Podcast appearances and mentions of Jann Wenner

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Best podcasts about Jann Wenner

Latest podcast episodes about Jann Wenner

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast
Strange Bedfellows: Ep 2 Sticky Situations w/Joe Hagan

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 134:32


SUMMARY Welcome to STRANGE BEDFELLOWS, an AKOM series about Yoko Ono and Paul McCartney after John Lennon's death. In Episode 2 we welcome author Joe Hagan for a loose, candid and wide-ranging conversation centered around Paul, Yoko and Jann Wenner.  Topics include: Rolling Stone's stake in the Ono-McCartney drama, Jann's autobiography, the Rock Hall, Paul's endorsement of Wenner's book, McCartney's image building, Joe's experiences interviewing both McCartney and Ono, Yoko's attitude towards Paul, Paul's “Fairy Dust,” Wenner's philosophy and attitude towards music and pop culture, John and Yoko's media obsession, George Harrison and loads MORE. PLAYLIST Well, Well, Well JOHN LENNON (1970) Wanna Be Your Man ROCK HALL PERFORMERS (2015) Yes, I'm Your Angel YOKO ONO (1980) Do the Oz JOHN LENNON (1970) Smile Away PAUL McCARTNEY (1971) Three Legs PAUL McCARTNEY (1971) Wah Wah GEORGE HARRISON (1970) Get Me Out of Here PAUL McCARTNEY (2013) SOURCES “Sticky Fingers, the Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone Magazine” Joe Hagan. Knopf (October 24, 2017) “Jann Wenner: Like a Rolling Stone” Jann Wenner. Little, Brown and Company (September 13, 2022)

Charlotte's Web Thoughts
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Announces Ban on Pink Floyd

Charlotte's Web Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 5:11


[This blog will always be free to read, but it's also how I pay my bills. So, if you like what you read, please consider a paid subscription.]TALLAHASSEE (CWT) — Florida Governor Ron DeSantis shocked political observers and reporters this morning at a press conference where he announced a statewide ban on Pink Floyd, the English progressive rock group generally considered by popular music critics to be one of the most influential bands of all-time. The stunning move came less than a week after controversy erupted in response to the release of their 50th anniversary album logo for The Dark Side of the Moon—the group's magnum opus—which prominently features a rainbow, harkening back to the original album cover that depicts light being shone through a glass prism and then dispersing into a spectrum of color. Because physics. The logo design drew enraged criticism from many who felt the band were attempting to engage in “wokeness” by referencing the Pride flag, the LGBTQ-inclusive banner that was created by gay activist Gilbert Baker five years after the release of The Dark Side of the Moon.At the press conference, DeSantis slammed the group as “attempting to push their sexual frivolity on children” and “the latest example of moral degenerates seeking to weaponize pop culture against families.”DeSantis, who has spent the past few years engaging in an all-out attack on LGBTQ rights in the state, then proceeded to lament the “demise of rock ‘n' roll” to incredulous political reporters in a series of awkward exchanges.When asked by one journalist to elaborate on his misgivings over the trajectory of the genre, DeSantis pointed to legendary rock acts and pointedly asked why today's music is so sexually immoral.“You know, when I was in high school and college, rockers were men's men,” he said in response to reporters. “I'd pop in a Judas Priest CD on the way to class and feel amped. You remember Rob Halford? That guy was a beast. Women loved him.”Reporters, exchanging confused glances, asked DeSantis if he had any other favorites.“Oh yeah, sure, I liked all kinds of stuff back then. I drove up with my old high school buddies to see Against Me! when they were first starting out and playing little gigs around the state. That was real punk rock. They understood that men are men and women are women.”DeSantis appeared briefly confused at muffled laughter from the gathered press. “I mean, look, you can laugh at my taste in music, but you can't deny that men back then weren't wearing dresses onstage. You'd never see Kurt Cobain or David Bowie dressing like women.”At this point, the Governor's press secretary attempted to intervene by rushing to the podium and claiming he was behind schedule.“Wait, wait—”, DeSantis said, waving off his concerned staffer, “These people need to understand what real rock ‘n' roll is. Uh, where was I?”“Sir, you were saying Kurt Cobain never wore dresses,” a reporter called out.“Right, thank you, men were men. Rock music in my high school days was about men playing music to attract girls. Even the weirder groups like The B-52s and Scissor Sisters played songs that made sense. We didn't have all these queers on the radio, singing about their sexual depravity.”“Governor DeSantis, you may want to—”, a Fox News reporter attempted to interject before being shushed by his colleagues. “The music industry no longer makes good ol' fashioned, red-blooded-American rock,” DeSantis continued, ignoring the interruption. “Where is today's David Geffen? Even music critics are no longer manly. Back in my day, we had Jann Wenner.”“Governor, that may be true for rock but what about pop in those days,” another journalist asked, struggling to suppress a smile.“Pop music was never my thing,” DeSantis admitted. “But you'd have to admit that pop a few decades ago was still about boys playing music about girls. You remember Ricky Martin? That guy was surrounded by hot chicks. Boy bands, too. I'll take Lance Bass and his buddies in N*SYNC over any of today's sexually subversive music acts.”Laughter broke out among the gathered press.“Hey, this isn't funny,” DeSantis chided them. “We've gotten away from the days when men knew rock is about extolling the virtues of women.” He paused.“Freddie Mercury knew a thing or two about fat-bottomed girls.”Charlotte's Web Thoughts is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Hi, I'm Charlotte Clymer, and this is Charlotte's Web Thoughts, my Substack. It's completely free to access and read, but it's also how my bills! So, please do kindly consider upgrading to a paid subscription: just $7/month or save money with the $70/annual sub. You can also go way above and beyond by becoming a Lifetime Member at $210. Get full access to Charlotte's Web Thoughts at charlotteclymer.substack.com/subscribe

Literally! With Rob Lowe
Jann Wenner: The Diet of America

Literally! With Rob Lowe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 50:08


Music lovers unite when Jann Wenner and Rob Lowe are talking. On today's episode you'll find out why Bob Dylan may be the best songwriter of all time, how rock 'n roll has evolved, the unique position Jann has had to take between creative minds, how Mick Jagger hypnotized Rob Lowe, and the importance of the song "Margaritaville." Got a question for Rob? Call our voicemail at (323) 570-4551. Yours could get featured on the show! 

