Podcasts about Dust Bowl

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  • 407PODCASTS
  • 516EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
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  • May 20, 2022LATEST
Dust Bowl

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Best podcasts about Dust Bowl

Latest podcast episodes about Dust Bowl

Science Friday
Seabird Poop, ‘Prehistoric Planet' TV Show, Dry Great Plains, Six Foods For A Changing Climate. May 20, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 47:46


We Need To Talk About Bird Poop Seabird poop—sometimes called guano—was the “white gold” of fertilizers for humans for millennia. Rich in nitrogen and phosphorus from birds' fish-based diets, the substance shaped trade routes and powered economies until chemical fertilizers replaced it. But while people may no longer find bird poop profitable, these same poop deposits—often found on islands or coasts where the birds nest and rear their young—may also be nurturing ecosystems that would be left high and dry if the birds were to disappear. As seabird populations quickly decline, that's becoming an increasing risk. Australian researchers Megan Grant and Jennifer Lavers talk to Ira about the under-appreciated role of bird guano in ecosystems, and why scientists should be looking more closely at the poop patterns of endangered seabirds.   How Did ‘Prehistoric Planet' Make Dinosaurs Look So Real? Being a fan of dinosaurs has its challenges. The largest, perhaps, is that no human has seen these creatures with their own eyes. Depictions of prehistoric creatures in film and media have been based on the research available at the time, but accurate knowledge about feathers, colors, and behavior have changed as science has progressed. The much-anticipated docuseries “Prehistoric Planet” dives into the most recent research about dinosaurs and their environment and illustrates what the world might have looked like 66 million years ago. The show uses hyper-realistic computer imaging to make the most realistic dinosaurs seen on film yet. The result is an epic look at how dinosaurs once lived. Joining Ira to talk about “Prehistoric Planet” is producer Tim Walker and paleontologist Darren Naish, who served as the show's lead science consultant.    Midwestern Farmers Face Drought And Dust Even with a few recent rains, much of the Great Plains are in a drought. Wildfires have swept across the grasslands and farmers are worried about how they'll make it through the growing season. Randy Uhrmacher is in his tractor, planting corn and soybeans in central Nebraska. But it's hard to see his work. The soil is so dry that clouds of dust hang in the air as he drives through his fields. “Not sure how I'm supposed to see what I'm doing tonight,” Uhrmacher said on a recent night of planting. Even turning on the windshield wipers didn't help him see through the dust storm. If he didn't use soil conservation practices like reduced tillage and cover crops, he said his fields could look like something out of the 1930s Dust Bowl. It's the driest spring Uhrmacher can remember in his 38 years of farming. Drought is a challenge many farmers and ranchers are facing in the middle of the country. Read the rest on sciencefriday.com.   When Climate Change Reaches Your Plate No matter how you slice it, climate change will alter what we eat in the future. Today, just 13 crops provide 80% of people's energy intake worldwide, and about half of our calories come from wheat, maize and rice. Yet some of these crops may not grow well in the higher temperatures, unpredictable rainfall and extreme weather events caused by climate change. Already, drought, heat waves and flash floods are damaging crops around the world. “We must diversify our food basket,” says Festo Massawe. He's executive director of Future Food Beacon Malaysia, a group at the University of Nottingham Malaysia campus in Semenyih that studies the impact of climate change on food security. That goes beyond what we eat to how we grow it. The trick will be investing in every possible solution: breeding crops so they're more climate resilient, genetically engineering foods in the lab and studying crops that we just don't know enough about, says ecologist Samuel Pironon of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in London. To feed a growing population in a rapidly changing world, food scientists are exploring many possible avenues, while thinking about how to be environmentally friendly. Read the rest on sciencefriday.com.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.  

Playlist Wars
The Battle of Joe Bonamassa (w/ Erik Chale)

Playlist Wars

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 70:22


In this episode, we're joined by Patreon Playlister Erik Chale, to battle over who created the best Joe Bonamassa playlist. Time to see those different shades of the blues! Vote now for YOUR favorite playlists, hear the results of past episodes & listen to ALL of the playlists at: http://www.playlistwarspodcast.com If you'd like to support Playlist Wars, then consider becoming a Patreon subscriber: http://www.patreon.com/playlistwars. Tiers include: Patreon exclusive content; early access to ad-free episodes; & join the show as a guest for a "Playlist An Album" mini episode or a full-length episode! SONGS DISCUSSED INCLUDE Ball Peen Hammer, Blues Deluxe, Blue & Evil, Cradle Rock, Dirt In My Pocket, Drive, Driving Towards The Light, Dust Bowl, Evil Mama, High Class Girl, I Got All Ya Need, Just Got Paid (Live at the Royal Albert Hall), Man In The Middle (Black Country Communion), Meaning Of The Blues, Mind's Eye, Miss You Hate You, Sloe Gin, So Many Roads, Spanish Boots, Steal Your Heart Away, Tennessee Plates, The Ballad of John Henry, The Ghost Of Macon Jones, The Heart That Never Waits, The Last Matador Of Bayonne, The River, Traveling South & Walking Blues AS HEARD IN THE EPISODE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gS5ibUPUvg CONNECT WITH PLAYLIST WARS Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/playlistwars Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/playlistwars Twitter: http://twitter.com/playlistwars Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/playlistwarspodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcW7NibxehYRf8_UZ88Qtbg --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/playlistwars/support

Great Lives
Rob Newman on Franklin D Roosevelt

Great Lives

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 27:23


Comedian and writer Rob Newman is a long-time fan of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who "saved the United States, just in time for the United States to save the world". When FDR came into office in 1933, at the height of the Great Depression, unemployment stood at more than 25% and drought in the Dust Bowl had decimated American agriculture across the Great Plains. While known for his folksy charm, Roosevelt was a shrewd and determined politician, who transformed federal government, the US financial system and the relationship between the American people and their president forever. His raft of early interventions, known as the New Deal, have become the benchmark for US presidents' first 100 days in office ever since. As 'Forester in Chief', FDR's administration initiated mass tree planting and soil conservation - all while providing employment for 3 million young men. Rob talks to Matthew Parris about how FDR's radical and ambitious environmentalism continues to inspire him, and how this man defied his sheltered upper class upbringing to reach out to working Americans and address their struggles directly. They are joined by Professor David B. Woolner, Senior Fellow and Resident Historian of the Roosevelt Institute and author of The Last 100 Days: FDR at War and at Peace, to discuss FDR's personal triumphs, his hidden struggles and his international legacy. Could or should he have predicted the divided Europe that followed hot on the heels of a hard-fought peace? With thanks to the archivists at the Franklin D Roosevelt Presidential Library. Presented by Matthew Parris. Produced by Sarah Goodman for BBC Audio Bristol.

Main Street
"A Dusty Echo" ~ Audubon's Marshall Johnson ~ Bird Flu ~ Teacher Wendy Grote

Main Street

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 52:59


Wednesday, May 11, 2022 - A Dusty Echo is a true North Dakota story. It won the 1976 North Dakota Bicentennial Playwriting Contest, and it's written by Bismarck native Ev Miller. It focuses on a struggling family farm during the Dust Bowl. Alicia Hegland-Thorpe visits with director Amanda Perry and cast member Patrick Engelhart. A Dusty Echo opens tomorrow at Dakota Stage in Bismarck. ~~~ In an excerpt from the Prairie Pulse television show, John Harris visits with Marshall Johnson, the National Audubon Society's chief conservation officer, who's based here in North Dakota. ~~~ Speaking of birds, the country is in the midst of one of the worst bird flu outbreaks in years. Millions of wild birds and poultry have died. William Brangham has more in this story from the PBS NewsHour. ~~~ Future Business Leaders of America is an organization devoted to inspiring and preparing students to become community and business minded leaders. And it sponsors competition between its chapters. Teacher Wendy Grote is about to retire, and she's doing so after leading her students of the Divide County High School FBLA chapter to 21 state championships!

This Day in Weather History
May 11 - Welcome to the 1934 “Dust Bowl”

This Day in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 7:17


That year, a severe drought spread across the region. Crops were scorched and withered and died.  And as that spread like a virus to the entire Great Plains collection of States, wind began to carry dust from the over-plowed and over-grazed lands. The over-plowed and abused land was too weak to recover and there was no rain so it was hopeless. It was so intense and so dangerous that it forced thousands of families from Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas and New Mexico to uproot and migrate to California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Up is Down Podcast
Ep 127: We're All (Not)Homesteading Now

Up is Down Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 70:33


Greetings To The Living. Thank you for tuning in to the Up Is Down podcast and double-plus-good thanks to all who support this work. Read ahead for news about supporting this work...This go round I attempt to bring attention to the often misused term, "homesteading". If you are building a life of self sufficiency and autonomy through community and self reliance, the hard and sweaty work of agriculture and animal husbandry, trading goods, services and value with other like-minded people and using only cash in your community for mutual aims and benefits, building barns, sheds, coops and gardens by yourself or with others then you, my friend, are not "homesteading". You are decentralizing, plain and simple. There's no other way to say it. I'm sorry. There is no more Homesteading. There is only Decentralizing. At least in the United States. The irony is that all of the things the OG homesteaders did was by necessity for life not a lifestyle choice, which is what makes up the "neo homesteading movement" that we see today; the luxury of choosing a lifestyle and a nostalgia for the past with romance of a fantasy.The starved, bleeding and puss-filled plight of the mid 19th century homesteader was necessary in order to arrive at the place we are nowadays, which ironically or not, is a place many of us are trying to leave. Another inversion. It is a disservice, in my opinion, to name that effort "homesteading" when in reality it is an effort at decentralizing, for there is nothing comparable taking place by youtubers, podcasters, and content creators regarding so-called homesteading to the OG pioneering homesteaders of the mid 19th century. Those people tried and died at the urging and incentive of the federal government, a government whose aim was always to form a centralized cohesive class system even if it had to mask that objective in "life, liberty and the pursuit of property". What we desire is departure from that empirical machine of grinding authority and centralization of power. We desire decentralization. The closest thing we can relate that desire to is a romanticized and programmed notion of the past as way to create a future. But the days of wide open spaces and being left alone are gone and gone for good. And they ain't never comin' back. They will never ever leave you alone.The truth is that the government first homesteaded the nation from the Atlantic to the Pacific, by ruthless murder and genocide, then subleased parcels of that property to a handful of poor people while allowing corporate giants of industry to suck up the remaining 80% of those millions of acres of "free land". We would be wise, conscious and courteous not to compare the luxury of choice we have today with the suffrage of those crafty, tirelessly inventive, sick and starving people 150 years ago. It was a different time. And we ought to use a different word.***AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE FROM UP IS DOWN***BETWEEN RECORDING AND PUBLISHING THIS EPISODE PAYPAL HAS RESTORED MY ACCOUNT TO FULL FUNCTIONALITY. FOR NOW ANYWAY. THAT SAID, THE SUREST WAY TO SUPPORT THE SHOW AND THE WORK WE DO HERE IS TO USE THE P.O. BOX ADDRESS FOR DECENTRALIZED SUPPORT ACTIONS LIKE CASH OR CHECKS. THE SECOND BEST WAY TO SUPPORT THE SHOW AND THE WORK IS TO AUTHORIZE YOUR FINANCIAL INSTITUTION TO ISSUE A CHECK DIRECTLY FROM YOUR ACCOUNT JUST LIKE ANY OTHER AUTOMATIC PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER BILLS. YOU CAN USE THE SAME P.O. BOX ADDRESS FOR THE DESTINATION.***Executive Producers of Ep 127***William CarterDianna RobisonSeth Klann***Associate Exec. Producers Ep 127***Chris JeromeChris TroppBryan ChappleJordan Dyer+++T H A N K Y O U A L L V E R Y V E R Y M U C H+++((((S U P P O R T THE S H O W))))PayPal Support Link:https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=U66JAQQUSFSUYBitCoinCash BCH: qzgwfjeu5vp634h84zzurw8kdah5j3cuxg8daq6qrk. Venmo: @Dean-Reiner-1YOU (OR YOUR BANK) CAN SEND A CHECK (or cash) for ANY AMOUNT TO:P.O. BOX 354345 Westfield StreetSilverton, OR 97381(you can even go so far as to schedule recurring, sustaining donations with your own bill pay services via your bank and by doing this you cut out the paypal/mastercard middlemen who charge fees and take a cut for themselves)CONSIDER SUPPORTING THIS WORK BY ACQUIRING SOME ORIGINAL ART THROUGH THE GALLERY SHOP AT deanreiner.comVALUE-FOR-VALUE: Consider the value you have for yourself as a free person with the ability to think for yourself. Next, consider the value you received from this production. Then consider the money value you'd place on that value and consider returning that value in the form of a donation to this production. You can decide for yourself what amount feels right for you. You don't need a PayPal account, just the generosity and will to support something you value and believe in. It all helps. This work is enjoyable but not easy, it takes time and costs money. Your support is needed and highly appreciated.PayPal Support Link:https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=U66JAQQUSFSUYBitCoinCash BCH: qzgwfjeu5vp634h84zzurw8kdah5j3cuxg8daq6qrk. Venmo: @Dean-Reiner-1A GREAT WAY TO SUPPORT THIS WORK IS TO PURCHASE SOME OF MY ARTWORK. BY DOING THIS YOU NOT ONLY SUPPORT ME AND THE SHOW BUT YOU ALSO HAVE SOMETHING TO SHOW FOR IT THAT IS BEAUTIFUL, ORIGINAL AND MADE BY MY OWN HANDS. I DO NOT PRODUCE OR ENDORSE CLEVER MERCH MADE BY FORCED VACCINATED SLAVES IN FACTORIES FAR AWAY. THAT IS NOT WHAT LIBERTY LOOKS LIKE.You can browse some of the art here: deanreiner.comFollow me on them Twitters: @upisdownpodcastEmail me at upisdownpodcast@gmail.comYou will never find me on Youtube, they'd shut me down instantly, and it's only a matter of time before the podcast platform and hosting services become as compromised as the mainstream media. I will never accept sponsorships that require me to try and sell you bullshit products you not only don't need, but likely cannot afford anyway. I believe that Value-For-Value is indeed the future of free speech and expression, as anything else has already proved itself to be more than compromised at all levels; you can actually just sit back and watch monetized platforms disintegrate each and every day. That cannot happen with Value-For-Value, because only YOU decide what's valuable and only YOU decide how that is determined and returned. Now that's power!Of course you can always listen (and donate) at:deanreiner.comS U B S C R I B ED O N A T ED O W N L O A DR E P O S TS H A R EC O M M E N TS U P P O R TS U P P O R TS U P P O R TR A T E / R E V I E WE M A I L upisdownpodcast@gmail.comdeanreiner.com for more art and support optionsPayPal Support Link:https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=U66JAQQUSFSUYT H A N K Y O U F O R L I S T E N I N GThis podcast contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. It is being made available in an effort to advance the understanding of society, economics and social engineering. It is believed that this constitutes a ‘fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and education purposes.

The Opperman Report
UNDER A FULL MOON: The Last Lynching In Kansas

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 64:23


UNDER A FULL MOON: The Last Lynching in Kansas tells of the tragic abduction and death of an eight-year-old girl at the hands of a repeat offender in 1932. This crime stands apart as the last mob lynching in Kansas. Based on true events, this account takes a deep dive into the psycho-social complexities of pioneer times and their impact on this particular crime and the justice meted out to the perpetrator. Beginning in the year 1881, and written in a chronological narrative non-fiction format, author Alice Kay Hill vividly weaves the stories of the victims and the families involved. She reveals how mental and physical abuse, social isolation, privations of homesteading, strong dreams and even stronger personalities all factored into the criminal and his crimes. Spanning the years of settlement to the beginnings of the Dust Bowl, historic events are lived as daily news by the seven families whose lives become intertwined. Historically accurate and written with an intimate knowledge of the area, UNDER A FULL MOON is as personal as a family diary, as vivid as a photo album found in an attic trunk, and will remain with the reader long after the book is closed.

The Opperman Report'
UNDER A FULL MOON: The Last Lynching In Kansas

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 64:23


UNDER A FULL MOON: The Last Lynching in Kansas tells of the tragic abduction and death of an eight-year-old girl at the hands of a repeat offender in 1932. This crime stands apart as the last mob lynching in Kansas. Based on true events, this account takes a deep dive into the psycho-social complexities of pioneer times and their impact on this particular crime and the justice meted out to the perpetrator.Beginning in the year 1881, and written in a chronological narrative non-fiction format, author Alice Kay Hill vividly weaves the stories of the victims and the families involved. She reveals how mental and physical abuse, social isolation, privations of homesteading, strong dreams and even stronger personalities all factored into the criminal and his crimes.Spanning the years of settlement to the beginnings of the Dust Bowl, historic events are lived as daily news by the seven families whose lives become intertwined. Historically accurate and written with an intimate knowledge of the area, UNDER A FULL MOON is as personal as a family diary, as vivid as a photo album found in an attic trunk, and will remain with the reader long after the book is closed.

