Podcasts about Communicator

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Best podcasts about Communicator

Latest podcast episodes about Communicator

Is that really legal? with Eric Ruben
Episode 105: Corporate Communicator, Artist, and Photographer Liz McCrocklin

Is that really legal? with Eric Ruben

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 60:21


Liz started in San Diego, sailed with adventurous parents, went to school in Washington D.C. and London, lived in Africa and returned to the U.S. at the start of the pandemic. Her brilliance and flexibility are inspirational.Support the show

Earrings Off! Podcast
Mastering the Art of Communication (Rebroadcast)

Earrings Off! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 23:49


Lou and Teresa speak with Brenden Kumarasamy, a Communication Coach and YouTuber. Brenden shares some actionable tips that will have you communicating like a master communicator in no time! Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk. He coaches executives and entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators. He also has a YouTube channel where he provides free access to communication tools for everyone. Read today's blog here: https://www.earringsoff.com/posthttps://www.earringsoff.com/post/morning-routines Marketing and Social Media Strategist:   Tyresa Oluyide Theme song:                                                               D-Techneekz Logo Design:                                                               Claire Ritter Producers:                                                                   Lou Ali and Teresa Vaughan

Fearless Parenting
233 FearLESS Parenting Interview of Brenden Kumarasamy_Making Your Child A Rock Star Communicator

Fearless Parenting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 19:40


Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world. But parents, in this interview, he's here to show you how your kids/teens can become "Rock Star" communicators.Guest Links: mastertalk.ca Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/masteryourtalk/Linkedin:  linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mastertalkyt/Also, you can get a copy of Stan's book FearLESS Parenting at: https://tinyurl.com/FearLESSly-Parenting.    Free Parental Resource From FearLESS Parenting:  https://www.dropbox.com/t/IGL3ELKRb5QCOn1i Get your copy of Stan's book FearLESS Parenting at: https://tinyurl.com/FearLESSly-Parenting. Free Parental Resource From FearLESS Parenting: https://www.dropbox.com/t/IGL3ELKRb5QCOn1iAlso, please, please check each podcast episode's description to see my guest host links!God Bless!!!

Big O Radio Show
Podcast Wednesday - Mike McDaniel Is A Good Communicator 11 30 2022

Big O Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 4:20


Big O talks Mike McDaniel

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Wednesday - Mike McDaniel Is A Good Communicator 11 30 2022

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 4:20


Big O talks Mike McDaniel

Relentlessly Resilient Podcast
Kari Malkovich Part 1: Remember what you have already survived in the resiliency relay race

Relentlessly Resilient Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 40:28


Kari Malkovich is best known as a community leader in Woodland Hills, Utah, but not many know her past struggles that drive her desire to serve and lift others. In this first-part of a two-part series, she expands on her backstory to our hosts (and her good friends), Jennie Taylor and Michelle Scharf. She compares the problems of life to running a relay race, wherein each lap, we are leaning on our past self's lessons of survival. She offers advice from her experiences in emergency management with the acronym W.O.O.P.; Wish- what our goal is, the Outcome we want to achieve, acknowledging any Obstacles that might get in our way, and making Plans to reach the goals and overcome obstacles.  Even though we live in challenging times, we can become Relentlessly Resilient as we lean on and learn from one another's experiences. Hosts Jennie Taylor and Michelle Scharf are no strangers to overcoming adversity; Michelle lost her husband to cancer, while Jennie's husband Major Brent Taylor was killed in the service of our country. Their stories bond them together, and now listeners can join them weekly as they visit with others enduring challenges and who teach us how they are exercising resiliency, finding value in their grief, and purpose in moving forward.  Listen to the Relentlessly Resilient Podcast regularly on your favorite platform, at kslpodcasts.com, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL App. Join the Resilience conversation on Facebook at @RelentlesslyResilient and Instagram @RelentlesslyResilientPodcast. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fearless Parenting
232 FearLESS Parenting Interview of Brenden Kumarasamy_Making Your Child A Rock Star Communicator

Fearless Parenting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 14:48


Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world. But parents, in this interview, he's here to show you how your kids/teens can become "Rock Star" communicators.Guest Links: mastertalk.ca Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/masteryourtalk/Linkedin:  linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mastertalkyt/Also, you can get a copy of Stan's book FearLESS Parenting at: https://tinyurl.com/FearLESSly-Parenting.    Free Parental Resource From FearLESS Parenting:  https://www.dropbox.com/t/IGL3ELKRb5QCOn1i Get your copy of Stan's book FearLESS Parenting at: https://tinyurl.com/FearLESSly-Parenting. Free Parental Resource From FearLESS Parenting: https://www.dropbox.com/t/IGL3ELKRb5QCOn1iAlso, please, please check each podcast episode's description to see my guest host links!God Bless!!!

Talaera Talks - Business English Communication
75. Top Strategies to Become a Better Communicator - Talaera Talks

Talaera Talks - Business English Communication

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 31:16


Effective communication is important in almost every aspect of life. To get that job, to enjoy more stimulating interpersonal relationships, or to close that deal. Communication makes the world go round!In this episode, our hosts pick their top three strategies that make you a better communicator. Grab all the other tips in this post: 14 Simple Rules that will Make you a Better Communicator.✨ Explore our Business English Training at https://bit.ly/3vQpgyl.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast
Episode 107 - Nan Sterman is a California native, garden expert, garden designer, author, botanist, and award-winning communicator.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 53:46


Nan Sterman is a California native, garden expert, garden designer, author, botanist, and award-winning communicator. Nan has long been dedicated to the transformation of planted landscapes from overly thirsty and resource-intensive to climate appropriate and sustainable. In addition to designing gardens, Nan works hard to connect plants to people and the planet. Some examples of that work include: · Her award-winning public TV show, A Growing Passion which Nan hosts, produces, and writes. Forty-eight episodes air on KPBS TV in San Diego, on CREATE TV, and are available online at www.AGrowingPassion.com. · Nan's most recent book, Hot Color, Dry Garden, is a guide for creating color-filled, waterwise gardens. She's written hundreds of articles for newspapers and magazines, too. · In 2014, Nan founded the San Diego Gardener Facebook group, where more than 16,000 people discuss plants and gardening in Southern California. · At the beginning of the COVID quarantine, Nan co-founded Grab & Grow Gardens to support food-insecure communities during the COVID-19 crisis and beyond. To date, Grab & Grow Gardens has supplied more than 26,000 starter vegetable gardens for families and seniors in need across the region. · Nan leads tours to garden adventures around the world, including Europe, South Africa, Costa Rica, and the US. · In 2022, Nan kicked off the online Garden School, targeted at passionate home gardeners. In addition to a monthly garden membership, Nan teaches online and in-person seed-starting workshops every spring. Nan's approach to gardening dates back to the 1970s when she was involved in the first wave of the sustainability movement. She trained at the Integral Urban House in Berkeley, California, earned a botany degree from Duke University, a master's in biology from UC Santa Barbara, and a master's in instructional design from San Diego State University. Prior to delving into the gardening world, Nan created curricula, training programs, and educational materials for Fortune 500 companies, zoos, aquaria, and not-for-profit organizations. Her ability to take complex information and create effective educational programs is one of her greatest strengths, and a major source of her successes. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/plantatrilliontrees/support

Becoming Unique
Tips on How to be a World Class Communicator with Brenden Kumarasamy

Becoming Unique

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 48:31


To connect with Brenden go to https://www.rockstarcommunicator.com/?r_done=1

HeartBlend Podcast
#Communication: Becoming a Confident and Assertive Communicator

HeartBlend Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 40:26


Do you struggle to communicate confidently to others about what you want or in times of presenting? In this episode, we will cover ways to become more assertive and more confident within ourselves with communication. Follow @heartblendhost on IG

Off The Dome Radio
Episode 200: Our Favorite 6 OTD Episodes, Why Golfers Should Lift Weights, and How to be a Clearer Communicator

Off The Dome Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 84:15


Show Description: In today's episode, we each reflect on our top 3 most influential Off the Dome Radio episodes, and how each one helped us level up in life. For career and fitness tips, we discuss how to provide more clarity with your communication and 3 reasons why golfers should lift weights. Show Highlights: 2:45-34:15: We end the show with some reflection on our last 200 episodes, big events coming up for each of our businesses, and how we're approaching content creation in 2023. 34:15-44:15: Tim explains how to provide more clarity behind your questions, including a tip to make yourself a better communicator. 44:15-52:15: Slager provides 3 reasons why golfers should lift weights, including some ideas on how to get started with your golf fitness journey. 52:15-1:20:00: We end the show by each highlighting our top 3 most influential OTD episodes, and how they molded us into who we are today.

Own Your Choices Own Your Life
475 | How to Become a Top 1% Communicator in Your Industry with Brenden Kumarasamy

Own Your Choices Own Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 57:24


In this episode, we are speaking with Public Speaking Coach & YouTuber, Brenden Kumarasamy. Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world.In this episode we discuss:1) Why it is so important that we learn to communicate, speak and master our skills no matter what profession or field we are in. 2) One question to keep asking ourselves is if we are making our purpose a priority?  It will never just happen.  It requires belief in ourselves, discipline, commitment, practice and honing in on our skills every single day. 3) How all change begins at the identity level and once we see and believe that identity is ours, we then practice the habits that identity would embody every single day. Connect with Brenden Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/masteryourtalk/ Website: http://rockstarcommunicator.com/ Email: kumarasamy.brenden@gmail.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy/ YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/MasterTalks Marsha Vanwynsberghe — Storytelling Business Coach, 2xs Podcaster, Author, SpeakerMarsha is the 6-time Bestselling Author of “When She Stopped Asking Why”.  She shares her lessons as a parent who dealt with teen substance abuse far past the level of normal experimentation. Through her programs, coaching, and live events for women, Marsha is on a mission to teach you how to “Own Your Choices” in your own life.  She teaches women how to own their stories, lead themselves and pay it forward to others by creating businesses that serve, support, and impact others

Today with Claire Byrne
Artemis takeoff

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 4:28


Dr. Niamh Shaw, Irish Scientist and Communicator specialising in space

The Shrink Think Podcast
116. Are You A Content Or Process Communicator?

The Shrink Think Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 24:40


When you communicate, do you focus on the content of the conversation - the specifics of what you're talking about? Or do you focus more on the dynamic (process) between you and the other person? Many people don't realize they lean in one direction or the other, and it impacts their relationships. We break down the differences between these and what you can do to become aware of your tendencies so you can improve your communication and relationships. ———————— Sign up for our FREE email course on overcoming fear and insecurity at: https://www.shrinkthink.com/podcast *Member of the PsychCraft Podcast Network* https://psychcraftnetwork.com/

The Influential Communicator
[EP.42] How to Become a Confident Communicator on Video

The Influential Communicator

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 7:37


HOW TO BECOME A CONFIDENT COMMUNICATOR ON VIDEO; Want to build a magnetic personal brand on social media? Want to prospect in a way that cuts through the noise? Want to deliver impactful webinars that sell? I have one word for you... Video. In today's world, learning how to become a confident communicator on video is the key to standing out, becoming memorable and developing a unique voice that gets heard. The million dollar question is, how can you speak with confidence on video without fear of judgement, anxiety or nerves? The answer lies in the unwanted truth and in today's episode, Ravi is going to unleash it to you in a tactical and tangible way. Tune in to this week's episode where you will learn how to gain more confidence on video in less than 10 days. What are you waiting for? Press play! VALUABLE INSIGHTS AND KEY TOPICS: How to become a confident communicator in less than 10 days The exact story framework to share a 59 second message on video Why practice is the difference between ordinary and extraordinary NOTABLE QUOTES [2:40] - “We compare our Chapter 1 to somebody else's Chapter 31, and that's a recipe for disaster.” - Ravi Rajani CONNECT WITH RAVI: Connect with Ravi on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ravirajani/ Follow Ravi on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@theravirajani Subscribe and watch the show on Youtube: https://bit.ly/3eAJQx0 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Communication TwentyFourSeven
The Steps to Becoming a World Class Communicator

Communication TwentyFourSeven

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 49:43 Transcription Available


How would your life change if you were an exceptional communicator? What steps can you take to become one? Y'all hear me say all the time that communication is a skill just like any other skill; you must practice to get good at it. That's why I asked Brenden Kumarasamy to be a guest on the show. Brenden is the founder of the popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, which provides free access to communication tools. He also coaches ambitious executives and entrepreneurs to become the top 1% of communicators in their industry.Listen as Jennifer Furlong and guest Brenden Kumarasamy discuss the steps you can take today to become a world-class communicator tomorrow. Brendan's website: https://www.rockstarcommunicator.com/Sign up for PodMatch! Click here.Join The Rich Code Club for free! Click here. Read this for More Communication Tips! Book on relationships written by the podcast host, Jennifer Furlong.Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the showAdditional contact information for Jennifer Arvin Furlong:https://linktr.ee/jenniferfurlong Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/communication-twentyfourseven/id1576764160Order your copy of "Cracking the Rich Code" today at https://www.communicationtwentyfourseven.com/product-page/cracking-the-rich-code. Use code 'PODCAST' and get 20% off at checkout.Are you ready to meet your superhuman self? Join The Rich Code Club and take your business and life to the next level! Join the club for free! Click here. Are you a podcast host looking for a great guest or a guest looking for a great podcast? Join PodMatch! Click here.As an affiliate, I may earn a commission at no extra cost to you.

All The Dirt  Gardening, Sustainability and Food
Horticulture and DIY Communicator Adam Woodhams

All The Dirt Gardening, Sustainability and Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 45:20


Adam Woodhams is a communicator with a life long love of gardening and DIY. Deryn and Steve chat with Adam about his horticultural and media career, home garden and passion for sustainability.

Rochester Business Connections
LST #42: Brenden Kumarasamy || How To Become An Exceptional Communicator

Rochester Business Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 57:14


Learn Speak Teach episode 42 w/ Brenden Kumarasamy of MasterTalk Watch The Full Episode: https://youtu.be/7muE0TIjKq0 - During this episode, you will learn about; [00:00] Episode intro [03:37] Brenden's experience on podcasts [04:18] Who is Brenden Kumarasamy, and how he became successful [05:27] Workshop mode [06:01] Brenden's definition and opinion of communication [06:50] The first step in today's workshop; The random word exercise [07:48] Writing your goals down, concentrating, and focusing to achieve [09:16] The steps and the process to achieving: Do the random word exercise a hundred times [13:28] Ben does the Random Word Excercise, what he did right, and Brenden's recommendations on what to improve [15:24] How to beat fear, anxiety, and other stressors to be an exemptional communicator [17:35] Brenden's first move to starting a YouTube channel and what makes him successful [19:38] Brenden's advice to the parents and educators helping kids do the random word exercise [29:58] How to find and get better at your personal vocal tones [34:00] An exercise that you can implement to get better at vocal tones [37:40] Why Brenden recommends video messages and how to get better at it [43:11] The five levels of speech [44:44] How to write and incorporate the five levels in your communication [47:24] The power of pausing in communication [49:48] Brenden's perspective on color coding in speech presentation [51:34] Reasons you need to smile and how to incorporate it in your communication [53:45] How to keep in touch, support, and learn more from Brenden [55:14] The most important action step for your long-term communication [56:23] Ending the show and call to action Notable Quotes ~ “If we don't concentrate and focus on the goals we want to achieve in life, our goals will simply be a dream, and we can't leave our goals to be dreams. The difference between a dream and a goal is that goals have tangible steps.” ~ [08:43] ~ “If you have not done the random word exercise a hundred times, the steps don't matter; you get points on how many times you do the exercise, not on how well you do it.” ~ [09:52] ~ “Fear of communication… the anxiety of communication... can never be completely removed. It's kind of if you are in a marriage and expecting every day to be a great day; that is a wrong expectation.” ~ [15:36] “Think of your fear or anxiety like a boxing match, where one side of the ring is fear or any stressors, and the other side of the ring is the message and why it's important for you to share. The goal is not for the fear to leave the ring, but to make sure when the two meet in the middle, and the bell rings, the message gets the knockout punch.” ~ [16:48] ~ “The best speakers on the planet use three tones at the same time so that they can go high, low, and regular at any time, don't stay at the same tone when doing public speaking.” ~ [31:25] ~ “What's great about practicing communication is that the worst thing that can happen is that you get better.” ~ [40:04] ~ “Pausing is the most important power technique in communication; it allows us to emphasize the key parts of our message; you want to pause at the parts of your speech where you feel your audience should pay attention to.” ~ [47:27] ~ “The reason you need a smile in your speech is that the presentation isn't about you and what you think. The presentation is about the results and outcome you are delivering for the client.” ~ [52:15] --- FULL SHOW NOTES AND LINKS AT: https://realbusinessconnections.com/episode/brendenkumarasamy/ Real Business Connections is made possible by www.balbertmarketing.com

Your Confident Self
Self-Care is Amazing: It Makes You A More Confident Communicator

Your Confident Self

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 9:19


Sometimes there are demands on your life that make self-care nearly impossible. As a result, self-care gets shoved way down the list of things you'd like to do but can't or don't. Sometimes this is temporary or situational and other times it becomes chronic. Even in the most difficult times, it is still possible to make self-care a priority. In this episode we look at:What self-care has to do with communicationWhat happens when self-care isn't a priorityHow you feel when you ignore self-careTips for keeping self-care a priorityWhat does self-care have to do with communication? Simply put, self-care makes you a better communicator. When you take care of yourself, you are able to show up as your best self in all areas of life. You have more energy and you're less stressed. When you're caring for yourself and taking time to restore and refresh, you are able to think more clearly.All of these things lead to improved communication. This makes your communication more understandable, clear, and confident.Self-care is essential in order to be a confident and effective communicator. When you're not taking care of yourself, you're more likely to experience stress and anxiety, which can lead to negative reactions and communication failures. However, when you make self-care a priority, you see vast improvements in all areas of your life, including your communication abilities.Full show notes are available at https://allegrasinclair.com/podcast

V'Ger Please!
Dude Where's My Phone? (ENT S2 : E8)

V'Ger Please!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 56:27


When Reed leaves his new iPhone at the restaurant it leads to wacky...invisible man gags? That's right, we review "The Communicator"! Archer gets to indulge his head wound fetish yet again while the continuity becomes almost too much for the plot to handle.

