann Annie, Asher Fulero, Sergey Cheremisinov, Puddle of Infinity, Coyote Hearing, Lee RosevereFeatured song: Run by Jordana Talsky

Mysterious Radio
Desert Nightmares

Mysterious Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 67:53


Flashback Episode: My special guest is M.L. Behram here to discuss is research into terrifying events that occurred in the Mojave Desert including his own! Author M.L. Behrman opens his cabinet of curiosities to bring you a deliciously spooky and bizarre collection of true accounts featuring everything from UFOs, unknown creatures, ghosts, hideous murders, demonic cults and some of the weirdest and most puzzling events ever to come out of the great Mojave Desert. Considered "the Rod Serling of the desert", M.L. Behrman offers an intensely interesting and perplexing assortment of stories from witnesses, both modern and historical, detailing their encounters with things that left them shaken, terrified - or worse! Fans of the supernatural and paranormal will find Mojave Mysteries a thrilling addition to their libraries and collections of strange, bizarre and unknown phenomenon. Wanna get creeped out? Follow our new podcast 'Paranormal Fears' on any podcast app or Apple Podcasts. Listen AD-FREE by subscribing to our channel on Apple Podcasts! On all other apps you can enjoy AD-FREE listening here https://mysteriousradio.supercast.com/ Share your thoughts and opinions! Join our new group chat on Telegram - https://t.me/mysteriousradio Visit our home on the web: https://www.mysteriousradio.com Follow us on Instagram @mysteriousradio Follow us on TikTok mysteriousradioTikTok Follow us on Twitter @mysteriousradio Follow us on Pinterest pinterest.com/mysteriousradio Like us on Facebook Facebook.com/mysteriousradio Check Out Mysterious Radio! (copy the link to share with your friends and family via text Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world
Voyager Experimental Aircraft Flight Communications

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 15:17


"Rutan Model 76 Voyager Experimental Aircraft was the first aircraft to fly around the world without stopping or refueling. It was piloted by Dick Rutan and Jeana Yeager. The flight took off from Edwards Air Force Base's runway in the Mojave Desert on December 14, 1986, and ended 9 days later on December 23, setting a flight endurance record. This shortwave recording is a sample of some of the communications between Dick Rutan and his ground crew including a debate if Dick should walk out of the aircraft after it lands. Note: Best estimate for date of recording is December 22, 1986." Recorded by Tom Gavaras, courtesy of the Shortwave Radio Archive. Part of the Shortwave Transmissions project, documenting and reimagining the sounds of shortwave radio - find out more and see the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/shortwave

90 Miles From Needles with Chris Clarke and Alicia Pike
Welcome to 90 Miles from Needles! Our inaugural episode

90 Miles From Needles with Chris Clarke and Alicia Pike

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 54:17


In this first episode, Chris and Alicia head out to Sand Draw, a beautiful and vibrant bit of desert dry wash woodland in the Mojave Desert that almost became an industrial sacrifice zone for the energy industry. It's a good place to see why the desert needs protection, what's at stake, and that desert protectors can win. We mention Paul Loeb's book Soul of a Citizen, which is available here: https://www.paulloeb.org/soul-of-a-citizen/ . Highly recommended, especially if you're wondering whether you have it in you to become an activist. Note that Loeb doesn't use the word "citizen" in the sense of someone born in a certain place or with a theoretical legal right to be in a place: it's all about community involvement. Speaking of community involvement, we'd like to thank the folks who called in and left us voicemail messages with their views about desert protection. You sparked some great conversation. Support our show!: https://90milesfromneedles.com/patreon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. Support the show: https://90milesfromneedles/patreon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 140: “Trouble Every Day” by the Mothers of Invention

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021


Episode one hundred and forty of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Trouble Every Day" by the Mothers of Invention, and the early career of Frank Zappa. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Christmas Time is Here Again" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources I'm away from home as I upload this and haven't been able to do a Mixcloud, but will hopefully edit a link in in a week or so if I remember. The main biography I consulted for this was Electric Don Quixote by Neil Slaven. Zappa's autobiography, The Real Frank Zappa Book, is essential reading if you're a fan of his work. Information about Jimmy Carl Black's early life came from Black's autobiography, For Mother's Sake. Zappa's letter to Varese is from this blog, which also contains a lot of other useful information on Zappa. For information on the Watts uprising, I recommend Johnny Otis' Listen to the Lambs. And the original mix of Freak Out is currently available not on the CD issue of Freak Out itself, which is an eighties remix, but on this "documentary" set. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Just a quick note before I begin -- there are a couple of passing references in this episode to rape and child abuse. I don't believe there's anything that should upset anyone, but if you're worried, you might want to read the transcript on the podcast website before or instead of listening. But also, this episode contains explicit, detailed, descriptions of racial violence carried out by the police against Black people, including against children. Some of it is so distressing that even reading the transcript might be a bit much for some people. Sometimes, in this podcast, we have to go back to another story we've already told. In most cases, that story is recent enough that I can just say, "remember last episode, when I said...", but to tell the story of the Mothers of Invention, I have to start with a story that I told sixty-nine episodes ago, in episode seventy-one, which came out nearly two years ago. In that episode, on "Willie and the Hand Jive", I briefly told the story of Little Julian Herrera at the start. I'm going to tell a slightly longer version of the story now. Some of the information at the start of this episode will be familiar from