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Harpist Yolanda Kondonassis celebrates Earth

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 38:34


Yolanda Kondonassis — Five Minutes for Earth (Azica Records) Jump to giveaway form New Classical Tracks - Yolanda Kondonassis by “I had such a great time practicing new stuff,” harpist Yolanda Kondonassis said. “It rewires your neurons when you're sitting there for hours absorbing new music, new material, new techniques and new everything.”During the pandemic Kondonassis had time and space to learn 15 new solo pieces for harp inspired by Earth for her latest album, Five Minutes for Earth. How does this album fit into the mission of your nonprofit? “My foundation, Earth at Heart, will sponsor and finance all ongoing performances of these five-minute pieces that are on the album every time they're performed. Any harpist anywhere in the world, if they can upload their performance and info to the Earth at Heart website, a contribution will be made to an Earth conservation organization. “The idea was not only to inspire through the arts, but in the case of Five Minutes for Earth, it gives artists a way to contribute through their performances.” Why is five minutes the magic number? “Five minutes started as a construct. I asked myself, ‘What can I realistically ask composers to do or donate?' I thought five minutes was a great metaphor for the time we have as a global community to get our act together.” How would you describe Maximo Diego Pujol's piece, Milonga Para Mi Tierra? “Diego says it's a love song for my Earth, and I love that ownership. It's not just the Earth. It's my Earth. That's an important part of the title and subliminally threaded throughout. It's nostalgic and melancholy while remaining hopeful. It's awe inspiring to watch that work in progress.” Can you talk about the composer and piece that opens the album? “Takuma Itoh, who is based in Honolulu, Hawaii, composed Kohola Sings. He wrote this piece using the stunning effect. It's a string-bending maneuver that can imitate the songs of whales.” Can you talk about Michael Daugherty's Hear the Dust Blow? “The initial idea came from the Dust Bowl period. The Grapes of Wrath and all that came from a convergence of elements. It was a combination of weather patterns and an abuse of the land. We learned something back then in the 1930s, but we need to learn it again. “There are gorgeous, aching moments in this piece. The idea of wishing, hoping and dreaming of a new day and a better life are woven through his piece. It is the glue. “Each piece has a small element of both looking back and forward. They are all so different from one another. But, if I were to try and narrow down a common thread with each work, it is that they all have a touch of melancholy combined with lots of hope.” To hear the rest of my conversation, click on the extended interview above, or download the extended podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Watch now More on Yolanda Kondonassis From NPR Tiny Desk: Jason Vieaux And Yolanda Kondonassis Performance Today In studio with Yolanda Kondonassis and Jason Vieaux New Classical Tracks Yolanda Kondonassis premieres new harp concerto by Jennifer Higdon in 'American Rapture' Giveaway Giveaway You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy. This giveaway is subject to the Official Giveaway Rules. Resources Yolanda Kondonassis — Five Minutes for Earth (Amazon) Yolanda Kondonassis (official site)

FoodNationRadio's podcast
FOOD SHORTAGES - AN EPIC BATTLE LIES AHEAD

FoodNationRadio's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 17:23


Food and Travel Nation with Elizabeth Dougherty Broadcast Date:  4/16/22 It's been 83 years since John Steinbeck released his controversial "Grapes of Wrath" that documented both the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl.  Farms that fed this nation went barren, leading to break-ups of families and the great migration westward to California.  It would take an additional six years (and World War II) to pull this country out of that slump.  Very few people alive today lived through that experience, yet we are facing our own challenges... by an invisible enemy that is set to destroy us.  Elizabeth shares details of what could be ahead.   LIVE BROADCAST every Saturday morning at 8am. (ET) Listen to the show NOW on iHeart Radio. website:  FoodAndTravelNation.com email:  Elizabeth@FoodAndTravelNation.com text: (321) 877-9898

FoodNationRadio's podcast
FOOD SHORTAGES - GRAPES OF WRATH 2022

FoodNationRadio's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 8:44


Food and Travel Nation with Elizabeth Dougherty Broadcast Date:  4/16/22 Is America on the verge of severe food shortages?  More and more, experts are predicting that by later this year, shelves will be empty.  You'll hear how America in the summer of 2022 could resemble America in 1939 as the Dust Bowl led to mass migration and starvations. LIVE BROADCAST every Saturday morning at 8am. (ET) Listen to the show NOW on iHeart Radio. website:  FoodAndTravelNation.com email:  Elizabeth@FoodAndTravelNation.com text: (321) 877-9898

Weather With Enthusiasm
Hottest Official (excludes dust bowl) SUMMERS For Chicago: 1988, 2012,1952,53,54,55 (based on # of 90°+ days a year)

Weather With Enthusiasm

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 1:00


Weather With Enthusiasm
Part 3: Will The Amazing Dust Bowl Years Ever Happen Again?

Weather With Enthusiasm

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 10:17


The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Ballet's principal dancers to perform most difficult ballet; The Dust Bowl

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 14:24


The two new principal dancers at the Colorado Ballet will perform the elegant but notoriously demanding “Theme and Variations” ballet at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House this month. The modern classic, which has challenged dancers for 75 years, is commonly considered the most difficult ballet to perform.  The Colorado Ballet's Jennifer Grace and Mario Labrador will dance the grueling “Theme and Variations” to the last movement of Peter Tchaikovsky's (CHI-kov-ski's) Orchestral Suite Number 3. It begins with a slow opening followed by fast-paced variations and high energy finale. Colorado Sun freelancer Mark Jaffe calls it a 100-yard dash that lasts for 21 minutes. He caught up with Grace, Labrador and Colorado Ballet artistic director Gil Boggs as they prepared for Friday's opening. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tageschronik
Heute vor 87 Jahren: Heftiger Sturm im «Dust Bowl»

Tageschronik

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 4:23


In den 1930er-Jahren wurden die «Great Plains» in den USA von einer schweren Dürre und heftigen Stürmen heimgesucht. Am 14. April 1935 ereignete sich mit dem «Black Sunday» ein besonders heftiger Sturm des sogenannten «Dust Bowl».

The Other California
Episode 4: Chowchilla and Fairmead

The Other California

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 26:40


We leave last week's Western Stampede behind but return to the town of Chowchilla to find out more about its history from its Dust Bowl migrants to present day immigrants, including the only Yemeni-American family living in Chowchilla. We also meet the 84-year-old grandson of one of the town's earliest white settlers. His grandparents sold 150 horses and left the cold weather of North Dakota to start a dairy farm in Chowchilla. Their 1910 house still stands. Like many towns back then, Chowchilla had racist housing covenants that kept certain groups of people out. But just a couple of miles from town was a place where Black people could actually buy property. At one point, the Black settlement of Fairmead had the largest single dairy in the state. We find out more about Fairmead's past and what it can teach us today.

Girls, Beer, Sports
Dust Bowl Cosplay

Girls, Beer, Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 82:19


In this episode we start out talking about Paw Patrol, that's right Paw Patrol and then get into some sports including the USNMNT making the World Cup and what Carrie did last time they were in the tournament. We talk some NCAA final four and pick the winner of our favorite Simpsons episode in the finals of the Smarch Madness bracket. Everyday cosplay in the News of the Weird and fruit loop peeps, an Outback Bowl name change, the Wendyverse and a peanut butter burger in Take It or Leave It.

Your Brain on Facts
Fell on Black Days: Sunday (ep. 189)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 34:46


(Get Surfshark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/MOXIE - Enter promo code MOXIE for 83% off and 3 extra months free!) T-shirt for Ukraine, all proceeds and matching donation to Ukraine Red Cross at yourbrainonfacts.com/merch There are four Sundays a month, but more than a dozen days we call "Black Sunday."  Here are three -- two forces of nature and one parade of schadenfreude. 02:42 Black Blizzard 12:45 Bondi Beach 24:42 Disneyland Quote reader: Vlado from It's Not Rocket Surgery Promo: Remnant Stew Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Dan Lebowitz,  Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Every year, tens of millions people or so go through Denver International Airport, the fifth busiest in the country and in the top 20 busiest in the world.  That's a lot of bodies to get from hither to yon, so the airport relies heavily on Automated Guideway Transit System, a people-mover that connects all of the midfield concourses with the south terminal, providing the only passenger access to concourses B and C.  And in 1995, a day that will live in infamy for staff and passengers alike, the system failed.  They refer to that day as Black Sunday.  My name's…   So I said to myself the other day, you know what would make a good topic, days with colorful sobriquets, surely there are enough of those to write about.  In what they call a good problem to have, there are in fact, too many!  Most of the “black.”  So I'm starting with a few Black Sundays and if you thinks it's a fruitful area of discussion, I'll make it a series, maybe one a month.  I'd space them out because you don't hear about the planes that land and you don't call a day Black whatever if everything was chill.  As such, today's episode is two heavy topics and one packed with schadenfreude, so gauge how you're feeling today.,  I don't mind waiting – it's not how long you wait, it's who you're waiting for.  We're going to go heavy, heavy, light, as decided by folks in our Facebook group, the Brainiac Breakroom, where anyone can share clever or funny things they find; same goes to the ybof sud-reddit.   Speaking of social media, folks are starting to post pictures of themselves wearing their Russian Warship go F yourself shirts to raise money for the Ukraine red cross (url).  Thanks to them specifically and I want to send a sweeping cloud of thanks to people in other countries for taking in the refugees.  Speaking of refugees, there was a time when hundreds of thousands of Americans were refugees in their own country.  During WWI, wheat prices rose and farming in the open prairies of the great plains was an attractive proposition.  Homesteaders and farmers set up shop, ripping up or tilling under the native grasses that had evolved as part of that ecosystem, with long roots that both held onto lots of soil, but reached down far enough to reach water waaay below the topsoil, allowing it to better survive drought conditions.  But we don't like to eat those grasses, so they replaced it with shallow-rooted wheat.  The rain stopped falling in 1931, leaving instead a severe widespread drought that lasted the rest of the decade, eventually killed thousands of square miles of wheat fields.  No other crops, either, and nothing to feed livestock.  Without live plants to hold onto the topsoil, it blew away.  The prairie wind became a sandstorm and people's livelihoods blew away.  It got so bad, the dust clouds eventually reached the east coast and beyond.  At the same time, they had this Great Depression on, a real nuisance, you've seen the movies, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, the other versions of Of Mice and Men, O Brother Where Art Thou (only time I enjoyed George Clooney), and dozens more.  The price of wheat [sfx raspberry] and people lost their jobs left right and center.  Many families were left with no choice but to pile whatever they still had left onto the family car and follow rumors of work, sometimes migrating all the way to California, where, even though they were regular ol' ‘Mericans, they were treated like foreign invaders.   Black Blizzard, American Dust Bowl, 1938   That's a broad-stroke quickie overview – and boy do I want to rewatch Carnivale for the fourth time (love me some Clancy Brown, rawr, I still would) – but we're here to talk about one day, a black Sunday, brought on by a black blizzard.  It's a blizzard but made up of dirt so thick, it blocks out the sun.  14 hit black blizzards hit in 1932, 38 in 1933, up to 70 by 1937 and so on.  The worst of it hit Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.  The storms became so frequent that people could discern the origin of the storm by the color of its dirt – brown dust storms were from Kansas or Nebraska, gray from Texas, and red dust storms were from Oklahoma.    People tried to protect themselves from breathing the dust and cloth masks were the least of it.  They'd hang wet sheets over doorways and seal up windows, sometimes with a paste ironically made of wheat flour because that's what they could get. They'd rub petroleum jelly into their nostrils, anything to try to prevent the “brown plague,” dust pneumonia.  Constant inhalation of dust particles killed hundreds of people, babies and young children particularly, and sickened thousands of others.   1934 was the single worst drought year of the last millennium in North America, temperatures soared, exceeding 100 degrees everyday for weeks on much of the Southern Plains, absolutely *baking the soil.  When spring of 1935 rolled around, there was a whole lot more dry dirt ready to be thrown into the air.  After months of brutal conditions, the winds finally died down on the morning of April 14, 1935, and people jumped on the chance to escape their homes.  Hope springs eternal and people thought maybe it was finally over.   It was, of course, not over.  The worst was standing in the wings in full costume, waiting for its cue.  A cold front down from Canada crashed into warm air over the Dakotas.  In a few hours, the temperature fell more than 30 degrees and the wind returned in force, creating a dust cloud that grew to hundreds of miles wide and thousands of feet high as it headed south.  Reaching its full fury in southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, it turned a sunny day totally dark.  Birds, mice and jackrabbits fled for their lives.  Have you ever heard the sound *one terrified rabbit makes?  I would not want to be on the ground while this was happening.  Domestic animals like cattle that couldn't get to shelter were blinded and even suffocated by the dust.   Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down anywhere they could, from fire stations to tornado shelters to under beds if a bed was the closest you could find to safety.  Folksinger Woody Guthrie, then 22, who sat out the storm at his Pampa, Texas, home, recalled that “you couldn't see your hand before your face.” Inspired by proclamations from some of his companions that the end of the world was at hand, he composed a song titled “So Long, It's Been Good to Know Yuh.”  [sfx song] Guthrie would also write other tunes about Black Sunday, including “Dust Storm Disaster.”   The storm dragged on for hours and peoples' wits began to fray.  One woman reportedly thought the merciless howling wind blocking out the sky was the start of the Biblical end of the world – can't imagine how she arrived there-- contemplated killing her child to spare them being collateral damage in a war between heaven and hell.  By all accounts it was the worst black blizzard of the Dust Bowl, displacing 300,000 tons of topsoil.  That would be enough to cover a square area of .4mi/750 m on each side a foot deep.  “Everybody remembered where they were on Black Sunday,” said Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, a history professor at Iowa State University and the author of “Rooted in Dust: Surviving Drought and Depression in Southwestern Kansas.”  “For people on the Southern Plains, it was one of those defining experiences, like Pearl Harbor or Kennedy's assassination.”   The Black Sunday storm blew its dust all the way to the east coast, causing street lights to be needed during the day in Washington DC and even coating the decks of ships in the Atlantic ocean.  The next day, as the remnants of the storm blew out into the Gulf of Mexico, an Associated Press reporter filed a story in which he referred to “life in the dust bowl of the continent,” coining the phrase that would encapsulate a phenomenon, a place, and a time.  Inspired by the myriad tales of suffering that proliferated in Black Sunday's wake, the federal government began paying farmers to take marginal lands out of production. It also incentivized improved agricultural practices, such as contour plowing and crop rotation, which reduced soil loss roughly 65 percent. By then, however, many families had given up hope and ¼-⅓ of the most affected people fled the Southern Plains, never to return.  But in the win column, thanks to better agricultural management practices, the massive black blizzards never returned either. Bondi Beach, Australia, 1938   The phrase Black Sunday isn't exclusive to the US, of course.  My one sister's adoptive country of Australia has had their fair share as well.  Like Black Sunday from 1926, an especially bad day during an already disastrous bushfire season.  60 people were killed and 700 injured.  Or the Black Sunday bushfires across South Australia in 1955.  60 fire brigades and 1,000 volunteers were needed to get the fires under control.  Thankfully this time only 2 people died that time.     On the far side of the element wheel is the story of Bondi Beach, minutes east of Sydney, on a February Sunday in 1938.  Sydney had recently celebrated its 150th birthday, or sesqui-centenary, with a big old parade and events planned to last until April.  The city was a-bustle with visitors, many of whom joined the locals spending the hot, sunny day at Bondi Beach.     The sky was clear, but the sea was already acting a fool. A large swell was hitting the coast and lifeguards at Bondi were busy all day Saturday pulling people from the heavy surf, as many as 74 rescues in one hour.  Despite the heavy seas, beach inspectors gave a mayor of Amity-approved thumbs-up to opening the beach on Sunday, February 6.  Beachgoers started coming and coming and coming.  The morning started out relatively quiet for the lifeguards, but business got brisk, even as they tried to wave swimmers toward safer parts of the beach.  As the tide moved out, more and more people ventured out to a sandbar that ran parallel to the beach.  The crowd had grown to 35,000, enjoying the surf and sand.  Extra surf reels were brought out to the beach as they tried to keep pace with the ballooning battery of bathers.  A lifesaving reel is an Australian invention that was brilliant in its simplicity.  It was a giant reel of rope, with a belt or harness at the end, in a portable stand.  The life saver would attach the harness to his or her self then swim out to the struggling swimmer or surfer.  The lifeguard –and I am going to persist in saying the American lifeguard rather than the Australian lifesaver– then puts the rescuee in the harness and a lifeguard on the beach would reel them in.  The lifeguard in the water either accompanies that person back or goes on to rescue someone else.      Boat crews were out in the water dropping buoys to mark out a race course for weekly races held by and for the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club.  This would turn out to be as fortuitous as when a woman had a heart attack on a trans-atlantic flight, but there were 15 cardiologists on board, going to a conference.  At about 3.00 p.m. two duty patrols were changing shifts at the Bondi surf club and some 60 club members were mingling around waiting for the competition.    Suddenly, five tremendous waves crashed high onto the beach, one right after the other, in such quick succession that the water could not recede.  Even though most bathers were only standing in water up to their waists, they were thrown onto the beach, and pummeled by the following waves.  Then the water receded.  What goes up must come down and what comes in must go back out.  The backwash, which is the term for water on the beach finding its level and returning to the ocean, swept people who'd been nowhere near the water, including non-swimmers who never planned to get in the water, into the water.  The people on the sandbar were then swept further out.  The club recorded 180 people, but news reports at the time put the figure as high as 250 – 250 people now in need of rescue, panicking and thrashing in the surf.     All hands from the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club lept into action.  Beltmen took every available line out, many went in without belts and held up struggling bathers.  Lifesaver Carl Jeppesen is said to have simply dived into the surf to rescue six people without the aid of a surf reel.  One of the main problems was not lack of assistance but too much unskilled help from the huge crowd on the beach.  One beltman, George Pinkerton, was dragged under water by members of the public trying to haul him in. He ended up in need of medical attention. Once the lines had been cleared and a certain amount of order restored, the lifeguards could get on with the job.  Thankfully there were people who *could help.  “I was co-opted into the situation because I was a strong swimmer and they put me on a line,'' said Ted Lever, just 16 at the time, a member of the Bondi Amateur Swimming Club who would soon be invited to join the renowned Bondi lifesaving club.    Even when the well-meaning public had been cleared from the lines to leave them in trained hands, there were still problems. The beltmen often found themselves swamped by swimmers seeking assistance. Some of them had to punch their way through a wall of distressed bathers to get to others in more danger.  One beltman spoke of being seized by five men who refused to let go.  “I was trying to take the belt to a youngster who was right out the back but I didn't get the chance.  As I went by, dozens yelled for help and tried to grab me.  I told them to hang on to the rope as soon as I got it out.  I didn't think I had a chance when they all came at me.  One grabbed me around the neck, two others caught me by one arm, another around the waist and another one seized my leg.  I hit the man who had me around the neck, managed to get him on his chin and he let go.  I had to do it; but for that, I would have been drowned myself.”   The boat was still out after laying the buoys but the crew were waiting for the race to start, but they were completely unaware of the chaos just off the beach.  Nobody thought to signal them, but even if they had, the boat could have posed a danger to people in the water with overactive waves and rip currents.   It was difficult to tell exactly how many people had been rescued during the course of that chaotic 20 minutes.  Rescued swimmers were brought up the beach by the dozens.  About 60 needed to be resuscitated to one degree or another.  Five people died, including one man who died saving a girl.   American doctor Marshall Dyer, there on vacation, helped resuscitate swimmers.  “I have never seen, nor expect to see again, such a magnificent achievement as that of your lifesavers,'' he said. ``It is the most incredible work of love in the world.''   There were inarguably many heroes on Bondi Beach that day, but the Lifesavers' club stance afterwards was that “everyone did his job.”  “It must be realised that though perhaps less spectacular, the work on the beach and in the clubhouse was just as necessary if not more so,'' he told a newspaper.  Instead of recognising individuals for their efforts the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia recommended the entire club for a special meritorious award.   Opening day of Disneyland, 1955   even a potential COVID outbreak or the measles outbreak they had a few years ago would pale in comparison to the disaster that was opening day at Disney.  Disneyland is known as the happiest place on Earth.  But when the park opened on July 17, 1955, the now-ubiquitous nickname was downright ironic.  Disney employees who survived the day referred to it as Black Sunday.  So opening day at Disney was a bit more like the Simpsons episode where they went to itchy and scratchy world. The opening day was meant to be a relatively intimate affair, by invite only, not for every Huey, Dewey and Lewey.  If you were friends and family of the employees, members of the press, and celebrities of the day, you received a ticket in the mail.  If you were everyone else, you bought a counterfeit ticket.  The park was only expecting 15,000 guests; 28,000 showed up, nearly doubled what they prepared for.  Well, what they meant to prepare for, we'll ride the teacups back around to that in a sec.  The counterfeit tickets might have been better than the legit ones, as those were only good for half the day, morning or afternoon, to spread the workload out more evenly.  The morning tickets had an end time of 2:30 pm, when, assumably, they figured people would see that and just say, oh, bother, my time is up, guess I'll leave then.  Nobody did that.  One is stunned.  You buy a ticket for a theme park, you're there all day.  So the morning people were still milling about when the afternoon people started showing up.  And then there were the people who started just sneaking in.  One enterprising self-starter set a ladder up against the outside fence and charged people $5 to climb it.  That's about $50 adjusted for inflation, many many times over for schlepping along a ladder that I like to think he nicked from his neighbor's yard.    A lot of things were not ready on opening day, within the park and without.  The Santa Ana Freeway outside turned into a 7 mile long parking lot.  The opening of the park essentially shut the freeway down.  There were so many people waiting so long, according to some media reports, there was rampant [] relief on the side of the road and even in the Disney parking lot.  Like the video for Everybody Hurts, if folks couldn't hold their water.  If you just flashed back to your life when that video came out, be sure to stretch before you mow the lawn and don't forget your big sun hat.     Today might think of a Disney park as being meticulously manicured and maintained.  Opening day, not so much.  Walt Disney tried to have everything ready on time, hustling his people to work faster, but there's only so much you can do.  So there were bare patches of ground, some areas of bare ground that had been painted green, weeds where the lawns and flowers were meant to be.  Weeds and native flora that they couldn't get rid of in time, they instead put little signs with the Latin name of the plant in the weeds, so it kind of looks like it was meant to be there.  Turn a liability into an asset, I always say.  Returning to the topic of bathrooms, there was a plumber's strike going on during construction; Walt basically had to decide between working water fountains or working toilets.  Florida heat notwithstanding, he chose to have the toilets working, and I'd say that was probably a good call.  If you've ever played theme park tycoon or any of those games now, you know that a lack of water fountains means people *have to pay for drinks now…  Or they would… if the park's concessions had been fully stocked.  The overabundance of people meant that the food and drink sold out completely in just a couple of hours.  Did I mention it was literally 100 deg freedom/38C that day?  The asphalt had been finished so close to opening that it began sticking to people's shoes.  Some people even claimed to have gotten their shoes completely stuck to the pavement on Main Street, where lots of people spent lots of time, because the rides, kind of a big deal at a theme park, they were not ready.  A number of rides, like Peter Pan's Flight, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage, and the famous Flying Dumbo either broke down or never opened at all.   Disney's Black Sunday lasted for weeks.  A Stagecoach ride in Frontierland permanently closed when it became clear that they were as safe against rollovers as a Bronco II with a roof rack loaded with building supplies.  36 cars in Autopia crashed due to aggressive driving on the part of the patrons.  I'm starting to wonder if Disney ever met people.  Ironically, the ride was designed to help children learn to be respectful drivers on the road.  There were a number of live animals in a circus attraction, which was not great when a Tiger and a Panther escaped, which resulted in a furious death struggle on Main Street, USA.  Now that's an attraction you can't pay for, like Baghera vs Sher Khan, 8 years before The Jungle Book.  Like the park, the Mark Twain Riverboat was over capacity on opening day with over 500 people cramming onto the boat, causing it to jump its tracks and sink in the mud.  It took about half an hour to get it back onto the rail, and as soon as it pulled up to the landing, everyone rushed to one side of the boat to get off…. and tipped it over.  Thankfully, the water was shallow and there were no injuries.  There was, however, a gas leak inside Sleeping Beauty's Castle, which could have been a serious problem and prompted the closing of Adventureland, Fantasyland and Frontierland for a few hours because, whoopsie-doodles, Sleeping Beauty's Castle is on fire.  Well, trying to catch fire.  Reports vary as to how severe it actually was.  Walt was so busy handling the press that he didn't even learn about the fire until the following day.  That's how chaotic things were.     Disney was a shrewd and clever businessman, so he thought, I am opening this park. Let's make this into a big live television event.  He partnered with ABC, which had also helped provide nearly a third of the funding.  In return, Walt Disney would host a weekly TV show about what people could expect to see in Disneyland for the year before it opened.  So on opening day, Walt hosted a 90 minutes live TV special with Art Linkletter and future President Ronald Reagan.  90 million people tuned in to see the happiest place on Earth and that kind of ratings was no mean feat for the 50's.  The cameras showed all of the fun and excitement of Disneyland, completely obscuring all of the disasters and unhappiness that was actually happening.  But if you think the live broadcast would go off without a hitch, you may have pattern-recognition problems.  It was riddled with technical difficulties.  Parkgoers kept tripping over camera cables that snaked all over the park.  They were on-air flubs, mics that didn't work, people who forgot their mic *did work, and unexpected moments caught on camera, such as co host Bob Cummings caught making out with one of the dancers.  “This is not so much a show as is a special event,” Art Linkletter said during the broadcast.  “The rehearsal went about the way you'd expect a rehearsal to go if you were covering three volcanoes, all erupting at the same time and you didn't expect any of them. So from time to time, if I say we take you now by camera to the snapping crocodiles in adventure land and instead somebody pushes the wrong button and we catch Irene done adjusting her bustle on the Mark Twain. Don't be too surprised.”  And that's…. The train system is essential for the airport to function at its full capacity since it provides the only passenger access to Concourses B and C. In rare instances of the train system being out of service, shuttle buses have been used. While the system is highly reliable, one major system failure took place on April 26, 1998. A routing cable in the train tunnel was damaged by a loose wheel on one of the trains, cutting the entire system's power. The system was out of service for about seven hours. United Airlines, DIA's largest airline (who operates a large hub out of Concourse B), reported that about 30 percent of their flights and about 5,000 passengers were affected by the failure.     Sources: find sources for Disney https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/11/historical-echoes-what-color-is-my-day-of-the-week/ https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://www.history.com/news/dust-bowl-migrants-california https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnEErB6sPRY https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1925%E2%80%9326_Victorian_bushfire_season https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_bushfires https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/159183/Bondis_Black_Sunday,_1938_rev.pdf https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1000-mile-long-storm-showed-horror-life-dust-bowl-180962847/ https://alchetron.com/Denver-International-Airport-Automated-Guideway-Transit-System  