Dead America
Brenden Kumarasamy Rockstar Communicator

Dead America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 19:18


Brenden Kumarasamy Brenden is a returning guest with us, and we love it when we get the chance to speak with Brenden. The level of knowledge Brenden brings every time is incredible. Brenden is the type of person that is eager to make positive changes in our world. Communication is so essential to ensure we have a better life. When we understand how communication plays a significant role in every aspect of our lives, we can achieve our personal and business goals much more accessible. This is where Brenden can help you. Brenden has so many tips and tricks that he offers each of us on his incredible Youtube platform MasterTalk. Brenden is the person you want to help you find the art of communicating. I've included his past Dead America episode, along with all his contact links, under the link tab of this blog post. I hope that you find value in this episode; if you know someone that would benefit from our conversation, please share this episode with them.  

The JK Experience with Josh Kalinowski
How to Be the Best Communicator in Your Industry (ft. Brenden Kumarasamy)

The JK Experience with Josh Kalinowski

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 30:05


"If you confuse, you lose" in business. If you're an entrepreneur, you probably have a very diverse skillset... but you're probably not always the best communicator. Join the club! Founder of MasterTalk, Brenden Kumarasamy, shares some great tips on becoming the best communicator in your industry.

Marketing for Good
Can Constraints Make You a More Innovative Communicator?

Marketing for Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 13:18


On this episode of Communicate for Good, Erica explores whether or not constraints can become a pathway to innovative leadership. She uses the fear of public speaking as an example for how constraints can lead to innovation for impact and clarity.  Resources Referenced:A beautiful constraint by Mark Barden and Adam Morgan: https://amzn.to/3gJyBn4Predictive Index Assessment: https://go1.predictiveindex.com/freeThe Wordifier: https://claxon-communication.com/wordifier/Pierre Casse Assessment: https://bit.ly/Pierre-Casse Connect with Erica:Website: https://claxon-communication.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/EricaMillsBarnLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericamillsbarnhart/Email: info@claxon-communication.com  Book Time With Erica: https://bit.ly/ChatWithErica

Mitlin Money Mindset
WhiskyCast, Episode #104

Mitlin Money Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 36:52


Mark Gillespie is the host and executive producer of WhiskyCast and founding partner of CaskStrength Media. Now in its 17th year, WhiskyCast is the world's longest-running whiskey podcast series, enjoyed by listeners in over 180 countries. Mark has developed WhiskyCast into a worldwide online community, providing complete news coverage of the whiskey industry.  Mark is a veteran journalist with four decades of experience in broadcast and online journalism and was awarded Communicator of the Year honors in the 2021 Whisky Magazine Icons of Whisky Awards. He has also been inducted into the Kentucky Distillers Association's Order of the Writ for his contributions to whisky-focused journalism. Listen to this episode of Mitlin Money Mindset™ for some great takeaways about Mark's journey from journalist to entrepreneur, great whiskey recommendations that you may want to try, and what he thinks the future of the whiskey industry looks like.  You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Learn more about Mark Gillespie and WhiskyCast [3:10]  How WhiskyCast has grown since its conception in 2005 [8:32]  The most interesting thing Mark has learned about Whiskey [10:33] How Mark's HappyHourLive Webcast came to be [12:53]  How beginners can expand their whiskey palette [15:07] Why Mark doesn't have a favorite whiskey—yet [21:40] Mark's whiskey collection is his personal library [23:11]  What does the future of the whiskey industry look like? [27:45]  The story behind Mark's custom desk [30:13]  What's up next for Mark Gillespie in 2022? [31:35]  What brought Mark joy and put him in the mindset for success [32:33] Resources & People Mentioned AnCnoc Peter Arkle Limited Edition Whiskies Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey Connect with Guest The website On Instagram On Twitter On Linkedin On Facebook On YouTube Bio Mark Gillespie is the host and executive producer of WhiskyCast, now in its 17th year as the world's longest-running whisky podcast series. WhiskyCast provides whisky lovers with news and interviews from the world of whisky each week, and has been produced on location in more than 15 different countries.  Mark is a veteran journalist with four decades of experience in broadcast and online journalism, and was awarded Communicator of the Year honors in the 2021 Whisky Magazine Icons of Whisky Awards.  He has also been inducted into the Kentucky Distillers Association's Order of the Writ for his contributions to whisky-focused journalism, and has been recognized for his work by the Society of Professional Journalists, the Spirited Awards, the Academy of Podcasters Awards, the Drammies Awards, the Alaska Press Club, and the Houston Press Club. He is a former president of the Alaska Press Club.  Mark and his family own CaskStrength Media, and are based in the charming, yet regrettably dry town of Haddonfield, New Jersey. Guests on the Mitlin Money Mindset Show are not affiliated with CWM, LLC, and opinions expressed herein may not be representative of CWM, LLC. CWM, LLC is not responsible for the guest's content linked on this site. Connect With Mitlin Financial podcast(at)MitlinFinancial.com - email us with your suggestions for topics or guests https://mitlinfinancial.com  Follow on Twitter Follow on Instagram Subscribe on Youtube Follow on Linkedin Follow on Facebook Subscribe to Mitlin Money Mindset™ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

Clearing The Way
Ep18 | Natural Communicator with James Protin

Clearing The Way

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 50:12


Welcome back to Clearing the Way. A resource for small business. I talk with sales and HR experts, other small business owners, and anyone else that can provide you with information to clear your way to success.  My guest today is James Protin, owner of the Protin Group, host of the James Protin Podcast, speaker, author, Leadership coach, and Director of Business Development at GPI. James started his career in project management. After 8 years, he transitioned to Business Development and Marketing. He spent the next 15 years working for Engineering and consulting firms as the Director and VP of Business Development and Marketing. In 2015, James started the Protin Group, providing strategic consulting services focusing on Business Development, Advocacy, Marketing, Public Relations, and Leadership Coaching. In 2020, he was brought on as the Director of Business Development at GPI. James was a Board Member for Leadership Washington County, President of the Mon Valley Chamber of Commerce, and Chairman of the BVA Charitable Trust. In February of this year, 2022 he entered the world of podcasting. The James Protin Podcast highlights people with powerful stories that focus on love, faith, gratitude, forgiveness, and redemption. James Protin Website: https://jamesprotin.com/ The James Protin Podcast: https://jamesprotin.com/episodes/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-protin-08109213/

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 69 – Unstoppable Corporate Communicator with Bradley Akubuiro