that and other episodes, but I'm not going to expect people to remember something from that long ago, given all that's happened since. The DJ Art Laboe is one of the few figures from the dawn of rock and roll who is still working. At ninety-six years old, he still promotes concerts, and hosts a syndicated radio show on which he plays "Oldies but Goodies", a phrase which could describe him as well as the music. It's a phrase he coined -- and trademarked -- back in the 1950s, when people in his audience would ask him to play records made a whole three or four years earlier, records they had listened to in their youth. Laboe pretty much single-handedly invented the rock and roll nostalgia market -- as well as being a DJ, he owned a record label, Original Sound, which put out a series of compilation albums, Oldies But Goodies, starting in 1959, which started to cement the first draft of the doo-wop canon. These were the first albums to compile together a set of older rock and roll hits and market them for nostalgia, and they were very much based on the tastes of his West Coast teenage listenership, featuring songs like "Earth Angel" by the Penguins: [Excerpt: The Penguins, "Earth Angel"] But also records that had a more limited geographic appeal, like "Heaven and Paradise" by Don Julian and the Meadowlarks: [Excerpt: Don Julian and the Meadowlarks, "Heaven and Paradise"] As well as being a DJ and record company owner, Laboe was the promoter and MC for regular teenage dances at El Monte Legion Stadium, at which Kip and the Flips, the band that featured Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston, would back local performers like the Penguins, Don and Dewey, or Ritchie Valens, as well as visiting headliners like Jerry Lee Lewis. El Monte stadium was originally chosen because it was outside the LA city limits -- at the time there were anti-rock-and-roll ordinances that meant that any teenage dance had to be approved by the LA Board of Education, but those didn't apply to that stadium -- but it also led to Laboe's audience becoming more racially diverse. The stadium was in East LA, which had a large Mexican-American population, and while Laboe's listenership had initially been very white, soon there were substantial numbers of Mexican-American and Black audience members. And it was at one of the El Monte shows that Johnny Otis discovered the person who everyone thought was going to become the first Chicano rock star, before even Ritchie Valens, in 1957, performing as one of the filler acts on Laboe's bill. He signed Little Julian Herrera, a performer who was considered a sensation in East LA at the time, though nobody really knew where he lived, or knew much about him other than that he was handsome, Chicano, and would often have a pint of whisky in his back pocket, even though he was under the legal drinking age. Otis signed Herrera to his label, Dig Records, and produced several records for him, including the record by which he's now best remembered, "Those Lonely Lonely Nights": [Excerpt: Little Julian Herrera, "Those Lonely, Lonely, Nights"] After those didn't take off the way they were expected to, Herrera and his vocal group the Tigers moved to another label, one owned by Laboe, where they recorded "I Remember Linda": [Excerpt: Little Julian Herrera and the Tigers, "I Remember Linda"]  And then one day Johnny Otis got a knock on his door from the police. They were looking for Ron Gregory. Otis had never heard of Ron Gregory, and told them so. The police then showed him a picture. It turned out that Julian Herrera wasn't Mexican-American, and wasn't from East LA, but was from Massachusetts. He had run away from home a few years back, hitch-hiked across the country, and been taken in by a Mexican-American family, whose name he had adopted. And now he was wanted for rape. Herrera went to prison, and when he got out, he tried to make a comeback, but ended up sleeping rough in the basement of the stadium where he had once been discovered. He had to skip town because of some other legal problems, and headed to Tijuana, where he was last seen playing R&B gigs in 1963. Nobody knows what happened to him after that -- some say he was murdered, others that he's still alive, working in a petrol station under yet another name, but nobody has had a confirmed sighting of him since then. When he went to prison, the Tigers tried to continue for a while, but without their lead singer, they soon broke up. Ray Collins, who we heard singing the falsetto part in "I Remember Linda", went on to join many other doo-wop and R&B groups over the next few years, with little success. Then in summer 1963, he walked into a bar in Ponoma, and saw a bar band who were playing the old Hank Ballard and the Midnighters song "Work With Me Annie". As Collins later put it, “I figured that any band that played ‘Work With Me Annie' was all right,” and he asked if he could join them for a few songs. They agreed, and afterwards, Collins struck up a conversation with the guitarist, and told him about an idea he'd had for a song based on one of Steve Allen's catchphrases. The guitarist happened to be spending a lot of his time recording at an independent recording studio, and suggested that the two of them record the song together: [Excerpt: Baby Ray and the Ferns, "How's Your Bird?"] The guitarist in question was named Frank Zappa. Zappa was originally from Maryland, but had moved to California as a child with his conservative Italian-American family when his father, a defence contractor, had got a job in Monterey. The family had moved around California with his father's work, mostly living in various small towns in the Mojave desert seventy miles or so north of Los Angeles. Young Frank had an interest in science, especially chemistry, and especially things that exploded, but while he managed to figure out the ingredients for gunpowder, his family couldn't afford to buy him a chemistry set in his formative years -- they were so poor that his father regularly took part in medical experiments to get a bit of extra money to feed his kids -- and so the young man's interest was diverted away from science towards music. His first musical interest, and one that would show up in his music throughout his life, was the comedy music of Spike Jones, whose band combined virtuosic instrumental performances with sound effects: [Excerpt: Spike Jones and his City Slickers, "Cocktails for Two"] and parodies of popular classical music [Excerpt: Spike Jones and his City Slickers, "William Tell Overture"] Jones was a huge inspiration for almost every eccentric or bohemian of the 1940s and 50s -- Spike Milligan, for example, took the name Spike in tribute to him. And young Zappa wrote his first ever fan letter to Jones when he was five or six. As a child Zappa was also fascinated by the visual aesthetics of music -- he liked to draw musical notes on staves and see what they looked like. But his musical interests developed in two other ways once he entered his teens. The first was fairly typical for the musicians of his generation from LA we've looked at and will continue to look at, which is that he heard "Gee" by the Crows on the radio: [Excerpt: The Crows, "Gee"] He became an R&B obsessive at that moment, and would spend every moment he could listening to the Black radio stations, despite his parents' disapproval. He particularly enjoyed Huggy Boy's radio show broadcast from Dolphins of Hollywood, and also would religiously listen to Johnny Otis, and soon became a connoisseur of the kind of R&B and blues that Otis championed as a musician and DJ: [Excerpt: Zappa on the Late Show, “I hadn't been raised in an environment where there was a lot of music in the house. This couple that owned the chilli place, Opal and Chester, agreed to ask the man who serviced the jukebox to put in some of the song titles that I liked, because I promised that I would dutifully keep pumping quarters into this thing so that I could listen to them, and so I had the ability to eat good chilli and listen to 'Three Hours Past Midnight' by Johnny 'Guitar' Watson for most of my junior and senior year"] Johnny “Guitar” Watson, along with Guitar Slim, would become a formative influence on Zappa's guitar playing, and his playing on "Three Hours Past Midnight" is so similar to Zappa's later style that you could easily believe it *was* him: [Excerpt: Johnny "Guitar" Watson, "Three Hours Past Midnight"] But Zappa wasn't only listening to R&B. The way Zappa would always tell the story, he discovered the music that would set him apart from his contemporaries originally by reading an article in Look magazine. Now, because Zappa has obsessive fans who check every detail, people have done the research and found that there was no such article in that magazine, but he was telling the story close enough to the time period in which it happened that its broad strokes, at least, must be correct even if the details are wrong. What Zappa said was that the article was on Sam Goody, the record salesman, and talked about how Goody was so good at his job that he had even been able to sell a record of Ionisation by Edgard Varese, which just consisted of the worst and most horrible noises anyone had ever heard, just loud drumming noises and screeching sounds. He determined then that he needed to hear that album, but he had no idea how he would get hold of a copy. I'll now read an excerpt from Zappa's autobiography, because Zappa's phrasing makes the story much better: "Some time later, I was staying overnight with Dave Franken, a friend who lived in La Mesa, and we wound up going to the hi-fi place -- they were having a sale on R&B singles. After shuffling through the rack and finding a couple of Joe Huston records, I made my way toward the cash register and happened to glance at the LP bin. I noticed a strange-looking black-and-white album cover with a guy on it who had frizzy gray hair and looked like a mad scientist. I thought it was great that a mad scientist had finally made a record, so I picked it up -- and there it was, the record with "Ionisation" on it. The author of the Look article had gotten it slightly wrong -- the correct title was The Complete Works of Edgard Varèse, Volume I, including "Ionisation," among other pieces, on an obscure label called EMS (Elaine Music Store). The record number was 401.I returned the Joe Huston records and checked my pockets to see how much money I had -- I think it came to about $3.75. I'd never bought an album before, but I knew they must be expensive because mostly old people bought them. I asked the man at the cash register how much EMS 401 cost. "That gray one in the box?" he said. "$5.95." I'd been searching for that record for over a year and I wasn't about to give up. I told him I had $3.75. He thought about it for a minute, and said, "We've been using that record to demonstrate hi-fi's with -- but nobody ever buys one when we use it. I guess if you want it that bad you can have it for $3.75."" Zappa took the record home, and put it on on his mother's record player in the living room, the only one that could play LPs: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Ionisation"] His mother told him he could never play that record in the living room again, so he took the record player into his bedroom, and it became his record player from that point on. Varese was a French composer who had, in his early career, been very influenced by Debussy. Debussy is now, of course, part of the classical canon, but in the early twentieth century he was regarded as radical, almost revolutionary, for his complete rewriting of the rules of conventional classical music tonality into a new conception based on chordal melodies, pedal points, and use of non-diatonic scales. Almost all of Varese's early work was destroyed in a fire, so we don't have evidence of the transition from Debussy's romantic-influenced impressionism to Varese's later style, but after he had moved to the US in 1915 he had become wildly more experimental. "Ionisation" is often claimed to be the first piece of Western classical music written only for percussion instruments. Varese was part of a wider movement of modernist composers -- for example he was the best man at Nicolas Slonimsky's wedding -- and had also set up the International Composers' Guild, whose manifesto influenced Zappa, though his libertarian politics led him to adapt it to a more individualistic rather than collective framing. The original manifesto read in part "Dying is the privilege of the weary. The present day composers refuse to die. They have realized the necessity of banding together and fighting for the right of each individual to secure a fair and free presentation of his work" In the twenties and thirties, Varese had written a large number of highly experimental pieces, including Ecuatorial, which was written for bass vocal, percussion, woodwind, and two Theremin cellos. These are not the same as the more familiar Theremin, created by the same inventor, and were, as their name suggests, Theremins that were played like a cello, with a fingerboard and bow. Only ten of these were ever made, specifically for performances of Varese's work, and he later rewrote the work to use ondes martenot instead of