Hunter-Gatherers Podcast
Goodbye 2022, and a bet on Franco Harris being Black

Hunter-Gatherers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 29:43


The Hunter S. Thompson classic "Fear & Loathing on the Campaign Trail, '72" book was published in 1973, just one of many follow-on impacts of that year on the next. For example one 1973 story involves HST, Franco Harris, ESPN Legend John A. Walsh, George Plimpton and Jann Wenner, Trigger warning: It was a different era in gambling on race.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit: Richard Fulco, Author of 'We Are All Together', On The Summer of Love & The Long Hot Summer of 1967, with Woodstock Photographer Elliott Landy

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 72:16


In this episode of Rock is Lit, Richard Fulco, author of the new novel ‘We Are All Together', is here to take us on a rockin' jaunt through the late 1960s, where we'll encounter several iconic players on the music and literature scene from that era. If you're a fan of the Summer of Love and all the trimmings that go with it, you'll love his novel and this episode. Later, Elliott Landy drops by to talk even more about the 1960s music scene, a period he should know a lot about since he's been photographing rock stars since the mid-60s. Best known for his classic rock photographs, Elliott Landy was one of the first music photographers to be recognized as an “artist.” His celebrated works include album cover photographs for Bob Dylan's ‘Nashville Skyline', The Band's ‘Music From Big Pink' and ‘The Band' album, and Van Morrison's ‘Moondance'. He's also taken portraits of such rock icons as Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, etc. He was the official photographer of the 1969 Woodstock Festival. And . . . Elliott has a new book out, entitled ‘Photographs of Janis Joplin On the Road & On Stage', featuring 129 photos, including 100 unpublished, accompanied by Janis's own words from recorded interviews by David Dalton of ‘Rolling Stone' magazine. HIGHLIGHTS:Richard Fulco and I talk about Syd Barrett's descent into mental illness and his exit from Pink Floyd1967: The Summer of Love—music, culture, vibe—but for African Americans, 1967 was known as The Long Hot SummerRichard's music career when he was in his twentiesThe story and characters in ‘We Are All Together'—Syd Barrett as inspiration behind the character DylanThe Beatles' performance on the ‘Ed Sullivan Show' in 1964The quest for fame and having “IT”The American Dream and racism and toxic ChristianityCharles MansonThe Merry PrankstersThe significance of the title of the novel and its connection to The BeatlesAndy Warhol, The Factory, The Velvet Underground with Nico, Lou Reed and their role in the novelThe depiction of the Monterey Pop Festival in the story, especially the performance of Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding CompanySome of the other icons who make cameos in the novel: Pete Townshend, Eric Burdon, Jann Wenner, Neal Cassady, William S. BurroughsWhat the Jack Kerouac classic novel ‘On the Road' means to Richard and meThe Monkees as a gateway drug to The BeatlesElliott Landy and I talk about How Elliott's concern about the Vietnam War brought him from a job as a photographer on a Danish film set back to America in the mid- to late 1960s to photograph peace demonstrationsHow a Country Joe and the Fish light show at The Anderson Theater in NYC's East Village started Elliott on a new career path photographing musiciansSeeing Janis Joplin, Tim Buckley, and Albert King perform the very first show at the Fillmore East on March 8, 1968Hanging out with Janis Joplin after a NYC gigElliott's style as a “fly on the wall” photographerShooting the album covers of The Band's ‘Music From Big Pink' and ‘The Band', Bob Dylan's ‘Nashville Skyline', and hanging out with guys in the town WoodstockHis experience as the official photographer at Woodstock in 1969 and the spirit of Woodstock and the 1960s MUSIC AND MEDIA IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:(Royalty Free Music) “Summer of Love” by Roy Edwin Williams“The King is Half-Undressed” by Jellyfish“Dock of the Bay” by Otis Redding“See Emily Play” by Pink FloydRoger Waters talks about Syd Barrett on the Joe Rogan Experience“Four” by Sonny RollinsClip of Muhammad Ali explaining his anti-draft, anti-Vietnam War stance“I Am the Walrus” by The Beatles“Ball and Chain” performed by Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding Company at Monterey Pop Festival“Heroin” by The Velvet Underground with Nico‘The Monkees' Theme Song“Itchykoo Park” by The Small Faces“I Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die Rag” by Country Joe and the Fish“Morning Glory” by Tim BuckleyCountry Joe and the Fish chant at Woodstock 1969“To Be Alone With You” by Bob DylanWavy Gravy at Woodstock“Woodstock” by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young“Down on Me” Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding Company LINKS: Richard's website, www.richardfulco.comRichard on Twitter and Instagram, @RichardFulco Link to clip of Roger Waters talking about Syd Barrett on the Joe Rogan Experience, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BcKrk5tFnE&t=66s Elliott's website, www.elliottlandycomElliott on Instagram, @elliott_landy_photography Christy Alexander Hallberg's website: https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/Christy Alexander Hallberg Twitter, @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg Instagram, @christyhallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSnRmlL5moSQYi6EjSvqagLink to Christy Alexander Hallberg's short story on Janis Joplin, “Third Party,” published by ‘Eclectica', https://www.eclectica.org/v20n4/hallberg.html

The Beat with Ari Melber
GOP struggles with narrow House majority; Trump under fire for white supremacist meeting

The Beat with Ari Melber

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 41:37


MSNBC's Ari Melber hosts "The Beat" on Monday, November 28 and reports on Kevin McCarthy's imperiled bid for House Speaker. Plus, Donald Trump's controversial hosting of white supremacist Nick Fuentes and Ye at Mar-A-Lago. Michael Steele and Joan Walsh join. Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner joins as part of the Summit series of interviews.

The Dishmaster
Shocking Press Leaks from Angelina Jolie and Armie Hammer's Wife; Jennifer Aniston's IVF Journey; Selena Gomez v. Francia Raisa, Jessica Simpson's Concerning Ad and more

The Dishmaster

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 60:27


We're back from a very long break and we're coming in swinging with lots of pop-culture updates and a deep-dive into romantic attachment theory from the book 'Attached' by  Dr. Amir Levine and Rachel Heller . On this week's show we discuss the shocking news that Angelina Jolie was behind that 2005 leak of her and Brad Pitt on the beach in Africa with a then young Maddox. We also talk about Armie Hammer's wife, Elizabeth Chambers, leaking stories about her then husband to the press by using her best friend as a cover. Lastly, we talk about Jennifer Aniston's infertility admission, Jessica Simpson's concerning Pottery Barn ad,  Meghan Markle feeling objectified, and the very controversial ending to Love is Blind Season 3.

The Q Interview
[Full episode] Jann Wenner, Brighid Fry, francesca ekwuyasi, Sharon and Bram

The Q Interview

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 62:25


Rolling Stone magazine co-founder Jann Wenner discusses his new memoir, Like a Rolling Stone, which documents his incredible legacy and tells some wild stories about '60s counterculture and the heady early days of rock and roll. Singer-songwriter Brighid Fry talks about her personal and musical evolution, forming her musical project Housewife at 14, and the band's new EP, You'll Be Forgiven. Author francesca ekwuyasi talks about winning this year's Dayne Ogilvie Prize, which is awarded to an extraordinary debut book by a Canadian writer from the LGBTQ2 community. Children's entertainers Sharon and Bram reflect on their incredible four decade career and why their music resonates with kids.

q: The Podcast from CBC Radio
[Full episode] Jann Wenner, Brighid Fry, francesca ekwuyasi, Sharon and Bram

q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 62:25


Rolling Stone magazine co-founder Jann Wenner discusses his new memoir, Like a Rolling Stone, which documents his incredible legacy and tells some wild stories about '60s counterculture and the heady early days of rock and roll. Singer-songwriter Brighid Fry talks about her personal and musical evolution, forming Housewife at 14, and the band's new EP, You'll Be Forgiven. Author francesca ekwuyasi talks about winning this year's Dayne Ogilvie Prize, which is awarded to an extraordinary debut book by a Canadian writer from the LGBTQ2 community. Children's entertainers Sharon and Bram reflect on their incredible four decade career and why their music resonates with kids.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Shack and Awe: Has Liberalism Gone Off The Rails?

