Podcasts about Japanese Americans

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Ethnic group

  • 901PODCASTS
  • 1,247EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 23, 2022LATEST
Japanese Americans

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Best podcasts about Japanese Americans

Show all podcasts related to japanese americans

Latest podcast episodes about Japanese Americans

Modern Minorities
Larry Hama's our (real) American Hero

Modern Minorities

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 58:05


“It's not just heroics - the highest compliment one soldier can pay to another soldier is he did his job.” Larry Hama is an American comic book legend — an accomplished artist, writer, actor, and musician who's been in the business since the 1960s. Larry is also a US Army Veteran - where he became a firearms and explosive ordnance expert. Larry's actually best known to American comic readers as writer / editor for Marvel Comics, where he worked on G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, Wolverine, Nth Man: The Ultimate Ninja, and Elektra. He co-created the character Bucky O'Hare - developed into comics, toys, and animation. And in the 1980s, Larry helped create “The ‘Nam” - arguably one of the most authentic retellings of the Vietnam war from the American perspective (for many surpassing the film Platoon). Larry's storied experience as a Japanese American, Army Veteran, comics legend, and kid from SF + NY - inform everything he's done, and why his work resonates with so many across industries. And you'll love hearing about all of his encounters with contemporaries like Gloria Steinem, Neal Adams, and even Marlon Brando. Special shout-outs to guest host Dan Wu (from NPR's “Where Y'All Really From”) and Keith Chow @ HardNOC Media who connected us with the one and only Larry Hama. This episode is sponsored by the Department of Health & Human Services, who's encouraging you and your community to make sure you've got the COVID-19 Vaccine & Booster. We can do this, together. Find vaccines and boosters near you @ VACCINES.gov LEARN ABOUT LARRY HAMA wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Hama facebook.com/larry.hama MENTIONS INVERSE: “I Always Wanted Snake Eyes To Be Asian” - inverse.com/entertainment/snake-eyes-gi-joe-larry-hama-interview COMIC: The ‘Nam - wikipedia.org/wiki/The_%27Nam CBR - “Larry Hama Shares a Dismaying Marvel Story About Pearl Harbor and White Privilege” - cbr.com/gi-joe-larry-hama-marvel-pearl-harbor-white-privilege-story/ PERSON: Neal Adams - wikipedia.org/wiki/Neal_Adams PERSON: Gloria Steinem - wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_Steinem Underground Comix: https://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/55614 AUTHOR: wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Marryat

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST
Ep 370: Dale Minami

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 76:28


Attorney Dale Minami is most known for leading the legal team that overturned the conviction of Fred Korematsu. Forty years earlier, Korematsu had defiantly disobyed Executive Order 9066--which unjustly incarcerated over 100,0000 Japanese Americans during World War II--  which led to Korematsu v. United States, widely considered one of the worst and most racist SCOTUS decisions in American history. 