Theremin cellos, which is how the work is normally heard now: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Ecuatorial"] But Varese had spent much of the thirties, forties, and early fifties working on two pieces that were never finished, based on science fiction ideas -- L'Astronome, which was meant to be about communication with people from the star Sirius, and Espace, which was originally intended to be performed simultaneously by choirs in Beijing, Moscow, Paris, and New York. Neither of these ideas came to fruition, and so Varese had not released any new work, other than one small piece, Étude pour espace, an excerpt from the  larger work, in Zappa's lifetime. Zappa followed up his interest in Varese's music with his music teacher, one of the few people in the young man's life who encouraged him in his unusual interests. That teacher, Mr Kavelman, introduced Zappa to the work of other composers, like Webern, but would also let him know why he liked particular R&B records. For example, Zappa played Mr. Kavelman "Angel in My Life" by the Jewels, and asked what it was that made him particularly like it: [Excerpt: The Jewels, "Angel in My Life"] The teacher's answer was that it was the parallel fourths that made the record particularly appealing. Young Frank was such a big fan of Varese that for his fifteenth birthday, he actually asked if he could make a long-distance phone call to speak to Varese. He didn't know where Varese lived, but figured that it must be in Greenwich Village because that was where composers lived, and he turned out to be right. He didn't get through on his birthday -- he got Varese's wife, who told him the composer was in Europe -- but he did eventually get to speak to him, and was incredibly excited when Varese told him that not only had he just written a new piece for the first time in years, but that it was called Deserts, and was about deserts -- just like the Mojave Desert where Zappa lived: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Deserts"] As he later wrote, “When you're 15 and living in the Mojave Desert, and you find out that the World's Greatest Composer (who also looks like a mad scientist) is working in a secret Greenwich Village laboratory on a song about your hometown (so to speak), you can get pretty excited.” A year later, Zappa actually wrote to Varese, a long letter which included him telling the story about how he'd found his work in the first place, hoping to meet up with him when Zappa travelled to the East Coast to see family. I'll read out a few extracts, but the whole thing is fascinating for what it says about Zappa the precocious adolescent, and I'll link to a blog post with it in the show notes. "Dear Sir: Perhaps you might remember me from my stupid phone call last January, if not, my name again is Frank Zappa Jr. I am 16 years old… that might explain partly my disturbing you last winter. After I had struggled through Mr. Finklestein's notes on the back cover (I really did struggle too, for at the time I had had no training in music other than practice at drum rudiments) I became more and more interested in you and your music. I began to go to the library and take out books on modern composers and modern music, to learn all I could about Edgard Varese. It got to be my best subject (your life) and I began writing my reports and term papers on you at school. At one time when my history teacher asked us to write on an American that has really done something for the U.S.A. I wrote on you and the Pan American Composers League and the New Symphony. I failed. The teacher had never heard of you and said I made the whole thing up. Silly but true. That was my Sophomore year in high school. Throughout my life all the talents and abilities that God has left me with have been self developed, and when the time came for Frank to learn how to read and write music, Frank taught himself that too. I picked it all up from the library. I have been composing for two years now, utilizing a strict twelve-tone technique, producing effects that are reminiscent of Anton Webern. During those two years I have written two short woodwind quartets and a short symphony for winds, brass and percussion. I plan to go on and be a composer after college and I could really use the counsel of a veteran such as you. If you would allow me to visit with you for even a few hours it would be greatly appreciated. It may sound strange but I think I have something to offer you in the way of new ideas. One is an elaboration on the principle of Ruth Seeger's contrapuntal dynamics and the other is an extension of the twelve-tone technique which I call the inversion square. It enables one to compose harmonically constructed pantonal music in logical patterns and progressions while still abandoning tonality. Varese sent a brief reply, saying that he was going to be away for a few months, but would like to meet Zappa on his return. The two never met, but Zappa kept the letter from Varese framed on his wall for the rest of his life. Zappa soon bought a couple more albums, a version of "The Rite of Spring" by Stravinsky: [Excerpt: Igor Stravinsky, "The Rite of Spring"] And a record of pieces by Webern, including his Symphony opus 21: [Excerpt: Anton Webern, "Symphony op. 21"] (Incidentally, with the classical music here, I'm not seeking out the precise performances Zappa was listening to, just using whichever recordings I happen to have copies of). Zappa was also reading Slonimsky's works of musicology, like the Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns. As well as this "serious music" though, Zappa was also developing as an R&B musician.  