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 36:15


Liberalism, in the 1960s in America, empowered a generation of young people to battle social injustices, conformity of the 50's, and the Vietnam War. These liberal cultural and social changes were fueled, in part by sex, drugs, and rock and roll. At the forefront of this counterculture revolution was Rolling Stone Magazine, the bible for baby boomers of the counterculture movement. At the helm of Rolling Stone was its founder and editor Jann Wenner, who wrote in the magazine's first edition, Rolling Stone “is not just about the music, but about the things and attitudes that music embraces”. What happened to this classical liberalism of peace, love & unity? The philosophy has spurred away from its former past and today is being hijacked by a progressive extreme left that uses identity politics and a polarizing woke agenda to further divide us. Has Liberalism gone off the rails? Who better to ask than this week's guest, Rolling Stone Magazine founder, Jann Wenner. Bill explores the changes liberalism has gone through over the years and asks Jann if it will ever resemble its former self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bryan Air
#115 Cemair Expansion And The SARS Travel Pass!

Bryan Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 51:24


✈️Cemair adds to their already impressive route network, SARS implement a new travel pass system

Liberty Tree
Honkey if You Voted for Obama

Liberty Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 78:07


Kelly and Matt take apart all of the nonsense asserted by Jann Wenner, cofounder of Rolling Stone Magazine, on his recent appearance on The Joe Rogan Experience.  Tag us on Instagram and we will DM you a 15% discount code for apparel at LibertyTreeLifestyle.com, the best post will win a couple of free shirts! As always, if you like what we're doing, let us know on your podcast app by leaving a review or reach out to us on Instagram.  And, check out our website for the best subversive shirts, flip-flops, and coffee mugs your money can still buy at libertytreelifestyle.com Wanna support the show?  Go to https://www.patreon.com/libertytree and become a member of the Liberty Tree Social Club  

The Jimmy Dore Show
Rogan DISMANTLES Rolling Stone Founder On Censorship

The Jimmy Dore Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 65:43 Very Popular


During a recent episode of the Joe Rogan Experience podcast, the titular host welcomed Rolling Stone Magazine founder Jann Wenner, and the conversation quickly turned to online censorship. Wenner expressed support for the tech industry and government regulating speech since government does so well regulating the food supply and the pharmaceutical industry. At which point Rogan stepped in and set Wenner straight in a gentle but nevertheless devastating way. Jimmy and America's Comedian Kurt Metzger wonder at the founder of an iconically countercultural publication like Rolling Stone turning into such a neoliberal shill for the establishment. Plus segments on the escalating war in Ukraine, a former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff calling for NATO to negotiate a settlement to the Ukraine War, Joe Biden lying about codifying Roe v Wade into law and a Wired Magazine article with the dumbest work-related advice ever. Also featuring Stef Zamorano!

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul
The Endgame 101022 - All Birds with One Stone

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 62:04


In today's episode:Rolling Stone's Jann Wenner has no idea how anything worksFL Surgeon General Ladapo recommends against the vaccineScience Journal 'Nature' claims that everything is everything and its opposite - that's science!No one knows who blew up Nord Stream, but Ukraine assassinated Daria Dugina and blew up Putin's favorite bridgeClimate change can be fixed by a nuclear war, according to experts.Connect with Be Reasonable: https://linktr.ee/imyourmoderatorHear the show when it's released. Become a paid subscriber at imyourmoderator.substack.comOther ways to support the work:ko-fi.com/imyourmoderatorbtc via coinbase: 3MEh9J5sRvMfkWd4EWczrFr1iP3DBMcKk5Merch site:https://cancelcouture.myspreadshop.com/Follow the podcast info stream: t.me/imyourmoderatorOther social platforms: Truth Social, Gab, Rumble, Bitchute, Odysee, DLive or Gettr - @imyourmoderator Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/be-reasonable-with-your-moderator-chris-paul. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Joe Rogan Experience Review podcast
292 Joe Rogan Experience Review of Roger Waters Et al.

Joe Rogan Experience Review podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 51:32


 Thanks to this weeks sponsors:  First Personand use code JRERfor 15% off your first order Mintmobile Go to www.mintmoble.com/JRER to cut your bill to $15 a month and get your plan shipped to your door free.  First Person Go to www.getfirstperson.com Code JRER for 15% off your first order www.JREreview.com For all marketing questions and inquiries: JRERmarketing@gmail.com This week we discuss Joe's podcast guests as always. Review Guest list: Jann Wenner, Roger Waters and Sober October A portion of ALL our SPONSORSHIP proceeds goes to Justin Wren and his Fight for the Forgotten charity!! Go to Fight for the Forgotten to donate directly to this great cause.  This commitment is for now and forever. They will ALWAYS get money as long as we run ads so we appreciate your support too as you listeners are the reason we can do this. Thanks! Stay safe.. Follow me on Instagram at www.instagram.com/joeroganexperiencereview Please email us here with any suggestions, comments and questions for future shows.. Joeroganexperiencereview@gmail.com

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul
The Endgame 101022 - All Birds with One Stone

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 62:04


In today's episode:Rolling Stone's Jann Wenner has no idea how anything worksFL Surgeon General Ladapo recommends against the vaccineScience Journal 'Nature' claims that everything is everything and its opposite - that's science!No one knows who blew up Nord Stream, but Ukraine assassinated Daria Dugina and blew up Putin's favorite bridgeClimate change can be fixed by a nuclear war, according to experts.Connect with Be Reasonable: https://linktr.ee/imyourmoderatorHear the show when it's released. Become a paid subscriber at imyourmoderator.substack.comOther ways to support the work:ko-fi.com/imyourmoderatorbtc via coinbase: 3MEh9J5sRvMfkWd4EWczrFr1iP3DBMcKk5Merch site:https://cancelcouture.myspreadshop.com/Follow the podcast info stream: t.me/imyourmoderatorOther social platforms: Truth Social, Gab, Rumble, Bitchute, Odysee, DLive or Gettr - @imyourmoderator Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/be-reasonable-with-your-moderator-chris-paul. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy find out why you don't want to debate AZ Dem gov nominee Katie Hobbs   14:14 - Dan & Amy react to Joe Rogan's interview  with Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner   33:43 - Want to know why your danish costs more?   53:22 - Richard V. Reeves, senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution, where he directs the Boys and Men Project and holds the John C. and Nancy D. Whitehead Chair, discusses his new book  Of Boys and Men: Why the Modern Male Is Struggling, Why It Matters, and What to Do about It   01:06:35 - Former Chief Asst. U.S. Attorney & Contributing Editor at National Review, Andrew McCarthy:  Taking on Trump and Hunter Biden: What to do with cases that could change elections? Be sure to check out Andy's still timely book Ball of Collusion: The Plot to Rig an Election and Destroy a Presidency   01:21:15 - President at Wirepoints, Ted Dabrowski, responds to being called a “carnival barker” by Governor Pritzker. Check out Ted's latest wirepoints.org    01:35:54 - President of the Crime Prevention Research Center and former senior advisor for research and statistics at the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Legal Policy, John Lott, points out Massive errors in FBI's Active Shooting Reports regarding cases where civilians stop attacks. For more from John @JohnRLottJr   01:49:28 - The who's who and who wasn't at Chicago's Columbus Day parade  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sermon Audio – Cross of Grace