AuthentiKate
Breaking Free From the Containers with Masako Kozawa

AuthentiKate

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:52


Welcome back to another Friday episode of AuthentiKate & Nate, friends! Today our guest is Masako Kozawa. Masako is a Japanese American who spent the first 21 years of her life in Japan before coming to the U.S. to attend college. She has now been in the U.S. for 20 years and what she has learned through her cultural, religious and personal journey is amazing and eye-opening. Masako shares with us how she navigated her divorce from her husband and becoming a single mother, as well as what it means to be a Christian and live within the Christian community as a divorced woman. She also shares her perspective on breaking free from containers, whether they be cultural, religious, relational, professional or otherwise, and what we can all learn from asking ourselves some hard questions and doing some deep inner work to show up as our authentic, best and true selves in the world. We hope you learn a lot and really enjoy this episode and please give Masako some love at the links where you can find her below! You can follow along with Masako on her Instagram page and look at her beautiful photography @ Masako (正子) (@masakozawa_photography) • Instagram photos and videos You can also follow along with her beautiful paintings on IG @ Masako (@masakozawa_painting) • Instagram photos and videos Check out her website at https://www.masakozawa.com and listen to her podcast, "Why Not Meditate?" wherever podcasts are found. Parents, do you need help planning for Summer for your kids? Well, we've got you! Click on the link below for your Summer Survival Guide FREE DOWNLOAD created just for you! https://www.subscribepage.com/summer-survival-guide If you are a mama who needs some daily encouragement and affirmations, I've got you! Click the link below for 15 FREE affirmations for your iPhone wallpaper and be encouraged every day! https://www.subscribepage.com/15-iphone-wallpaper-affirmations-for-moms If you are struggling with disciplining your children, check out the FREE DOWNLOAD link below with 6 Steps to Discipline Your Children Well. We would love to know how these strategies work for you, so please reach out and let us know with questions or comments! https://www.subscribepage.com/6-steps-to-discipline-your-children-well You can always find us on Instagram at Parenting Coach (@authentikate_and_nate) • Instagram photos and videos for parenting, marriage and self-care content! You can also check out our website at https://www.authentikate22.com Email us with questions, comments or to be on the show at https://www.authentikate22@gmail.com And you can also join our private AuthentiKate + Nate Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1130336367771619 We would also love if you would rate and review us on the platform you listen on! It means the world to us and helps this podcast reach so many more!

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Inclusion: How Hawaii Protected its Japanese Americans from Mass Incarceration after Pearl Harbor

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 65:38


Following Japanʻs attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States removed 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry from their homes on the West Coast and incarcerated them in remote camps. In Hawai`i, fewer than 2,000 people among the 160,000 were incarcerated. The question is, why not en masse? If people of Japanese ancestry were actually a security threat, as alleged, their large and concentrated numbers and proximity to strategic installations were a reason for removal from Hawai`i. Thus far, historians have only generalized that they made up over one-third of the population and were vital to the economy. In his new book, Inclusion, How Hawai'i Protected Japanese Americans from Mass Internment, Transformed Itself, and Changed America, author Tom Coffman has written a meticulously researched history of the remarkable individuals from across ethnic groups and civilian, police, FBI and military institutions who came together to spare Hawai`iʻs Japanese community from mass removal and enable their sons to serve America heroically in World War II, inspired by American ideals of democracy and equality. The community, working from the ground up, won the battle for “inclusion” against the exclusionary policies of President Franklin Roosevelt, the U.S. Navy, various generals and the anti-Japanese elements of the press. With a post-war epilogue, it provides a window into the inclusive, multi-ethnic culture of todayʻs Hawai`i. SPEAKERS Tom Coffman Author, Inclusion In conversation with Robert Handa Reporter, NBC Bay Area News Welcome by Dr. Mary G.F. Bitterman President, The Bernard Osher Foundation; Member of the Board of Governors, Commonwealth Club of California In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on May 11th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MAKE PODS GREAT AGAIN
K&C Ep 43: Jamie Hagiya [Focus on Female Ep 3]

MAKE PODS GREAT AGAIN

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 62:35


In this latest edition of our “Focus on Female” episodes, Niki sits down with Games athlete, gym owner, and broadcaster Jamie Hagiya. From body image, to what it means being a Japanese-American representative in sport, to embarrassing stories involving nip slips at the gym, there's no stone left unturned in this one!

Colorado Matters
May 18, 2022: Bloom of ‘witness roses’ eagerly anticipated; ’50 Things to Bake Before You Die’

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:36


It's been decades since anyone's seen the roses bloom that were planted by Japanese-American prisoners at Colorado's Camp Amache. But that may soon change. Then, the fight to recertify a creek and what that means for clean water. Plus, a Denver food critic shares "50 Things to Bake Before You Die." Later, a big step to preserve Chicano murals in Colorado.