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 76:23


Bradley Akubuiro's parents raised him to have a deep and strong work ethic. His father came to the United States from Nigeria at the age of 17 and worked to put himself through school. As Bradley describes, both about his father as well as about many people in extremely impoverished parts of the world, such individuals develop a strong resilience and wonderful spirit.   Bradley has led media relations and/or public affairs for Fortune 50 companies including Boeing as it returned the grounded 737 MAX to service and United Technologies through a series of mergers that resulted in the creation of Raytheon Technologies. He also served as an advisor to Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and to the Republic of Liberia post-civil war. Today Bradley is a partner at Bully Pulpit Interactive, an advisory firm founded by leaders of the Obama-Biden campaign.   As you will see, Bradley is a wonderful and engaging storyteller. He weaves into his stories for us lessons about leadership and good corporate communications. His spirit is refreshing in our world today where we see so much controversy and unnecessary bickering.   I look forward to your comments on this episode.   About the Guest: Bradley is a partner at Bully Pulpit Interactive, an advisory firm founded by leaders of the Obama-Biden campaign. He focuses on corporate reputation, executive communications, and high visibility crisis management and media relations efforts, as well as equity, diversity, and inclusion matters for clients. Bradley has led media relations and/or public affairs for Fortune 50 companies including Boeing as it returned the grounded 737 MAX to service and United Technologies through a series of mergers that resulted in the creation of Raytheon Technologies and has also served as an advisor to Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and to the Republic of Liberia post-civil war. A nationally recognized expert in his field, Bradley has been quoted by outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, and The Washington Post, and his columns have been featured in Business Insider, Forbes, and Inc. Magazine, where he is a regular contributor. Bradley is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where he currently sits on the Board of Advisers and serves as an adjunct member of the faculty.   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Well, hi, everybody. Thank you for joining us on unstoppable mindset today, we have Bradley Akubuiro with us. Bradley is a partner in bully pulpit International. He'll tell us about that. But he's been involved in a variety of things dealing with corporate communications, and has had a lot of adventures. He deals with diversity, equity and inclusion. But most of all, before we started this, he had one question for me. And that is, how much fun are we going to have on this podcast? Well, that really is up to Bradley. So Bradley has some fun.   Bradley Akubuiro  01:56 Michael, thank you so much for having me is is going to be a ton of fun. I'm really excited. Thanks for having me   Michael Hingson  02:01 on. Well, you're you're absolutely welcome. And we're glad that you're here had a chance to learn about you. And we've had a chance to chat some. So why don't we start as often and Lewis Carroll would say at the beginning, and maybe tell me about you growing up and those kinds of things.   Bradley Akubuiro  02:18 Yeah, I'd be happy to do that. And, you know, I think it would be remiss if I didn't start off talking about my parents a little bit before I talked about myself. My dad grew up in the Biafran war in Nigeria, Civil War, Nigeria. And you know, while he was going through school, they were bombing schools, and it wasn't safe for adults to be out. And so, you know, he was the guy in his family at six years old, who was taking crops from their plantation. They grew up maybe about six hours outside of Lagos, Nigeria, and was moving, you know, some of these crops two miles away, to sell in the marketplace. And you know, at a very early age was learning responsibility, not just for himself, but for the family.   Michael Hingson  03:02 Wow. Which is something that more people should do. So what what all did he do? Or how did all that work out?   Bradley Akubuiro  03:09 Yeah. Well, you know, this was a really interesting time in Nigeria's History, where you had a lot of folks who were in this circumstance, and my dad was a really hard worker, his parents were hard workers before him, his father was a pastor. And so he had a certain level of discipline and support in his household. But, you know, he knew that he had this kind of onus on him. So grew up at a time then where not only do you have this responsibility, but a big family, brothers and sisters to take care of. He was the guy who was chosen later, you know, flash forward a few years, to come to the United States, to be able to find an opportunity here in this country, and to be able to always hopefully, give back to his family.   Michael Hingson  03:59 So he came, and How old was he? When he came here?   Bradley Akubuiro  04:03 When he got to the States, he was about 17. So came to New York City, not a lot going on there. And, you know, he had to put himself through   Michael Hingson  04:15 school. Did he know anyone? Or Was anyone sponsoring him? Or how did all that work? He had a little   Bradley Akubuiro  04:20 bit of family here, but he had to find his own way, get a full time job at a gas station, and work to figure out what this country was all about, but also how to be successful here.   Michael Hingson  04:32 Where did he stay when he got here then   Bradley Akubuiro  04:36 got a little apartment up on the kind of Washington Heights Harlem area of New York, little hole in the wall and, you know, continue to work to pay that off while he was trying to pay off school. So not easy, but at the same time, you know, a really, really great opportunity for him to kind of start fresh and create some opportunity for himself and family.   Michael Hingson  04:58 So did he tell him at least With a little bit of money, how did all that work? It's funny, he   Bradley Akubuiro  05:04 asked that question. He did come with some, but it wasn't a lot. Let's start off there. But you know, what's interesting about that is, you know, he put himself through undergrad, put himself through a master's program, you know, and was doing a PhD program over at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. And at Penn, he blew through his entire life savings and one semester. And so, you know, was on a great path. You studying engineering, and, you know, a semester and he's like, Oh, what am I going to do ended up going across the street to Drexel, where they were able to bring him in and give him a scholarship, as long as he was one a TA, which he really enjoyed doing. And he was able to put himself through the PhD.   Michael Hingson  05:50 Wow. So he started there as a freshman then   Bradley Akubuiro  05:55 started, so he went to several different schools started in New York. Yep, sorry, started in New York at Hunter College, did a master's program at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, and then came up to do his PhD at Penn. And then went to Drexel, and went to Drexel.   Michael Hingson  06:12 He moved around how, how come? What, what took him to Atlanta, for example? Do you know?   Bradley Akubuiro  06:18 Yeah, well, it was the opportunity. You know, one of the things that he had learned and had been instilled in him growing up, which he's passed on to me is, you follow the opportunity where it's and as long as you're not afraid to take that risk and take a chance on yourself and your future that will ultimately more often than not pay off in the end. And so he followed scholarship dollars, he followed the programs that would have an opportunity for him. And he went exactly where it took,   Michael Hingson  06:45 and what were his degrees in.   Bradley Akubuiro  06:47 So his master's degree was in chemistry, his PhD was chemical engineering. Wow. Yeah. What did he What did he do with that? So well, you know, the world was his oyster, I suppose, in some ways, but you know, he ended up you know, going into a couple of different companies started with Calgon, carbon and Pittsburgh, and spent a number of years there and on later on to Lucent Technologies, and fiber optics. And so, you know, he's moved on to a number of different companies, engineering roles, eventually got his MBA and has been, you know, employed a number of different places and continued over his career to work in a number of different geographies as well, whether it's like going to Pittsburgh, New Jersey, Atlanta, Massachusetts. They're now living in Rochester, New York, which I've never lived in. But it's a very charming place. It's, yeah.   Michael Hingson  07:44 It is. It is a nice place. I've been there many times. Yeah. And for customers and so on, it's a fun place to go. Well, he obviously learned in a lot of ways, some might say the hard way, but he learned to value what was going on with him, because it was the only way he was going to be successful. So nothing was handed to him at all, was   Bradley Akubuiro  08:10 it? That's right. He had a very strong family foundation. And he definitely learned a lot from his parents and from his family, and they were very close. So I think that he would say that's what was handed to him, but he certainly didn't give any get any leg up.   Michael Hingson  08:26 Right. Well, that's a good thing to have handed to you, I guess. Well, how did he meet somebody from Gary, Indiana, which is a whole different culture.   Bradley Akubuiro  08:36 Well, this becomes a love story pretty quickly. That's an article.   Michael Hingson  08:42 You can embellish how you want.   Bradley Akubuiro  08:46 Oh, my parents actually met somewhat serendipitously. They were at two different schools. My mom was going to school in Alabama, Alabama a&m. My dad was going to school at the time and Clark, Atlanta and Atlanta. So about four hours apart, Huntsville, Atlanta. My mom's roommate was dating my dad's roommate. And so my mom agreed to come with her roommate to go and visit her boyfriend at the time. She happened to meet this strapping young Nigerian man in Atlanta, and they ended up hitting it off and as fate would have it, the other two their respective movements didn't make the distance but they had a budding romance that ended up lasting now at this point several decades.   Michael Hingson  09:37 Wow. So they're, they're still with us.   Bradley Akubuiro  09:41 They're both still with us   Michael Hingson  09:42 both going strong. That is, that is really cool. So what do you think you learn from them?   Bradley Akubuiro  09:48 I learned a number of things. You know, I learned first of all, and you heard my father's story, resilience. He has learned to take whatever is thrown at been thrown at him. Be able to not only take it in stride, which I think is good, but more importantly, to turn it around and channel it and to use it to his advantage, no matter what that might be. And he's instilled that in me and my two sisters, two sisters, ones, older ones younger. And that's, that's really been important. You know, when it comes to my two parents, the things that they value a ton are education, family. And when you think about the world around you, how are you leaving it in a better place than you found it. And if you can really focus on those handful of things, then you are going to have a very fulfilling and successful life. And that's how he measured success. I've taken that away from them.   Michael Hingson  10:41 He doesn't get better than that. And if you can, if you can say that I want to make a difference. And that I hope I've made at least a little difference. It doesn't get better than that does it?   Bradley Akubuiro  10:53 That's exactly right. So then   Michael Hingson  10:55 you came along. And we won't we won't put any value judgment on that.   Bradley Akubuiro  11:02 Thank you for that we   Michael Hingson  11:03 could have for Yeah, exactly. But actually, before I go to that, have they been back to visit Nigeria at all?   Bradley Akubuiro  11:11 Yeah, absolutely. And unfortunately, the most recent time that my parents took a trip back was the passing of my grandmother, a handful of years ago. And so that brought them back. But, you know, one of the things that I'm hoping to do, and I haven't done it yet, is just spend some real time out there. I've got plenty of family that's still there. So go in and spend a little time in Nigeria that's longer than a quick in and out trip. I spent some time and we've talked about this before Michael, but in West Africa, generally in Liberia. And that was a great experience. But there's not quite like going back to where it all began with your family.   Michael Hingson  11:49 No, it's still not home. Right. Well, so you you came along. And so what was it like growing up in that household and going to high school and all that?   Bradley Akubuiro  12:03 Well, there's a couple ways to answer that. Go ahead. Well, let's put it this way, I we have a very close family bond. And so you know, when you think about the folks who have finished your senses, who laugh at your jokes, because they think it's funny, and if you hadn't told that joke, first, they probably would have told that joke, the kind of family we have. It's a great, great dynamic. And so I was very fortunate to have grown up in that household with parents who truly, truly embraced that that side. You know, it was also a tough household. You know, my parents were very strict, my father, especially coming from this immigrant mindset, and this Nigerian culture, I mentioned the value of education. What I didn't mention quite, but might have been a little bit implied, and I'll say it more explicitly is anything less than an A was entirely unacceptable. There were a number of times where I found myself on the wrong side of that. And, you know, we grew up in different times, as my parents were trying to provide the best life they could for us, and a number of different urban settings. And, you know, one, one period of life for me was particularly studying in high school, where, you know, the school district of Springfield, Massachusetts at a time graduated about 54% of the students that went through that system. And so you're thinking about one in two kids who don't make it out of high school, much less make it the college, much less have a successful and fulfilling career in life. And my father, especially, but of course, both my parents want us to do absolutely everything in their power to ensure that those would not be our statistics that we would be my sisters, and I would be able to have every tool at our disposal to be successful. And they work hard at that, despite the circumstances.   Michael Hingson  14:08 So how were they when I'm sure it happened? It was discovered that maybe you had some gifts, but there were some things that you weren't necessarily as strong as other things. How did that work out for you?   Bradley Akubuiro  14:21 I want to be very clear, the list of things that I wasn't quite as good at, especially in those days, was long enough to stun you. So you know, it we we work through it together, right? I think one of the things that I admire most about my parents now that I maybe didn't appreciate enough growing up was just the amount that they leaned in, and we're willing to be hands on and helping with our education. And so my father would give us times tables when we were in elementary school and make sure that we worked through them. And if we didn't get them quite right, we would do them again, and we do them again, and we do them again. And And I remember a time when I was in the fifth grade where my father had me up until 1am, doing math problems. And, you know, I was thinking to myself, I cannot imagine doing this with my kids, when I was at that age, and then I swore at that time that I never would, I'll tell you what my blood now I swear that I definitely will maybe not till 1am, I think there's probably a more reasonable time. But to be able to invest that level of effort into making sure that your kid has everything they need to be successful. I just have I admire the heck out of it.   Michael Hingson  15:36 I remember a couple of times, I think one when I was oh seven or eight, when we were living in California, and going back to visit relatives in Chicago, or driving somewhere. And my dad said to me, and my brother who was two years older, you guys have to learn the times tables. And we spent time driving, just going through the times tables. And it took me a little while. And a couple of times, I tried a shortcut that messed me up. But eventually I got it all figured out. And he said, when you say the times tables correctly, we'll give you 50 cents. And they did when I got the time two times tables, right? They did. And also, I was learning algebra from him. My dad was an electronics engineer. And so he really worked because I didn't have books in braille early on until I was in the fourth grade, I had to study with them to a large degree. So he taught me a lot more than the schools were teaching little kids as it were. So I learned algebra early, and I learned to do it in my head, and still do. And in high school, it got me in trouble in my freshman year, because my math teacher said, Now whenever you're doing things, you have to show your work. Well, you know, I kept trying to tell her that, for me, showing my work in Braille isn't going to do you any good. I can tell you what I do and how I do it. And she wouldn't accept that and she was going to fail me literally fail me in math. Until one day I wrote out, I think one of the problems and I think just in case she took it and went somewhere where she could find somebody to read Braille. I wrote it out correctly. But I got to see an algebra one because of that one thing. By the way, after that, I never got below an A in math. She was insistent that you had to show your work, and wasn't flexible enough to recognize that there are a lot of ways to show your work. Oh,   Bradley Akubuiro  17:35 yeah. Well, that's part of the challenge, and not to make this an entire commentary on our education system. But there are so many different ways to your point to get to the right answer. And I don't think there's nearly enough flexibility in our system in many cases, except for those who really, truly tried to find it and create that environment for their students. But at a at a you know, broader look, there isn't nearly enough flexibility to appreciate that we're going to have many different ways to get these answers.   Michael Hingson  18:04 I think that really good teachers, and there are a lot of good teachers. But I think the really good teachers make that leap and allow for flexibility in what they do. Because they recognize everyone learns differently. But the big issue is, can you learn and can you demonstrate that you learned?   Bradley Akubuiro  18:24 Yeah, well, that's what we're all striving for.   Michael Hingson  18:27 It is I was pretty blessed going through school, especially in high school, a lot of the times, I would stay after school and extra period to study in the library because again, not everything was available so that we actually had people who would read material to me or give me information that was written on boards that I didn't get any other way. And usually, the teachers would come in, we would set up days and they would come in and give me tests. And what was fun about that was we would go through the tests fairly quickly and spend most of the hour chatting and I got to know a number of my teachers that way and that was so valuable for me. One of them especially Dick herbal Shimer, I still know and you know, he's going to be what 85 I think it is this year, and he will be at five I think August 28. We still keep in touch, he came to our wedding. And he tells me that I'm getting to be closer in age to him and I point out that I'll never be as old as he is. And he tries to convince me that mathematically I'm getting closer and I say 13 years is still 13 years.   Bradley Akubuiro  19:35 Hmm, yeah, don't let them don't let them try to get you. That's   Michael Hingson  19:39 right. It's not gonna work.   Bradley Akubuiro  19:42 was gonna ask you if you had a favorite teacher because I feel like teachers, if you put together this for many years have such an incredible impact on you and how you see yourself.   Michael Hingson  19:52 I remember a lot of things from a number of my teachers and I can tell you the names of most all of my teachers. I remember in my freshman year English, our teacher was a Mr. Wilson has actually Woodrow Wilson was his name was an older gentleman. And one day we were sitting in class and he was just talking about philosophy. And he's talking about people's ethics. And he said, and I remember it that, you know, a good example is, if you need to borrow a quarter from somebody, be sure you pay that quarterback, where does that come in English? But nevertheless, those are the kinds of things that he said, and other teachers said various things, and they stick with you.   Bradley Akubuiro  20:36 Yeah, no, it's so true. I mean, for me, my favorite teacher was Darlene Kaffee. She was my fourth grade teacher, taught all kinds of, I mean, touch everything you learned in fourth grade. But the most important thing for me was, she gave me confidence in my writing ability. You know, I had always enjoyed writing, but I never really thought of myself as someone who could potentially be a writer. And she was the first person who sat me down and said, Hey, look, you submitted this assignment. And it's really good. You could be a writer one day, and you know, she had me write poems, you had me write a number of different things that weren't class assignments. But there were things that she was like, Hey, if you want to do this, then you got to practice it. And I learned so much from her. But the most important thing I took away was that confidence in my ability to do these things.   Michael Hingson  21:27 Yeah, yeah. And that's one of the most important things that good teachers can bring to us and not tear you down, because you don't necessarily do something exactly the way they do or want. But if you can demonstrate you learn that is so cool.   Bradley Akubuiro  21:42 Yeah, it is. Yeah, it is. So,   Michael Hingson  21:47 as I said, I keep in touch with declarable Shimer won his 80th birthday, I flew to Nebraska where they live and surprise him for his birthday, which was nice. That's awesome. Yeah, it was a lot of fun. And hopefully, we'll get back there one of these days soon. Meanwhile, I'll just give him a hard time on the phone.   Bradley Akubuiro  22:08 Cathy's out here listening when I'm not going to surprise you don't listen to Michael. But if I show up, then I'll have a cake or something.   Michael Hingson  22:17 Yeah, exactly. Well, so. So what was high school like for you? I think you said there were some things that happened in high school.   Bradley Akubuiro  22:26 Yeah, high school was a I mean, when you think about formative man, this was a formative experience for me. So it was between my sophomore and junior year of high school, when one of my very best friends a guy who I consider to be like an older brother to me, was shot and killed in the drive by shooting. It was devastating. You know, I had a period over a few months, where not only was he killed, and I found out about it, 45 minutes after I'd left town to take my older sister, with my family to college and 22 hours away. So this wasn't something he did every night. And I likely had been with him had we not been on that trip. But you know, he unfortunately passed that night with a 45 caliber bullet hole in his heart. You know, my experience with school with with life that I mean, it really took a turn at that point. Because not only had I lost somebody who was very close to me, but the police didn't catch the guy who did it. In fact, they caught a guy who was a friend of ours that had absolutely nothing to do with it, and put him through absolute hell, only to find out that he wasn't responsible for this, any of us could have told you that right up front. You know, that was a terrible time. You know, a couple of months later, Michael, we had another one of our close friends who was shot and killed. And the girl who was with her at the time was shot in the leg trying to get away. And you know, and another month and a half after that another one of our good friends was you know, shot in his own driveway trying to get into his car and head to the grocery store. And it wasn't safe for us. And it was a really, really challenging time, just to exist, much less to try to focus on school and to focus on other things that are going on. How could you do that? When you didn't know if when you left in the morning, you were going to be able to make it home at night?   Michael Hingson  24:32 Why was there so much crime? Well, that's   Bradley Akubuiro  24:36 a million dollar question. You know, there's so many factors that go into it. And since then, I've spent a lot of time thinking more about the kind of, you know, macro factors, but it's a very specific on the ground situation at that time was there was a gang war between two rival gangs, street gangs in the city. And my engineer who I just referred to lived right in the heart of Eastern Avenue, which is the home of the app and Springfield became there. And across State Street was Sycamore and a number of different folks and rivalries had kind of established then. And so, you know, this was not that there's ever, you know, really sensical reasons that, you know, these things happen. But this was as nonsensical as it could be, you know, people who are killing each other and dying for reasons that if you were to ask those who survived now, why they would ever pull a trigger and situation like this, they probably couldn't really tell you or maybe even remember.   Michael Hingson  25:38 So it wasn't race or anything like that. It was just the whole gang environment, mostly.   Bradley Akubuiro  25:45 Yeah, that's right. And at the time, you know, you think about the economic factors that go into this. And I talked about this in the context of Chicago all the time, because that's where I live now. And the situation is just as salient here. But if you were to be on the west side of Chicago, Northwestern most neighborhood within the city limits of Austin, you would be in one of the poorest and one of the most dangerous zip codes in the industrialized world. If you were to go two miles over to Oak Park, one of the suburbs just outside of the city. It's one of the wealthiest in the region, and it is an amazing neighborhood, and the infrastructure across the board when it comes to the education system, and the amount of money per pupil. If you were to look at the crime statistics, if you were to look at the policing, if you were to look at any measure of quality of life, it is night and day different, but it's separated by a couple of streets. And that to me is unfathomable.   Michael Hingson  26:52 It is crazy. Chris, you also have some really serious gangs back in Chicago. You know, the notorious was the cubs in the Sox, for example.   Bradley Akubuiro  27:03 That's right. And you know what the competition? beaters? You don't get in the middle of those two sets of fans?   Michael Hingson  27:09 Ah, no way. and never the twain shall meet, period. That's right. That's very many people who will say they're fans of both.   Bradley Akubuiro  27:20 I don't think that's legal, actually. Ah,   Michael Hingson  27:23 that would explain it. I'll tell you sports fans are really tough. I remember when I lived in Winthrop, mass right outside of Boston. And every year, I would on opening day, I'd be somewhere in Boston. And if the Red Sox lost immediately, basically everybody on the news and everyone else just said wait till next year. Yeah, they were done. It was no faith at all. It was amazing. And and I remember living back there when Steve Grogan was booed off out of the Patriots game one year and just I'll tell you, they're, they're amazing.   Bradley Akubuiro  28:04 Well look at the dynasties they've gotten now. Unbelievable. Although, you know, I live with a die hard. Tom Brady fan. My fiance has been a Patriots fan since the beginning. And it's been a complete complete nightmare trying to figure out are we watching the Patriots? Are we are we watching the Buccaneers? And are we Tom Brady fans are Patriots fans? You know, it's a little bit of everything in that house. But I can't ever say that I'm not happy. I am a fully dedicated supporter of all things. Somebody in SNAP, otherwise, I'm in a   Michael Hingson  28:39 lot of trouble. It is safer that way. Well, I have gained a lot of respect for Tom Brady, especially after he left the Patriots. And not because I disliked the Patriots, but because of all the scandals and the deflated footballs and all that sort of stuff. But he came back and he proved Hey, you know, it's not what you think at all. I really am good. And he continues to be good.   Bradley Akubuiro  29:03 Yeah, it's 100%. Right. Well, and that to make this, you know, given a broader topic about Tom Brady, he gets plenty of press. But you know, the fact that he was able to say, All right, you have decided that I'm done in this sport. You've decided I'm too old to play this sport, but I have not run to the end of my capability. And in fact, I've got a lot more to offer this game. And he went and he took it with someone who would respect that and the Buccaneers and he won another championship. I mean, you can't you can't make this up.   Michael Hingson  29:38 No, absolutely. You can't. And so we'll see what the Rams do this year. I liked the Rams. I grew up with the Rams, Chris, I'm really prejudiced when it comes to sports and probably a number of things because we've been blessed out here in California with great sports announcers. I mean, of course, Vin Scully, the best of all time in baseball, and I will argue that with anyone But then Dick Enberg did a lot of football and he did the rams and he did the angels. And of course we had Chick Hearn who did the Lakers, their descriptions and the way they did it, especially Vinnie just drew you in. And I've listened and listened to announcers all over the country and never got the kinds of pictures and announced me announcing and announcements that I got by listening to people in California, so I'm a little prejudiced that way.   Bradley Akubuiro  30:31 Well, and you shouldn't be you absolutely should be. And I will say this, the power of storytelling that these folks that you just described are able to wield is phenomenal. And it's a skill that I actually wish more folks had and more different industries. Because if you can tell a strong compelling story, you can make it visual, you can bring people and like that the power it has to bring people together, and to motivate them to act is just unbelievable.   