He later said of the Webern album, "I loved that record, but it was about as different from Stravinsky and Varèse as you could get. I didn't know anything about twelve-tone music then, but I liked the way it sounded. Since I didn't have any kind of formal training, it didn't make any difference to me if I was listening to Lightnin' Slim, or a vocal group called the Jewels (who had a song out then called "Angel in My Life"), or Webern, or Varèse, or Stravinsky. To me it was all good music." He had started as a drummer with a group called the Blackouts, an integrated group with white, Latino, and Black members, who played R&B tracks like "Directly From My Heart to You", the song Johnny Otis had produced for Little Richard: [Excerpt: Little Richard, "Directly From My Heart to You"] But after eighteen months or so, he quit the group and stopped playing drums. Instead, he switched to guitar, with a style influenced by Johnny "Guitar" Watson and Guitar Slim. His first guitar had action so bad that he didn't learn to play chords, and moved straight on to playing lead lines with his younger brother Bobby playing rhythm. He also started hanging around with two other teenage bohemians -- Euclid Sherwood, who was nicknamed Motorhead, and Don Vliet, who called himself Don Van Vliet. Vliet was a truly strange character, even more so than Zappa, but they shared a love for the blues, and Vliet was becoming a fairly good blues singer, though he hadn't yet perfected the Howlin' Wolf imitation that would become his stock-in-trade in later years. But the surviving recording of Vliet singing with the Zappa brothers on guitar, singing a silly parody blues about being flushed down the toilet of the kind that many teenage boys would write, shows the promise that the two men had: [Excerpt: Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart, "Lost in a Whirlpool"] Zappa was also getting the chance to hear his more serious music performed. He'd had the high school band play a couple of his pieces, but he also got the chance to write film music -- his English teacher, Don Cerveris, had decided to go off and seek his fortune as a film scriptwriter, and got Zappa hired to write the music for a cheap Western he'd written, Run Home Slow. The film was beset with problems -- it started filming in 1959 but didn't get finished and released until 1965 -- but the music Zappa wrote for it did eventually get recorded and used on the soundtrack: [Excerpt: Frank Zappa, "Run Home Slow Theme"] In 1962, he got to write the music for another film, The World's Greatest Sinner, and he also wrote a theme song for that, which got released as the B-side of "How's Your Bird?", the record he made with Ray Collins: [Excerpt: Baby Ray and the Ferns, "The World's Greatest Sinner"] Zappa was able to make these records because by the early sixties, as well as playing guitar in bar bands, he was working as an assistant for a man named Paul Buff. Paul Buff had worked as an engineer for a guided missile manufacturer, but had decided that he didn't want to do that any more, and instead had opened up the first independent multi-track recording studio on the West Coast, PAL Studios, using equipment he'd designed and built himself, including a five-track tape recorder. Buff engineered a huge number of surf instrumentals there, including "Wipe Out" by the Surfaris: [Excerpt: The Surfaris, "Wipe Out"] Zappa had first got to know Buff when he had come to Buff's studio with some session musicians in 1961, to record some jazz pieces he'd written, including this piece which at the time was in the style of Dave Brubeck but would later become a staple of Zappa's repertoire reorchestrated in a  rock style. [Excerpt: The PAL Studio Band, "Never on Sunday"] Buff really just wanted to make records entirely by himself, so he'd taught himself to play the rudiments of guitar, bass, drums, piano, and alto saxophone, so he could create records alone. He would listen to every big hit record, figure out what the hooks were on the record, and write his own knock-off of those. An example is "Tijuana Surf" by the Hollywood Persuaders, which is actually Buff on all instruments, and which according to Zappa went to number one in Mexico (though I've not found an independent source to confirm that chart placing, so perhaps take it with a pinch of salt): [Excerpt: The Hollywood Persuaders, "Tijuana Surf"] The B-side to that, "Grunion Run", was written by Zappa, who also plays guitar on that side: [Excerpt: The Hollywood Persuaders, "Grunion Run"] Zappa, Buff, Ray Collins, and a couple of associates would record all sorts of material at PAL -- comedy material like "Hey Nelda", under the name "Ned and Nelda" -- a parody of "Hey Paula" by Paul and Paula: [Excerpt: Ned and Nelda, "Hey Nelda"] Doo-wop parodies like "Masked Grandma": [Excerpt: The PAL Studio Band, "Masked Grandma"] R&B: [Excerpt: The PAL Studio Band, "Why Don't You Do Me Right?"] and more. Then Buff or Zappa would visit one of the local independent label owners and try to sell them the master -- Art Laboe at Original Sound released several of the singles, as did Bob Keane at Donna Records and Del-Fi. The "How's Your Bird" single also got Zappa his first national media exposure, as he went on the Steve Allen show, where he demonstrated to Allen how to make music using a bicycle and a prerecorded electronic tape, in an appearance that Zappa would parody five years later on the Monkees' TV show: [Excerpt: Steve Allen and Frank Zappa, "Cyclophony"] But possibly the record that made the most impact at the time was "Memories of El Monte", a song that Zappa and Collins wrote together about Art Laboe's dances at El Monte Stadium, incorporating excerpts of several of the songs that would be played there, and named after a compilation Laboe had put out, which had included “I Remember Linda” by Little Julian and the Tigers. They got Cleve Duncan of the Penguins to sing lead, and the record came out as by the Penguins, on Original Sound: [Excerpt: The Penguins, "Memories of El Monte"] By this point, though, Pal studios was losing money, and Buff took up the offer of a job working for Laboe full time, as an engineer at Original Sound. He would later become best known for inventing the kepex, an early noise gate which engineer Alan Parsons used on a bass drum to create the "heartbeat" that opens Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Speak to Me"] That invention would possibly be Buff's most lasting contribution to music, as by the early eighties, the drum sound on every single pop record was recorded using a noise gate. Buff sold the studio to Zappa, who renamed it Studio Z and moved in -- he was going through a divorce and had nowhere else to live. The studio had no shower, and Zappa had to just use a sink to wash, and he was surviving mostly off food scrounged by his resourceful friend Motorhead Sherwood. By this point, Zappa had also joined a band called the Soots, consisting of Don Van Vliet, Alex St. Clair and Vic Mortenson, and they recorded several tracks at Studio Z, which they tried to get released on Dot Records, including a cover version of Little Richard's “Slippin' and Slidin'”, and a song called “Tiger Roach” whose lyrics were mostly random phrases culled from a Green Lantern comic: [Excerpt: The Soots, "Tiger Roach"] Zappa also started writing what was intended as the first ever rock opera, "I Was a Teenage Maltshop", and attempts were made to record parts of it with Vliet, Mortenson, and Motorhead Sherwood: [Excerpt: Frank Zappa, "I Was a Teenage Maltshop"] Zappa was also planning to turn Studio Z into a film studio. He