Luke 17:11-19On the way to Jerusalem, [Jesus] was going through the region between Samaria and Galilee. As he entered a village, ten lepers approached him. Keeping their distance, they called out to him, “Jesus! Master! Have mercy on us!” When Jesus saw them he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went, they were made well.One of them, seeing that he had been healed, turned back praising God with a loud voice. He prostrated himself at the feet of Jesus and thanked him. And he was a Samaritan.Jesus said, “Were not ten made clean? But the other nine, where are they? Was none of them found to turn back and give praise to God except this foreigner?” Then he said to him, “Get up and go on your way. Your faith has made you well.” Foreigners, foreigners, foreigners… If you have not seen the latest Ken Burns/PBS series called “The US and the Holocaust” I highly recommend it. (Here's a link.) It's not for the faint of heart, but one of those things that should be seen. Even if you think you've heard that history before, or heard it enough, this is different. It tells a different story about the way the US handled the issue of Jews as “foreigners,” and as refugees, and as immigrants before, during and after the war, and it has a lot to teach us about how we do – or do not do – immigration these days.My sermon for today was already done when I finished up the series late last night, so all I'm prepared to share about it is a little Public Service Announcement – and pastoral encouragement – to take the time to watch it.In the meantime … have you heard the stories lately about the migrants from our southern border who are helping with the hurricane recovery and rescue and rebuilding in Florida? It's a thing. And it feels like a cosmic irony to me that many of the people who, just a few weeks ago, were being toyed with like so many pawns in one of the ugliest, most controversial political games we have going in our country these days, have made their way “to the rescue” in Florida, despite the fact that that state's governor, in particular, is the source of so much of the drama that surrounds them.What I mean is, the very people – or people very much like them – who, a couple of weeks ago, were being flown around the country to score political points about a broken immigration system, have since headed into the source of the drama, to help save the day. Apparently, it's nothing new though, and prevalent enough, that there are even non-profit organizations that facilitate these efforts and advocate for the safety and fair treatment of the migrants who do that kind of work. There's an organization called “Resilience Force,” for example, which helps thousands of undocumented immigrants move around our country from one disaster to another as they clean up and rebuild homes and businesses that get destroyed by hurricanes, tornadoes, tropical storms and the like.A Mexican roofer who does this sort of thing describes himself and others like him as being like “traveling white blood cells … who congregate after [a disaster] to heal a place, and then move on to heal the next place.” Apparently, hundreds of these people have made their way to Florida, in the wake of Hurricane Ian. They're coming from places like New York, Dallas, and Houston. Again, the very states – to and from which – they were being shipped in the first place.Of course, migrants do this work because they're smart and resourceful and desperate enough, perhaps. It's hard, dangerous work. They get screwed out of compensation, they risk their safety and they endanger their lives by working without insurance or a safety net of any kind. That's some of what an organization like “Resilience Force” exists to help with.But it's not only about wages, job security and self-preservation for these “foreigners.” “Resilience Force” also leads these migrant workers on service projects where undocumented immigrants rebuild homes for uninsured Americans who are, like them, without a safety net, too. And then they host meals where those American homeowners and migrant workers can get to know each other. They build relationships. They become friends. And their minds, opinions and politics, even, often change because of it.And when I read about this and then read this morning's Gospel about Jesus and that Samaritan “foreigner,” I couldn't help but connect the dots.Yes. There's a lot in this Gospel that invites us toward deeper gratitude and a more faithful response to God's blessing in our lives. I've preached that sermon plenty of times and will again, someday.But what makes this story different … the key player today … the surprise twist for anyone who heard about what happened with Jesus and those lepers that day, in some village somewhere between Samaria and Galilee is all about the Samaritan; it's that he was a foreigner; it mattered to Jesus, and it should matter to us, that he was an outsider in a group of outsiders.Yeah … this guy was an outsider in a group of outsiders. He was an outcast, among the outcasts. As a foreigner, he was a leper, even to the lepers, you might say. (I wonder if that's why he turned around, honestly. I wouldn't be surprised if, once they were all healed, the rest of them left this guy in the dust and returned to their homes, because they were no longer bound to him by their disease. The other nine were utterly liberated. He was healed, but still a foreigner … still an outcast … still an outsider, after all.)Which is why Jesus lifts him up as a model of faithfulness. Jesus lifts him up as an example that the other nine – and we – could learn from. In doing that, Jesus reminds whoever's paying attention that, where God is concerned, there are no insiders and outsiders; no “us” and “them;” no “illegal” children of God, if you will. After all, Jesus didn't ask for the foreigner's papers, or expect him to assimilate, or naturalize, or pledge his allegiance before he was healed. He just loved him and healed him right along with the others.It's a reminder that our boundaries are not God's boundaries – whether those boundaries are political, religious, theological, ethnic or whatever.I heard Howard Stern interview Jann Wenner last week – he's the creator of Rolling Stone magazine. Among other things, they were waxing nostalgic about John Lennon, generally – about what a genius he was on so many levels, and about what a tragedy it is that he's no longer alive among us. And they marveled specifically about the song “Imagine” and the seemingly earth-shattering, mind-blowing, ground-breaking ideas he sings about there.And Howard Stern, a self-professed atheist who I actually have a fair amount of respect for, swooned over Lennon's encouragement to – as the song goes – “Imagine there's no countries … it isn't hard to do … nothing to kill or die for … and no religion, too.” “Imagine all the people … sharing all the world.” You know the song. If you don't, you'll have to take that up with Jesus.Anyway, in today's Gospel, Jesus himself, embodies what John Lennon – genius though he was – could only imagine. Jesus embodies what we can only imagine, too much of the time.In that moment, with that Samaritan, there were no countries. No nationality that mattered any more than any other.There was no religion, too. (Jesus wasn't a Christian, remember. And those lepers were healed before they ever made it to the priests. Religion didn't do that for the, their faith did.)And there was no hell down below, and no heaven somewhere far and away, either. Because heaven was happening right there among them. Grace was shared. Healing had come. Gratitude was expressed. New life was taking shape. The outsider was allowed in. Faith and life had come together and all was well.Imagine.And then let's stop imagining it and let's make it so. Let's stop imagining what we are called to embody as God's people on the planet. Let's see all of it – our country and theirs – as God's creation. Let's see all of us – and them, whoever they may be – as God's children, too. Let's talk about and seek out the common ground of our faith more often than we argue about what divides us where religion is concerned.Let's do like Jesus did – and calls us to, just the same. Let's embody the kind of grace, courage, welcome and mercy that so much of the world has very good reason to doubt, deny, long for and merely imagine, unless and until we show them how real it is and how real it can be, by the grace of the God we know in Jesus.Amen