Michael Hingson  31:01 Johnny most was a was a good announcer a pretty great announcer in basketball, but not really so much into the storytelling, but he had a personality that drew you in as well. Well, that counts for a lot. It does. I remember living back there when the Celts were playing the rockets for the championship. And the Celtics lost the first two games. And Johnny most was having a field day picking on the rockets and so on. But Moses Malone, Malone was criticizing the Celtics and said, You know, I can go get for high school people. And we could beat these guys. Wrong thing to say, because then the Celts came back and won the next for Johnny most really had a field day with that. That's what happens. Yeah, you don't open your mouth. Alright, so you went to Northwestern, that's a whole different environment.   Bradley Akubuiro  31:59 Totally different environment. And, you know, I gotta tell you, I owe a ton to Northwestern. The exposure, it gave me two more global mindsets, people come to that university from all over the world, all kinds of different socioeconomic backgrounds, and looking to do so many different things, the academic rigor of the institution, and the resources that were at our disposal, were so incredible that it completely changed my experience. And frankly, the outlook I had for my own self and career. How so? Well, I'll put his way I went to school, for example, at the same time, as you know, students who had some similar backgrounds to the one I did, to being in school at the same time, as you know, Howard Buffett is the grandson of Warren Buffett, and you know, Bill polti, you know, whose grandson of, you know, the polti, you know, the namesake of Pulte Homes, and you know, literally billionaire families. And so you start to realize, if you can sit in a classroom with folks like this, and with all of the opportunities that they've had, the education, they've had private schools, things along those lines, and these are good friends, by the way, you know, when you can do that, and then realize, hey, you know what, I can keep up, I can do this. And then you know, you are receiving, you know, grades professors who support you opportunities, in terms of internships, all of these things, and realms that you never even considered possible even just a year or two earlier. It truly broadens your horizons in ways that I don't even think I could have appreciated before I was into it.   Michael Hingson  33:44 Wow. And that makes a lot of sense, though. We're all we're all people. And we all have our own gifts. And the fact that you could compete is probably not necessarily the best word because it implies that there are things that we don't need to have, but you are all able to work together and that you can all succeed. That's as good as it gets.   Bradley Akubuiro  34:05 That's exactly right. And I do find compared to a lot of places, Northwestern have a very collaborative culture. I found that, you know, from faculty, the staff to students, everybody was very interested in seeing everybody succeed. And you know, we believed truthfully, that all of us could there's enough room on the boat for all of us.   Michael Hingson  34:29 What was your major journalism? No surprise being Northwestern?   Bradley Akubuiro  34:36 Yeah, I was I was a big, big, big proponent of the journalism school and actually still remain affiliated. I'm on the faculty over there and sit on the board of the journalism school and have loved every second of my time, wearing the purple t shirt.   Michael Hingson  34:52 There you go. Is my recollection. Correct? Wasn't Charlton Heston, a graduate of Northwestern?   Bradley Akubuiro  34:57 You know, I don't know the answer to that but I will wouldn't be surprised if it really seems,   Michael Hingson  35:02 it seems to me, I heard that he was doing something where he was he was doing something for Northwestern, as I recall. But that just strikes my memory.   Bradley Akubuiro  35:12 Yeah, there's some very remarkable graduates from that organization.   Michael Hingson  35:16 So you were involved, as I recall, in our conversations about and about such things in dealing with minority enrollment, and so on, and you met some pretty interesting people during your time there. Tell me about that, if you would?   Bradley Akubuiro  35:32 Yeah, no, absolutely. So my freshman year, we will actually, this was my sophomore year, we actually only brought in 81 black freshmen. And that was the lowest number in terms of black enrollment in a given year at Northwestern since the 1960s. And so, you know, the university was looking around and trying to figure out what what is it that we're doing? And where are we missing the mark? And how do we not only attract black applicants, because we were able to get folks to apply? The challenge was to actually get them to choose to matriculate. And where are we losing folks in the process. And so, you know, I had been really, really interested in participating in some of the work around minority recruitment enrollment, from the time that Northwestern had recruited me, because I recognized my background wasn't necessarily what you would consider to be orthodox for the folks that got into schools like this. But they took a real hard look at me and said, We think this guy can be successful here. And I wanted to encourage others who might not necessarily think of Northwestern as an option that was attainable to them, and I don't even know about it, to really start to understand the opportunities that could be available to them. And so I was, you know, flying to different schools, not only in the Chicago area, but back in places that looked a lot like where I grew up, and telling, you know, folks, Northwestern wants you, and you should really give it a shot. And so that was a fascinating time for me, and my own development, that space.   Michael Hingson  37:11 So what did you do for the school and dealing with the whole issue of minorities in that time?   Bradley Akubuiro  37:19 Yeah, there were a handful of things. You know, there's there's one was how do you create programs that channel some of the frustration that a lot of students who look like me had, and so a number of folks, actually, this is the spirit of college students, gotten together, you know, put up signs and decided to kind of protest. And so instead of going through, and just kind of registering our anger, what I did was work with the admissions office. And I did actually formally work as a work study student and worked on some of the stuff, it wasn't just volunteer, but take this energy that the students had, and create programs like a pen pal program, like a fly in programs, some volunteer initiatives that we can have, that would allow students who are upset about the outcomes, to help change those outcomes by direct engagement with those who might come to Northwestern, and really improve our metrics for the following year. And we were able to do that, both in the African American and Latino communities. What did   Michael Hingson  38:23 you discover? Or what did the university discover about why people might apply, but then didn't matriculate. And then how did you turn that around?   Bradley Akubuiro  38:32 Yeah, there were a couple of things. So one was, for students who are getting into places like Northwestern, very commonly, we saw that they were getting into places like University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Harvard, a number of other universities at the same time, particularly if you were to think about the minority students who are applying and getting in, and what those schools had, that Northwestern didn't quite have, was full need blind admissions processes, which Northwestern did adopt. But the short version of this is, if you got into one of those schools, you are probably going to be able to get if this if your circumstances required a full ride. And so, you know, the economic opportunity was really significant. And you were at a disadvantage. If you were a student who was interested in going to Northwestern, or any of these other schools that was really good, but couldn't you couldn't afford to go and you're gonna go to the place that you could afford to go and maybe that's your local school, or maybe that's one of these other schools, but we had to really do something to create the funding to ensure that these folks could go to the school and do it at a at a rate that wasn't going to break the bag.   Michael Hingson  39:49 And you found ways to do that. Well, I   Bradley Akubuiro  39:52 certainly didn't do it alone, but the university   39:55 there see University found ways to do that. Yes, that's right.   40:00 We started up a commission. So a number of students, myself included, foreign petition at the time, Marty Shapiro, who was the President of University took this issue very seriously as a economic scholar, and genuinely his background is in the economics of higher education. And he started at the school as president, while I was in again, my sophomore year, as a lot of these things were kind of taking shape and taking hold. And as one of the most successful leaders that I've met, invited us in students, the leaders in the university who are focused on this, and we had asked for a taskforce to focus on this. And he set one up, and he chaired it. And it was focused on how do we create opportunities for access, particularly for this community that had need, but wanted to be here. And, you know, one of the things that he did pretty early on in his tenure, was to establish a fund that was going to be dedicated to programs to financial need to a number of different things that would directly address this community. And we built on it from there.   41:14 Wow, that's, it's great that you had a strong champion who was willing to be farsighted enough to help with that, isn't it?   Bradley Akubuiro  41:22 Absolutely. It would not have been possible without that.   Michael Hingson  41:25 So you met as I recall you saying Jesse Jackson, somewhere along the way? in that arena, especially since you're in the Chicago area? That makes a lot of sense.   Bradley Akubuiro  41:35 Yeah, you know what I'm starting to put together thanks to you hear that this was a pretty big year for me.   Michael Hingson  41:41 To see, I'm getting impressed. So I did about yourself.   Bradley Akubuiro  41:50 You know, it's funny. But yeah, there was a convergence of things. And so in this particular year, I did meet Reverend Jesse Jackson. And this started a relationship that's been incredible and life changing that remains to this day. But the way that it happened, Michael, is that there was a woman Roxana Saberi, who had been taken political prisoner by Iran, and she worked for the BBC. She had been a former Northwestern middle student. So a number of us who are part of the journalism program, Adele had decided that we were going to get together and as college students are wanting to do, we decided to protest and hopes that we would, on our campus in Evanston, get the State Department to pay more attention to this particular issue. And hopefully, it takes negotiating for her really seriously. And while I have no idea whether, at the time Secretary Clinton saw anything we were doing, my guess, is probably not Reverend Jackson, who to your point was just on the other side of Chicago did. And the connection there is Roxanne's buried, did her first interview with the BBC as a professional reporter with Reverend Jesse Jackson. And he was committed to advocating for her release. And so he actually reached out to us, via the university asked a few of us to come down and join a press conference with him, where he intended to go and negotiate for her release on humanitarian grounds. And I participated in that with another student. And it was absolutely phenomenal and led to so many doors being opened for me.   Michael Hingson  43:35 Wow, what your were you in school at the time?   Bradley Akubuiro  43:38 So this was my sophomore year. Great, great. Again, still part of the great sophomore year. Yeah, and I continue to work with Reverend Jackson, throughout the remainder of my time in college and for some period after college. But there were a number of things, but it all tied back together, because the issue that Reverend Jackson was advocating for at the time that spoke most deeply to me, was this issue of college affordability and access, and you have this program called reduce the rate, which was all about reducing the interest rate on student education loans, because we had bailed out banks. And you know, the autos and so many others, rates of zero to 1% and said, Hey, you're in trouble pass back when you're ready. We'll make it cheap and affordable for you to do that. But we never granted that level of grace to students who are supposed to be our future. And instead, we were breaking their backs was, you know, interest rates of six to in some cases, as high as 18%. Without any, you know, kind of recourse you get stuck with these things for life.   Michael Hingson  44:47 And people wonder why we keep talking about eliminating the loans today or lowering the interest rate and the reality is, as you said, students are our future and we should be doing all we can to say point that that's absolutely   Bradley Akubuiro  45:01 right. I still firmly believe that and, you know, our loan system, and frankly, the cost of education is just crippling. It's, it's, it's crazy. And this is for multiple generations. And I'm sad for what the future will look like if we can't figure this situation out.   Michael Hingson  45:23 Yeah, we've got to do something different than we're doing. And it's just kind of crazy the way it is. It's extremely unfortunate. Well, so you got a bachelor's? Did you go get any advanced degree or?   Bradley Akubuiro  45:36 Well, I did actually attend Northwestern. For a good portion, I masters that integrated the integrated marketing communications program over there. And that dovetails really well into where my career ultimately went and where it currently resides. But you know, Northwestern was the educator of choice for me.   Michael Hingson  45:57 So, career wise, so what did you then go off and do? Since you opened the door? Yeah.   Bradley Akubuiro  46:03 So you know, it's been a number of different things. And this will sound disparate, but it all comes together. I went, after working with Reverend Jackson to Liberia, and I spent time in Liberia working for the president of Liberia on postwar kind of reestablishment of a democracy, which was a big thing. And frankly, way above my paygrade, I got an opportunity to work on it, because I had spent time working with Reverend Jesse Jackson, and that will come back in a second. But there was a student who was doing his PhD program at Northwestern, who had been who is I should say, the grandson of a former president of Liberia, who had been killed in a coup in October. And I had been friends with him, I knew that I wanted to get to West Africa to do some work, particularly around education and social programs. And he connected me with his mother who had been deputy minister of education. And I had been fortunate enough to create an arrangement that I was really excited about to go to Monrovia, and Liberia, the capital city, and to spend some time working on programs out there. And when she found out that I worked with Reverend Jesse Jackson, she called the president and said, This could be a great opportunity. And they cooked up a program where I would actually champion and work on establishing a program and policy around leadership development, and capacity building for the country post Civil War, which was, again, an absolutely amazing and life changing experience, really hard.   Michael Hingson  47:45 What was the world like over there? And what was it like for you being from a completely different culture as it were than over in Liberia?   Bradley Akubuiro  47:53 Well, the first thing I'll say is, if you live in the United States, and you believe, you know, poverty, you ain't seen nothing yet. Because, you know, one of the things that you will find in countries like Liberia, and some of the places and post war, Eastern Europe and the 90s, and different kinds of places is, there is a level of resilience and a level of spirit that is built into society that comes almost entirely from experience with incredible hardship, just absolutely incredible hardship. And Liberia at the time that I was over there was amongst the, you know, five poorest countries in the world, after what had been 14 years of concrete civil war and 30 years of civil unrest. But the people that I met could not have been better spirited, and just nicer, more optimistic and incredible people.   Michael Hingson  48:52 So how long were you over there?   48:54 I was over there for less than a year and spent some time doing consulting, even after I came back to DC, but was on the ground for less than a year.   49:03 And when you came back from Liberia, what did you go off and do?   49:07 When I came back from Liberia and I want to, you know, couch this and my rationale, I had worked for Reverend Jesse Jackson on these big kind of global programs that that presidents and heads of state and you know, business leaders and all these different folks went over to Liberia and got this chance to work on, you know, kind of reinstituting a democracy and meaningful ways with the president who later on became a Nobel Prize, Peace Prize Laureate. And you know, what I came to realize, Michael, was that my opportunities were quickly outpacing my experience. And so what I said is, let's now try to find a place where I can get some of the fundamentals some of the framework for a lot of the work that I had the opportunity to do. And the place that I chose to go is Booz Allen Hamilton is a management consulting firm and you One of the largest public sector practices in the world. And so I went in with the intention of really being able to shore up my skills. And what happened? Well, hopefully they'll tell you that I was successful.   Michael Hingson  50:11 Okay, good.   Bradley Akubuiro  50:16 It was a really fascinating time to be there. You know, Booz Allen, had a lot of significant contracts. This was the time of the Affordable Care Act's passage. And so, you know, at the time that I went over, I got to work almost exclusively on ACA, and a lot is talked about in terms of the legislative kind of process to get that accomplished. But what is talked a lot less about is the actual opera operationalization of it, and what that looks like to stand up state health exchanges, and different states to actually entice somebody coming from, you know, a psychiatry program at top medical school, that choose to put on a uniform and go to a base at, you know, an Air Force base or an army base, and provide clinical care for those who are returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan. And all of these were provisions of the bill. But actually implementing those things, was a very tall order. And so I got an opportunity to really kind of roll up my sleeves and work on a lot of that work. And that was incredibly formative work.   Michael Hingson  51:22 So it was a real challenge, of course, to get the Affordable Care Act passed. I remember in 2009, I was speaking at a an event for a companies whose hospital boards and leaders of the staffs of the hospitals in the network, were getting together and I went to, to speak, and talk about some of my experiences and talk about disabilities and so on. The person right before me, was a medical expert. He was, it was a person who talked about the whole concept of how we needed to change our whole idea and environment of medical care, and what we really needed to do as a country and so on. And he had been involved in every president's investigation of how to change the medical synth system. Ever since I think he went this was 2009, I think he went back to Nixon, Oh, wow. He, he said it all came down to the same thing. And he said The best example is, he was doing this as part of the team for Bill Clinton. And they talked about what needed to be done, how to change the medical system, and everybody bought into it, and so on, until it got down to specifics of saying what it was going to cost. And that they needed to deal with some of the provisions that eventually went into the Affordable Care Act. And he said, As soon as the politicians got a hold of it, and said, This is a horrible thing, you're gonna cause too much controversy, the President's would all run. And that's why no one ever got anything accomplished. And he also said that Obama was probably going to get something passed. And he actually predicted almost to a tee, if you will, what was going to pass. And that's exactly what passed and what didn't pass. And he said, later, we'll actually start to worry about the cost of, of medical coverage in this country, but they're not really willing to face that issue yet. And he predicted we would be able to do something by 2015. Well, that hasn't really happened yet, either. And now we're maybe making a little bit of a dent. But it was very fascinating to listen to him predict, based on so many years of expertise, what was going to happen.   Bradley Akubuiro  53:46 Yeah, I mean, that's incredible. And I will say, a lot of times the policy takes a backseat to the politics on these things. And it takes so much, you know, Will and kind of moral fortitude to get in there and drive these things, particularly when there's interests on the other side of it. But you know, I'm with you. We're not quite where I think you predicted we'd be in 2015. But driving towards it now. And hopefully we'll make more progress.   Michael Hingson  54:16 Yeah, we're slowly getting there. So what did you do after Booz Allen Hamilton?   Bradley Akubuiro  54:21 Yeah, so the things that I really love the most about that work during that time that the the change in a lot of that kind of management strategy was the change communications aspects of it. And so I knew that I wanted to get more fully into communications. And so the next few jobs for me, were discretely corporate communications, if you will. And so I got an opportunity to follow a mentor to a company called Pratt and Whitney jet engine company, you know, builds jet engines from from fighter jets to, you know, the big commercial airplanes that we fly in, and love that experience. It's moved to kind of the corporate side of that company to United Technologies in time and worked on a number of different mergers and acquisitions, including the spin offs of Otis, the big Elevator Company to carry air conditioning both of these which spun off into fortune 200 publicly traded companies their own, to ultimately what became you know, the merger with Raytheon. Raytheon? Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It most recently produced Raytheon technologies. And so a really, really fascinating set of experiences for me there. And then   Michael Hingson  55:35 you along the way, also, I guess, we're part of the formation of bully pulpit international with the Obama Biden administration.   Bradley Akubuiro  55:44 You know, I wasn't part of the founding, this all kind of happened in parallel with folks who I have a ton of respect for who I now work with bully pulpit, interact was formed in 2009, with a number of folks who came out of that Obama campaign, and then White House. And it started in the kind of digital marketing, digital persuasion space, and all of the kind of, you know, really amazing tactics and strategies that they learned on that campaign, particularly, as social media was starting to become more popularized and more mass adopted, they said, how do we start to apply some of that stuff, as you think about not only other campaigns, but to foundations and advocacy groups into corporations? And you know, you flash forward 1213 years now, and this is a fully operational 250 person agency, where we're focused on, you know, how do you help organizations of all types, you know, really express their values and find their voices on these really key important issues. But also, how do leaders make really tough decisions on things like, you know, Roe v. Wade, and what that means for their employee base, and what they're going to do policy wise, and how they're going to communicate around that afterwards? On through gun reform, and what folks do if you know, you are operating, and buffalo or in Texas, when you know, some of the massacres that happened earlier this year happen. And this has been, you know, really fascinating. And I came over here after being chief spokesperson for Boeing. And it's been really fun to reunite with some old friends and folks who have been doing this kind of work for a really long time now.   Michael Hingson  57:37 So Boeing, so when did you leave Boeing   Bradley Akubuiro  57:41 left Boeing, a year, just shy of a year and a half go   Michael Hingson  57:45 around during the whole 737 Max thing?   Bradley Akubuiro  57:49 Well, you know, interestingly, you bring this up, I was brought over to Boeing, in response to the 737. Max, you know, I was asked to come over and to really think about what does a world class Media Relations organization look like? That is going to be transparent, accountable, and 24/7? Around the globe? And more than anything, after you've had, you know, two accidents on the scale that they had, you know, how do we really become more human and how we interact with all of our stakeholders, internal and external on a lot of this stuff? And that was a really, really, really challenging, but rewarding process to be part of and to help lead?   Michael Hingson  58:33 How do you advise people? Or what do you advise people in those kinds of situations, you had a major crisis? And clearly, there's an issue? What do you what do you tell corporate executives to do? And how hard was it to get them to do it?   Bradley Akubuiro  58:49 Yeah. So on the first part of that question, it really comes down to being human, you got to put yourself in the shoes of the people that you're trying to communicate with, and to, if you are a person who lost a loved one, on a plane that went down outside of, you know, Addis Ababa, and Ethiopia, if you if you were, you know, one of the people who lost your, your spouse or your kid, you know, the last thing you want to hear from a company is, you know, we did things right, from an engineering standpoint, what you want to hear from that company, is, we are so sorry that this happened. And we're going to do absolutely everything in our power to ensure it can never happen again. And here are the steps we're taking and here's what we're going to do to try to make things right and you can never completely make things right. In that circumstance. You can at least be understanding.   Michael Hingson  59:48 I remember 1982 When we had the Tylenol cyanide incident, you know about that. Yeah. And if For us, and what was the most impressive thing about that was within two days, the president of company was out in front of it. And as you said, being human, that's a corporate lesson that more people really should learn.   Bradley Akubuiro  1:00:18 Yeah, it's a difficult thing to do. Because I think, and this isn't just lawyers, but it's easy to blame it on lawyers, the natural reaction is to immediately think, well, what's my liability going to be? What are people going to think if they think that I actually did make this mistake? And how do I cover it up? And how do I try to diffuse responsibility? And that is exactly the opposite of what you should do. And this isn't just good communications. This is good leadership.   Michael Hingson  1:00:44 Good leadership. Yeah,   Bradley Akubuiro  1:00:45 that's right. And we need more people to really understand that to your point.   Michael Hingson  1:00:50 Well, and with with Boeing, it sounds like if I recall, all of the stuff that least that we saw on the news, which may or may not have been totally accurate, there were some issues. And it took a while to deal with some of that to get people to, to face what occurred that necessarily things weren't going exactly the way they really should have in terms of what people were communicating and what people knew and didn't know.   Bradley Akubuiro  1:01:15 Yeah, well, then you ask the question, how difficult was it to get the senior executives to get on board with the new approach. And what I would say is, and this goes back to some of we were talking about earlier, the top down kind of approach to this, and what's happening and the most senior role matters the most. And the CEO who came in this was after the former CEO was was like, you know, the chief legal officer, the head of that business, and a number of different executives, you keep going on, had exited the company, the new CEO, who came in they've Calhoun, currently is still the CEO, they're brought in this new wave, this refreshing new approach and culture, and was all about how do we ensure that we are being accountable, and that we're being transparent, because that is what matters in this circumstance. And so with that license to operate, it was a lot easier to come in and convince folks Well, this is how we should approach this from a media perspective, from a communications staff perspective, and across the board, with our customers with regulators, cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Because everybody was on board that this is what we needed to do. And frankly, it's the only way to not only repair our reputation, because this is 100 year old company has been at the first of so many different things historically, from an aviation standpoint, and helped truly invent modern flight. So how do you create a reputation that people expect coming out of that, but also to respect again, those who trusted the company, because when you step on a fly, you know, you know, as Michael, when you stop on a flight, you don't want to think about whether it's gonna make it to the other side or not. You want to trust that it's gonna make it to the other side and focus on what you got to do when you get there and everything else in your life. And people had for a brief period of time lost that faith. And that is what we were really trying to restore.   Michael Hingson  1:03:15 Do you think you were pretty successful at getting faith and confidence restored,   Bradley Akubuiro  1:03:20 I think we've made a good start at bone still remains a client. And I would say that the work that is ongoing is going to take time, because it takes five seconds to lose your reputation. It takes a long time to rebuild it and to regain trust. And I think the company is committed to what it needs to do to do that. But it is a journey.   Michael Hingson  1:03:44 What do you advise people today you do a lot of consulting, and you're in