This Date in Weather History
1935: "Black Blizzard" strikes Amarillo, TX

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 2:11


The 1930s were not kind to the Great Plains, in the midst of economic disaster caused by the Great Depression, one of the most prolonged periods of severe weather struct the region in the form of severe drought, known as the Dust Bowl. Mass migration hit the area and many parts of the region lost population that would not be replenished for more than 25 years. With insufficient understanding of the ecology of the plains, farmers had conducted extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains during the previous decade; this had displaced the native, deep-rooted grasses that normally trapped soil and moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. The rapid mechanization of farm equipment, especially small gasoline tractors, and widespread use of the combine harvester contributed to farmers' decisions to convert arid grassland, much of which received no more than 10 inches of precipitation per year, to cultivated cropland. During the drought of the 1930s, the unanchored soil turned to dust, which the prevailing winds blew away in huge clouds that sometimes blackened the sky. These choking billows of dust were named "black blizzards". On March 15, 1935 one of the worst of these black blizzards, stuck Amarillo, Texas with Suffocating dust; 6 people died, many livestock starved or suffocated. Dust lay 6 feet deep in places. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sew Powerful Parables
The Really Bad Farmer

Sew Powerful Parables

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 29:20


Based on Jesus' Parable of the Sower, this story gives us a hilarious new look at a classic story. Written and Narrated by Dana Buck Devotional Thoughts Narrated by Kim Pratt Produced by Beneath Blue Skies Productions Music Credit: “Upbeat Happy Ukulele Kids”, “Folk Acoustic Ukulele Kids”, “Little Piggy”, “Motivational Ukulele”, “Dust Bowl”, “Wildflower”, “Guitar Acoustic Summer Live”, “Borderline”, “Relatives”, “Upbeat Folk Acoustic”, “Happy Ukulele” – Adobe Music Sound Effects by Zapsplat

HerStory - starke Frauen der Geschichte
HerStory meets Fotomenschen: Dorothea Lange, Fotografin der Großen Depression

HerStory - starke Frauen der Geschichte

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 123:46


Dorothea Lange war erfolgreiche Porträtfotografin, bevor sie ihre Kamera auf Menschen in Not richtete: Für die Regierung dokumentierte sie offiziell die Folgen der Großen Depression und der Dust Bowl, einer Klimakatastrophe im Herzen Amerikas. Mit Dirk Primbs von Fotomenschen spreche ich über ihr Wirken als Fotografin und die Entstehungsgeschichte ihres wohl berühmtesten Fotos: "Migrant Mother" - und warum das Foto heutigen Ansprüchen an die Dokumentarphotographie wohl nicht mehr genügen würde.

Aspire with Osha: art, nature, humanity
Democracy, Food & Our Climate with Guest Frances Moore-Lappé

Aspire with Osha: art, nature, humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 47:58


The future of Democracy is at stake. Democratic countries and people have united to punish Russia for Putin's unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.In this episode, Osha Hayden and  Frances Moore-Lappé engage in a discussion about democracy, food and our climate and underline the empowering choices available to each one of us right now.   My guest, Frances Moore Lappé, revolutionized how we think about food in 1971 when she published Diet for a Small Planet, now available in the 50th Anniversary Edition with all new recipes. She researched the impact of our food systems on our planet and the role democracy plays in addressing hunger worldwide. Through her 50 years of research into the impact of the producing and eating meat she shows us how food and democracy are interconnected.  Recipient of multiple awards and author of over 20 books, Frances Moore Lappé invites us to become active participants in a democracy that works for the people, not just  the powerful few. “Frances' message is … [even more] relevant today, as we factor in a global climate crisis and the social injustice and systems contributing to poverty and food insecurity. Her new edition of 'Diet for a Small Planet' expands on the idea of diet as a powerful agent of social change.” (SmallPlanet.org)  https://www.smallplanet.org/frances-moore-lappeOver 50 years ago in 1969 as Frances was researching food production and the roots of starvation, she discovered two life changing facts: - that “what we had grown up believing was a healthy diet”  was false and - there is an enormous amount of waste involved in producing meat. When she researched the real costs of meat production she learned that we could erase starvation entirely by changing the way we produce food. 50 years later, here are some facts Frances discovered about the true costs of eating meat. The costs of producing just one # of steak:- 2,500 gallons of water- erosion of our topsoil  (another Dustbowl on the horizon?)- energy costs: it takes 20,000 calories of fossil fuel to produce just 500 calories of food energy - two thirds of our agricultural exports go to livestockThe UN IPCC report on climate change was just released. It contained what it calls “a dire warning about the consequences of inaction.” The scientists made clear that humans must make changes to adapt and mitigate the worst consequences of climate change and we must do it now. Farmers must improve soil health to improve yields - human health, food security and biodiversity are at risk. A 2022 report from Stanford university states that: “Replacing animal agriculture and shifting to a plant-based diet could drastically curb greenhouse gas emissions, according to new model”. (Feb 1, 2022, Stanford News - https://news.stanford.edu/2022/02/01/new-model-explores-link-animal-agriculture-climate-change/)  Scientists around the world are clearly stating that we need to shift to a plant centered diet to avoid the worst effects of climate change. All the work Frances does is centered in the idea of “living democracy” - and the idea that true democracy is the solution to the issues that affect us today, such as food insecurity, climate change and poverty.We each have choices - we can make life affirming choices for our health, our democracies, our climate. We have the power in our hands to make life affirming choices each day for a better life for  future generations. Song:  Mystery by Chic Street Man

Trumpet Hour
#677: Week in Review: Russia’s War on Ukraine Enters Brutal Phase

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 51:06


Russia's illegal war on Ukraine, now in its eighth day, is dramatically intensifying, with Russia now using aerial bombardment and missile launchers to destroy civilian targets in key Ukrainian cities. Russia's invasion is having some major effects on Germany and its leadership over the European Union. We also cover a significant upgrade in Germany-Israel relations, takeaways from President Joe Biden's first State of the Union address, Russia moving closer to China, alarming developments in Iran's nuclear program, possible outcomes from France's upcoming presidential election, and an intensifying drought in California. Links [00:47] Russia's War on Ukraine (10 minutes) “Putin Can't Afford to Lose in Ukraine” [10:33] Effects on Germany (6 minutes) “Germany Responds to Russia With an Explosive Announcement!” [16:08] German-Israeli Relations (7 minutes) Jerusalem in Prophecy [23:00] Biden's State of the Union (8 minutes) “A Nation-Destroying Presidency” [31:55] Russia and China ( minutes) “Where Western Sanctions Against Russia Are Leading” [36:59] Iran's Nuclear Developments (7 minutes) The King of the South [43:57] Upcoming French Presidential Election (3 minutes) “France Is Resurrecting the Holy Roman Empire” Germany and the Holy Roman Empire [46:58] California Drought (3 minutes) “Is America Headed for a Dust Bowl?”