Amanpour
The women leading Iran's protests

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 54:53


Women have been at the forefront of ongoing protests in Iran, following the death of Mahsa Amini in the custody of the so-called morality police three weeks ago. In a country infamous for crushing dissent, these women are trying to force authorities to pay attention to their demands, sometimes at their own peril, as Jomana Karadsheh explains. Following her report Christiane is joined by Shirin Ebadi, a Nobel laureate and human rights lawyer who was Iran's first female presiding judge before being demoted following the 1979 revolution.  Also on today's show: celebrated journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, author of a new memoir, My People; Rolling Stone co-founder Jann Wenner.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Kissing Lips & Breaking Hearts: A U2-ish Podcast with the Garden Tarts

BOOK TOUR! BOOK TOUR! There's a book tour! Will we make it to a date? FINALLY! The Jann Wenner's answer to who's lying, Obama of Bono? And so much more. Take a listen and hope to see you on tour! www.thegardentarts.com SUPPORT: www.patreon.com/thegardentarts AND www.buymeacoffee.com/thegardentarts twitter: @the_gardentarts instagram: @the_gardentarts --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thegardentarts/message

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Jann Wenner: The Rolling Stone Generation

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 57:50


Jann Wenner has had an outsized impact on Bay Area history, music, popular culture and the world of magazines. In 1967, with the founding of Rolling Stone magazine in San Francisco, Wenner not only created the "bible of the counterculture," he helped catalyze a generation of young people into a force that would go on to transform the politics and lifestyles of much of the country. In his deeply personal new memoir, Like a Rolling Stone, Wenner vividly describes an epoch of cultural change that swept America and beyond, and the role his magazine played in it. His book goes on to explore not only his own work, but the lives of Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Bono and Bruce Springsteen. He also discusses the role he played in the careers of Hunter S. Thompson, Tom Wolfe and Annie Leibovitz. After leaving San Francisco for New York, Wenner's journey took him to the Oval Office with groundbreaking interviews with Bill Clinton and Barak Obama, leaders to whom Wenner's publication gave its historic, full-throated backing. Wenner also had his magazine focus on the Dalai Lama, Greta Thunberg, and others he felt should be seen and heard in the pages of Rolling Stone, because of their potential impact on American culture. It is not surprising that many have called him "the greatest magazine editor of his generation." Please join us as Wenner makes a rare visit to The Commonwealth Club to discuss his life and the impact he has made on America. NOTES This program is generously supported by Relevant Wealth.  This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. SPEAKERS Jann Wenner Founder, Rolling Stone Magazine; Member, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Paul Liberatore Music Columnist, Marin Independent Journal In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded on September 21st, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Journal du Rock
Le Journal Du Rock - Bruce Springsteen; Genesis; Phil Collins; Paul "Bonehead" Arthurs; Oasis; Neil Young; Arctic Monkeys; Iron Maiden

Journal du Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 4:04


Comme on le soupçonnait depuis les annonces de Jann Wenner tout récemment, Bruce Springsteen est bel et bien de retour avec un nouvel album. et comme vous l'entendez, ce nouveau projet solo est 100% composé de covers de classiques de la soul ! . L'album s'intitulera Only the Strong Survive et sortira le 11 novembre. Springsteen y explore le catalogue légendaire de la Motown, Gamble and Huff, Stax et beaucoup d'autres labels célèbres. Sur ce 21e album studio, le Boss sera accompagné au chant par Sam Moore et par la section cuivre du E Street Band. Phil Collins et Genesis vendent leur catalogue à leur tour. La vente tutoie les 300 millions de dollars et concerne les droits et les enregistrements "master" de la majorité du catalogue de Genesis, de la carrière solo de Phil Collins, et du groupe Mike & the Mechanics. Le Président de Concord Music group (la société à la base de l'achat), Bob Valentine, a expliqué vouloir amener les back-catalogues de Collins et Genesis vers une nouvelle génération d'auditeurs plus jeunes. "Dans notre monde actuel, les réseaux comme Facebook, Instagram ou TikTok font désormais partie de la façon de consommer de la musique plus ancienne. Ils sont clairement un moyen de faire revivre ces musiques." Paul "Bonehead" Arthurs, l'ancien guitariste d'Oasis qui accompagnait Liam Gallagher lors de ses dernières tournées, a annoncé qu'il avait vaincu le cancer. Il y a quelques mois, nous apprenions que le guitariste devait se retirer un certain temps des tournées pour recevoir un traitement contre le cancer des amygdales dont il était atteint. Mais le musicien a annoncé hier la bonne nouvelle sur ses réseaux sociaux : il est à présent débarrassé de ce cancer. On savait que Neil Young allait sortir un nouvel album avec le Crazy Horse ce 18 novembre, et il vient d'en dévoiler un premier extrait. L'album World Record était confirmé depuis un moment. Et Neil Young vient d'en partager un premier extrait : "Love Earth", décrit comme "un hommage à mère-nature". L'album comptera 10 titres et sera produit par Rick Rubin dans ses studios Shangri-La de Malibu. C'est déjà là que Young avait travaillé là pour son album Peace Trail sorti en 2016. Neil assurera le chant sur World Record, tandis que le Crazy Horse se chargera des instruments Arctic Monkeys vient de dévoiler "Body Paint", nouvel extrait de l'album, The Car, à venir… Il s'agira du dernier titre qui teasera leur album The Car qui sortira ce 21 octobre, un disque annoncé comme "introspectif" et contenant du piano et de la batterie plus lente qu'attendu. "Body Paint" fait l'objet d'un clip réalisé par Brook Linder. Iron Maiden vient de dévoiler les détails de la réédition de The Number of the Beast sous forme d'un triple vinyle pour les 40 ans de cet album mythique. Le titre "Total Eclipse" figurera sur la réédition de l'album, à la place de "Gangland" qui s'y trouvait dans les éditions précédentes. Steve Harris est revenu sur cette décision: "C'était prévu comme ça à la base. Mais la raison pour laquelle ça ne s'était pas fait tenait au rush de cette période un peu folle. Où nous avions sorti le single "Run to the Hills" avant de partir en tournée. Nous avions dû choisir une face B pour ce titre, qui se retrouverait aussi sur l'album. Le choix s'était posé entre "Gangland" et "Total Eclipse", et nous avons pris la mauvaise décision. "Total Eclipse" est une chanson plus forte, et l'album aurait été encore meilleur si elle avait figuré dessus." La sortie de cette réédition est prévue pour le 18 novembre. --- Classic 21 vous informe des dernières actualités du rock, en Belgique et partout ailleurs. Le Journal du Rock, chaque jour à 7h30 et 18h30.