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S.O.S. (Stories of Service) - Ordinary people who do extraordinary work
Professional communicator turned diplomat | Suzanna Brugler - S.O.S. Podcast #59

S.O.S. (Stories of Service) - Ordinary people who do extraordinary work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 53:37


Ever wonder what it's like to work directly with the U.S. State Department and have the tenacity to fight for what you do best? Hear from Capt. Suzanna Brugler, a U.S. Navy Captain who after five tries got the promotion she desired. Her story is one of determination and one that shows it's never too late to quit on what you really want in life.Capt. Suzanna Brugler, a native of Defiance, Oh., graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1998. Brugler holds a master's degree in Defense and Strategic Studies with a focus on International Relations in African Studies from the U.S. Naval War College. She's a graduate of the Defense Information School (DINFOS), Defense Institute of Security Cooperation Studies (DISCS), Joint Special Operations University (JSOU), and Defense Security Cooperation University (DSCU).Capt. Brugler started her career as a Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) serving aboard USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) in Yokosuka, Japan. After qualifying SWO she lateral transferred to Public Affairs (PA), and in January 2002 deployed to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to facilitate media coverage of the first detainee flights from Afghanistan. A year later, Capt. Brugler was hand-selected to deploy to Bahrain as part of the Coalition Press Information Center (CPIC Bahrain) and served aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) to assist the first-ever DoD-wide media program for military air strike campaign “Shock and Awe,” marking the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She later served as the Media department head aboard USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76).Brugler taught the Public Affairs Qualification Course at DINFOS in Fort Meade, Md. before serving her last tour on active duty as director of the Navy Office of Information, East in New York City. While there, she served as chief of public affairs for the commissioning of USS New York (LPD 21), a ship built with 7.5 tons of steel recovered from the World Trade Center after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.In 2011, Brugler transferred to the Navy Reserves (NR) and served as the Africa Partnership Station PAO for U.S. SIXTH Fleet. Subsequent tours include serving as the congressional liaison coordinator at NATO Headquarters, Supreme Allied Commander Transformation in Norfolk, Va., executive officer of the NR Chief of Navy Information Headquarters unit at the Pentagon, and director of NR Naval Special Warfare PA with NSW Group 11 in Coronado, Calif. In May 2017, Capt. Brugler again lateral-transferred to the NR component of the Foreign Area Officer (FAO) community and served as the NR FAO Africa regional lead assigned to U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany. In 2021 she mobilized for one year as the liaison officer for Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. FIFTH Fleet. She was called to serve as the Interagency Coordinator for Task Force 58, the contingency task force that was stood up to facilitate 7,079 Afghan refugees from Kabul to the U.S. during the noncombatant emergency operation ALLIES REFUGE. She finished her NAVCENT mobilization this past May serving as an inaugural member of the Commander's Initiatives Group (CIG), advising the CommandeVisit my website: https://thehello.llc/THERESACARPENTERRead my writings on my blog: ...

Living the Dream
Helping the Next Elon Musk become an Amazing Communicator with Brenden Kumarasamy (Explicit)

Living the Dream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 49:20


Check it out on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/33Z4VsE Check it out on Apple: https://apple.co/3AHc2DT Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world. Dreams: Empower every genius to be an exceptional communicator. Become the Modern Day Dale Carnegie - Create something that Dale Carnegie couldn't because of the era he lived in How you can Help: Peter Thiel - author of book zero to one because he has great contrarian questions Favorite Book, Movie, or Podcast: Favorite Book is Thirst be Scott Harrison Contact them at: https://www.rockstarcommunicator.com/?r_done=1 https://www.youtube.com/c/MasterTalks

Living the Dream
Helping the Next Elon Musk become an Amazing Communicator with Brenden Kumarasamy (Explicit)

Living the Dream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 49:20


Check it out on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/33Z4VsE Check it out on Apple: https://apple.co/3AHc2DT Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world. Dreams: Empower every genius to be an exceptional communicator. Become the Modern Day Dale Carnegie - Create something that Dale Carnegie couldn't because of the era he lived in How you can Help: Peter Thiel - author of book zero to one because he has great contrarian questions Favorite Book, Movie, or Podcast: Favorite Book is Thirst be Scott Harrison Contact them at: https://www.rockstarcommunicator.com/?r_done=1 https://www.youtube.com/c/MasterTalks

Enlightened Masculinity
WHAT it TAKES to GO OUT with AZD?

Enlightened Masculinity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 46:46


What it takes to go out with AZD? Staying ethical. Managing your energy. Looking and smelling good. Always ready to communicate and being in that talkative state. Staying sharp. These are just a few of the factors on what it takes to go out AZD.  In this episode, I explain how to calibrate your lifestyle to match his and be flexible to change your plans, without disrupting your production. How to handle your life. Managing your state of mind i.e. state management and for the whole time you're out in the world. Make IMC Nation more important to yourself, so that you can really receive the potency of Arash's behavior. Live in a Base with other IMC monks and be accountable.   Follow our show for content and announcements!  https://geni.us/LfLAcqE

The Data Scientist Show
From Amazon research scientist to head of data product at Vestiaire Collective, why data science projects fail, how to be a good communicator - Alisa Kim - the data scientist show #054

The Data Scientist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 132:17


Alisa Kim is the head of data product at Vestiaire Collective. Previously, she was a research scientist at Amazon Web Services. We used to work on the same team in Machine Learning Solutions Lab and Amazon Web Services. We have collaborated on projects before and previously she was a consultant and worked on analytics and investment banking. She has a Ph.D. in Econ AI and she has worked on various industries and multiple continents. She's someone I really enjoyed working with. We talked about her journey, the projects she worked on and the lessons she learnt. If you like the show subscribe to the channel and give us a 5 star review. Subscribe to Daliana's newsletter on www.dalianaliu.com/ for more on data science. Alisa's LinkedIn: https://de.linkedin.com/in/alisakolesnikova Daliana's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dalianaliu/ Daliana's twitter: https://twitter.com/DalianaLiu

Clearing The Way
Ep17 | Becoming a Better Communicator with Jeremy Widenhofer

Clearing The Way

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 94:50


Welcome back to Clearing the Way. A resource for small business. I talk with sales and HR experts, other small business owners, and anyone else that can provide you with information to clear your way to success.  Today's Topic: Communication My guest today is Jeremy Widenhofer, owner of Chitwood Communcations. Jeremy graduated from Indiana University Bloomington with a Bachelors in Public and Environmental Affairs. He then attended the University of Pittsburgh to receive his Masters in Public and International Affairs. Jeremy spent a few years in the corporate world as an Account Manager before transitioning to over to the government. He spent the next 12 years within the government and Department of State where he was responsible for creating the Presidential Daily Brief, building national security solutions, and collaborating with the FBI and the military on high stakes situations. In 2020, Jeremy started Chitwood Communications. Chitwood Communications gives you the resources, knowledge, and confidence to elevate your interpersonal and sales skills that will grow your business. Jeremy Widenhofer Website: https://chitwoodcommunications.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremy-widenhofer-332283173/

Mastering Social Media for Schools
Wisdom from a Well-Connected School Communicator with Thomas Scheidel, APR

Mastering Social Media for Schools

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 39:28


With a background in broadcasting, Tom has used his “outside” view of education to help him communicate for the Allegan Area ESA in Michigan for the past 11 years.In his role, Tom helps serve 8 local school districts and 2 academies with support for social media and communication.Using social media for a financing campaign? Listen in to some of Tom's best tips.Networking is key to your survival in this role. Tom shares how getting connected through social media, state chapters, and national organizations has helped his career.SPECIAL GUESTThomas ScheidelPublic Information CoordinatorAllegan Area ESA, MichiganEmail: tom.scheidel@alleganaesa.org Twitter: @TomsTravels    Website: www.alleganaesa.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlleganAreaESA Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlleganAreaESA USEFUL INFORMATIONSocial media examples from the campaign:Get out to voteElection day postInterested in our membership program? Learn more here: https://socialschool4edu.com/ MORE RESOURCESFree Video Training: Learn the simple secrets behind social media for K12 schools!Sign up for our free e-newsletter - click herewww.SocialSchool4EDU.com

Let's Keep It Real
MasterTalk: Become an Effective Communicator

Let's Keep It Real

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 49:25


About Brenden: Brenden Kumarasamy is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world. To learn more about Brenden, check out the following links: Brenden's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/MasterTalks Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mastertalkyt Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/masteryourtalk/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy/

Public Safety Innovators
Becoming a Rockstar Communicator

Public Safety Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 32:11


When Brenden didn't go out for sports in college, his "nerd club" was presented with the nail-biting choice between hoisting a rock onto a pedestal to be their leader... or choosing him. Brenden went on to become a great leader, great communicator, and started his own YouTube channel to help others. THEN, he founded MasterTalk and began getting handsomely paid to help executives and entrepreneurs overcome fears and faults concerning communication. Today, Brenden joins us and helps break down public speaking and uncomfortable communications by using mangos, toilet paper, and learning to juggle.