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)
Recapturing Japan's "Woodstock" - the Minka Summit of 2022 | Talking with Japanologist Alex Kerr

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 62:07


Japanologist Alex Kerr joins the Seek Sustainable Japan talkshow once again to share some of his insights from his keynote, as well as beautiful traditional features of Minka houses, the challenges and experiences at the 2022 Minka Summit event in rural Kyoto which brought reuse and old house enthusiasts together from across Japan. http://alex-kerr.com/ (http://alex-kerr.com/) Previous Talks in 2022 with Alex Kerr on Seek Sustainable Japan: 2/14/2022 Beautiful Sustainability of Reusing Minka Houses in Rural Japan - Alex Kerr https://youtu.be/2DMobzO4IPc (https://youtu.be/2DMobzO4IPc) 3/24/2022 The Modern Relevance of Lost Japan & Dogs & Demons- talk with Alex Kerr: https://youtu.be/vwn3EvbAiDI (https://youtu.be/vwn3EvbAiDI) #seeksustainablejapan #alexkerr #minkasummit #japanwoodstock ** About JJWalsh - InboundAmbassador ** Seek Sustainable Japan talkshow-podcast is LIVE every week: talks with "Good People Doing Great Things" to inspire ideas for your work, life and travel in Japan and beyond. JOIN on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbjRdeieOLGes008y_I9y5Q/join Please Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/JJWalshInboundAmbassador?sub_confirmation=1 Listen to the SeekingSustainability LIVE Talkshow on Podcast [AUDIO] http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/ ALL Talks in Seek Sustainable Japan (April 2020~) https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP JJWalsh Official InboundAmbassador Websites: https://www.inboundambassador.com/ https://www.seeksustainablejapan.com Please join, become a monthly sponsor or a 1-time donation supporter on YouTube / Patreon / BuyMeACoffee / or KoFi - every little bit helps keep Seek Sustainable Japan going, thank you! Joy is also doing regular walking tours around Hiroshima and other parts of Japan on HeyGo - free to join and tip if you like it! All Links: https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ** Get in Touch!! ** Doing something great in Japan or beyond with a connection to Japan? Or know someone who would be great to interview? Please get in touch! I'd love to hear from you! ~~~ Music by Hana Victoria Music rights to "Won't you See" purchased for Seek Sustainable Japan 2022 Hana Victoria Short Bio My name is Hana Victoria, and I am a Japanese-American singer songwriter who dreams of inspiring, encouraging and empowering others through my music. Every word, melody, and visual comes straight from my heart, and I hope they influence you in some positive way :) YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria (https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria) INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/ (https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/) SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg (https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg) APPLE MUSIC: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/hana-victoria/1550597954 (https://music.apple.com/us/artist/hana-victoria/1550597954)

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)
Dismantling Traditional Houses to Send Abroad | Andrea Carlson - Japan-USA Kominka