Fresh Hop Cinema: Craft Beer. Movies. Life.
256. Licorice Pizza // Uncharted // Dust Bowl (Turlock, CA) // Trillium (Boston, MA)

Fresh Hop Cinema: Craft Beer. Movies. Life.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 82:23


This week on Fresh Hop Cinema; Beer 1: "Taco Truck Lime Lager" from Dust Bowl Brewing Co (Turlock, CA). Style: Lager. ABV: 4.7% Ratings: Jonny - 9.1, Max - 6. Film: "Licorice Pizza" directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. Ratings: Jonny- 5.4 , Max - 7. Beer 2: "Night and Day" from Trillium Brewing Co (Boston, MA). Style: Imperial Stout ABV: 12.7% Ratings: Jonny - 6.4 Max - 4. Film: "Uncharted" directed by Reuben Fleischer. Ratings: Jonny- 8.5, Max - 7. Inside Hot & Bothered: - Max - Bailey Visit // Uncharted Patreon Fieldtrip - Jonny - "Fantasy on Draught" ------ Episode Timeline: 0:00 - Intro, Ads, & Shoutouts 5:37 - Taco Truck Lime Lager 16:10 - Licorice Pizza (No Spoilers) 30:58 - Licorice Pizza (DANGER ZONE) 37:14 - Night and Day 51:40 - Uncharted (No Spoilers) 1:01:15 - Uncharted (Spoilers) 1:08:20 - Hot & Bothered Please leave us a rating and/or review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts! Got a few bucks to spare? Support us on Patreon for as little as a dollar per week at www.patreon.com/freshhopcinema.

This Date in Weather History
1936: Temperature reaches -58 degrees at McIntosh, SD

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 2:28


The Dust Bowl is generally associated with extreme drought and heat. The "Dust Bowl" years of 1930-36 brought some of the hottest summers on record to the United States, especially across the Plains, Upper Midwest and Great Lake States. For the Upper Mississippi River Valley, the first few weeks of July 1936 provided the hottest temperatures of that period, including many all-time record highs The string of hot, dry days was also deadly. Nationally, around 5000 deaths were associated with the heat wave. Several factors led to the deadly heat of July 1936. A series of droughts affected the U.S. during the early 1930s. The lack of rain parched the earth and killed vegetation, especially across the Plains states. Poor land management and farming techniques across the Plains furthered the impact of the drought, with lush wheat fields becoming barren waste lands. Without the vegetation and soil moisture, the Plains acted as a furnace. The climate of that region took on desert qualities, accentuating its capacity to produce heat. But also, like hot desserts there are also cold desert climates – the lack of vegetation and drought allows for cold air to sweep across these regions, unchecked and creating unheard of cold extremes. The situation that set up for several years in the plans states in the 1930's created these extremes of both hot and cold. So, it was on the morning of February 17, 1936, when the mercury dipped to -58 degrees at McIntosh, SD... the state record low temperature. Later that very same year, at the height of the Dust Bowl on, July 5, 1936, the state record high temperature of 120 degrees was set at Gann Valley, SD. A difference in the state in less than 6 months' time of 178 degrees. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Something to Chew On - Global Food Systems at Kansas State University
Diversity is the key to Sustainability: Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science