The Hustle Less Profit More Podcast
17. How to Become a Top 1% Communicator in Your Industry feat. Brenden Kumarasamy

The Hustle Less Profit More Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 48:16


What would your life be like if you were a world class communicator? Imagine your business and how much it could grow if you were a powerful public speaker! Brenden Kumarasamy is the founder of MasterTalk; he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world. Brenden offers a free 90-minute training on effective communication over Zoom every few weeks. It's LIVE and interactive; it is not a webinar. Here are some topics we cover: 1. How to Present Succinctly 2. How to Run Effective Meetings 3. How to Master Presentation Confidence 4. How to Present Yourself Effectively in Any Setting Click here to register: https://www.rockstarcommunicator.com/ Find Brenden Kumarasamy Online: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/MasterTalks Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mastertalkyt Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/masteryourtalk/

On the Edge with April Mahoney
Vanessa Alfaro The Empowered Communicator joins me On the Edge

On the Edge with April Mahoney

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 41:00


Youtube https://youtu.be/FW8BeKH3Onc http://vanessaalfaro.co My commitment to my emotional, spiritual, and psychological growth will never end for me in this lifetime. My journey has led me to the beautiful life that I've created for myself. I spent many years understanding, accepting, and mourning my past through therapy. I also spent many years healing my old wounds through yoga, dance, and meditation. It wasn't until I decided to commit to a meditation practice that I truly started to listen to my deeper self and accept myself exactly for who I am. When I started to pay attention to what was inside, I realized that I needed to move the energy that was weighing me down by expressing what was in my heart. I literally found my voice. I live my life as an empowered communicator every day and have firsthand experience of how much healing and momentum I've gained over the years from courageously and vulnerably speaking my truth. My mission is to share what I've learned over the years and to support and guide others who are ready to be in their truth as empowered communicators.

Relentlessly Resilient Podcast
Educator Renee Milne on using her grief to help her students find their own pillars of resilience

Relentlessly Resilient Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 39:04


Renee Milne lost her younger brother to a tragic car accident in 2005. As a daughter, sister, wife, and young teacher she used her skills as an art teacher and trained communicator to help her loved ones deal with grief. Over the years she has exemplified the pillars of resiliency, self-awareness, mindfulness, self-care, positive relationships, and purpose. Now, as she continues as an educator, she helps her students deal with their crises. She joins this episode of Relentlessly Resilience to share her story, and how sharing her story has helped others. Even though we live in challenging times we can become Relentlessly Resilient as we lean on and learn from one another's experiences. Hosts Jennie Taylor and Michelle Scharf are no strangers to overcoming adversity; Michelle lost her husband to cancer, while Jennie's husband Major Brent Taylor was killed in the service of our country. Their stories bond them together and now listeners can join them weekly as they visit with others enduring challenges and who teach us how they are exercising resiliency, finding value in their grief, and purpose in moving forward.  Listen to the Relentlessly Resilient Podcast regularly on your favorite platform, at kslpodcasts.com, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL App. Join the Resilience conversation on Facebook at @RelentlesslyResilient and Instagram @RelentlesslyResilientPodcast. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your Story Our Fight by Lupus LA
Season 2 | Episode #11 with Abstract Artist, Visual Communicator and Lupus Patient, Fatema Siddiki

Your Story Our Fight by Lupus LA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 29:01


Fatema Siddiki is an Abstract Artist and a visual communicator. After being diagnosed with Lupus and Scleroderma in 2007, her life took a miraculous turn.  Art was there for Fatema when no one was, it helped her overcome her worst days when she was fighting against Lupus. Art soon became her therapy and purpose to fight. 

Not Most People
Disrupting The Establishment And Having A Healthy Amount Of Stubbornness with Sheral DeVaughn - 077

Not Most People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 77:43


In this episode, I'm joined by a good friend of mine Sheral Devaughn. Sheral is a communication Strategist and voice talent, 3-time #1 rated Morning Show Radio Host, and Certified Specialist of Wine and Bourbon Professional. She also recently completed the MR340 (the world's longest nonstop kayak/canoe river race).Want to know how to succeed even if it means disrupting "the way things have always been" and being met with major resistance? Then this is the episode for youNot only that, but you'll learn communication secrets from Sheral that you've never heard anywhere else, and how extreme physical challenges provide countless parallels and lessons for the rest of your life.Inside This EpisodeWhy being authentic and unscripted are not the sameHow Sheral made her mark in a male-dominated industryHow to become a master communicatorThe 2 steps to finding happinessHow speaking and communicating are not usually the sameHow to join the conversation already going on in your listeners' headsHow Sheral completed a 340-mile kayak race with minimal experienceThe power of “one more”How to improve your life by removing “deadlines”Connect With SheralFollow Sheral On InstagramWant To Show Your Support?Leave A Review  On iTunesLeave A Review On AudibleConnect With BradleyBradley's InstagramSupport the showWant More Not Most People? Join The Not Most People Alliance Follow Not Most People On Instagram Subscribe & Turn On New Episode Notifications

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
Brenden Kumarasamy: Top 1% Communicator in Your Industry