Don Lemon Tonight
Trump tries to block testimony from ex-aides about January 6

Don Lemon Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 76:48 Very Popular


In a CNN exclusive, sources reveal Trump's legal team is fighting a secret court battle to block a federal grand jury from gathering information from his ex-aides about his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. Former Nixon White House counsel John Dean and former general counsel for the Director of National Intelligence, Robert Litt, join to discuss.Plus, Russians desperately try to escape Vladimir Putin's call up of hundreds of thousands of people to fight in Ukraine, stocks fall to their lowest levels since November 2020 amid recession fears, an Arizona judge rules the State can enforce a near-total abortion ban, and Rolling Stone Magazine founder Jann Wenner joins to discuss music's influence on civil rights and his front row seat to music history.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Book Review
The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 51:13 Very Popular


For the next few months, we're sharing some of our favorite conversations from the podcast's archives. This week's segments first appeared in 2017 and 2019, respectively.Jann Wenner, the co-founder and longtime editor of Rolling Stone magazine, has a new memoir out — but it's not the first book to tell his life story: In 2017, the journalist Joe Hagan published a biography, “Sticky Fingers,” that Wenner authorized and then repudiated after it included unflattering details. Hagan was a guest on the podcast in 2017, and explained his approach to the book's most noteworthy revelations: “I made a decision, really at the outset, that I was going to be honest with him and always be frank with him,” he told Pamela Paul and John Williams. “And if I came across difficult material, I was just going to address it with him. So in that way, it kind of let some of the pressure off. And by the end, we reached a point where I really tried to present him with the most radioactive material and make him aware of what I knew, so he wouldn't be surprised.”Also this week, we revisit a 2019 conversation among Williams and The Times's staff book critics Dwight Garner, Jennifer Szalai and Parul Sehgal about their list ranking the 50 best memoirs of the past 50 years. No. 1: “Fierce Attachments,” by Vivian Gornick.We would love to hear your thoughts about this episode, and about the Book Review's podcast in general. You can send them to books@nytimes.com.

KQED’s Forum
An Inside View of San Francisco's Legendary Music Scene with Rolling Stone Founder Jann Wenner

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 55:38


Jann Wenner started Rolling Stone magazine in San Francisco at the tender age of 21 – placing himself smack in the middle of 1967's wild and groundbreaking music scene. We'll talk with Wenner about San Francisco rock and roll, the legacy of Rolling Stone magazine and his new memoir, “Like a Rolling Stone”. Guests: Jann Wenner, founder, Rolling Stone Magazine; author of the memoir, "Like a Rolling Stone"

Free Library Podcast
Jann Wenner | Like a Rolling Stone: A Memoir

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 59:31


In conversation with David Fricke, senior editor for Rolling Stone and SiriusXM host The co-founder, co-editor, and publisher of Rolling Stone, Jann Wenner has influenced the ways in which the world perceives music, politics, and pop culture for nearly 50 years. Also the founder and publisher of Outside, US Weekly, Family Life, and Men's Journal, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the American Society of Magazine Editor's Hall of Fame. Praised by Bruce Springsteen as ''a touchingly honest memoir from a man who recorded and shaped our times and of a grand life well lived,'' Like A Rolling Stone tells the story of Wenner's life and generation as it charts his association with rock stars, journalists, artists, politicians, and thought leaders. (recorded 9/15/2022)

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast
A Mistake in Many Ways: Ep5A I Want to Give Him That Divorce

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 107:19


SUMMARY In the final (2 part) episode of our series, we'll address the final event in the Breakup drama of April 1970: the battle of Phil Spector's production of The Long and Winding Road.  We'll also take an in-depth look at Paul's revelatory interview in The Evening Standard. Candid, comprehensive and intriguing, this interview is an important piece of history we have dubbed “McCartney Remembers.” We'll examine some of the recurring issues highlighted by Paul in the interview and address the ultimate question: Could John and Paul Have Turned Things Around? SOURCES Conversations with McCartney by Paul DuNoyer (2015) You Never Give Me Your Money by Peter Doggett (2009) Paul McCartney: The Life by Philip Norman (2016) “Why The Beatles Broke Up” by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Sept 3, 2009) “Why The Beatles Broke Up; The Story Behind our Cover” by Mikael Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Aug 18, 2009) The Beatles Anthology (1995) “Lennon Remembers” w/ Jann Wenner for Rolling Stone (1970) “The Ex Beatles Tells His Story” Paul McCartney Interview: Life Magazine (April 16th 1971) Paul McCartney Interview w/ Chrissie Hynde for USA Weekend (1998) St. Regis Interview, Peter McCabe and Robert Schonfeld (1971) Q & A from McCartney LP (1970) “Magical Mystery Tours: My Life with the Beatles“ by Tony Bramwell (2014) The Beatles: The Biography by Bob Spitz (2005) Paul McCartney Interview By Ray Connolly for Evening Standard (April 21-22, 1970) https://www.the-paulmccartney-project.com/interview/interview-for-the-evening-standard “The Party's Over for the Beatles” by Derek Taylor for Sunday Magazine, (July 26, 1970) http://www.meetthebeatlesforreal.com/2017/03/the-partys-over-for-beatles-written-by.html The Beatles Authorized Biography by Hunter Davies (1968) The Beatles Anthology (1995) Cellarful of Noise by Brian Epstein (1964) PLAYLIST You Never Give Me Your Money THE BEATLES (1969) Long and Winding Road THE BEATLES (1970) When the Wind is Blowing WINGS (1971) Rupert PAUL MCCARTNEY (1977) Let it Be THE BEATLES (1970) I Know (I Know) JOHN LENNON (1973)

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast
A Mistake in Many Ways: Ep5B I Want to Give Him That Divorce

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 103:09


SUMMARY In the final (2 part) episode of our series, we'll address the final event in the Breakup drama of April 1970: the battle of Phil Spector's production of The Long and Winding Road.  We'll also take an in-depth look at Paul's revelatory interview in The Evening Standard. Candid, comprehensive and intriguing, this interview is an important piece of history we have dubbed “McCartney Remembers.” We'll examine some of the recurring issues highlighted by Paul in the interview and address the ultimate question: Could John and Paul Have Turned Things Around? SOURCES Conversations with McCartney by Paul DuNoyer (2015) You Never Give Me Your Money by Peter Doggett (2009) Paul McCartney: The Life by Philip Norman (2016) “Why The Beatles Broke Up” by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Sept 3, 2009) “Why The Beatles Broke Up; The Story Behind our Cover” by Mikael Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Aug 18, 2009) The Beatles Anthology (1995) “Lennon Remembers” w/ Jann Wenner for Rolling Stone (1970) “The Ex Beatles Tells His Story” Paul McCartney Interview: Life Magazine (April 16th 1971) Paul McCartney Interview w/ Chrissie Hynde for USA Weekend (1998) St. Regis Interview, Peter McCabe and Robert Schonfeld (1971) Q & A from McCartney LP (1970) “Magical Mystery Tours: My Life with the Beatles“ by Tony Bramwell (2014) The Beatles: The Biography by Bob Spitz (2005) Paul McCartney Interview By Ray Connolly for Evening Standard (April 21-22, 1970) https://www.the-paulmccartney-project.com/interview/interview-for-the-evening-standard “The Party's Over for the Beatles” by Derek Taylor for Sunday Magazine, (July 26, 1970) http://www.meetthebeatlesforreal.com/2017/03/the-partys-over-for-beatles-written-by.html The Beatles Authorized Biography by Hunter Davies (1968) The Beatles Anthology (1995) Cellarful of Noise by Brian Epstein (1964) PLAYLIST You Never Give Me Your Money THE BEATLES (1969) Long and Winding Road THE BEATLES (1970) When the Wind is Blowing WINGS (1971) Rupert PAUL MCCARTNEY (1977) Let it Be THE BEATLES (1970) I Know (I Know) JOHN LENNON (1973)