obtained some used film equipment, and started planning a science fiction film to feature Vliet, titled "Captain Beefheart Meets the Grunt People". The title was inspired by an uncle of Vliet's, who lived with Vliet and his girlfriend, and used to urinate with the door open so he could expose himself to Vliet's girlfriend, saying as he did so "Look at that! Looks just like a big beef heart!" Unfortunately, the film would not get very far. Zappa was approached by a used-car salesman who said that he and his friends were having a stag party. As Zappa owned a film studio, could he make them a pornographic film to show at the party? Zappa told him that a film wouldn't be possible, but as he needed the money, would an audio tape be acceptable? The used-car salesman said that it would, and gave him a list of sex acts he and his friends would like to hear. Zappa and a friend, Lorraine Belcher, went into the studio and made a few grunting noises and sound effects. The used-car salesman turned out actually to be an undercover policeman, who was better known in the area for his entrapment of gay men, but had decided to branch out. Zappa and Belcher were arrested -- Zappa's father bailed him out, and Zappa got an advance from Art Laboe to pay Belcher's bail. Luckily "Grunion Run" and "Memories of El Monte" were doing well enough that Laboe could give Zappa a $1500 advance. When the case finally came to trial, the judge laughed at the tape and wanted to throw the whole case out, but the prosecutor insisted on fighting, and Zappa got ten days in prison, and most of his tapes were impounded, never to be returned. He fell behind with his rent, and Studio Z was demolished. And then Ray Collins called him, asking if he wanted to join a bar band: [Excerpt: The Mothers, "Hitch-Hike"] The Soul Giants were formed by a bass player named Roy Estrada. Now, Estrada is unfortunately someone who will come up in the story a fair bit over the next year or so, as he played on several of the most important records to come out of LA in the sixties and early seventies. He is also someone about whom there's fairly little biographical information -- he's not been interviewed much, compared to pretty much everyone else, and it's easy to understand why when you realise that he's currently half-way through a twenty-five year sentence for child molestation -- his third such conviction. He won't get out of prison until he's ninety-three. He's one of the most despicable people who will turn up in this podcast, and frankly I'm quite glad I don't know more about him as a person. He was, though, a good bass player and falsetto singer, and he had released a single on King Records, an instrumental titled "Jungle Dreams": [Excerpt, Roy Estrada and the Rocketeers, "Jungle Dreams"] The other member of the rhythm section, Jimmy Carl Black, was an American Indian (that's the term he always used about himself until his death, and so that's the term I'll use about him too) from Texas. Black had grown up in El Paso as a fan of Western Swing music, especially Bob Wills, but had become an R&B fan after discovering Wolfman Jack's radio show and hearing the music of Howlin' Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson. Like every young man from El Paso, he would travel to Juarez as a teenager to get drunk, see sex shows, and raise hell. It was also there that he saw his first live blues music, watching Long John Hunter, the same man who inspired the Bobby Fuller Four, and he would always claim Hunter as the man whose shows taught him how to play the blues. Black had decided he wanted to become a musician when he'd seen Elvis perform live. In Black's memory, this was a gig where Elvis was an unknown support act for Faron Young and Wanda Jackson, but he was almost certainly slightly misremembering -- it's most likely that what he saw was Elvis' show in El Paso on the eleventh of April 1956, where Young and Jackson were also on the bill, but supporting Elvis who was headlining. Either way, Black had decided that he wanted to make girls react to him the same way they reacted to Elvis, and he started playing in various country and R&B bands. His first record was with a group called the Keys, and unfortunately I haven't been able to track down a copy (it was reissued on a CD in the nineties, but the CD itself is now out of print and sells for sixty pounds) but he did rerecord the song with a later group he led, the Mannish Boys: [Excerpt: Jimmy Carl Black and the Mannish Boys, "Stretch Pants"] He spent a couple of years in the Air Force, but continued playing music during that time, including in a band called The Exceptions which featured Peter Cetera later of the band Chicago, on bass. After a brief time working as lineman in Wichita, he moved his family to California, where he got a job teaching drums at a music shop in Anaheim, where the bass teacher was Jim Fielder, who would later play bass in Blood, Sweat, and Tears. One of Fielder's friends, Tim Buckley, used to hang around in the shop as well, and Black was at first irritated by him coming in and playing the guitars and not buying anything, but eventually became impressed by his music. Black would later introduce Buckley to Herb Cohen, who would become Buckley's manager, starting his professional career. When Roy Estrada came into the shop, he and Black struck up a friendship, and Estrada asked Black to join his band The Soul Giants, whose lineup became Estrada, Black, a sax player named Davey Coronado, a guitarist called Larry and a singer called Dave. The group got a residency at the Broadside club in Ponoma, playing "Woolly Bully" and "Louie Louie" and other garage-band staples. But then Larry and Dave got drafted, and the group got in two men called Ray -- Ray Collins on vocals, and Ray Hunt on guitar. This worked for a little while, but Ray Hunt was, by all accounts, not a great guitar player -- he would play wrong chords, and also he was fundamentally a surf player while the Soul Giants were an R&B group. Eventually, Collins and Hunt got into a fistfight, and Collins suggested that they get in his friend Frank instead. For a while, the Soul Giants continued playing "Midnight Hour" and "Louie Louie", but then Zappa suggested that they start playing some of his original material as well. Davy Coronado refused to play original material, because he thought, correctly, that it would lose the band gigs, but the rest of the band sided with the man who had quickly become their new leader. Coronado moved back to Texas, and on Mother's Day 1965 the Soul Giants changed their name to the Mothers. They got in Henry Vestine on second guitar, and