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 39:43


In this episode, Founder of MasterTalk, Brenden Kumarasamy, talks about public speaking. Today, Brenden talks about becoming an exceptional communicator, online versus in-person presentations, group presentations, and presenting as an introvert. How do we get better at communicating? Hear about Brenden's random word exercise, answering questions proactively, and building the jigsaw puzzle of a presentation, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “If you can make sense out of nonsense, you can make sense out of anything.” “The best way to get rid of fear is to have direction.” “You're only as strong as your weakest link in group presentations.” “When you are not speaking, you are still speaking.” “Someone out there needs your message, and you've just got to go out there and share it and leverage your strengths in the process.” “The goal is not to live forever but rather create something that will.” “When we realize that communication is about leading a more fulfilling life, we'll start to take it more seriously.” “Ask yourself one hard question about life every single day, and you'll never be the same ever again.”   More about Brenden Kumarasamy Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, a coaching business he started to help ambitious executives & business owners become TOP 1% communicators in their industries so that they can accelerate their success in the workplace & companies. He also hosts a successful YouTube channel by the same name with over 25,000 subscribers. Brenden has coached many executives from companies like Salesforce, Amazon, IBM, Morgan Stanley, Blue Cross, J. Walter Thompson, Deloitte, Verizon, and many more.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Communication, Public Speaking, Presentations, Fear, MasterTalk,   Recommended Reading: Thirst, by Scott Harrison.   To learn more, follow Brenden at: Website:          https://rockstarcommunicator.com. YouTube:        MasterTalks. LinkedIn:         Brenden Kumarasamy.   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:05 Welcome to the healthy, wealthy and smart podcast where healthcare meets business with your host me, Dr. Karen Litzy. And just as a reminder, the information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only, and is not to be used as personalized medical advice. Enjoy the show.   00:28 Hello, welcome back to the podcast. I am your host, Dr. Karen Litzy. And in today's podcast, we're talking all about how vital it is to be a good communicator to be a good public speaker, especially for healthcare professionals. So I have a great guest to walk us through all of that and he is Brendon kumara Asami Brendon is the founder of master talk a coaching business, he started to help ambitious executives and business owners become top 1% communicators in their industries so that they can accelerate their success in the workplace in companies. He also hosts a successful YouTube channel by the same name master talk. With over 25,000 subscribers. Brendan has coached many executives from companies like Salesforce, Amazon, IBM, Morgan, Stanley, Blue Cross, J, Walter Thompson, Deloitte, Verizon, and many more. So like I said, today we're talking about public speaking, how becoming how to become an exceptional communicator, how to give great presentations, whether they're online or group and presenting as an introvert. So it's all about getting better at communicating. Brendon has some great tips and tricks, some homework for us all to do so that we can become better communicators, presenters and public speakers. So big thanks to Brendan, and everyone enjoyed today's episode. Hey, Brendan, welcome to the podcast. I'm excited to have you on it to talk about public speaking. So thank you so much for joining me, Karen. The pleasures absolutely mind. Thanks for having me. All right. So public speaking. As you know, sometimes it can be people's number one fear in life getting in front of a group of people in the I'm a physical therapist in the physical therapy world.   02:10 Public speaking is something that can really help move the needle on your career. Yet, so many people are afraid to do it afraid to apply afraid to get up there, that sometimes they just never do it. So before we get into a lot of things in this interview, because I have so many things that I want to ask you, from what you've seen, and in your experience, what are the biggest challenges people have with public speaking? You know, a lot of people, Karen, they think it's fear. But there's actually a challenge, even greater that fear, surprisingly. And the challenge is motivation. Because if we aren't motivated to actually work on our communication, if we don't have an intrinsic reason, we'll never push through the fear. Because the fear will always exist in some way, shape, or form. Even for me, even for the person on the podcast. Why? Because of me, and you are having lunch and Elon Musk calls me and he says, Hey, man, I really liked your YouTube channel. Can you come and coach and I'll pay you a million bucks? Would I be scared? Yeah, it's Elon Musk. But with motivation. The reason this is so powerful is from this question that I'm sure a lot of physicians a lot of healthcare pros don't really think about, which is how would your life change? If you became an exceptional communicator, we dream about becoming a doctor, we dream about finishing finishing med school, we dream about expensive vacations, things we want to buy experiences we want to go on. When was the last time we dreamed about a life in which we're a better communicator in it? And if we don't want to make it about us, I'll throw another one out to you. How would the lives of your patients change? If you became an exceptional communicator? We know in health care patient experience is so important how we make them feel. So if we're not going to do it for us, we might as well start by doing it for them. Yeah, I think that's a great way to to kind of turn that narrative around to take it off of ourselves and say, Well, wait a second, if I were better at communication, because it's communication in front of 100 or communication front of one, it's still being able to communicate effectively, right?   04:19 Absolutely. Yeah. So how do we get better? Right? So there's a couple of things on Oh, go ahead, John, jump in. Oh, you're good. So so a couple of things that are current communication. The reason why a lot of us don't work on it is because we don't know the strategy behind that example. Communication is like juggling 18 balls at the same time. One of those balls is body language. Another one is storytelling. Another one's eye contact, facial expression, smiling and the list goes on. So if we try and juggle all 18, all of them will naturally fall to the floor. So instead, what are the three easiest balls that we can juggle in the air to get started with this practice?   05:00 What I call my easy threes. So start number one, I'll pause after each one. So I don't monologue for 15 minutes. So the first one is the random word exercise, pick a random word like tea like trophy, like Master, like paper towels, and create random presentations out of thin air. Why is this exercise effective, because it helps us quickly think in our feet, I always tell people that if you can make sense out of nonsense, you could make sense out of anything. And it's also really easy to do. Because all of us listening to this podcast, I hope showers every day. So you got 10 minutes in the shower to do this exercise. Or if you have kids, you could do it when you're picking them up from school. So by random word exercise, you mean like, if I were to say a microphone, and I'm doing a presentation on a microphone, I'm trying to sell a microphone. What does that mean? Does that work? Absolutely. So to your point, let's demonstrate this throw any word at me. But don't use microphone because it's too easy, because I have time to think about it. Right? Right. How about polar bear? Awesome. So Karen did not give me the word polar bear proaches. Conversely, I just need to invent something that it didn't want to do. Right now. When I think of the polar bear, I think of many things. The first one is the cold temperature in the North Pole.   06:20 But minus just how aggressively killer these polar bears can be. There's also a bright side, kind of like how polar bears are the main attraction to the Coca Cola brand, or I'll pull up yours kind of reminds us of Christmas and of Santa Claus and of the holiday season. But the reason I bring up the polar bear is that the polar bear has both an aggression. That's a bit crazy, but also a soft nature to them when you look at them from afar anyways. And I think life in many ways is that way too, especially when it comes to our dreams. A lot of us from the outside, it's the opposite. We think it's really, really scary. But then when we get closer towards it, that's actually not that bad. Kind of like a polar bear from 10 or a long feet away. So what's the advice or the advice here is   07:18 follow your dreams. Because all it takes is a little polar bear. All it takes is a little bit of ambition for you to say, You know what, even if that polar bear might be scary. Let's just see what happens. And that's just the random word. It's just just something random. That's it. That's crazy. Yeah, well done. You well done and people like I literally did not give him that word ahead of time. So that was just speaking off the top you have kind of like improv improvisation. Yeah, which I took improv classes a couple of years ago to help with the podcast. But what I found is it really helped with my patient interaction. So tying back to what you said before I became a better communicator with my patients as well. Okay, so number one random word exercise, improving sort of riffing on things. What's number two? Absolutely. So number two is questioned drills. We get asked questions all the time in our life care,   08:16 on podcasts, on shows, at school at work and med school, we're always getting asked questions, and most of us are reactive to them, especially for patients. We wait for the question to come. And then we go oh, let me answer that one.   08:32 In the same way, but a few years ago, when I started guesting on podcast, I sucked. I remember one question somebody asked, he said, Where does the fear of communication come from? And I looked at the guy and I said, I don't know man of San Diego, London, it's you tell me like I didn't know how to answer it. So I was being very reactive, instead of proactive. So what did I do differently? Every single day, Karen, for just five minutes. That's all answer one question that you think the world will ask you. But if you do this for five minutes a day, let's say we take a list of your commonly asked questions by patients. If you just do that once a day, let's say day one is where does your communication come from? Day two is when will I hear back? You know, day three is Will everything be okay? You know, just just make a list. And if you do this once a day for a year, Karen, you'll have answered 365 questions about your industry, you'll be absolutely bulletproof.   09:32 I like that. I like that a lot.   09:35 That's so interesting. I never really thought about doing that. And as you were speaking, I was like, what are the common questions that physical therapists get asked? So now I'm gonna have to do a think on it, and maybe write down seven. So you got a week's worth. And then, as you're kind of answering those questions, I'm sure other ones will start to pop up. So I don't want people to think   10:00 Oh, you have to write out 365 questions right off the bat, right? Correct. I'm glad you jumped into the news. Let me even help help the audience even a bit more, because I'm glad you went there. Don't do this alone. I just said that because I want people to take action. So what's the easiest version, but there's others. But then people will make excuses. But I'm happy to give it for your audience here. Because you're all medical professionals, sure, you'll take action. So what does this mean? You know, there's other people, you got friends who are in physio. So what I would do the smart way of doing this exercise, whether you're the CEO of let's say, the Office of the clinic, or you got friends in that field, I would book a call with like, seven other people. And I've seven other people bring seven questions. So then you have 49 questions. And you're what's great about this process, is we're not competing against each other. If I don't know the answer to the question, I'll just ask you, Hey, Karen, I don't know what to do. How would you answer this question? And then you tell me and I go, Oh, let me just copy that with my patients.   10:54 Because the questions are the same. But the point is just to do the exercise, there's different ways of doing this. The easy one is just a load in your basement. And if no friends, you know, write it out every day. But to your point, yes, I'm sure you have colleagues in the medical profession that you could just do this with. Yeah, that makes it a lot easier takes us takes the pressure off, because I'm sure you've heard this before. Like, if you're under 65 questions, forget it. It's too much. I'm not gonna do it. Right. Absolutely. So to kind of have have some pals help you out will make a big difference. Alright, random word exercise question drills. What's number three? Absolutely. So number three is so simple. That nobody does it. Make a list of the five people you love the most in your life could be your mom, your sister, your brother, family members could even be patients. And ask yourself a simple question. When was the last time you sent them? Not a 20 minute, but a 22nd video message, just to tell them how much you appreciate having them in your life, the people who helped you through medical school, the people who really believed in you, the teachers, the mentors, the people supported you. video messages, make people's days, Karen, but more importantly, video messages teach us a very important lesson that the education system does not teach us. The education system teaches us, Karen, that communication is a chore. Oh my god, I have to get better at this thing. Because I have to do well. And then it's so much stress and anxiety. Versus when you start sending video messages and you wake up the next morning, you're shocked at the responses you get. A lot of people look at you look at the text and you say whoa, everyone's saying it made their day it made their their week feel really special enough. Some people never got a video message in their life. And it helps us relearn what communication is for, which is to create an impact to share an idea with the world. Going back to the fears we alluded to earlier. Right? I don't want to share my message I don't want but what happens if you don't?   12:47 Well, if you don't, you won't be able to serve as a role model for the people who are going through medical school right now, and are looking up to you. Don't worry about the millions of people in the world. Just worry about the people behind you, or rather, before you I think is the right way of putting it. Yeah, yeah. All right. So three really great sort of drills or strategy that we can use at home either on our own or with some pals to help us find that motivation for public speaking. Right. So let's say we've, we're motivated, now we want to do it. We're we've got a conference coming up. And what happens next, right? We know our stuff, we're good, but you're still it's still in there. You get up to the mic, and you're like   13:47 so what do we do that? Sir, sir? So so a couple of things before that moment arrives, hopefully people get to this episode of time, which I hope I would say the next piece. So now you're doing these drills, you're really building up your momentum, your skill set. What's what's my go to strategy for keynote prep? I call this the jigsaw puzzle method. Communication is like jigsaw puzzle security, you know, those pieces, you know, little things used to do as kids those toys, right? So whenever we're doing this jigsaw puzzle, we always want to start with the corner pieces. And the reason is because they're easier to find at the box. So if you open a jigsaw puzzle, you get these corner pieces, you put them all together, and then you're working into the middle. Now you're probably wondering, Brendan, why are you talking about jigsaw puzzles? And the reason is super simple care. The reason I talk about jigsaw puzzles is because in communication, most of us do the opposite. We start with the middle first, we shove a bunch of content or presentations. We get to the podium, and we ramble throughout the whole thing. And then the last slide sounds something like this.   14:56 Thanks, not the right approach. So what should we do instead?   15:00 To prepare presentations like a jigsaw puzzle, start with the edges first, practice just your introduction here. 50 times 50 Seems like a big number, but it really is it because your introduction is 60 to 90 seconds. So we're talking like an hour's worth of work. Same thing with the conclusion, what's a great movie with a terrible ending, terrible movie last time I checked. So same thing with the close, do it 50 times, once again, it'll take you another hour, then focus on the middle. If you do that, especially in this industry that we're talking to right now, most people don't bother prime, I've coached a lot of the the people in this industry, most people don't even spend a lot of time and effort doing the communication. So if you just spend those puzzles, and you just practice in that way, you'll blow everyone's minds.   15:50 That makes a lot of sense. I was just   15:54 a way at a at a physical therapy conference. And I did have to do an opening of the conference with another physiotherapist. And what we really did do a lot is we practiced that first slide that opening to make sure that we're grabbing people's attention. And then like you said, we actually did sort of finish with, again, another slide that grabbed people's attention and left people feeling really good about it. And we didn't do it intentionally. Mind you, we just kind of it just sort of happened, you know. But now I like that working on the edges. It's like when you're doing your you write the outline, and then you just start filling it in.   16:51 But I really like the beginning in the end, because it's true, you always remember sort of that last image, that last slide, whether it's a presentation, or even, you know, a TED talk or Keynote, you kind of always remember the end and kind of how that made you feel. So I think that's really great advice. I really liked that. What else? Is there anything else we need to? I mean, I'm sure there's a million things that we need to think about, although the podcast is not 10 hours long. But what are some other kind of big things that we should remember when it comes to the presentation itself? While we're in those prep stages? Absolutely, Karen. So I would say for the for the prep. What's nice about doing the beginning the end is because it builds momentum really quickly, especially in the industry. Right now we're in healthcare, where a lot of us, you know, we're dealing with a ton of patients, we're working long hours, we don't have as many hours as other industries to actually invest in our communication. So I'll give you an example. So people understand the comparison. Let's say you have three hours to practice a presentation, that's 30 minutes, what most people in any field will do is they'll practice a 30 or 30 minute talk three times in a row, they'll get tired, and then they'll eat lunch. That's generally what happens. But the problem is, is in those three practices, they don't really see that much growth. Because it's a big presentation, it's hard to keep improving upon. Versus if you take that seemed three hours, and you just spend the same the first two, the first hour doing just the intro and the second hour just doing the conclusion, you're going to go to lunch really happy, you say, Wow, I just delivered the best introduction of my life, the best conclusion of my life. Now I'm just going to spend the next hour to your point filling out the dots connecting the rest. So that's the reason strategically, why that works more sense, it's a better investment of time, in terms of the other points. Now we're going into the bonus round. So the bonus round is this. Every great presentation, Karen generally has one key idea, what do you want them to remember, I'll give you an example from one of my clients. What she is trying to do is the draw the relationship between empathy and patient care experience. That's what our presentations, but if she tries to talk about 10 Other things for a TED talk, it's not going to work, because she only has 15 minutes to talk. So every story, every analogy, every tool, every statistic is really revolving around the idea that we need to bring more empathy into not just the patient care experience, but towards other functions within the hospital, whether it's the support teams, the it the ops, so that the patient care experience is 360 Not just one ad, right. That's our whole key idea. But notice how clear that is. But if we try and do 10 different things, we go nowhere. So what's the advice, the advice is to bullet down 10 different key ideas on a list, and then look at that list with your friends if you have any ideally, and then look at that list and saying hmm, out of these 10 ideas, which one energetically excites me the most. Which one energetically gets me wow, like this is the one that I really want to land and the frame number two   20:00 Getting a little bit more advanced. But the frame around this is just asking ourselves this question. What is the one key idea out of this long list that I just wrote that I feel no one else is talking about the conference? No one else is emphasizing. No one else is really drawing a point around in the same way. We talked about Ajay, right, where she focused on the other areas of the hospital, not just doctors. That's her key idea. What's yours? So that's the other piece. And then the last piece to presentation prep, is the willingness to experiment like a painter, like an artist, like a mad scientist. What does that mean? That means try a bunch of tools, try a personal story. Try an anecdote, try statistic. And the only question you ask yourself, is this one, and I'll throw it back to you? Does this defend my key idea? Does this personal story does the statistic does this anecdote, defend my key idea? Yes or No? Try a bunch of things. And then you'll figure out the ones that make the most sense. That's what goes into the final deck. Yeah, that's great. I love that advice. I'm taking copious notes here. Because I like the way you're kind of laying it out for people. And I think that it's simple, it's easy to follow. Most people love a template, they love kind of instructions, right? I'm sure you get that all the time. Like, just give me instructions on how to do X, Y, and Z. And then I'll do it. And then when you feel at least, I'm going to say this personally, when I feel better prepared going into a talk, it's a better talk, I'm a little more relaxed, I can kind of go with the flow. If there's a complication or a tech issue, it doesn't completely throw you off your game. So I think, to your point by being prepared and prepping adequately, I think that can help take away some of the fear.   21:58 I completely agree. You know, what I always say is that the best way to get rid of fear is to have direction. If you're focused on direction of where you're going, and you're not thinking about the future thinking, Oh, I should probably do the branch board exercise tomorrow. I should probably do some question drills, I probably should get some buddies together. On and so on, so forth. Yeah. Now, switching gears slightly, but   22:21 we're still you know, in these COVID times, everybody's on Zoom. There's many, many, many zoom conferences. So does your advice change when it comes to an online presentation versus an in person presentation? And can you compare and contrast those for us? Absolutely happy to Karen. So the advice does stay the same. But there are three ads that are that I'll jump on that I'll let her on top for online. So the first one is eye contact. So when you're in an in person setting, Karen, do you want to move your head based on who's in the crowd to maintain eye contact with them? What's nice about online is whether you're speaking to one or 10,000 people, you only have to look in one area, which is the camera lens. That's it, you just gotta look in one direction, which is nice. So that's one. The second one and this is the most important, I would argue is energy. Look at the end of the day, Karen, it's easier to shove with energy when you're in person, because the accountability is higher, you'll take a shower, you'll wake up earlier, because you actually have to talk to people, you have to shake their hand, you have to hug them, depending on what your preference is. When you're online, you go like well, I mean, I guess they put my PJs on, no one's gonna know. So it's, it's that it's just that piece. It's impossible, in my opinion, to have that same level of standard as we do online than offline. So what's the advice, the advice is bring more energy in person, get really good in person and bring as much of that as possible, online. That's the advice. And then finally, number three, is accessibility a lot easier to get feedback from your audience when you're in person, because there's no friction, you just go up to them say what's up, you want to get lunch. And that's it. Simple, online. Not as easy, not as easy to build relationships with event planners and things like that organizers. So in that situation, you got to force those relationships, caring that means you got to get on calls with people you get on feedback calls with the organizers who brought you there to make sure you keep that relationship alive. You're getting the feedback you need, but you're also closing more speaking gigs through those relationships.   24:31 You're muted, by the way   24:33 I was gonna say it's all about the follow up.   24:37 And when your online follow up, can seem a little bit harder.   24:44 So follow up people email, text, voice message, DM however, whatever you need to do, but follow up. That's something that I admit I was not great at up until a couple of years ago was that follow up?   25:00 and it makes a huge difference. And it's it takes, I don't know, two seconds of your time to send an email to follow up, right? It's not that invasive to your time. No, yeah. So follow up, follow up, follow up. Okay.   25:16 One more question around the presentation and presentations is, oftentimes I see this a lot at in physical therapy conferences, or sports medicine conferences is, oftentimes you're presenting as part of a group. So there may be, you know, anywhere, maybe two people up to four people in a symposium or within a presentation. So what can you do to prepare for that, and present and stand out within this group presentation? Absolutely. So let me ask a clarification. Question, Karen on this. So when you've been stand out, because usually, and because that's why I want your feedback on this. A lot of the times when I'm coaching people in this industry on group presentations, it's usually like a research study that they all did together. So is that the context you're coming in from as well? Or is there like a different context that I missed? You? Know, I think that's definitely part of it is it'll be a research study that a group of people did on their own, or it may be part of a symposium on knee pain. And they'll be three or four different people speaking on knee pain, perhaps presenting their own individual research, or sometimes it can be researched together. Hmm. Okay, interesting. So I'll go in the context of let's assume they're all on the same team, because the other piece is more like you want to stand up for everyone else, which goes back to the individual tips, right, just just when, then then just do the rest of our exercise and just get the get the recognition. But in terms of the group, there's a couple of nuances be control. So thanks for that, Karen. The first difference is realize that if you're listening to this podcast, you are automatically the leader of the team. And the reason is because you have the most information, unless you're sending this podcast, which I encourage you to do as well, right to your to your fellow teammates in this group. Because you're the person with the most information, I encourage you to take leadership and understand the strengths and weaknesses of everyone on your team. Why? Because you're only as strong as your weakest link in group presentations. That would be my first advice. Take leadership, take all the hardest parts on make your teammates life as easy as possible. That's tip one. Tip number two, realize that when you are not speaking, you're still speaking. What do I mean by this? Let's say me and Karen are on the same team. We're both presenting this amazing research Bravo, she she did all the work, because what do I know about the medical industry? And she's presenting. And as she's presenting, I'm looking in the sky, and I'm thinking, Ah, what's for lunch? Even if I'm not talking? I'm telling my audience something, Karen, what I'm telling them is, by the way, guys, I spent six months researching this with Karen. And I don't care what she says. So you shouldn't either. And that's the message we're sending people. So what's the point? The point is you got to speak even when you're not speaking, which means when Karen's talking bread's looking at her and going, Wow, nodding his head, wow, when she says something great, you nod your head. So do the same thing with your teens be sure you're paying attention to the people that are speaking. That's number two. Number three is have a solid system for q&a, especially in the context of research. Why? Because generally in those presentation, not always it depends on the format. But usually, you will get specific nuanced questions about the research, the thesis, the sample size, what you did, you gotta be strong. Because if you miss those questions, or worse, you contradict each other, your whole presentation sinks. And that's what a lot of people don't get. So I actually have a system on this, but that nobody the medical industry uses that people, you could be the first one who is I call it q&a Master. So q&a Masters is a technique I learned from a team in Sweden, that I thought was really fascinating. So what they did is that the best person who answers questions became the master. And then based on the questions they got from the research teams, or the people in the room, or judges, what that Master would do is he would filter or she would filter all the questions, turn to the research team, and see who has their hands in front of their body. So everyone has their hands in front of their body wants to answer the question. And whoever doesn't want to answer the question has their hands behind their body. It's super nuanced, nobody would actually notice it. And all the Master does is that he looks really quickly or she looks really quickly and picks out the people. So he evenly distributes the question. So there's no stress because he knows who the expert is. And if nobody has their hands up, he just answers the question because he's the best at q&a. That's it q&a Master. I love it. That is such an easy and like you said nuanced way so the audience isn't really picking up on that and it makes your q&a flow so much   30:00 To easier, correct? Oh, that is such a good idea. I love that one. All right, if I, the next time I am in a group presentation, I will definitely bring that up. I love it. Okay. So   30:14 when,   30:16 when we're,   30:19 when we're presenting and we're up on stage, people often think, well, of course, they're up on stage because they're such a people person. They're the extrovert of the group there. You know, of course, only extroverts get up on stage, which we know is not true. So what advice do you have for those folks who might be a little more introverted or shy? And to get up there and do their thing? Absolutely. I mean, let me start with this, Karen, I had no business getting up on any stage. You know, I was 22. When I started master talk, my average client is 20 years older than me, I have a bachelor's degree in accounting. I spoke my whole life and a second language, and I have a crooked left arm because of a surgery head when I was younger, who in the world am I to share ideas on communication and public's view of the world? So the better question now becomes, why did I press record? Why did I do it? I had every excuse not. I did it for the 15 year old girl who couldn't afford me. I never did it for my executives. I just said, Hey, wait a second, like people are like 12 years old? Like who are they going to relate to with their communication, not some six year old white guy who's retiring, and what's seven PhDs and comms, she's going to relate to me. And I'm the only person who can share these videos, I have the expertise because I've been doing it for so long, even if I'm 26 have been doing for seven years. Nobody has that kind of resume. So I said it's either I do these videos, or nobody does. So think about that message in the context of what you want to share with the world. So if you're a little bit more shy or introverted, that generally means a few things. And let's focus on the positive three things specifically wonder a better listener. Okay, extroverts like me, are terrible listeners. That's why we make great guests on podcasts. Yep. All the time. Right. When you're an introvert, you listen more because you speak less. So it's easier for you to be empathetic, not just to the patients you serve in your day to day work, but also empathetic to your audience. You know what's going to land because you're asking them powerful questions, you're listening to them. That's one, two, you're better off Pausing. Pausing is the most important tool in communication, because that allows us to draw emphasis with our key ideas. Extroverts suck at pausing, because we hate space for at a party or at a bar, and we're just staring at somebody and there's no conversation. We start to get really anxious, and we've got us caregiver color. As a freak out. Resident introvert never has that problem, Karen, because they're just comfortable silence don't talk about much anyways. So pausing is really easy for them. And then the last piece is accessibility. Introverts are actually a lot more accessible to share their ideas than extroverts are. Example. Gary Vaynerchuk, CEO of VaynerMedia, massive social media following. I'm a big fan personally, but you either like the guy or you don't you either like he's really, really loud approach or you go get this guy away from me. Nobody says that about Brene. Brown, Karen. Nobody says I hate Brene. Brown. So what's the message? The message is someone out there needs your message. And you just got to go out there and share it and leverage your strengths in the process. Oh, great advice for all of those introverts out there. Or even you're sort of somewhere in between that introvert and extrovert, right? I think it what is it an entre entrepreneur, entrepreneur?   33:40 Entrepreneur, no one ever heard, and pervert, right? Right, right. No, I was gonna say an entrepreneur. And then I'm like, No, that's not right. Yes. So great advice. Now, you had mentioned master talk a couple of times. So can you talk a little bit more about that? Yeah, for sure. Karen. So master was just a fluke, you know, after university ended for me, I had no plans of being an entrepreneur, like a content creator. Similar to a lot of the questions you would ask around introverts, I was just going to become an executive at IBM. That was my goal. So I went on to work there for a few years. But I realized that everything that I was sharing with the students back then wasn't available for free on the internet. So I started making YouTube videos on communication. And it just turned into something I never could have imagined, which today, of course, a coaching business and a media company for people can't afford a coach.   34:30 That's wonderful. I love that. You're, you're supplying people with really good, relevant content. That doesn't cost 10 grand to get it   34:43 out at all. Fabulous. Now, as we start to wrap things up here, I have a couple more questions for you. These will be easy. Number one, what are your top three books for public speaking or speaking in general, that you would wreck   35:00 have met, I'll recommend one because usually when you recommend three people don't buy all three. So I'll give one an unconventional one. Thirst by Scott Harrison. So that's thirst by Scott Harrison Scott Harrison is the CEO and founder of Charity Water. It's a nonprofit, he started to help people gain access to clean water. The reason I recommend Scott's work, Karen, is because the guy's a world class storyteller. I've never seen anyone like him where he would practically went from a nightclub promoter in New York City in his 20s, to building the largest water charity in America, he raised $100 million, just last year to find clean water projects. And he did it primarily through communication and storytelling. And there's a great quote in the book that I'd love to share. And the quote is simply this. The goal is not to live forever, but rather create something that will and that quote will always stick with me. Excellent, great. So that's thirst by Scott Harrison. And just so people know, we'll have a link to that in the show notes at the podcast website. All right. So what are you? What do you want people to take away from this conversation? I would say for me, Karen, it goes back to the question we alluded to a bit earlier in this conversation. How would your life change? Or rather, how would your patient's experience in life change if you became an exceptional communicator, I fundamentally believe that the biggest piece that's missing in this field is excitement and passion for pursuing communication. Communication is supposed to be fun, like everything we shared today, isn't like, Oh, my God, like you have to sit there and find your key idea. Like it's fun, do this with people around you get excited. Why? Because it matters. Because it's every moment of your life. It's not just about getting on the stage. It's not just about making your patients feel like they're the most important people in the world in that moment with you. It's every conversation you have with your family. It's the way that you talk to your children, your nieces, your nephews, it's the way that you're the foot at restaurant or when you make new friends. And when we realize that communication is about leading a more fulfilling life, we'll start to take it more seriously. Excellent, great takeaway for everyone listening. Thank you so much. Where can people find you? Absolutely can This is a great conversation. Thanks for having me. So two ways of keeping in touch one, the YouTube channel, just go to master talking one word, you'll have access to hundreds of free videos on how to communicate ideas effectively. And number two, I do a free workshop over zoom that's live and interactive. It's not some boring webinar. And I facilitate it. So if you want to jump in on one of those, all you have to do is register for free. At Rockstar, communicate tour.com. Perfect. So that's Rockstar, communicate tour o r.com. Perfect. And again, we'll have links to all of this at the podcast website, podcast at healthy, wealthy smart.com. One click will get you to Brendan and all of these amazing resources. So last question, knowing where you are now in your life and in your career. What would what advice would you give to your younger self? My advice, Karen would be asked yourself one hard question about life every single day. And you'll never be the same ever again. That's the biggest thing. I'll give you three to not make your audience too crazy here. One, if you had all the money in the world, how would you spend your time? You know, a lot of us are always optimizing for the magical number 65. But if I made you an instant billionaire, what would you do with your time now? That's one, two, if you could only accomplish three things in your life and only three? What would you accomplish and why this helps you focus because time is limited time is the essence that we're all trying to optimize again. So use it effectively. And number three, what's a goal or a dream that you secretly gave up on? And never told anyone about? I'd encourage you to answer that question because it might lead to a dream that you should be pursuing in your life. Wow, great advice. And I think that's a first I've never heard that for a piece of advice and I asked all my all my guests this that's the first time I've gotten that piece of advice. So you are certainly a first on the podcast and I'm really happy that you came on and shared all this great info with myself and with with the listeners of the podcast. So thank you so much. pleasure was mine can't that's for me. Yes and everyone. Thanks so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   39:29 Thanks for listening. And don't forget to leave us your questions and comments at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com