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock's Backpages: Wayne Robins on Steely Dan + Donald Fagen + Denny Dias

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 82:22


In this episode we invite former Creem editor and Newsday critic Wayne Robins to reminisce about his journalistic journey from the Berkeley Barb to NYU's graduate school of journalism — and to hold forth on his (and our) beloved Steely Dan.Wayne recalls the suburban East Coast childhood he had in common with the Dan's Donald Fagen— and the music that set them both free from it. Jumping forward to 1969, he describes the Rolling Stones show he saw in Oakland a month before Altamont. He also paints a vivid and amusing picture of Bard College, the upstate New York institution he attended at the same time as Fagen and Dan co-founder Walter Becker. Clips from RBP audio interviews with the duo and original Dan member Denny Dias accompany an in-depth discussion of every rock egghead's favourite group, not to mention Fagen's 40-year-old solo album The Nightfly.The episode concludes with a swift survey of recent additions to the RBP library, including  pieces about Juliette Gréco (1961), James Booker (1976), Mark E. Smith (1990), Limp Bizkit(2000), Soul Train's Don Cornelius (2012), Rolling Stone's Jann Wenner (2017)… and the "atomic" Count Basie (2020).Many thanks to special guest Wayne Robins. Sign up for his newsletter Critical Conditions at waynerobins49.substack.com.Pieces discussed: Rolling Stones, Steely Dan, Steely Dan II, Donald Fagen audio, Denny Dias audio, Donald Fagen, Steely Dan III, Juliette Gréco, The Beach Boys, David Bowie, Culture Club, James Booker, Tom Petty, The Sixties, The Fall, Jann Wenner, Among the Mooks, Don Cornelius and Count Basie. 

HBR IdeaCast
Rolling Stone’s Jann Wenner on Cultivating Creative Talent

HBR IdeaCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 25:56


Rolling Stone launched in 1967 with a mission to not only redefine music journalism but also chronicle important societal changes. Under the leadership of founding editor and publisher Jann Wenner, it published work from some of the 20th century's greatest writers, reporters, designers and photographers. He explains how he identified and managed that talent and shares other lessons from his five decades at the forefront of rock and roll. Wenner is the author of "Like a Rolling Stone: A Memoir."

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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Ringer Dish
Queen Elizabeth's Funeral Ceremonies, Even More 'Don't Worry Darling' Drama, and Jann Wenner's Memoir | Jam Session

Ringer Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:01 Very Popular


Juliet Litman and Amanda Dobbins talk about some of Queen Elizabeth II's funeral ceremonies and the drama around Harry and Meghan being present (1:00), the continued drama with the 'Don't Worry Darling' press tour (13:29), and some of the juicy tidbits revealed in Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner's memoir (25:59). Hosts: Juliet Litman and Amanda Dobbins Producer: Kaya McMullen Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Morning Toast
S5 Ep127: A Night At The Theater: Thursday, September 8th, 2022

The Morning Toast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 63:14 Very Popular


Queen Elizabeth 'Under Medical Supervision' as Doctors Are 'Concerned for Her Health,' Palace Says (PEOPLE) (28:58) 'DWTS' Season 31 cast (Page Six) (37:38) Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner's memoir confirms Angelina Jolie behind famous Brad Pitt pics (Page Six) (45:07) Ansel Elgort Shares Photos from His Italian Vacation with Shailene Woodley: 'The Season for Loving' (PEOPLE) (51:52) 'RHOBH' star Diana Jenkins donates $100K to Tom Girardi's alleged victims (Page Six) (58:15) The Morning Toast with Jackie (@JackieOshry) and Claudia Oshry (@girlwithnojob) NLOG Tickets Merch The Morning Toast Patreon Girl With No Job by Claudia Oshry (Book)

Colleen & Bradley
9/8 Thurs Hr 2: Continued Royal coverage; What happens now? Plus Jann Wenner's new book

Colleen & Bradley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 38:50


Colleen and Holly continue to discuss the passing of Queen Elizabeth and the next steps for the Royal family. Lord and Lady D-Bag is dominated by stories from Rolling Stone co-creator, Jann Wenner's new memoir. AND Colleen explains Thomas the Train's awesome, new friend.

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley
Back to the Office, Arthur Ashe Legacy, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 59:18


Hosted by Jane Pauley. In our cover story, David Pogue looks at how some companies are transitioning their employees back to the office, not always successfully. Plus: Norah O'Donnell talks with Hillary and Chelsea Clinton about their docuseries celebrating "Gutsy" women"; Anthony Mason sits down with Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner; Nancy Cordes interviews NPR's Nina Totenberg, author of a book about Ruth Bader Ginsburg; David Martin looks at how one weapons system is shifting the battle in Ukraine; Susan Spencer examines a new documentary series, "The U.S. and the Holocaust"; and Jim Brown explores the legacy of tennis legend Arthur Ashe with his widow, Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast
A Mistake in Many Ways: Ep4 That Makes Two of Us

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 131:50 Very Popular


SUMMARY When John's attempts to lure Paul back to the fold prove unsuccessful, he orchestrates one final outrageous maneuver. But John's actions are another miscalculation; Paul responds irately to John's tactics and further digs in his heels with a combative questionnaire inserted into press copies of his McCartney LP.  Early April shows an escalation in the acrimony between Lennon and McCartney, and by the end of Episode 4, the floodgates are open and the Breakup of the Beatles irreversibly begins. PLAYLIST You Never Give Me Your Money THE BEATLES (1969) Valentine Day PAUL McCARTNEY (1970) Momma Miss America (1970) Kreen Akrore PAUL McCARTNEY (1970) Teddy Boy PAUL MCCARTNEY (1970) Teddy Boy THE BEATLES (1969)   SOURCES “Why The Beatles Broke Up” by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Sept 3, 2009) Many Years From Now by Barry Miles (1997) “Why The Beatles Broke Up; The Story Behind our Cover” by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Aug 18, 2009) The Beatles Anthology (1995) “Lennon Remembers” w/ Jann Wenner for Rolling Stone (1970) “The Ex Beatles Tells His Story” Paul McCartney Interview: Life Magazine (April 16th 1971) Q & A from McCartney LP (1970) “Magical Mystery Tours: My Life with the Beatles“ by Tony Bramwell (2014) The Beatles: The Biography by Bob Spitz (2005) Paul McCartney Interview By Ray Connolly for Evening Standard (April 21-22, 1970) “The Love You Make” by Peter Brown and Steve Gaines (1983) Paul McCartney THE LIFE by Philip Norman (2016)