Something to Chew On - Global Food Systems at Kansas State University

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 55:15


Listen to our first podcast of 2022, where we discuss weed management techniques, old and new, and the tools being developed to achieve food crop yield optimization with Vipan Kumar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University. Weeds can reduce food crop yields by more than 30%.  In this podcast, Kumar discusses the ways in which this problem might be solved when the need for food production will continue to increase, and the challenges caused by climate change create a moving target.   Transcript: “Diversity is the key to Sustainability; Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science”.      Diversity is the key for sustainability. You keep doing one thing again and again you will see a problem that we have seen in our herbicide based methods or weed control.   Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of global food systems. It's produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik, coordinator of Global Food Systems. We welcome back co host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology, weeds can reduce food crop yields by more than 30%. These interlopers compete for resources including soil nutrients and water. We attempt to control weed growth through chemistry, but over time they manage to mutate, overcome, thrive, and adjust to given management techniques. So how is this problem solved when the need for food production will continue to increase and the challenges caused by climate change create a moving target. Today, we will hear more about weed management techniques old and new. And the tools being developed to achieve food crop yield optimization with Dr. Vipan Kumar, Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University, I want to welcome you Vipan would like to before we get started in the technical side of things, just get a little background and understanding of who you are and how you got to the place that you are today as far as your professional interests go.   Sure, So my name is Vipin Kumar, I'm originally from India. I did my bachelor in crop science, but finished in 2008 from Punjab Agricultural University back in India, in the state of Punjab, it's a Northwestern State in India, mainly known for wheat production and rice production. And it's very big in ag, Punjab state. So, my original goal was to help communities there, especially the farming communities to management practices they are doing so I did my bachelor there. And then I started my master actually mastering Weed Science in Pau 2008, fall 2008. But somehow I was also interested to come abroad and expand my education here in the States. So I was looking through some programs and during that time, I got to know there is a master positions open in Louisiana State. So I I applied there and I got invited and came over 2009 That was summer 2009 started my graduate research assistant with LSU, Louisiana State, Louisiana State University. So that program was specifically looking for someone who can help growers in terms of managing their irrigation water irrigation scheduling, developing some crop coefficients for the cotton prop in North East side of Louisiana. So I was based in actually a research center. It was in North East Louisiana, about five, four or five hours from the main campus Baton Rouge. So my whole research was on resource center and I got to know very few people there but I had a very excellent project to work with. So during that time, I was doing a master I got interested in Weed Science because wonderful. One of my committee member was a weed scientist. He was the superintendent with the research center and he was on my committee and glyphosate resistant Palmer Amaranth was kinda getting a lot of attention during that time in codon. So during that conversation and meeting with his students, I got interested in wheat science. So finishing master and then I started applying for PhD program. So I think during that time, there was not a whole lot of opportunity because of the economic constraints, but I found one position in Montana State University 2011 So I started my PhD 2011 in Montana State University, Bozeman, the whole my dissertation research was focused on herbicide resistant weeds, mainly Tumbleweed Kosha, looking at, you know, characterizing herbicide resistance evolution, how we can manage in terms of what strategies growers can use to control herbicide resistant Kosha in Different cropping systems. So, that was for four years I spent there and then just immediately after finishing my PhD, I started my postdoc there and two year postdoc in the same program in Montana State. So 2017 I got here at K State got this position, where I am in his as an assistant professor in Weed Science. Part of my responsibilities. I am 100% researcher. All the focus is on developing integrative weed management strategies for western Kansas. Looking at herbicide resistance evolution in weeds, what are the novel and innovative strategies we can come up for our dry land are no till dryland growers in western Kansas. So that's I have been doing last for more than 40 years in Hays, Kansas. And a little bit history on this tradition. My predecessor, Dr. Phil Stallman, he had spent 42 years on this role. He was kind of He's like one of the pioneer in herbicide resistance management in High Plains specially in dryland cropping system in Kansas. So right now leading a statewide program, research program and little bit outreach program because I've been involved with a lot of growers here are the my appointment is not extension or no extension tents, but the been doing some extension as well. So that's kind of in the nutshell, what I'm doing here.    That's great. Okay, well, thank you so much for that overview. That's helpful in me understanding a little bit more about what it is you're doing in reading through some of the information I found on your website about what you do, there was a lot of discussion on no till and the impact of no till on managing weeds and that type of thing. Can you tell me a bit more about what that term means and how it impacts the growing period?   Sure, since the dustbowl period, the soil conservation practices have been you know, taken place among growers in the main reason was those soil conservation practices were to conserve the soil and other resources for longer term because soil erosion in these areas, especially the Great Plains area, or High Plains area was pretty obvious. And because we control it was generally achieved by tillage. So folks still the ground and control the weeds in history, if you see that's like number one method it used to be and then USDA NRCS folks came up with this idea of conserving the soil not to till the ground just to preserve the soil from erosion as well as not to blow the surface soil where we have fertile soil. So, so no till is basically a concept brought up after the Dust Bowl period and got adopted by growers throughout the Great Plains. And no tillage equipments also got, you know, into the market after that like no till drills, no till planters, that growers don't have to till the ground to make the seed bed they can directly go and plant or drill their crops. And this idea or concept was achieved with the chemical weed control. So if you look at after 1940s, when the this chemical era started, like the two four D came into the market, or any other cleaning herbicide came into the market, one of those early products came into the market grower started using those and they found very convenient to kill those weeds and not till the ground. So this chemical era helped to adopt that concept of no tillage in High Plains as well as in throughout the Great Plains. So mostly what growers been doing is they don't tell the grounds they clean their fields before planting and after planting and in season crop by using chemicals and by using herbicides, so it's kind of serving to purpose they're controlling the weeds and they are also conserving the soil. Another aspect of doing no tillage is to conserve the moisture. We are in semi-arid regions our annual precip is not that great. If you look at historically we are between somewhere between 12 to 24 inches, you know depending on the place where you are in the Great Plains so doing a no tillage practice also helped conserving the moisture throughout the winters time. So whatever the snow or the moisture comes, if you don't do the ground, you know it stays there for the subsequent crop to plan and have the crop in place. There are two things basically conserving the soil and conserving the moisture that no till practice came into existence. But however, I would I also like to emphasize over the last 1015 years, what has happened is because we have relied too much on chemicals, too much on herbicides, and we are seeing evolution in weeds, they are developing or evolved resistance to these chemistries, what folks have been using in our systems. So herbicide resistant weeds have really, really become a threat to this Nortel production system and chemical industries are struggling in terms of bringing new chemistries into the market, because there is not a whole lot of investment going into bringing a new motor factions, especially from herbicide standpoint. So the dilemma is to control those herbicide resistant weeds, we need alternate strategies, alternate methods of weed control. So that's where my role kind of come into that where that fit is how we can combine different methods of weed control, including chemical or non chemical, and come up with some sort of sustainable system that can go in longer term.   Yeah, if I could follow up with a question. How prevalent is this problem globally?    Herbicide resistance globally, it's, it is the number one problem for Weed Science communities as well as the grower community. Wherever folks have been using herbicides, we have been seeing increasing trend after 1980s, we have been seeing exponential increase in a number of cases of herbicide resistant weed population being reported, there is a website called Weed Science dot O R G, that documents every single case been reported to the world. And if you go to that website, you will see after 1980s, that graph has just jumped to the highest level. And it's not only one herbicide, it's basically, you know, all the available herbicide motor factions, we have reported case of resistance somewhere in the world. In the US, we are leading in that graph, country wise, in terms of herbicide resistance, the complicated issue is okay, one time a herbicide fails, for example, glyphosate. So folks start using other herbicides or other mode of action, but now been doing those things, we have been seeing multiple resistance in our weed populations. So resistance not only to one herbicide mode of action, but 23456, even six herbicide mode of action resistance in those weed species. So that's the challenge that we are having a limited options in terms of chemicals.   One of the quality parameters for seed, like the grains and things like that is the number of weed seeds that are also in with the grains. Is that a significant way of moving herbicide resistant genotypes around?   Yes, recently, what happened has most of our soybean, you know, most of our corn, we export to other countries. And there has been international standards in those products. And there's inert material and weed seeds are one of those standards. And recently, we have got email from our society, as well as USDA that come up with the plans how we can minimize those weed seeds in the crop seeds. Because some of the Chinese importer, they have stopped taking some of our soybean because of the big weed seeds present in those crop seeds. So it's a function of what is escaping in those crops, what is leaving in those crops at the time of harvest what you're harvesting with. And that's ultimately making those crop quality lower and making those export important difficult. And it's not only that they have they have also raised concern that hey, we don't have this, let's say big weed in China, you are sending herbicide resistant pigweed in our ways. So that's the hurdle with the growers how to sell those because the quality is lower in terms of having weed seeds in those. Those greens.   Yeah, so you mentioned some, weed genotypes with resistance to five, six or more chemistries. What's the strategy then? How do you get on top of this?   Yeah, I feel fortunate and excited some time that I'm in the field that where there is a lot of growth, there's a lot to do. I don't know if you have probably noticed that recently, a Weed Science area we have so many openings, so many positions coming up in industry as well as in academia and public sectors. And the reason is that we are struggling with these issues of resistance and crop weed competition in different scenarios. So, you know, considering that we are getting, you know, way back in terms of herbicide options. Industry is not coping up with the new molecules in the market. And we have more and more cases of resistance. So the shift of the research or read science research has gone to looking at non chemical strategies, what are the non chemical strategies we can bring into our system? So historically, as I said, folks used to do tillage. But in our system in Great Plains, High Plains, that's probably not a good recommendation, if you want to give folks will not like that, because we've been promoting that no till system for decades. And that is number one challenge. But in other areas, tillage is helping and it's helping those folks controlling those herbicide resistant weeds or multiple system weeds. Another approach we are looking at, what are the ecological tactics? How about the crop weed competition, how we can make our crops so competitive against weeds, that we don't have to rely too much on chemicals. One example I can give that is ecological method we are testing here is cover crops, how the cover crops can come into the system, and helps pressing those weed populations and reduce the seed bank. Again, these are not these ecological tactics don't work like chemicals, but they have a fit in our system. If we can, let's say suppress our weeds from 100 100 weeds to 70 weeds, there are still benefit having that. And you can add with the chemicals method of weed control. So that's just one example than other methods, we are looking as a non chemical methods or harvest weed seed control, that new thing is kind of getting a lot of interest among growers and researchers throughout the globe. So when I say harvest weed seed control is basically a technique when you're harvesting the crop, you have weeds in that crop, so you are harvesting the crop and you're also collecting those weed seeds. And then either you are destroying those weeds by crushing them when they're coming out of the Combine that's called harvest wheat seed destruction or you can put them as a CEF as a narrow line called chaff lining behind the combine. So this concept was brought up or discovered by a grower actually in Western Australia in a dryland wheat grower actually, just similar to what we have in western Kansas, he was struggling with the rigid ryegrass, multiple resistance to the rye grass. So what he did is he started destroying those rye grass seeds when he was harvesting wheat. So over the two, three years when he did that, he found that he reduced the seed bank, he didn't have to deal with that problem with the chemicals. So but in US or in North America, that technology has just arrived. And we are the first one in classes we have bought that destructor and Jeff minor. And we have got some USDA wants to test here in High Plains, how that's going to work in our system. I'm just giving example that those are the kind of approaches we are looking at it from the future work. Third thing which I really like to touch base is the proceeds. And that's the coming future of the Ag digital agriculture or Smart Agriculture. You can name it differently, but that's happening. So from a weed control research or weed control perspective, precision agriculture is another way to look at these problems or herbicide resistant weed problems.   So how specifically does the Precision Ag is it about applying chemical where it's needed when it's needed? Is that the strategy there? Or?   Yes, that there are different aspects there preseason agriculture or preseason technology is what we are, but I can envision is, you know, it can help us at least doing field mapping with to start with if we can detect early detection of herbicide resistant weed population in a farm. And then we can develop strategies accordingly. And again, then the next level of proceeds and that could be a variable rates of herbicide application or spot treatment. We don't need to spray the whole farm maybe, but just a little patch where we have herbicide resistant weeds growing. So that's where we can, you know, have precision ag tools helping us in the future if we have a good set of data, especially if you have good algorithms and good database, we can identify our pig weeds or Kosha or any other weeds in our crops, I think that can help making making your decisions or plans for weed control.   Yeah, thank you. Sorry, Maureen I've been dominating.    No, that's okay. It was you know, as he was talking about some of the methods that they're looking at it. It took me back to my previous life. Were working in the food safety area, we focus heavily on integrated pest management, it sounds to me like the directions that you're heading now that the chemicals are not doing what they're supposed to necessarily be doing. You're looking at these integrated systems of trying to control those weed productions from a whole variety of different areas. And it may be that there are packages or approaches  that can be taken based on location based on crop type based on a variety of other things. But you will have that group of tools in your toolbox. Is that am I interpreting that correctly?    Yes, yes, you're right, you're on the same page. The things are like with this herbicide resistance management, it's all economic aspects. Economy drives these things, the farmer economy, when they are going to make their weed control decision, they're going to look at what herbicide how much it takes, what is the rate? What is the cost. And if you see, like with the roundup resistant weeds, folks have been switching to other chemistries which are more expensive, and having more other issues as well as like drift to other crops or drift to other organisms from environmental standpoint. Also, chemical control is kind of getting ahead. In terms of some folks, they don't like some chemicals because they are hitting their other organism or other crops sensitive crops. And the second is, economically Is it viable to use that chemistries, for example, you know, most of the folks most of the industry, you might notice these days, they're giving a talk having a true two or three different herbicide mode of action in a tank, they have a pre mixes available two to three actives in those pre mixes. But those are very, very expensive. Those are not cheap products to use. So the idea with the growers with the lower commodity prices, they don't want to put those high expensive herbicides at especially when you are doing in a fallow weed management, you're not getting any output or any return in those fallow fields. So to make the system more economical, you need to think about where my money is going in terms of inputs, those herbicide applications and in fallow systems grower used to spray like three, four times in the season. It's not like one application, and they're done. They used to spray three times four times. And you can imagine like 5000 acres spraying three times $10 an acre, that can multiply pretty quick. So that's where I think the folks or the weed science community is thinking to bring some of those cost effective programs or cost effective management strategies in our system that not only helps pressing this problem or suppressing these weeds, but also give benefit to the growers, and the environment and ecology or agro ecology, like a cover crops. So we are not just thinking integrating cover crops for weed suppression. But we are thinking that cover crops can help suppressing weeds. It can help you know fixing nitrogen, it can help improving the soil quality soil health. And it can also be used for grazing purpose to the animals. So there is a livestock integration as well. So we have we are thinking from a system standpoint that can help folks to be more economically viable.   This next question is kind of out there as it's taking us probably outside of your major focus at this point. But I've done a little bit read a bit of reading recently on the land institute and some of the work they're doing in Salina on perennial grains. Have you looked at that at all or have any thoughts on perennial brains? And if there's any value to that and what impact it would have on what you work on?   Definitely, I have not personally looked at that system yet. But I've been hearing that quite a bit. And we have a cropping system specialist here in his he's been talking one other day was giving a presentation on that side of it. But I think again, I would like to emphasize that Perennial system or perennial grain springing into our system is basically improving you know, our our ecosystem and also increasing the economic value of the products as well as the farm profitability overall. And some of the work being led by cropping system specialist here or agronomist here. Also looking at those forage species or forage annual forages or biennial forages or perennial forages as a part of the system that can integrate into our system. So, from Weed weed management side of it, I think that would be a win win situation that if that species or if those grains or perennial grains can provide that kind of weed suppression benefits what we are getting from other cover crops. I think that's what we need.   So one of the reasons we care about weeds as the as we do the other pests as their impact on production and grow the crops for to feed people, we grow the crops to feed the animals that become the food that they feed people. Are there reasonable estimates of the economic impact or the yield impacts that you know, general rules of thumb? I know there, there are no exact numbers, but what what are we talking about in terms of scale of impact that we have on food production, but then also, what having herbicide resistant weeds contributes to that?   Definitely, there has been several reports in different crops. And I will just highlight some of the examples here for Kosha or, or Palmer Amaranth. Those are the prevalent species here in western Kansas or central part of state, if you like, look at some of the reports on Kosha. previous reports from my previous predecessor and other colleagues in other other states, they have found Kosha is quite competitive. Irrespective of resistance, let's say there's no resistance in these species. These weed species are very, very aggressive, very invasive. They have good traits, good biological traits, to compete very well with the crops. First, you need to understand that the biology behind those weeds, that's why they're becoming more and more troublesome problem for the folks here. So in terms of yield impact, I would say Kosha, let's say you know, you leave the kosher season long infestation in a crop like that the sugar bee does the least competitive crop in among all those crops, we grow in the northern or central Great Plains by up to 95% reduction in those sucrose yield as well as the beat heels we have reported. We have seen in the literature since 1970s 1980s. Wheat 20 to 30%. Yield reduction, going to be the kosher season long infestation, when I'm saying the Kosha is like moderate densities 40 to 50 plants per square meter, if they are present, they can do that 20-30% of damage to the yield big waves, they can choke our our sorghum. So one of the worst fields I have seen in my lifetime here in western Kansas is sorghum because the folks they don't have option, there's not not a single effective option that can go with for controlling pigweed controlling Palmer Amaranth in sorghum, especially when the sorghum is above certain stage, like 30 inch tall, there's no label chemistry to go with controlling pigweed. And that's the time I start getting calls from growers, hey, our pigweed is this much our Milo is already two feet tall, can I spray Dicamba that's the off label you cannot and if you do it, you will hurt you leave you will that will cause a crop injuries that will cause reducing the grain quality. So yeah, really impact. I mean, there's a huge impact. And you can imagine now if those species are resistant, and you are putting the chemical, and they are surviving 70% of those ceilings are surviving. And you know, going up to the seed production, you can imagine that you have put the cost to control it. Plus you still have a problem, and there is a double hit there.   Right. That's the double insult with resistance.   Right. So yeah, that's I think that's where we need to be more proactive. And we need to think more in longer term. The growers don't think in a longer term, they think on an annual basis because their budget is running annual basis. They have like let's say 5000 acres, they have a plan for 5000 acre for one year, they don't have a plan for three year or five years. That's where the problem starts. And as I said, economy drives all these things that resistance management. And that's become really, really challenging for researcher as well as extension person to convince folks to do things they're not doing.   You're talking about the aggressive nature of some of those weeds and thought just came into my mind on the genetics of those materials as any work being done at K State on the genetics of some of these weeds.   Yes, yes, we have a weed physiologist, weed physiology lab in in Manhattan. There has been quite a bit of work been done. And yeah, there's all kinds of different genetic mechanisms they have found in these weed species, why they are adapting to these kinds of situations herbicide applications. One example I can give here is Kosha and Palmer Amaranth. They have developed resistance to glyphosate commonly used chemistry or herbicide in our system in Roundup Ready crops. We have seen both species Palmer and Kosha. What they do is they multiply that target gene so they have more copies of that gene with the glyphosate go and target. So what it does is instead of one copy, single gene in they have Kosha has like 10-15-20 copies of that gene. So that Are those number of copies of that gene produce more enzyme, so the chemical cannot inhibit that much enzyme. So the those plants survive those treatments. That's how they are kinda adapting to that glyphosate treatments or other mechanism recently, weed physiology lab in Manhattan, they have found these multiple resistant pigweeds, what they are doing is they have enhanced metabolism. So some of the genes involved in metabolism in those plants, they got activated, and they are just metabolizing, whatever you're spraying. So no matter what, even a new chemistries is not even existing, it can just metabolic metabolite because it's not reaching to the target gene and hitting those targets side. So that is a more fearful thing happening in the nature, that metabolism based mechanism is also evolving in weed species. And as I said, it's a function of the biology of the species like palmer amaranth, very, very diverse genetic background Kosha. Same with very diverse genetic background, a lot of gene pools, they're sitting in those, you know, individuals and they can, they can adapt, and they can evolve to any of those stresses. Among other biological feature if you read about kosher Palmer, both are highly prolific seed producers, a single kosher plant can produce hundreds of 1000s of seeds. A one female Palmer Amaranth can produce millions of seeds. So that many seed production, it has potential to infest more areas, more lands, and keep going if you don't manage them properly.   Is dissemination and equipment. Problematic locally, though, going from one field to the next?   Yes, yes, big weed or Palmer Amaranth. We had a meeting North Central wheat science meeting, talking with the folks from North Dakota, and South Dakota, they have started seeing palmer amaranth, it was not the case, five years back. And that's happening because of movement of equipment, movement of products, like hay movement, or even animal feed, people take the animal feed and take to the other states, and those farmer seeds go with that. And, and infest those areas. So that's kind of tricky, you know, managing those moments is very, very difficult. That's where we kind of emphasize that control those weeds in the field, so that you don't have to deal with in the products. Okay, or, or green or or equipments. For weeds like Kosha, it's a tumbleweed and doesn't need that many it can tumble miles and miles when the wind is blowing. And that's the kind of beauty of that weed species that finds new areas of infestations with the high winds, especially in the high plains, it can tumble, it's very hard to kind of contain that.   How is the contaminated seeds physically removed from the grain itself? I'm sitting here trying to get in my mind if we're going to be selling to other countries, and they've got obviously a lower limit that's allowed in there. Is there some kind of assuming practice or an air movement as the heavier seed goes through? How's that done?   Yeah, I don't know exactly how that will happen. Because this year, we are talking like a bulk export. And folks just take the produce from the field and sell it to the coop cooperative marketing places and I don't know how much storage they have, and it gets pretty big pretty quickly. So that's where we try to emphasize to the grower Hey, you know, if you can manage in the field, that's the best you can do. You don't let it go to the produce or to the greens I see that's where this harvest we'd see destruction is going to have a fared very well that can destroy the weed seeds don't don't don't let it go into the grains and escape folks to get the contaminated grains. And it's not only that in crops like wheat, we have a problem we have a central Kansas growers they've been dealing with awry federal MRI or CT or MRI issues. So those dry what it does is it contaminate it has allergen, so it contaminate the grains when you export to the you know, Asian country, they don't take that because they are allergic to that allergens in CRI. So the idea there is and it's very difficult there's no inseason chemical you can try and control in wheat unless you have herbicide resistant weed like waxy and wheat or Learfield weed where you can spray some of the herbicide and get rid of those grass species. So in those situation against this see destruction can really really help folks not letting those weeds eat grains in the in the crop grains.   Is there a limit in the seed size? Or? I think that new technology sounds excellent for being able to destroy the seed in the field, or the limit that in terms of which species would be vulnerable.   Yeah, yeah, those are all questions we are trying to address here as a future research in Australia, they have destroyed these rigid ryegrass that's quite a bigger size like a wheat grain size of the wheat seeds we are talking. But the things we are talking here like big weeds, very tiny small black color seed and waterhemp or Kosha. They're very tiny, tiny seeds, very small seed seed weeds. As per my experience. I have gotten the unit last Wolsey last fall September and we put together there was a technical team came and put on a combine and let's try that one of the grower field, we took it by miles south of Hayes and run on a grower farm was heavily infested with the Palmer Amaranth. I couldn't see even a sorghum plant, as all Palmer Amaranth. And I was trying to do that. The idea was how that goes, I was very curious how much destruction it can do especially in crop like sorghum, when it's green, and you know, high material, you're going through the combine what kind of destruction it can do, I was very, very curious. But somehow I found that we collected some of the samples out of the combine, and behind the Combine of that destructor I was always amazed to see like 85-90% of destruction is was doing on those Palmer Amaranth seed, those tiny, tiny seed was kind of pulverized. It was like powder form after that. So I was pretty amazed. So I was telling my team of folks from Iowa State and University of Arkansas, we're gonna run this in soybean, corn, as well as sorghum plots in the coming season to see if what it does and what how the crop species or the how the crop varieties also matters, using this technology, not only weed species, and then how the environment impact those results in high plane versus Midwest versus mid south, how things change from region to region, crop to crop, weeds to weeds. And with this, this grant, we have also a Ag Econ person on the team. So I'm going to look at the economic side of it. Because as I said, economy drives everything. And if you're gonna promote this technology, where we stand in terms of economy, is it cost effective? Is it sustainable? So I think I'm telling more future research here. But that's, that's going to happen.   Good. Good. Sounds promising. Yeah.   Pretty interesting, pretty exciting. And along with that, we are also not looking at one tool at a time. Our main mission with this project, which we got funded by NIFA, based on our TFS grant was to having bringing all the tools together, it's like bringing little hammers together. So we have a cover crops early in the season, we have herbicides applied. And then at the end of the season, we're gonna do see destruction versus Jeff lining, and comparing with what growers are normally doing conventional harvest. So there are three different approaches, we are trying to bring in one growing season, to say, hey, early season management with the cover crop, herbicides, late season management, or weed seed management, with this destructor or outlining how they come together as a system, and help growers if they're struggling with some of these multiple resistant pigweeds.   I appreciate your mentioning the seed grant and appreciate you having come to Manhattan to present the results of that work recently. And that information will be up on our website in the near future. We'll have all of those and have those available for anyone to listen to, as well. I'm glad to hear that it panned out into a larger grant. So that's great.   Yes. And that was really, really good support to get that kind of grant and reach out to the folks what they're really looking for the survey we did me and Sarah, we learn a lot. And some of that information. We just plug in our proposal. And it sold out pretty quickly. And to your surprise, and to my surprise, that proposal was ranked number one in CPPM in the country was in that program, NIFA CPPM program and the Secretary with agriculture wrote a letter to the PI. That was excellent proposal to put together for such kind of strategies to look in the soybean system.   Congratulations on that. That's great.    Yeah, that's, yeah, that was really, really a great help from the TFs good Add money in that we could create some data to supplement data for the proposal.   But you know, the phenomenon of resistance is just creeping through agriculture. So it's the herbicide resistant weeds. It's the fungicide resistant pathogens. It's the antibiotic resistant bacterial. And we really need to get a handle on it, if we're going to continue to produce at the levels we've been producing. So I'm wondering if the strategies you're looking at it, if there are some general principles that you think will be helpful in, in the other arenas, as well, not just the herbicide resistance, but in the others?   Yeah, the basic principles, we are looking at the diversity in our system, I think, diversity is the key for sustainability, you keep doing one thing again, and again, you will see a problem that we have seen in our herbicide based methods of weed control, you've been doing same chemistries over and over, we have seen resistance issues, diversity, could be anything diverse cropping systems and diverse, you know, diverse methods of weed control, doing different things, you don't give same thing to that we don't do that best again and again, that that test start adapting to that matters or that strategy. So every year you change that strategies and give something new to the past and head those past with a different approach. So diversity, I think, is the key, what we are trying to achieve with this eating greater weed management system or ITM systems that you bring diversity in crop diversity in your herbicide diversity in your read species, overall system wide. I think that's the key principle we are looking at it. And that can be translated easily to the other disciplines, like, as you mentioned, plant pathology or entomology, not to look at one strategy or one thing at a time, but looking at the system level, where things can be bring and can bring that diversity into the system.   I love this area. You mentioned that there are a lot of opportunities right now for weed scientists. And I look at the agronomy department here at K State. It's been really strong in terms of the scope of capabilities, the expertise that's in that department. It's pretty impressive what they've got within one department. So what if there are students that listen to this the either graduates or undergraduate students listening to this? What skill sets? Would you recommend chemistry? I mean, ecology, what skill sets would you recommend if they want to help tackle this problem?   Yeah, that's a great question. As I mentioned, a lot of opportunities coming for fresh graduates and a lot of weed science positions recently opening up in academia, industry and other public sectors and private sectors. What I see as the weed scientists in this position, the four most important skill sets I can see is the knowledge of field based research, field based Weed Science Research, every fresh graduates they need. And then training of all the plants, science, biochemistry, physiology, genetics are those are specialized area already there. If you can take little bit of that have some expertise, you don't need to be doing five different projects in that area. But if you have little, little component of those areas, that really, really help understanding the problem, you know, from the root stand point of view, but applied Weed Science, statistical skills, how to handle the data, because the future is all about the data. With all this digital agriculture, you're going to tackle with the big data set, how to look at the data, there is a lot of data but what you make of out of the data. So statistical analysis, or analytical skills are also very, very important. And then you can also look at the mysteries in Weed Science, especially herbicide you need to know what you're doing and what you're tackling with. Because again, 70%, more than 70% of the calls the growers give me is they asked me the option herbicide option. They don't ask me, Hey, should I try this cover crop? They simply asked Hey, can I spray they can buy glyphosate is not working? How expensive? Is there a generic one? Is there a lower price one what is the formulation? All kinds of chemistry related question will come if you are going to go to those real world situations like applied weed sign, you know Precision Ag or engineering side of it. If you can learn some of the skills. I think that's the benefit as well, because that's happening right now. Preseason agriculture tools, a lot of weed science folks, they have started really using it and implementing into their programs. And that's going to be the future. A lot of the industry investment is going into that digital agriculture, especially from pest management, especially from weed management perspective. So those are some of the skills I just listed is applied Weed Science, applied field based research, chemistry knowledge, little bit of those physiology, genetics, biochemistry is knowledge, statistical analytical approaches. And procedure neck, I think, if you have little bit of all of those, and you can sell yourself, you will get the job, I'm sure. But for the weed scientists, as far as I know, yeah.   Thank you. Thanks.   Great question. And great, good bit of information for the students here on campus to file away as they think about what they want to work on. Yes.   And I think I would also encourage undergraduate students if they are interested in in ag and if they are specifically interested in in weeds or any other pairs, they should do some project, they should contact folks on Main Campus or research center to get involved and to get learn how to handle the project or what to do in terms of research and how the research is conducted and how the data is handled. That's pretty basic. But there's quite a bit of learning before you get into your graduate schools, or Masters or PhD. If you can do a little project in undergrad that'd be really, really helpful.   I enjoyed this conversation quite a great. One other big challenge on the horizon is, of course, climate change. And a number of studies done on how it's impacting the migration of plant populations and impacting fertility of some plant species, things like that it does that come into play here in terms of weed management?   Yes, exactly. If you talk about climate change, or drastic changes in environmental conditions, weaves are one of those first pieces who will adapt to these changes, because they have highly diverse genetic background. And they have already been doing that molecular weight science program in Colorado State has been looking at Kosha from different angle. So they're trying to sequence the whole genome, they're trying to characterize some of the genes, good genes, they call it good genes, which are helping this Kosha to adapt cold treatments, or frost or drought, or heat, or salt, or even herbicide resistance, how those genes can be incorporated into our crops to make them more resilient for the future. Okay, so that's kind of angle to look at these weed species, we have that gene pool in those species, why don't we characterize and understand then how, and what they can do when we incorporate those gene in our crops for the future crops that can be resilient to the, to the these changes in climate environment. But as I said, changing climate changing environment, adaptation is going to be happen, evolution is going to happen in those weed species. Along with that, what's going to happen is interaction of the chemistry with the plant and the environment is going to change. And that's very critical to understand the efficacy of some of the chemicals we are seeing now probably will not be there into that future environmental future climate. Just because plant adapt, and they adapt differently, they have TIG cuticle, for example, the chemical may not penetrate that cuticle in the future, and cannot give you 90 95% control versus less than 70% control. So the efficacy is going to change or with increasing temperature or increasing carbon dioxide, C three C four species who's going to win and depending on those weeds species are those C three or C four, the shift will happen. And there'll be lot to play with climate and the principles of precipitation, how the precipitation change globally, some of these root shifts, also gonna share some some of the prediction has been done. Okay, if Great Plains start getting more rain, for example, we start going to see waterhemp coming this way, in Great Plains, if it's going to get more drier. Kosha is going to start going towards Midwest. There are predictions happening. And I think that's true, based on the biology of those weed species and based on the history of those species, how they have infested, and they have line ated themselves in those geography based on the climate.    Vipan, you had talked about when you were first over in the US you were working in Louisiana State working on cotton. And with climate change, I'm sure that that impacts this we're seeing cotton work its way into Kansas cropping Are you seeing? I mean, I know your focus is on the weed side of things. But are you seeing some of those other types of crops moving in more and more into these areas, some of the crops that we're used to moving Further north and having some new impacts of weed stress and that type of thing coming in with these new prompts.   Definitely, with changing things with the changing environment and climate, these things are happening. And we need to be very resilient in terms of adopting those things, changing things like we were doing this faculty meeting other day and prioritizing our missions for the unit other days. So one of the priority we have have for next 1015 20 years is to look at alternative crops, new crops, basically what folks need, provided that our conditions get changed, our environment gets changed, we get less peace, we get more dry land, what are the alternative crops, things like barley, millet is number one can be adapted to in the West, that has not been expanded. There's a lot of potential for that crop. There's a lot of potential for canola in the southwest Kansas. That has been happening already happening expanding. In as you mentioned, cotton, yes, it has gone up. It was not the case five, six years ago, but it has gone up 300,000 acres of cotton in Kansas, can you imagine. And then over the top of that you can see the changes, the commodity Commission's have started funding some of the positions for those areas as well, they are looking for a pattern specialist in Kansas, they can support this. So things have been changing with the climate change with environmental change, as well as you know, other changes. And one thing I can I can say for sure, from a read science perspective, you bring new things, new crops, for example, that has long term impacts on our weed population. Some of the previous studies, long term studies, 1020 years long term studies have shown that the crop rotation in competitive crops and what kind of crop you're growing, will have ultimate impact on those wheat population. If you are growing, for example, let's say highly competitive crop like corn, or could be any cereal grains, that grows pretty aggressively, it can shift some of those wheat population over the time, a study done in Nebraska has shown that you keep doing this corn soybean rotation, you will see more and more issues weather resistant Kosha and resistant big weed, but you will bring cereal into the system, you will lower down some of those resistance issues is because the crop competition expressed those cycles of those weed species and don't let them produce seeds. So weight shift is going to happen when these crop change is going to come into play in our system. But as again, I said we have to be very resilient and proactive, like things are happening. And it's going to happen, especially from climate change standpoint. So we need to be resilient, or what alternative crops we can grow. And we can still make these folks or the growers more profitable in the future. Considering all these constraints, weeds and other pests we will have.   Yeah, I'm hoping for mango and oranges.   I'm not sure on that. One more. Yes, really,   This has been a really a fun and interesting discussion. Well, thank you so much for your time. And thank you, Jim, for joining us as well. Do you have any final remarks, or any questions you might have for us before we sign off?   Well, I would like to thank you both for your time. And also I like to reiterate that the support I got through the GFS Grant was pretty timely, and very supportive. And I could develop that project based on that information. So I would keep looking at future opportunities from GFS folks that I can come up with and collaborate with folks from other disciplines. And I would encourage young faculty at K State to look for those opportunities. And to come up with ideas there where they can collaborate with folks like me sitting in Hays versus in you know, in Manhattan and we come to know each other. That's a great opportunity and really appreciate all the support you guys have.   So glad it worked out well. And thank you for your efforts. They're very much.   Thank you.   If you have any questions or comments you would like to share check out our website at https://www.k-state.edu/research/global-food/ and drop us an email. Our music was adapted from Dr. Wayne Goins's album Chronicles of Carmela. Special thanks to him for providing that to us. Something to Chew On is produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University.     