started playing Zappa's originals, as well as changing the lyrics to some of the hits they were playing: [Excerpt: The Mothers, "Plastic People"] Zappa had started associating with the freak crowd in Hollywood centred around Vito and Franzoni, after being introduced by Don Cerveris, his old teacher turned screenwriter, to an artist called Mark Cheka, who Zappa invited to manage the group. Cheka in turn brought in his friend Herb Cohen, who managed several folk acts including the Modern Folk Quartet and Judy Henske, and who like Zappa had once been arrested on obscenity charges, in Cohen's case for promoting gigs by the comedian Lenny Bruce. Cohen first saw the Mothers when they were recording their appearance in an exploitation film called Mondo Hollywood. They were playing in a party scene, using equipment borrowed from Jim Guercio, a session musician who would briefly join the Mothers, but who is now best known for having been Chicago's manager and producing hit records for them and Blood, Sweat, and Tears. In the crowd were Vito and Franzoni, Bryan Maclean, Ram Dass, the Harvard psychologist who had collaborated with Timothy Leary in controversial LSD experiments that had led to both losing their jobs, and other stalwarts of the Sunset Strip scene. Cohen got the group bookings at the Whisky A-Go-Go and The Trip, two of the premier LA nightclubs, and Zappa would also sit in with other bands playing at those venues, like the Grass Roots, a band featuring Bryan Maclean and Arthur Lee which would soon change its name to Love. At this time Zappa and Henry Vestine lived together, next door to a singer named Victoria Winston, who at the time was in a duo called Summer's Children with Curt Boettcher: [Excerpt: Summer's Children, "Milk and Honey"] Winston, like Zappa, was a fan of Edgard Varese, and actually asked Zappa to write songs for Summer's Children, but one of the partners involved in their production company disliked Zappa's material and the collaboration went no further. Zappa at this point was trying to incorporate more ideas from modal jazz into his music. He was particularly impressed by Eric Dolphy's 1964 album "Out to Lunch": [Excerpt: Eric Dolphy, "Hat and Beard"] But he was also writing more about social issues, and in particular he had written a song called "The Watts Riots Song", which would later be renamed "Trouble Every Day": [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Trouble Every Day"] Now, the Watts Uprising was one of the most important events in Black American history, and it feels quite wrong that I'm covering it in an episode about a band made up of white, Latino, and American Indian people rather than a record made by Black people, but I couldn't find any way to fit it in anywhere else. As you will remember me saying in the episode on "I Fought the Law", the LA police under Chief William Parker were essentially a criminal gang by any other name -- they were incompetent, violent, and institutionally racist, and terrorised Black people. The Black people of LA were also feeling particularly aggrieved in the summer of 1965, as a law banning segregation in housing had been overturned by a ballot proposition in November 1964, sponsored by the real estate industry and passed by an overwhelming majority of white voters in what Martin Luther King called "one of the most shameful developments in our nation's history", and which Edmund Brown, the Democratic governor said was like "another hate binge which began more than 30 years ago in a Munich beer hall". Then on Wednesday, August 11, 1965, the police pulled over a Black man, Marquette Frye, for drunk driving. He had been driving his mother's car, and she lived nearby, and she came out to shout at him about drinking and driving. The mother, Rena Price, was hit by one of the policemen; Frye then physically attacked one of the police for hitting his mother, one of the police pulled out a gun, a crowd gathered, the police became violent against the crowd, a rumour spread that they had kicked a pregnant woman, and the resulting protests were exacerbated by the police carrying out what Chief Parker described as a "paramiltary" response. The National Guard were called in, huge swathes of south central LA were cordoned off by the police with signs saying things like "turn left or get shot". Black residents started setting fire to and looting local white-owned businesses that had been exploiting Black workers and customers, though this looting was very much confined to individuals who were known to have made the situation worse. Eventually it took six days for the uprising to be put down, at a cost of thirty-four deaths, 1032 injuries, and 3438 arrests. Of the deaths, twenty-three were Black civilians murdered by the police, and zero were police murdered by Black civilians (two police were killed by other police, in accidental shootings). The civil rights activist Bayard Rustin said of the uprising, "The whole point of the outbreak in Watts was that it marked the first major rebellion of Negroes against their own masochism and was carried on with the express purpose of asserting that they would no longer quietly submit to the deprivation of slum life." Frank Zappa's musical hero Johnny Otis would later publish the book Listen to the Lambs about the Watts rebellion, and in it he devotes more than thirty pages to eyewitness accounts from Black people. It's an absolutely invaluable resource. One of the people Otis interviews is Lily Ford, who is described by my copy of the book as being the "lead singer of the famous Roulettes". This is presumably an error made by the publishers, rather than Otis, because Ford was actually a singer with the Raelettes, as in Ray Charles' vocal group. She also recorded with Otis under the name "Lily of the Valley": [Excerpt: Lily of the Valley, "I Had a Sweet Dream"] Now, Ford's account deserves a large excerpt, but be warned, this is very, very difficult to hear. I gave a content warning at the beginning, but I'm going to give another one here. "A lot of our people were in the street, seeing if they could get free food and clothes and furniture, and some of them taking liquor too. But the white man was out for blood. Then three boys came down the street, laughing and talking. They were teenagers, about fifteen or sixteen years old. As they got right at the store they seemed to debate whether they would go inside. One boy started a couple of times to go. Finally he did. Now a cop car finally stops to investigate. Police got out of the car. Meanwhile, the other two boys had seen them coming and they ran. My brother-in-law and I were screaming