Word In Your Ear
Celebrity mash-ups! An afternoon with Billy Joel, Ivanka Trump, Bono, Geldof and Rupert Murdoch

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 48:02 Very Popular


Welcome to this week's pod in which various white-hot topics are brought in for questioning, among them … … Whatever happened to Dando Shaft? … Alastair Sim, Terry-Thomas and flowsy saxophones in The Belles of St Trinian's … Does it matter if music-making acts are fictitious or that rappers are artificial and produced by computer graphics and AI? … how many people were in Keith Tippett's Centipede (the clue's in the name)? … Titus Groan and Demon Fuzz … is there anything the lily-livered music business is prepared to defend? … puddings delivered by Deliveroo … Jann Wenner and the caviar spoons … the ‘greening' of Reading Festival … and what kind of sane world allows pop music at hotel breakfasts?----------Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 4 months for free! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee!----------Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world, with full visuals, and ad-free!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word Podcast
Celebrity mash-ups! An afternoon with Billy Joel, Ivanka Trump, Bono, Geldof and Rupert Murdoch

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 48:02


Welcome to this week's pod in which various white-hot topics are brought in for questioning, among them … … Whatever happened to Dando Shaft? … Alastair Sim, Terry-Thomas and flowsy saxophones in The Belles of St Trinian's … Does it matter if music-making acts are fictitious or that rappers are artificial and produced by computer graphics and AI? … how many people were in Keith Tippett's Centipede (the clue's in the name)? … Titus Groan and Demon Fuzz … is there anything the lily-livered music business is prepared to defend? … puddings delivered by Deliveroo … Jann Wenner and the caviar spoons … the ‘greening' of Reading Festival … and what kind of sane world allows pop music at hotel breakfasts?----------Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 4 months for free! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee!----------Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world, with full visuals, and ad-free!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Rock's Backpages
E134: Wayne Robins on Steely Dan + Donald Fagen + Denny Dias

Rock's Backpages

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 82:22 Very Popular


In this episode we invite former Creem editor and Newsday critic Wayne Robins to reminisce about his journalistic journey from the Berkeley Barb to NYU's graduate school of journalism — and to hold forth on his (and our) beloved Steely Dan.Wayne recalls the suburban East Coast childhood he had in common with the Dan's Donald Fagen — and the music that set them both free from it. Jumping forward to 1969, he describes the Rolling Stones show he saw in Oakland a month before Altamont. He also paints a vivid and amusing picture of Bard College, the upstate New York institution he attended at the same time as Fagen and Dan co-founder Walter Becker. Clips from RBP audio interviews with the duo and original Dan member Denny Dias accompany an in-depth discussion of every rock egghead's favourite group, not to mention Fagen's 40-year-old solo album The Nightfly.The episode concludes with a swift survey of recent additions to the RBP library, including  pieces about Juliette Gréco (1961), James Booker (1976), Mark E. Smith (1990), Limp Bizkit (2000), Soul Train's Don Cornelius (2012), Rolling Stone's Jann Wenner (2017)… and the "atomic" Count Basie (2020).Many thanks to special guest Wayne Robins. Sign up for his newsletter Critical Conditions at waynerobins49.substack.com.Pieces discussed: Rolling Stones, Steely Dan, Steely Dan II, Donald Fagen audio, Denny Dias audio, Donald Fagen, Steely Dan III, Juliette Gréco, The Beach Boys, David Bowie, Culture Club, James Booker, Tom Petty, The Sixties, The Fall, Jann Wenner, Among the Mooks, Don Cornelius and Count Basie. 

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast
A Mistake in Many Ways: Ep1 I Want a Divorce

Another Kind of Mind: A Different Kind of Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 125:20 Very Popular


SUMMARY “I always felt the split was a mistake in many ways.” -John Lennon, 1976. In this series, Phoebe and Daphne will argue that the breakup of the Beatles was an accident, the result of insecurity, hurt feelings and misread signals. Backed by rigorous research, we'll analyze the events between September 1969 and April 1970 with probity, thoughtfulness and empathy. – Episode One will examine the divorce meeting that triggers the six-month-long standoff between John & Paul. We'll discuss Paul's reactions, both in the moment and over the following week. We'll also dissect some striking statements from John in a revealing interview he gives just days after the divorce meeting. SOURCES: Australia Women's Weekly (May 5 1976) McCartney LP press release (1970) Get Back Dir. Peter Jackson (2021) Heightened Awareness, audio clip (Jan 14, 1969) “Why The Beatles Broke Up” by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Sept 3, 2009) The Beatles: The Biography by Bob Spitz (2005) Many Years From Now by Barry Miles (1997) The Lyrics Paul McCartney ed. Paul Muldoon (2021) “Why The Beatles Broke Up; The Story Behind our Cover” by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone (Aug 18, 2009) The Beatles Anthology (1995) John Lennon, interview w/ Barry Miles, (partially) unpublished. (September 23rd, 1969) Scene and Heard, BBC (Feb 28, 1970) John Lennon Audio diary clip (Sept 5, 1979) John Lennon Interview w/ Jean-François Vallée (April 1975) Lennon Remembers by Jann Wenner, Rolling Stone (1970)   PLAYLIST You Never Give Me Your Money THE BEATLES (1969) The End THE BEATLES (1969) Glasses PAUL MCCARTNEY (1970) Cold Turkey (demo) JOHN LENNON (1970) Dizzy Miss Lizzy PLASTIC ONO BAND (1969) Sun King THE BEATLES (1969) Don't Let Me Down 28.45 THE BEATLES (1969) Kreen-Akrore PAUL MCCARTNEY (1970) Because THE BEATLES (1969) Child of Nature THE BEATLES (1968) Everybody's Talking NILSSON (1969) Momma Miss America PAUL MCCARTNEY (1970)

Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast
188 - LIKE A ROLLING STONE: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BEN FONG TORRES w Daniel Gill

Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 61:23


We're covering Like a Rolling Stone: the Life and Times of Ben Fong-Torres. Released in 2021, Suzanne Joe Kai's debut feature doc is now available on Netflix. Fong-Torres was the editor at the beginning of Rolling Stone magazine when it was based in San Francisco, and he has a fascinating background at the forefront of ‘60s and ‘70s cultural upheaval. The doc features this godfather of music journalism interacting with Annie Liebovitz, Elton John, Jann Wenner, and many more. Our guest is repeat third chair Daniel Gill, who runs Forcefield PR and NITA Records.We also talk about Danny Fields, Creem, George's writing, Paco's music, boomers, and The Bear.Follow Daniel:Instagram: @NITARecordsFollow Sup Doc on:Twitter: @supdocpodcastInstagram: @supdocpodcastFacebook: @supdocpodcastsign up for our mailing listAnd you can show your support to Sup Doc by donating on Patreon.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.