American Song
Folk Music Played the Changes in American Society.

American Song

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 20:22


In our July, 2021 episode on the first generation of folk music, “Folk Music Stood for America”, we talked about how the music was swept up in the major social movements of the day, especially the socialist/ American Communist party movements which gathered speed because of events like the Great Depression and the Dustbowl.  The second revival of the 1960's also had its own causes; the war in Vietnam, Civil Rights, and the Women's  movement primarily.  The ‘60s was the era when all the WWII war babies grew up.  Highly idealistic, they wanted to seize the moment in history and change the world for the better.  Raised in the suburbs of the concensus-driven fifties, and living under the palatable fear of the Cold War, with Eishenhower's warning about the military industrial complex ringing in their ears, seeing their classmates ship off to Vietnam, and shipped back home in body bags, they'd grown cynical about their parent's generation and demanded change NOW.  Folk music was the soundtrack to their rebellion; you could hear it played on college campuses all over America.  Many of the musicians matched that idealism note for note.   That's the theme of today's episode, Folk Music Played the Changes in American Society. Artists Featured in This EpisodeTom PaxtonRichie HavensPeter, Paul & MaryRev. Martin Luther King, Jr.Bob DylanPhil OchsCrosby, Stills & Nash

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - Female Leadership in Practice: Two ASCO Leadership Development Program Success Stories

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 33:42


In this Oncology, Etc. episode, Drs. Patrick Loehrer and David Johnson Speak with Drs. Lecia Sequist (Massachusetts General Hospital) and Melissa Dillmon (Harbin Clinic) on how ASCO's Leadership Development Program (LDP) has taken them down varying paths, as well as the ways it has influenced their lives, careers, and the lives of those around them. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: education.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 2/1/22   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING]   PAT LOEHRER: Hi, I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm director of the Center of Global Oncology here at Indiana University. DAVID JOHNSON: And hello. My name is David Johnson. I'm at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. So Pat, we've got a couple of really great guests today. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah. I'm really excited. I've been looking forward to this. DAVID JOHNSON: So have I. Listen. Before we get started, I have a book I want to recommend to you. This one I got over the holidays and just finished it recently. It's called The Doctors Blackwell by Janice Nimura. So as many of our listeners know, Elizabeth Blackwell was the first female physician in America. Her sister Emily also followed her into the medical profession. Nimura really writes, I think, a fascinating biography about both ladies, particularly Elizabeth. And one point she made, and I think it's interesting, it's not really clear why Elizabeth went into medicine. Certainly at the point that she did in the mid-1800s wasn't a profession of great reputation at that time. And, in fact, Nimura describes Elizabeth as, quote, "lacking a caring instinct," which I thought was an interesting characterization of the first female physician. And she indicated that she was hardly a feminist. She was actually opposed to Women's Suffrage, for example. According to Nimura, she became a doctor largely just to show that she could. And then, really, the rest of her career I won't give away. The subplot is really quite interesting. I think you would find it most interesting to recommend to you and our listeners who have a particular interest in medical history. PAT LOEHRER: Actually, I've ordered the book. I can't wait to read it. DAVID JOHNSON: Excellent. PAT LOEHRER: I got a book for Christmas, Lyrics by Paul McCartney. And I read through that. That's fascinating, actually. So 158 of his songs were detailed and the backgrounds for it. So that was kind of fun. We're excited today because we're going to talk to a couple of graduates of our Leadership Development Program. That was a program of ASCO that was conceived a little over a decade ago. It's been, to my mind, one of the best programs that ASCO has done. It has taken younger faculty and oncologists from around the country, and Dave and I were among the first leaders of the program as mentors. I think that was one of the bigger mistakes ASCO has ever done. But despite that, we have a lot of fun. There were 12 graduates each year. They all had projects they presented to the board of directors. There were, if you will, classes and lectures throughout the year on leadership. And they all had projects. And for me, it was the best three years of my life, I think, through ASCO. It was just a lot of fun. And part of it was getting to know a lot of people, including Melissa and Lecia, who are with us today. Lecia is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard and Mass General Hospital. She did her medical school at Harvard, residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital, fellowship at Dana-Farber. She is currently the co-leader of the Cancer Risk Prevention and Early Detection Program at Dana-Farber and director-- I think I want to hear more about this-- she's the director of the Center for Innovation in Early Cancer Detection at MGH. Melissa, she went to Converse College in Spartanburg, South Carolina, went to medical school at Wake Forest. Then did her internship and residency at UAB. She did her fellowship at UAB. And she now serves as the Chairman of the Department of Oncology and the Board of Directors at the Harbin Clinic. And we're so excited to have both of you here. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah. Very much so. And why don't we get started by just getting a little background information. Melissa, let's start with you. Can you tell us a little bit about how you got into medicine and, more specifically, why did you choose oncology? MELISSA DILLMON: That's a great question. I was a political science major at a women's college in South Carolina and was destined for the State Department. And we used to have January terms. And I mistakenly got put with-- and I don't think it's a mistake-- former graduate of Emigre Medical School, who is a medical oncologist in Greenville, South Carolina, for a six-week term and fell in love with medicine, fell in love with the ministry that he provided to his patients, and followed him to Bowman Gray and went back years later and told him thank you for changing my life. So that's how I got interested in medicine. I come from a long line of accountants and engineers. There is no person in my family in medicine. PAT LOEHRER: I was an engineer. Some of the best people in life are engineers. DAVID JOHNSON: I didn't know you drove a train. [CHUCKLES] PAT LOEHRER: Eat your heart out. DAVID JOHNSON: So Melissa, before you leave, I actually grew up very close to where you practice. How did you end up in Rome, Georgia? MELISSA DILLMON: Well, my dad and his twin are proud graduates of Georgia Tech. So he found me a job. And I said, well, I'm grown up. I was going to stay on faculty at UAB but came to Rome, Georgia and really was excited about the multispecialty group that I ended up joining. There's about 250 of us now. And kind of had the feeling of a university but in a small town. Kind of best of both worlds. Neither of my two daughters have gone to Georgia Tech. One of them is at Georgia. Just won that national championship. But my third one, we're hoping maybe she'll be the one that goes to Georgia Tech. PAT LOEHRER: So you stayed up and watched the game. I have to ask this, right? MELISSA DILLMON: I did. I stayed up to the very end. PAT LOEHRER: And so who are cheering for? Alabama or Georgia? MELISSA DILLMON: Definitely Georgia. PAT LOEHRER: Interesting. Good. Good. DAVID JOHNSON: And Lecia, why don't you tell us about your background and how you got interested in oncology. And let us know if MGH has a football team. [CHUCKLES] LECIA SEQUIST: Oh, sure. Thanks for having me here. This is going to be a fun conversation. So I grew up in the Midwest, in Michigan. But I've been on the East Coast now for the majority of my life. And when I was a resident, I was actually in a primary care track residency program, because I thought I wanted to be a primary care physician. And I really liked the idea of sticking with people, getting to know them over long periods of time, and kind of standing by them through the highs and the lows of their lives. Well, I was finding out in residency that primary care wasn't really like that. That was for television shows. People change primary care doctors and move around so much, it's rare that you actually do get to take care of people for a long time, at least in a big city. And I also found that, for me, primary care was a lot of asking people to do things they didn't want to do-- exercise, lose weight, stop smoking, do this, do that. And I always felt that I was at odds with my patients or nagging them. And then, when I would be in the hospital on oncology rotations, trying that out, I really felt like I was allied with my patients and not nagging them or pushing them, but really here we were together against this fight against cancer. And cancer was what we were fighting together. And I just fell in love with that. So much to the disappointment of the residency program that was really trying to get people to go into primary care, I said, I've got to be a specialist. And here I am. PAT LOEHRER: It's interesting, though, that you do risk reduction and prevention. So you're back to telling patients to lose weight and exercise again, you know? [CHUCKLES] LECIA SEQUIST: Yeah. I guess, in some ways that's true, although I'm not really taking care of primary care patients. But after spending a lot of years doing a more traditional medical oncology track of drug development and targeted therapies, the last five years I have switched my research over, kind of a midlife crisis situation, where I said I've got to do something different. I'm in a rut. And I started looking at new technologies for early detection. And I really enjoyed it because it's something different. For one thing, I just felt like I was in a rut. But it's really a way to be a lot more proactive with the community and to work on issues of social justice, thinking about cancer screening, and who has access and who doesn't, and what can we do better. So I'm really enjoying that in this phase of my career. PAT LOEHRER: Terrific. The four of us are linked because of this Leadership Development Program that the American Society of Clinical Oncology put together. And I think Dave and I are really curious whether, here it is many years later now. It's been almost 9 or 10 years later now. As you reflect on the LDP, what are some of the highlights? What did you learn about yourselves and was the program worthwhile for you? MELISSA DILLMON: Well, I'll start. I was part of the class, 2010-2011, best class ever. And it was the second class in the Leadership Development Program. I applied for the first year's class and didn't get it. And one of my friends and partners, a radiation oncologist, who was very involved in ASCO, encouraged me strongly. Said, don't give up. Try again. And I did. And it was instrumental in developing both my career within ASCO as well as pushing me to leadership positions in my own clinic and in my own state. And helped develop a lot of skills that have made me successful in pushing state legislative efforts. My political science background did not go away, just like her primary care roots. And so I think that the program also made friends with Pat and with Dave and with my co-classmates. And as the years have gone by, and I've gone to ASCO, when you see that LDP ribbon on somebody's tag, you immediately have a connection with them and know that you've been through a similar experience. So I think it's been really instrumental in developing my career. And I'm currently serving as a mentor for the leadership program. So I'm living your life 10 years ago, Pat and Dave, and it's great. DAVID JOHNSON: Oh, I'm sorry. PAT LOEHRER: Terrific. DAVID JOHNSON: [INAUDIBLE] LECIA SEQUIST: I would echo what Missy was saying about how much it's influenced my career. I was in the 2011 class. So I think the year after she was. And I also applied multiple times, and I always tell people who are thinking of applying that it often does take multiple attempts to get in and not to lose faith. The selection committee does like to see that persistence. So definitely apply more than once. I learned so much about what leadership is. I thought it was about being the best in a group of people. So then, being selected to have a certain title. And I just really learned so much during that year, that it doesn't really have anything to do with a title, although that can be a part of it for some people. But it's just more about a style, an approach to your profession, and that you can be a leader if you are the designated head or chief of something, but you can also be a leader if you don't have that designation. And there are many different styles and ways to lead and to help people to ultimately get a group to do the very best that they all can together. And the friends that I made that year from my co-classmates as well as you guys and Jamie, who are our leaders, are just lifelong friends and mentors. And you know, I think it really got me thinking seriously about my choices in my career too and not to just kind of cruise through a career and see what happened and where life took you, but to really plan and to chart your own course and to make sure to reevaluate. And if it's not going the way you want it to, to rechart and replan. DAVID JOHNSON: We had a bunch of different lectures on different topics. Was there one of the lectures or areas that was particularly beneficial to you? PAT LOEHRER: I can think of one. I'll start out by doing this. We threw this in the second year, just for the heck of it. We did this personality testing. And I thought it was fascinating because, in my group, there was a little bit of conflict going on with one of the people in my group. And I realized that we were both acting out our personalities. I like to look at the big picture, and he liked to just zoom in the middle one. And the other thing that I do remember is that we showed the profiles, and it turned out Dave and I were exactly opposite. And then we both said at the same time, we should be married. [CHUCKLES] MELISSA DILLMON: One lesson that stands out in my mind was the press preparation lesson that we received from Press Relations group at ASCO. And I think that was essential for developing skills with regards to preparing for difficult conversations and being able to redirect questions that were difficult. I use that as leader of the Government Relations Committee oftentimes. I will also say that the other lesson that stands out in my mind is conflict resolution because, at the time, I was not chair of my department and was having significant conflicts with the current chair of my department. And that lesson helped me to go back week after week and more constructively work towards a solution and then eventually became chair of that department. So I think those two lessons gave me lifelong skills that I've used in all my leadership roles. LECIA SEQUIST: Yes, it's amazing how 10 years later, we can still remember the specific lectures and specific comments that people made. I remember those that you were talking about Melissa, but yeah, before you had said yours, Pat, I was going to say the same thing, that personality test was extremely helpful. And I certainly don't remember all of the different initials of the personality types. But just to understand that concept that people have different emotional skills and blind spots that very much influence how they deal with others in the workplace. And to be able to think about that when you're having conflict with someone and think about how to take that into a strategy where you can kind of play to their strengths and understand where they're coming from, that was extremely helpful. And then, I also think that talking in small groups with our teams about specific problems we were having or obstacles that we were facing and getting advice from others on how to overcome them, that really started me on a recurrent mission to find friends who I could share that with outside of my institution, over the course of my career. I think that was a real exercise in how valuable that could be. It's so critical to have peer mentors that you can talk to and strategize with and get advice about how to handle something that you're struggling with at work and have people that aren't in the same room full of people or aren't living in it. So they're a little bit more objective. DAVID JOHNSON: Let me ask a question of the two of you. Do you think your home institutions in your case, Lecia, MGH and in your case, Missy, Harbin Clinic, valued that training that you received? Did they recognize it as something that was worth the time that you spent or do you think it just something that happened and they didn't really take notice? MELISSA DILLMON: I learned in LDP that institutions don't love you back. PAT LOEHRER: They don't love you to begin with. Joe Simone. Joe Simone. DAVID JOHNSON: So I take that as a no. Your institution really said, eh, OK, great. We're glad you did it, but so what? LECIA SEQUIST: I wouldn't say that. I don't know that they said, so what? I just, I'm not sure that they-- there was no rolling out the red carpet, thank goodness you did this. But I do think it's had an institutional impact in that I have since encouraged other people to apply from my institution. And I think that only strengthens the institution, to have multiple people going through that program. MELISSA DILLMON: So my clinic, being private practice, when I take time out, it is just a cut from my salary. There's no support given from the institution. But in order to be in positions of leadership, department chair or on the board of directors, which I later was elected to of the clinic, you have to have completed a leadership development program. And the clinic will pay for you to go do those things. But my participation in Leadership Development Program met all those criteria. So my clinic highly values professional development classes or meetings or programs and encourages that. Even if there's no financial support necessarily, it is encouraged, if you want to assume positions of leadership within our clinic. And so I think that it's important for institutions, whether they're private practice or university, to recognize the benefits that come from participation in a program like this. And it was interesting as a mentor this year, we did a personality test, but this time they did an interesting look at what our priorities, our top five priorities or values are. I think it was values. And it was a list of 300 things basically you go through. And you listed your top five values. And then you listed the values of your institution or employer. And then you wanted to look at, did they match? And did your university value what you value? And that was a really interesting exercise to go through because a lot of these young leaders who are taking their time out to do this program did not feel that support necessarily for them seeking out this program. PAT LOEHRER: It's no coincidence that Dave and I asked both of you to join because you both come from different places, if you will. And I think, Melissa, you've just been a rock star in terms of the community practices and so many things that you have done in the leadership roles. And Melissa's, you can't get any more prestigious in being in one of the Boston medical schools and particularly at Mass General. But the other reason we wanted to have you come in is to talk a little bit about your perspective as women and women in leadership roles. And if you could maybe share a little bit about your thoughts and perspectives of gender leadership and what you have noticed in men in leadership roles and women and what lessons you might give to other people, particularly other women in this capacity. MELISSA DILLMON: Well, I think we both were trained in a day. And I might be speaking for you, but when there were, at least here at the institutions where I trained, not that many women in internal medicine. Medical school was probably 45% female by the time I was in medical school. But when you look at the faculty of those medical schools that I went to and trained at, there were very few women in positions of leadership. And so there weren't very many role models. My dean of students at Wake Forest was a female nephrologist. And so she was a huge role model for me. And then I went to UAB, and I remember being asked in my interview, are you OK with being in a male-dominated program? Because you will be in a male-dominated program. I think there were 45 of us in my intern class, and eight of us were female. And I said, that's fine. But I had gone to a women's college, where obviously there were only women leading. So it was a big change for me to go back into a situation where I had to assert my unique female leadership qualities, which are different, and still use those in an effective way to lead. Right now, I'm serving as a mentor also for a small liberal arts college, primarily those interested in going into medicine or nursing, and usually most of those have been female. And so it's been a really great opportunity, because I've had very few mentors who were female, who were positive role models for me. So I think Leadership Development Program, one of the things they taught me was to go back and say thank you to your leaders and to be a leader for others. And specifically, as a female leader, I think that has been an important call for me. After leaving Leadership Development Program, I went back and ran for the board of my clinic as the first female to be on my board. My clinic was started in the 1860s, I think right after the Civil War, and I'm still the only female on that board. And I feel that it's important for me to stay there or to promote up more females within my clinic to be on that board because I think that having a diverse board helps in bringing different skill sets to the table. So I think Leadership Development Program gave me that courage to step up. LECIA SEQUIST: That's inspiring. Congratulations on being the first woman and may there be more soon. Yeah. I don't know that I've felt that I was in as much of a male-dominated field up in Boston. But certainly, leadership in my hospital and in my cancer center has been more male-dominated. And I think as I'm getting older now, I definitely appreciate-- of course, every individual has different leadership style. So you can't just paint a broad brush and say men are this type of leader and women are that type of leader. Everyone's a little bit different. But in general, I think women do tend to have a different leadership style and one that is maybe, present company not included, one that's less talking and more listening. And I think, when I was younger and trying to become a leader, I really felt out of peer pressure that I needed to talk more and sort of demonstrate more what a good leader I could be or what great thoughts I had. And I've really come to embrace a more listening type of leadership, which I have been happy to say that younger women that I work with have come up to me privately and thanked me for. And so I do think it's important to have all different types of role models for our junior faculty and all different types of styles, sort of on display and doing their best so that people can find something that matches with their own unique style to emulate. PAT LOEHRER: One of the lessons I learned a long time ago from someone, and I loved it, a great leader is one that changes the conversation. And to your point of listening, but it's really changing the conversation, deflecting it around it so that other people are talking. But you have a little role in moving that around. And I always liked that. MELISSA DILLMON: Today, I was listening to the National Press Conference, and I heard a definition of leadership that disturbed me. And I thought, I don't think that's my definition of leadership. So I think that defining what your type of leadership style is, is something that leadership development helped me with. And then, once I knew what my leadership style was, then using those skills to pull together a team and achieve a goal, a common goal, not the description of leadership today, which was pushing something up a mountain and rolling over boulders and doing whatever you had to do to get your way. I thought, well, that's not leadership, not my leadership. So I think that that was something that Leadership Development Program help me do is identify what my leadership style is and what kind of leader I want to be. DAVID JOHNSON: So I want to follow up on a point that both of you are making in a slightly different way. And that is, who are your role models? I mean, apart from Pat and me, but who are your role models? [CHUCKLES] LECIA SEQUIST: I've had lots of role models over the years, and I think at the beginning, my role models were really people that I wanted to emulate and be just like them. And that probably started with Tom Lynch, who was my initial research mentor when I started in lung cancer. And a lot of it was just the way he was with patients. I wanted to have that ability to make a patient feel just right at home from the first minute they walked in the door, which Tom is a master at. But over time, I think my mentors or my heroes have more become people that are different than me. And I'm not trying to be like them. But I appreciate the ways in which they lead or in which they conduct something, like balancing their home life and their professional life in a way that's just different but I appreciate. And that, in lung cancer, I would say another real big influence on my career has been Heather Wakely. She really has been my main female role model in my career. And she's given so much of her time to me and to so many to kind of sit and have personal talks and pep talks and strategies about what we're doing in our home institutions. DAVID JOHNSON: Missy, what about you? MELISSA DILLMON: So I would say from a professional standpoint, someone I respect and see as a mentor is actually now the female CEO of my clinic, who has been with my clinic for 20 years and worked her way up. And I think that's because she has retained her femininity, but she is recognized as a tiger that no hospital or other clinic wants to make mad. So she has a way of leading and listening that is unique. And I have learned a lot from her over the years and watched her rise in her leadership skills as I have alongside of her. And then, I will say from a personal perspective, one of the books I have enjoyed reading recently really talks a lot about servant leadership. And so I've really tried to identify servant leaders in my community and why it is that they're able to weather the storms of the last couple of years, for instance, and why their teams rally behind them and support them. And they're successful. And my husband is a restaurant owner times three, opening two of those, one right before COVID and one during COVID and yet has been able to mobilize a team. And that's because he's a servant leader that will get back in the kitchen and make pastry cream if that's what needs to be done or make reservations. And so I think during the last two years, what I have learned from that is to be a servant leader in the tough times has really helped rally my team and my clinic to be better and to continue to work, despite the challenges for our patients, for the bigger goal. PAT LOEHRER: Love it. We recently had a guy give a talk here at IU, and the lecture was on being a visionary leader. And to be honest, it was fine. It was good, but being a servant leader and being part of a group is more important than being the one right up in front. And it's good to be a follower too as a leader. So I really appreciate those comments. Just in a couple of sentences, I don't know if you guys could do this and reflect a little bit about your younger self. Say you're 21, and you could give yourself some advice now, what would those pieces of advice be? LECIA SEQUIST: I think one thing, and that's the common thread I've heard among a lot of more senior people in medicine, or in any profession probably, is that the things that you think are disappointments at the time often turn out to be some of the greatest opportunities that you're faced with. You plan and you think things are going to go a certain way, and then something doesn't work out, and you're very disappointed. But it's usually that process of how you deal with that disappointment that actually brings so much opportunity back to you. You can't see it at the moment. All you see is the disappointment. But I think that's a big lesson. PAT LOEHRER: Terrific. MELISSA DILLMON: So kind of similar to that, Lecia, doing our personality test this time, I wish I had done that same exact test 10 years ago, because I'd like to see what my leadership personality was 10 years ago versus now. I would not have scored as high in certain areas that I think I do now. And I think that one of the biggest things I have learned is, I'm very much a person of tradition. And I like things to continue the way I expect them, and I like things to be planned and done in medical school in four years, done with fellowship. So I like a regimen and a routine. And I have learned over the years to be comfortable with change. And I wish I had learned that earlier and to be open to change and listening to new ideas. I think that probably for the first few years of my practice and training, I was very much, this is the way it's done. And I think that that expressive part of my leadership had not developed yet. And I think that being open to change and looking at things in new ways, I wish I had learned that earlier. DAVID JOHNSON: So we only have a few minutes left. And what we have done in previous episodes, we like to ask our guests to tell us the book they've read recently or maybe a documentary or something they've watched recently that they would recommend to our listeners. LECIA SEQUIST: I really enjoyed the book The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah. That is a historical fiction about the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl and the migration of farmers from the Central Plains out to the West. And it was a really captivating book with a female protagonist. I enjoyed it quite a bit. MELISSA DILLMON: It's funny. I read that one just a few months ago. I love historical fiction, but I would say recently, and I know it's not a new book, Andre Agassi's Open, his autobiography, I found fascinating. I love sports, but it was very interesting to me to see how someone who's thrown into the limelight at a very early age and the pressure put on him by his parents and how that affected the course of his life. I found it a fascinating book and very insightful. And I like to play tennis, but I'm not a tennis player. But I found it interesting as a parent, who's got several sports-minded children, it gave me some lessons about parenting and how to just raise your children and where the focus should be. DAVID JOHNSON: Both my wife and daughter had been tennis players. I'm sure they would both love reading that book. Thanks for that recommendation. LECIA SEQUIST: It's a great book. DAVID JOHNSON: Well, that's really all the time we have for today. And Pat and I want to thank both of you, Missy and Lecia, for joining us. It's been a terrific conversation. Thank you so much for what you do. You're both, in our minds, fantastic leaders. You were when you arrived, and you certainly have been ever since. So thanks so much for that. I want to thank all of our listeners for tuning in. This is Oncology, Et Cetera an ASCO Educational Podcast. And we really have talked about anything and everything. And we'd like to continue to do so. So if you have an idea for a topic or a guest, please email us at education@asco.org. Thanks again for tuning in. And Pat, I just wanted you know I've ordered a chicken and an egg from Amazon. [CHUCKLES] PAT LOEHRER: It's because you couldn't quite make up your mind which was going to come first. I love it. I love it. You're the best. Thanks for doing this. And Dave, it's good to see you, as always. Take care. DAVID JOHNSON: Thank you so much. We really, really appreciate it. LECIA SEQUIST: Thank you. MELISSA DILLMON: Great to speak with you. Bye. [MUSIC PLAYING]   SPEAKER 1: Thank you for listening to this week's episode. To make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org. [MUSIC PLAYING]   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Your Lot and Parcel
The Misery and Calamity of the 1930's, and the Human Spirit