When Science Speaks
Special Episode: Mark's Commentary on How to Become a High-Impact Communicator

When Science Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 7:16


In this special episode, I share my thoughts on how you can quickly strengthen your communication skills - whether in spoken or written form. I discuss: - Lessons from tens of thousands of TED talks - The "3-Rs" and why they're essential if you want your communications to be memorable and move your listeners - Why the "Give energy, get engagement" dynamic is such a powerful force in effective communication - Why you shouldn't try to calm down when you're nervous about giving a big presentation and what you should do instead - What the Latin root of the word "communication" teaches us and how it should inform your communication style Resources mentioned in the episode Newsly.me Special discount code to get a FREE one-month premium subscription to Newsly: SC1SPEAKS

Productive Disruption
Building an Attendance Awareness Campaign: Marie Russell and Trinette Marquis

Productive Disruption

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 34:44


Marie Russel is the Director of Communications, Family Engagement & Outreach & Turlock Unified School District in California, and was named the 2021-2022 Communicator of the Year by CalSPRA - the California state chapter of the National School Public Relations Association. Trinette Marquis is the Executive Director of CalSPRA, and serves as an instructor for the CalSPRA Academy courses. Marie and Trinette join host Molly McGowan Gorsuch to talk about the September "attendance awareness” campaign in Turlock USD that Marie developed – using the strategy she learned from Trinette through a CalSPRA course. Connect with Molly: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mollymcgowangorsuch?miniProfileUrn=urn%3Ali%3Afs_miniProfile%3AACoAAAv-_PIB31LlaRKdyTt-1_VW7rzB1YJ9dXo&lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_search_srp_all%3BP511Pt60TjyXza7tqzmiIw%3D%3D Connect with Marie: https://twitter.com/fmarierussell?s=20&t=bsNrsp7V0OaMWWO2u-CMwQ Connect with Trinette: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trinettemarquis/

The Dirt
29. How to Become a Top 1% Communicator

The Dirt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 39:39


Brenden Kumarasamy, founder and CEO of MasterTalk, joins Jim Barnish on this episode to discuss how you can become a master communicator. He breaks down key areas of communication into actionable steps and why they are invaluable to you as a founder. These include leveraging your strengths (e.g. introverts are generally better at communication because they listen more and talk less), how to be bulletproof in answering questions about your business, and the necessity of online, remote communication.Brenden offers a few simple practices to do daily that will make you a top 1% communicator, including: Random word exercises where you learn to make sense out of nonsense, for example: Make a story out of “tissue box.” It will help you think on your feet. Answer one question per day about your company (e.g. Why is your price high, how are you different from competitors, etc.) to become an expert in your space. After a year, you'll have answered 365 questions. Master the framework for improving your business meetings.Key TakeawaysCultivate daily habits to improve your communication. See above…Improve your meetings by answering Brenden's 3-question framework:Determine the goal of the meeting - not all meetings are necessary. What is YOUR contribution to the meeting? The meeting itself may be needed, but are YOU needed there?How does your contribution INSPIRE and ADD VALUE? Take your meetings seriously.Your growth as a company correlates to your growth as a person. Keep working on yourself and show your team how to continue reaching higher.ResourcesBrenden's LinkedInMasterTalk YouTube ChannelThirst by Scott HarrisonRockstar Communicator Free CoursesAboutBrenden Kumarasamy is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world.If you love what you are getting out of our show please SUBSCRIBE.For more information on how we dig into the dirt check out our other episodes here: https://www.orchid.black/podcastAll contents of this show are rights of Orchid Black©️ and are not to be used unless authorized by written consent.

The Liquid Lunch Project
Becoming a Better Communicator with Brenden from MasterTalk

The Liquid Lunch Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 30:07


In this episode of The Liquid Lunch Project, Matt and Luigi sit down with Brenden from MasterTalk. If you're not already familiar with who he is, we can promise you'll want to know more after these 30 minutes.  Brenden runs a wildly successful YouTube Channel (MasterTalk) and is in the top 1% of communicators in the industry. He teaches tech execs and small business owners how to get ahead through the art of communication, and he's giving our listeners a TON of fantastic takeaways, absolutely free. Communication is one of the most important tools we have at our disposal, and yet, so many of us fail to treat it as anything more than a chore. We set goals for every other area of our life (health, relationships, finances), but when was the last time you sent goals for your communication skills? Brenden teaches us that as your business scales, those skills need to scale with it. His advice will help you with everything from running successful meetings, doing presentations, giving speeches, closing sales, and being confident in yourself and your abilities. Grab some paper and get ready to take notes!   What You'll Learn: How he overcame imposter syndrome An exercise he recommends to become a more effective communicator A simple, 5-minute drill that will make you bulletproof when it comes to your industry, products, or services How to decide and package the content you want to speak about …and much more!   Favorite Quote: “Competence comes from confidence. You learn it over time.”   Connect with Brenden: Check out his YouTube Channel, MasterTalk, for hundreds of free videos and exercises. You can also register to attend a FREE coaching call here: www.rockstarcommunicator.com   How To Get Involved: Matthew Meehan and Luigi Rosabianca use their combined experience to provide insight and strategic advice to help small and medium-sized businesses in America have the same opportunities as corporate 500 companies.  If you're looking for tailor-made solutions to grow your small biz, learn more at www.shieldadvisorygroup.com.    Stay Connected: Connect with Matt and Luigi on Instagram: @matthew.r.meehan @luigi_rosabianca, @theLiquidLunchProject @ShieldAdvisoryGroup. Visit The Liquid Lunch Project website and subscribe to The Weekly, our Friday morning newsletter, for all the latest in the world of finance, tech, small business, and more.  www.theliquidlunchproject.com Make sure you never miss an episode — check out The Liquid Lunch Project on Apple Podcasts, and don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review.

The 260 Journey
Learn to Be an Effective Communicator

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 4:53


Day 195 Today's Reading: 1 Timothy 5 A truck driver had been hired to deliver fifty penguins to the state zoo. As he was driving his truck through the desert, his truck broke down. Three hours passed, and he began to wonder if his cargo would survive in the desert heat. Finally he was able to wave down another truck. He offered the driver five hundred dollars to take the penguins to the zoo for him, and the other driver agreed. The next day, the first truck driver finally made it to town. As he drove, he was appalled to see the second truck driver walking down the street with the fifty penguins walking in a single-file line behind him! He slammed on his brakes, jumped out of his truck, and stormed over to the other trucker. “What's going on?” he shouted. “I gave you five hundred dollars to take these penguins to the zoo!” The other trucker responded, “I did take them to the zoo. And I had some money left over, so now we're going to see a movie.” Miscommunication leads to complication and confusion. Just a little miscommunication can mean a lot of problems. In today's chapter, Paul gives us a lesson on effective communication. As author William H. Whyte so aptly said: “The great enemy of communication, we find, is the illusion of it.” Paul wants to remove the illusions for us. And his advice is priceless. He starts off 1 Timothy 5 with explaining how to communicate to people: Never speak sharply to an older man, but plead with him respectfully just as though he were your own father. Talk to the younger men as you would to much-loved brothers. Treat the older women as mothers, and the girls as your sisters, thinking only pure thoughts about them. (Verses 1-2, TLB) This passage can so easily be passed over and we miss Paul's powerful lesson on how to communicate to different groups of people. All people don't hear the same way; ages and gender contribute to that. Paul tells us the importance of knowing who we are speaking to and how to speak to them. It's about knowing our audience. I have had the privilege of doing chapels in different venues. I have spoken to MLB and NFL teams, and in those environments, I make sure I do certain things. The window is short, and I realize for the entire season, this is these professional players' church. I must not only respect their time but also must make sure I am making use of their time. Here are my two rules in these settings: lift up God's Word and lift up God's Son. First, I always bring a physical Bible and read from it. Why? Isaiah 55:11 says, “My word shall never return void.” That means better than a leadership principle or a pep talk, the best thing I can do for those players is give them a Bible principle, because it will always be productive. Second, I lift up God's Son. Jesus said in John 12:32, “If I'm lifted up I will draw men to Myself.” When we don't lift up Jesus, then people are attracted to the wrong thing: us. And we don't have what they need. The apostle Paul gave us his important chapel rules as well when we are talking to certain groups of people. He said when we have to have a hard conversation with a person older than we are, harsh and hard talk must be dispensed with and we must take the posture of a son and see that person as a parent. This strategy goes from if we're a supervisor with senior citizens on our staff, to having to tell our elderly neighbor to keep their dogs off our lawn. Plead with them as if they were your own father. He says the same treatment goes for elderly women. His plea about how we speak to our peers is much needed also in our generation. Young men talk to other young men as beloved brothers, as though they are our own flesh and blood. And when we see a young lady, we treat them as flesh and blood also and keep our thoughts pure about them. This is profound communication advice from Paul for all of us.

The Business of College Sports
The Evolution of Licensing in the NIL Era

The Business of College Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:33


We're joined this episode by Marty Ludwig, Director of Trademarks and Licensing at University of Cincinnati, where he is responsible for managing all internal and external relationships regarding the commercial use of the university's brand (including its name, identifying marks, and still and moving images) to protect and promote the goodwill and reputation of the university, ensure the university receives appropriate value, and to actively enforcing the university's rights to prevent the unauthorized use of its brand.In this episode, we discussed:How licensing is typically divided between University operations and the athletic departmentHow university and athletic administrators work with sponsors that want to use marks from both sidesThe biggest issues facing licensing administrators todayHow university and athletic administrators can collaborate better How Cincinnati is handling requests from athletes who want to use school marksExamples of current sponsor campaigns that involve student athletesMarty's thoughts from a licensing perspective on NCAA President Emmert's idea on compensating athletes as university ambassadorsHow group licensing is working so far for student athletes and universities, including examples from CincinnatiMarty's career path to working in university licensingTrends in licensing to watchMarty is a member of the University's Brand Review Committee, Communicator's Cabinet, Marketing Advisory Committee, International Working Group, and Chair of the Institutional Sponsorship Committee. An active member of higher education trade groups, Marty was elected to serve as the first President on the Board of Directors for the University Partnerships Community of Practice (UPCoP) and is also an active member and Past President of the International Collegiate Licensing Association (ICLA). Under Marty's leadership the Cincinnati licensing program has been recognized as one of the top licensing programs in the nation including recognition as the 2021 Institutional Marketing Program of the year by the Collegiate Licensing Company, and the 2016 Licensing Program of the year by ICLA.  Marty is frequently asked to consult, contribute articles, and give presentations on various topics related to branding, contract and relationship management, licensing, marketing, strategic planning, and trademarks. You can follow Marty on Twitter.You can also follow me on Twitter and Instagram to discuss further, ask additional questions or suggest future episodes.You can find more of my analysis on the business of college sports at BusinessofCollegeSports.com and Forbes.

Connecting Faith to Life
168. Five Ways to be a Better Communicator

Connecting Faith to Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 29:55


We can all be better communicators. In this episode, Tommy and Trey talk about how we can be better communicators.

My Steps to Sobriety
296 Brenden Kumarasamy: How to Become a Top 1% Communicator In Your Industry

My Steps to Sobriety

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 63:55


Brenden is the founder of MasterTalk, he coaches ambitious executives & entrepreneurs to become top 1% communicators in their industry. He also has a popular YouTube channel called MasterTalk, with the goal of providing free access to communication tools for everyone in the world.                               3 top tips for my audience: 1. Random Word Exercise; 1 random word to practice full presentations. 2. Question Drills 3. Sending Video Messages rockstarcommunicator.com https://www.youtube.com/c/MasterTalks