and yelling for the boy to get out. He didn't hear us, or was too scared to move. He never had a chance. This young cop walked up to the broken window and looked in as the other one went round the back and fired some shots and I just knew he'd killed the other two boys, but I guess he missed. He came around front again. By now other police cars had come. The cop at the window aimed his gun. He stopped and looked back at a policeman sitting in a car. He aimed again. No shot. I tried to scream, but I was so horrified that nothing would come out of my throat. The third time he aimed he yelled, "Halt", and fired before the word was out of his mouth. Then he turned around and made a bull's-eye sign with his fingers to his partner. Just as though he had shot a tin can off a fence, not a human being. The cops stood around for ten or fifteen minutes without going inside to see if the kid was alive or dead. When the ambulance came, then they went in. They dragged him out like he was a sack of potatoes. Cops were everywhere now. So many cops for just one murder." [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Trouble Every Day"] There's a lot more of this sort of account in Otis' book, and it's all worth reading -- indeed, I would argue that it is *necessary* reading. And Otis keeps making a point which I quoted back in the episode on "Willie and the Hand Jive" but which I will quote again here -- “A newborn Negro baby has less chance of survival than a white. A Negro baby will have its life ended seven years sooner. This is not some biological phenomenon linked to skin colour, like sickle-cell anaemia; this is a national crime, linked to a white-supremacist way of life and compounded by indifference”. (Just a reminder, the word “Negro” which Otis uses there was, in the mid-sixties, the term of choice used by Black people.) And it's this which inspired "The Watts Riot Song", which the Mothers were playing when Tom Wilson was brought into The Trip by Herb Cohen: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Trouble Every Day"] Wilson had just moved from Columbia, where he'd been producing Dylan and Simon and Garfunkel, to Verve, a subsidiary of MGM which was known for jazz records but was moving into rock and roll. Wilson was looking for a white blues band, and thought he'd found one. He signed the group without hearing any other songs. Henry Vestine quit the group between the signing and the first recording, to go and join an *actual* white blues band, Canned Heat, and over the next year the group's lineup would fluctuate quite a bit around the core of Zappa, Collins, Estrada, and Black, with members like Steve Mann, Jim Guercio, Jim Fielder, and Van Dyke Parks coming and going, often without any recordings being made of their performances. The lineup on what became the group's first album, Freak Out! was Zappa, Collins, Estrada, Black, and Elliot Ingber, the former guitarist with the Gamblers, who had joined the group shortly before the session and would leave within a few months. The first track the group recorded, "Any Way the Wind Blows", was straightforward enough: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Any Way the Wind Blows"] The second song, a "Satisfaction" knock-off called "Hungry Freaks Daddy", was also fine. But it was when the group performed their third song of the session, "Who Are The Brain Police?", that Tom Wilson realised that he didn't have a standard band on his hands: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Are the Brain Police?"] Luckily for everyone concerned, Tom Wilson was probably the single best producer in America to have discovered the Mothers. While he was at the time primarily known for his folk-rock productions, he had built his early career on Cecil Taylor and Sun Ra records, some of the freakiest jazz of the fifties and early sixties. He knew what needed to be done -- he needed a bigger budget. Far from being annoyed that he didn't have the white blues band he wanted, Wilson actively encouraged the group to go much, much further. He brought in Wrecking Crew members to augment the band (though one of them. Mac Rebennack, found the music so irritating he pretended he needed to go to the toilet, walked out, and never came back). He got orchestral musicians to play Zappa's scores, and allowed the group to rent hundreds of dollars of percussion instruments for the side-long track "Return of the Son of Monster Magnet", which features many Hollywood scenesters of the time, including Van Dyke Parks, Kim Fowley, future Manson family member Bobby Beausoleil, record executive David Anderle, songwriter P.F. Sloan, and cartoonist Terry Gilliam, all recording percussion parts and vocal noises: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Return of the Son of Monster Magnet"] Such was Wilson's belief in the group that Freak Out! became only the second rock double album ever released -- exactly a week after the first, Blonde on Blonde, by Wilson's former associate Bob Dylan. The inner sleeve included a huge list of people who had influenced the record in one way or another, including people Zappa knew like Don Cerveris, Don Vliet, Paul Buff, Bob Keane, Nik Venet, and Art Laboe,  musicians who had influenced the group like Don & Dewey, Johnny Otis, Otis' sax players Preston Love and Big Jay McNeely, Eric Dolphy, Edgard Varese, Richard Berry, Johnny Guitar Watson, and Ravi Shankar, eccentric performers like Tiny Tim, DJs like Hunter Hancock and Huggy Boy, science fiction writers like Cordwainer Smith and Robert Sheckley, and scenesters like David Crosby, Vito, and Franzoni. The list of 179 people would provide a sort of guide for many listeners, who would seek out those names and find their ways into the realms of non-mainstream music, writing, and art over the next few decades. Zappa would always remain grateful to Wilson for taking his side in the record's production, saying "Wilson was sticking his neck out. He laid his job on the line by producing the album. MGM felt that they had spent too much money on the album". The one thing Wilson couldn't do, though, was persuade the label that the group's name could stay as it was. "The Mothers" was a euphemism, for a word I can't say if I want this podcast to keep its clean rating, a word that is often replaced in TV clean edits of films with "melon farmers", and MGM were convinced that the radio would never play any music by a band with that name -- not realising that that wouldn't be the reason this music wouldn't get played on the radio. The group needed to change their name. And so, out of necessity, they became the Mothers of Invention.