Your Lot and Parcel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 26:02


 Drought and tough times have appeared periodically and other weather disasters, such as floods and tornadoes, have come and gone. But none of these calamity periods can compare from the standpoint of monetary loss, long lasting distress, suffering, and discouragement with the decade of the 1930's.The great depression which began in the fall of 1929 affected Kansas just as it did every other part of the country, but on top of it there was superimposed a decade of drought and dust storms. In other words, Kansas and neighboring Great Plains states got a double dose of misery and calamity.http://www.kshs.orghttp://www.yourlotandparcel.org

Hownikan Podcast
Dust Bowl childhood, National Stalking Awareness Month and Treaty of 1867

Hownikan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 29:28


During this episode, we visit with an author about her new book that tells stories from a Tribal elder's childhood, a domestic violence prevention specialist about National Stalking Awareness Month and a historian about the 155th anniversary of the last treaty CPN signed with the federal government.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Ret. FDNY Rob Serra and Buddhist Priest, Actor and Writer Episode 526

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 133:55


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Robert “Rob” Serra's first day as a New York City firefighter was Sept. 11, 2001. Having completed the FDNY training on Sept. 10, the 2001 Hobart graduate expected to have the day off. On his way to try out for a FDNY hockey team, Serra crossed the Verrazano Bridge and saw the World Trade Center's twin towers on fire. He immediately grabbed his gear and made his way downtown – where he checked in with the first “white helmet” he saw, an identifier of FDNY Fire Chiefs. Despite having no experience, Serra says, “it never crossed my mind not to go.” The day changed his life forever. “Pretty much as soon as I got down there, I started to bleed from my nose.” Like thousands of first responders, emergency workers and civilians on Sept. 11, Serra suffers from illnesses as a result of exposure to toxic ash and debris on the day of the attacks and in the months following, when he worked at the Staten Island recovery site to search for the personal effects of victims. Having undergone surgery to remove nasal polyps, Serra now faces neurological damage– including neuropathy and fibromyalgia, which has led to intense bouts of shaking, nerve pain and trouble walking. Learn more about Rob Serra  The Firefighters Podcast is the hottest podcast in America, literally. Host Rob Serra, FDNY (ret.) is a 9/11 First Responder, an advocate, a dad and an all around great guy. Recored in Staten Island the pod will inform and connect a hungry audience and create a home for the country's 1.15 million firefighters — and their friends, families and fans. And they've got a lot of fans. Host Rob Serra is authentic as it gets. Born and raised in Staten Island, New York, his first day on the job was September 11th. He's been directly involved advocating for the health issues first responders have experienced as a result ever since. The show will include interviews with firefighters and first responders, celebrities, and the always popular and delicious Firehouse cooking segment. Everybody loves firefighters. Now they have a podcast. PETER COYOTE began his film career at 39, after living nearly a dozen years in the counter-culture during the 1960s and 70s. Since then, he has performed as an actor for some of the world's most distinguished filmmakers, including: Barry Levinson, Roman Polanski, Pedro Almodovar, Steven Spielberg, Walter Hill, Martin Ritt, Steven Soderberg, Diane Kurys, Sidney Pollack and Jean Paul Rappeneau. To date he has made over 150 films. In 2006 he had a major role in three televison series: The Inside on Fox-TV, the 4400 on USA Channel and played the Vice-President to Geena Davis's President on Commander in Chief for ABC-TV until the show's end. In 2011 he starred as the District Attorney in the new version of Law and Order – LA. In 2000 year he was the on-camera announcer of the Academy Awards Ceremony, taking the heavy-lifting off co-host Billy Crystal's shoulders for the detailed announcements and data which played live to an estimated one billion listeners. In 2007 he was prominently featured as an old boxing promoter in Rod Lurie's “Resurrecting the Champ” with Samuel. L. Jackson and Josh Hartnett, and also as Sally Field's disreputable writing teacher on the television series, “Brothers and Sisters.” He recently completed a six hour series called The Disappearance which aired last year. Most recently, he played Robert Mueller to Jeff Daniel's Jim Comey, and Brendan Gleeson's Donald Trump. The series is called The Comey Rule and will be released this year on SHOWTIME.   Mr. Coyote has written a memoir of his counter-culture years called Sleeping Where I Fall which received universally excellent reviews, appeared on three best-seller lists and sold five printings in hardback after being released by Counterpoint Press in 1999, it was re-released in November of 2010 and has been in continuous release ever since. It is currently in use as a source text for Sixties Studies in a number of universities including Harvard where he was invited to teach “The Theater of Protest” last year.   An early chapter from that book, “Carla's Story, won the 1993/94 Pushcart Prize for Excellence in non-fiction. His new book, The Rainman's Third Cure, released in April, 2015 is a study of mentors and the search for wisdom and he is currently readying a new book for publication in 2021-(TITLE) The I Behind the Mask: The Lone Ranger and Tonto meet the Buddha.   Mr. Coyote is well-known for his narration work, and has voiced 150 documentaries and TV specials, including the nine-hour PBS Special, The West. In 1992 he won an EMMY as the “Host” for a nine-hour series, called, The Pacific Century which also won the prestigious duPont-Columbia Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism.   In 2010 he recorded the12 hour series on The National Parks for Ken Burns and has recently completed the voice-work on Mr. Burns most recent series—a 16 hour special on The History of Country Music. He won a second Emmy for his narration on The Roosevelts, and has also done Prohibition, The Dust Bowl, and an 18 Hour series on Vietnam with Ken Burns. Mr Coyote and Mr Burns just completed a long series on Ernest Hemingway. In 2011 he was ordained as a Zen Buddhist priest and in 2015 received “transmission” from his teacher, making him an independent Zen teacher. He makes his home on a farm in Northern California, and considers working on his 1952 Dodge Power-Wagon his longest lasting addiction. He has 40 fruit trees and loves to make jam and walk with his two dogs.   Peter Coyote Episode 276 Peter Coyote Wikipedia Peter Coyote Movies IMDB Peter Coyote Books Peter Coyote with me on Episode 14   SUPPORT THE SHOW BY SUPPORTING  one of the sponsors of the show!   Indeed.com/StandUp TrueBill.com/standup     Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram

The Produce Moms Podcast
EP197: 100 Years And Two Families Have Helped Innovate The Entire Produce Industry With Brian Antle, Executive Vice President Of Sales For Tanimura & Antle

The Produce Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 44:38


“This is the company that really changed the access the rest of the United States had to get fresh, leafy greens.”   Lori Taylor (5:28-5:35)   Even though Tanimura & Antle wasn't “officially” launched until 1982, the families that make up this incredible fresh produce team have a legacy that stems from 100 years of growing experience. The Tanimura family and Antle family lived 40 miles apart from each other, with the Tanimura family emigrating from Japan and the Antle family migrating to California from Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl in the 1920's. During World War Two, the Antle family agreed to watch over the Tanimura's land while some of the Tanimura family was placed in internment camps and two of the brothers fought in the war.  When the war was over, the two families had an unmatched partnership and bond and decided to join forces; the Tanimuras growing the lettuce and the Antles marketing and selling it under their brand.     What started as a relationship between two families with a love for produce has now grown into a global company with 30,000 acres on the west coast, 7,000 employees annually, and sales across the Nation and internationally. Brian Antle, who got his start on the farm at the ripe age of 14 when he would get paid to move sprinkler pipes (a vital part of irrigation), jokes that “the plan was to get to 100,000 cases of produce a week.”  The company now sells almost 140,000 boxes a day and about 40 million cases a year!   Tanimura & Antle's core products are iceberg lettuce, romaine, red and green leaf, cauliflower, broccoli and celery. They also have organic produce, greenhouse grown produce, and an Artisan line of products that are uniquely branded for their different taste profiles, colors, qualities and crunchability. The Artisan family of specialty produce includes their Artisan Lettuce, Artisan Romaine, Artisan Sweet Gem, Artisan Baby Iceberg, Artisan Sweet Red Onions and Artisan Sweet Broccoli.   “They were the first company that put iceberg lettuce on a rail car on ice and shipped it from California to New York City and it arrived fresh. From there, as they say, the rest is history.” Lori Taylor (5:45-5:56)   The cool thing about Tanimura & Antle is the many ‘firsts' the company has ignited for the produce industry. Their family was the first to pack and wrap a head of lettuce in cellophane. They were also the first to use cardboard boxes and cool produce in vacuum cooling tubes prior to shipping, allowing the entire produce industry to move away from needing to ice everything and use rail cars.  Speaking of innovation, Tanimura & Antle even breeds their own seed genetics! The company can tailor their lettuce, to have a certain color, size or taste. They can also breed plants to become more resistant to certain disease or mildew pressures. Innovations in seed genetics ultimately allows Tanimura & Antle to harvest more product for consumption and decrease food waste at the field level. This is all done through natural plant breeding, none of these seeds are genetically modified organisms (GMOs).  Tanimura & Antle truly strives to find sustainability in every corner of their operations!     Another innovative practice of the company is the use of automated technology. Tanimura & Antle has a group of diversified businesses, one of those being Stout, a company focused on “smart farm equipment”. With the cost and shortages of skilled agricultural labor, farmers are being challenged with doing more with less every day. Tanimura & Antle is investing in machines that can help supplement these labor shortages, such as machines that eliminate weeds in the field using artificial intelligence and computer vision systems. Machines like this will allow farmers to [AP1] utilize the employees in areas of agricultural production that cannot be automated, such as harvesting or operating these new machines.  While this type of innovation can sometimes be viewed as eliminating jobs, they're not.  Innovations like this allow farmers to supplement the shortages within their work force in order to continue to feed the world.    “The ground is the most valuable asset we have next to our employees. Without either one, there is no sustainability.” Brian Antle (29:16-29:23)   One key to Tanimura & Antle's success is how much they value the ground they grow on. They're constantly rotating their crops and focus on keeping the ground healthy. Without healthy soil, they know they cannot grow a healthy crop. Tanimura & Antle views their employees as their #1 asset.  They ensure their employees are taken care of by providing things like a low cost employee housing complex, access to full health benefits, a matched 401k and one of the their proudest innovations, an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP).  They were one of the first major grower shippers to adopt an ESOP in the United States!  In 2017, the Tanimura and Antle families made the decision to make their employees official business partners and sold a portion of the company to the employees, creating the ESOP.  The ESOP allows employees to earn ownership stocks of the company through years of service and loyalty to the company.   When it comes to enjoying their produce, make sure to try one of their Artisan or Greenhouse Grown vegetables. You can find Tanimura & Antle in most major grocery retailers across North America, and if not, be sure to ask your local produce manager to put Tanimura & Antle's branded items on your grocery store shelf!  How to get involved Join The Produce Moms Group on Facebook and continue the discussion every week!  Reach out to us - we'd love to hear more about where you are in life and business! Find out more here.    If you liked this episode, be sure to subscribe and leave a quick review on iTunes. It would mean the world to hear your feedback and we'd love for you to help us spread the word!

This Date in Weather History
1930: Temperature in Watts, OK reaches -27°F

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 1:56


During the Dust Bowl days of the 1930s much of the Great plains of the United States was bone dry. Because there was little rainfall the ground was dry. Daytime heat is derived from the ground heating up from the sun and then heating the lowest level of the atmosphere from the warming ground. The amount of moisture in the ground has a great impact on this heating. A large percentage of the sun's energy goose into evaporating the moisture on the ground surface. When the ground is dry to begin with the sun just gets to work warming things up. It's not the sole reason that temperatures climb to record high levels – but it helps. During the 30's in places like Oklahoma a significant number of high temperature records were set in part because of this dry weather phenomenon. Lack of moisture also has an impact of lowering temperatures. Moisture in the ground leads to higher humidity near the ground and that prevents temperatures from getting below the saturation point of moisture in the air. When there is little moisture temperatures can drop more. So, in additions to the extreme heat that we all hear about from the Dust Bowl – there was also extreme cold. On January 18, 1930 in Watts Oklahoma the mercury dipped to -27 degrees the coldest ever in state. It was the 1st day of string of 33 days when temperature averaged -2.8 degrees. 7.7 degrees colder than any other period since records commenced. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Author and Journalist Michael Cohen and American Legend Peter Coyote Episode 512

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 109:39


Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more All this month and next I will be promoting GiveWell.org and I hope you will consider sending them a donation. They will match new donors up to $250! Please go to GiveWell.org/StandUp Today's show is pretty Awesome. I was just gonna have the legend on and do the news but I wanted to chat with Michael Cohen who has been writing some very important and interesting stuff as always so its a bonus that I got him to join me too. I have about 35 minutes of news then I start with Michael at about 36 minutes and Peter and I begin at about 55 minutes but def listen to the very last 15 minutes or so. Michael A. Cohen has been a columnist for the Boston Globe on national politics and foreign affairs since 2014. He is also the author of “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division,” “Live From the Campaign Trail: The Greatest Presidential Campaign Speeches of the 20th Century and How They Shaped Modern America” and is the co-author with Micah Zenko of “Clear and Present Safety: The World Has Never Been Better and Why That Matters to Americans.” Michael has written for dozens of news outlets, including as a regular columnist for the Guardian, Foreign Policy, the London Observer, and World Politics Review. He previously worked as a speechwriter at the US State Department, on Capitol Hill, and at NBC; was a Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation and a fellow at the Century Foundation, the American Security Project, and the World Policy Institute; and has also been a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. PETER COYOTE began his film career at 39, after living nearly a dozen years in the counter-culture during the 1960s and 70s. Since then, he has performed as an actor for some of the world's most distinguished filmmakers, including: Barry Levinson, Roman Polanski, Pedro Almodovar, Steven Spielberg, Walter Hill, Martin Ritt, Steven Soderberg, Diane Kurys, Sidney Pollack and Jean Paul Rappeneau. To date he has made over 150 films. In 2006 he had a major role in three televison series: The Inside on Fox-TV, the 4400 on USA Channel and played the Vice-President to Geena Davis's President on Commander in Chief for ABC-TV until the show's end. In 2011 he starred as the District Attorney in the new version of Law and Order – LA. In 2000 year he was the on-camera announcer of the Academy Awards Ceremony, taking the heavy-lifting off co-host Billy Crystal's shoulders for the detailed announcements and data which played live to an estimated one billion listeners. In 2007 he was prominently featured as an old boxing promoter in Rod Lurie's “Resurrecting the Champ” with Samuel. L. Jackson and Josh Hartnett, and also as Sally Field's disreputable writing teacher on the television series, “Brothers and Sisters.” He recently completed a six hour series called The Disappearance which aired last year. Most recently, he played Robert Mueller to Jeff Daniel's Jim Comey, and Brendan Gleeson's Donald Trump. The series is called The Comey Rule and will be released this year on SHOWTIME. Mr. Coyote has written a memoir of his counter-culture years called Sleeping Where I Fall which received universally excellent reviews, appeared on three best-seller lists and sold five printings in hardback after being released by Counterpoint Press in 1999, it was re-released in November of 2010 and has been in continuous release ever since. It is currently in use as a source text for Sixties Studies in a number of universities including Harvard where he was invited to teach “The Theater of Protest” last year.. An early chapter from that book, “Carla's Story, won the 1993/94 Pushcart Prize for Excellence in non-fiction. His new book, The Rainman's Third Cure, released in April, 2015 is a study of mentors and the search for wisdom and he is currently readying a new book for publication in 2021-(TITLE) The I Behind the Mask: The Lone Ranger and Tonto meet the Buddha. Mr. Coyote is well-known for his narration work, and has voiced 150 documentaries and TV specials, including the nine-hour PBS Special, The West. In 1992 he won an EMMY as the “Host” for a nine-hour series, called, The Pacific Century which also won the prestigious duPont-Columbia Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism. In 2010 he recorded the12 hour series on The National Parks for Ken Burns and has recently completed the voice-work on Mr. Burns most recent series—a 16 hour special on The History of Country Music. He won a second Emmy for his narration on The Roosevelts, and has also done Prohibition, The Dust Bowl, and an 18 Hour series on Vietnam with Ken Burns. Mr Coyote and Mr Burns just completed a long series on Ernest Hemingway. In 2011 he was ordained as a Zen Buddhist priest and in 2015 received “transmission” from his teacher, making him an independent Zen teacher. He makes his home on a farm in Northern California, and considers working on his 1952 Dodge Power-Wagon his longest lasting addiction. He has 40 fruit trees and loves to make jam and walk with his two dogs. Peter Coyote Episode 276 Peter Coyote Wikipedia Peter Coyote Movies IMDB Peter Coyote Books Peter Coyote with me on Episode 14   SUPPORT THE SHOW BY SUPPORTING  one of the sponsors of the show!   GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram

The Innovative Mindset
Al Petteway, Grammy-Award-Winning Guitarist, Encore

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 113:46


Al Petteway A Grammy Award-winning recording artist and performer, Al Petteway has played nearly every type of popular, folk, and classical music. Though his primary instrument has always been the guitar, he has also studied lute, string bass, percussion and music composition. His compositions for acoustic fingerstyle guitar are strongly influenced by his love of Celtic music and his own roots in folk, rock, and blues. His recordings, music books, and instructional videos have helped to win him international acclaim and appearances on National Radio and Television Programs. Al's music has also been used in soundtracks for independent films including the Ken Burns' documentaries “Mark Twain”, the Emmy Award-winning  “The National Parks – America's Greatest Idea” , “Baseball – The Tenth Inning,” “The Dust Bowl,” and most recently”The Roosevelts.”  Al was awarded FORTY FIVE “Wammies” by the Washington Area Music Association including the top honors of “ARTIST OF THE YEAR” and “MUSICIAN OF THE YEAR“. He was the recipient of two Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Awards for Music Composition and has performed at the Vice President's House and The White House. His playing is featured on more than sixty recordings by some of the World's best-known Folk and Celtic musicians. In 2005, he was voted one of the Top Fifty Acoustic Guitarists of all Time by the readers of Acoustic Guitar Magazine, and in 2008 he won Silver and Bronze medals in the magazine's Player's Choice Awards.  His CD “Caledon Wood” was voted one of the “Essential Albums of the Past Twenty Years” in Acoustic Guitar Magazine's 20th-anniversary issue and his 2012 release “It's Only the Blues” was included on two of the Acoustic Guitar Magazine's Editor's “Top Ten Essential Albums of 2012″ lists. In 2014 and 2015, he released two more solo albums “Mountain Guitar” and “Dream Guitars, Vol. II.” His most recent album “The Collector's Passion” was recorded in two sessions and includes more of his solo guitar compositions than any previous release. In addition to the numerous music camps, guitar festivals, concerts, and workshops he works with, Al records acoustic projects and teaches private lessons in his home studio in Fairview, NC. Social Media Www.alandamy.com/al.html https://www.instagram.com/alpetteway/ Amy White's Critter Cams: YouTube.com/FairviewCritterCams Hammock Bears HAMMOCK BEARS VIDEO 1 https://youtu.be/puXdsdJUOk0 BEAR CUBS CLIMB THE WISTERIA ARBOR https://youtu.be/eLMWwSHXYSA   BIG BUTT MOMMA BEAR at the SALAD BAR and the Runaway Cubs https://youtu.be/BPfeP4iJITo   BETTER LUCK NEXT TIME: THE TALE OF TURKEY TOM and the ELUSIVE HENS https://youtu.be/1eiP0S6Gsos   Listen and Subscribe on These Channels Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Podbean | MyTuner | iHeart Radio | TuneIn | Deezer | Overcast | PodChaser | Listen Notes

scary(ish) podcast
Scaryish - Ep 211: The Dust Bowl & The Giggling Granny: Nannie Doss

scary(ish) podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 60:41


Robin and Adam proudly present Episode 211 of Scary(ish)! Adam dives into the cause and effect of the decade long disaster known as the Dust Bowl while Robin tells of a horrific serial killer given the nickname the Giggling Granny. Listen, Share, Subscribe, and Review!

Double Deuce podcast
319: Extra Butter for Christmas, a Live Holiday Show!

Double Deuce podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 56:22


We're in the side room at Murf's for this year's holiday show, with guests: Amber Fraley (buy her book!), Molly Scanlon, Our Waitress Cinnamon, Allison Puderbaugh, Keri Mack, and Lawrence Mayor Courtney Shipley! We got the audience gifts out of Will's garage and/or first marriage! The notes: Advent calendar controversy! Nelson brokers a deal between Will and progress! Disposable socks! A real bad Wednesday! #DDDoesItRight! Nelson Fantasies calendar! Light-up jacket! Will learns a lesson: a Christmas miracle! Amber's book tour continues— buy her book, The Bug Diary! Mixed opinions on Andy Richter! Nelson may or may not be skeezier than Andy Richter! Amber created quite a stir down at the library! Will's wife likes the big danglies! Oliver prefers glitterbombs! Somebody is getting extra butter for Christmas! God tried to murder us! Will's a Dust Bowl truther! Songs, arrests, a no-holds-barred bathroom experience: Applebee's is doing fine! Breakfast sandwich maker or robot centipede! Breakfast sandwich stillsuit! Dune starring a breakfast sandwich maker as Timothee Chalamet! Give your postal carrier booze as a tip and/or for the holidays! Fuck frankincense and myrrh, we got a bag of forks (and napkins)! Get a massage from Keri at Bodhi Tree (on 7th above Java Break in LFK)! DOMINOES MOTHERFUCKER! Every domino has a story! A luxury evening in Topeka! The Christmas miracles keep coming! The perfect amount of applause for what happened! Happy holidays! See you on Boxing Day! Contact Us! Follow Us! Love Us! Email: doubledeucepod@gmail.com Twitter & Instagram: @doubledeucepod Facebook: www.facebook.com/DoubleDeucePod/ Also, please subscribe/rate/review/share us! We're on iTunes, Android, Libsyn, Stitcher, Google, Spotify, Radio.com, RadioPublic, pretty much anywhere they got podcasts, you can find the Deuce! Podcast logo art by Jason Keezer! Find his art online at Keezograms! Intro & Outro featuring Rob Schulte! Check out his podcasts at Pink Jeans! Brought to you in part by sponsorship from Courtney Shipley, the foul cur Applebee's, Amber Fraley's new novel The Bug Diary, and listeners like you! Patreon launching soon! Check out the Lawrence Times's 785 Collective at https://lawrencekstimes.com/785collective/ for a list of local LFK podcasts including this one! Do you like reading? Sure, we all do! Then you should read Amber Fraley's debut novel, The Bug Diary, from Anamcara Press! It's a hilarious coming-of-age college romp and a mysterious ghost story rolled into one by an authentic, relentless, amazing writer who also happens to be a fan of this podcast! Available at the Raven Bookstore, anamcara-press.com, or contact Amber Fraley, Author on facebook!