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:09


Andrea Carlson, PhD, works in the International Relations Department at Aichi Prefectural University and is involved in not-for-profit groups that are working to protect kominka and revitalize rural communities. #traditionaljapanesehouses #kominka #andreacarlson Andrea is the representative of the Japan Kominka Association's US Office and the Kominka Forum, the group's international events arm, and is a member of the Kominka Japan Board. She also supports the work of the Kominka Collective and Toda Komuten, for profit organizations which aim to protect old houses by making owning and restoring kominka more straightforward for Japan's multicultural community and people living overseas. Andrea has a background in Social Psychology and organizes workshops and other events related to mental health support for young people with diverse backgrounds in Japan. In the future she hopes to restore kominka in rural areas as places to hold retreats for children and young people from LGBTQ+ and other marginalized communities. The Japan Kominka Association's US Office (Representative) https://kominka-us.com (https://kominka-us.com) The Kominka Forum (Representative) https://www.kominkaforum.com (https://www.kominkaforum.com) Kominka Japan (Board member) https://kominkajapan.org (https://kominkajapan.org) The Connections Forum (Lead Organizer) https://www.multiculturaljapan.com (https://www.multiculturaljapan.com) ** About JJWalsh - InboundAmbassador ** Seek Sustainable Japan talkshow-podcast is LIVE every week: talks with "Good People Doing Great Things" to inspire ideas for your work, life and travel in Japan and beyond. JOIN on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbjRdeieOLGes008y_I9y5Q/join Please Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/JJWalshInboundAmbassador?sub_confirmation=1 Listen to the SeekingSustainability LIVE Talkshow on Podcast [AUDIO] http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/ ALL Talks in Seek Sustainable Japan (April 2020~) https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP JJWalsh Official InboundAmbassador Websites: https://www.inboundambassador.com/ https://www.seeksustainablejapan.com Please join, become a monthly sponsor or a 1-time donation supporter on YouTube / Patreon / BuyMeACoffee / or KoFi - every little bit helps keep Seek Sustainable Japan going, thank you! Joy is also doing regular walking tours around Hiroshima and other parts of Japan on HeyGo - free to join and tip if you like it! All Links: https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ** Get in Touch!! ** Doing something great in Japan or beyond with a connection to Japan? Or know someone who would be great to interview? Please get in touch! I'd love to hear from you! ~~~ Music by Hana Victoria Music rights to "Won't you See" purchased for Seek Sustainable Japan 2022 Hana Victoria Short Bio My name is Hana Victoria, and I am a Japanese-American singer songwriter who dreams of inspiring, encouraging and empowering others through my music. Every word, melody, and visual comes straight from my heart, and I hope they influence you in some positive way :) YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria (https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria) INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/ (https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/) SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg (https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg) APPLE MUSIC: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/hana-victoria/1550597954 (https://music.apple.com/us/artist/hana-victoria/1550597954)

Save As: NextGen Heritage Conservation
Is Leimert Park L.A.'s Most Significant Neighborhood?

Save As: NextGen Heritage Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 42:36


Is Leimert Park the most significant neighborhood in Los Angeles? Katie Horak thinks it might be. “I don't think there's any neighborhood in the city that tells so many different important stories about our history as a city, and that really has the integrity to still tell that story,” she says in this episode of Save As. A USC alum, principal at Architectural Resources Group, and adjunct professor, Katie took her students out of the classroom and into the neighborhood to document Leimert Park's remarkable architectural and cultural heritage. We also talk with three of Katie's students—Zongqi Li, Emily Varley, and Kira Williams—about what they found on their adventure. They unraveled a mystery about how Leimert Park developed, saw how persistent racism affected African American and Japanese American residents, and traced the evolution of schools and churches. You'll hear why Katie considers Leimert Park so important—and you might even agree.See episode page for links, photos, and recording of class presentationTake our survey for a chance to win a Save As mug!

Twisted Sisterds
191 - Twisterds Movie Club: Allegiance

Twisted Sisterds

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 39:39


For this month's installment of the Twisterds Movie Club, Amanda and Becky talk about the 2016 George Takei and Lea Salonga musical, Allegiance. You can watch this story inspired by George Takei's family's experiences during the Japanese American internment in the 1940s through a free trial of Broadway HD on Amazon Prime or a rental on broadwayondemand.com.   By becoming a $5 patron at patreon.com/twistedsisterds you can listen to bonus Twisterds Movie Club episodes and prior guests answering our 10 nerdy and ridiculous questions.   If you have questions or want to chat with us, tweet at us @twistedsisterds or drop a comment on our Facebook page, or better yet, head over to Patreon and become a $1 or more subscriber to join the Twisterds Tavern private FB group. We always enjoy sharing our magick.   Subscribe and drop us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts.   Support us at patreon.com/twistedsisterds to join our private FB group the Twisterds Tavern, get Sisterds swag, and even shape the content of the episodes.   Tweet at us @TwistedSisterds   Follow us on Instagram @twistedsisterds   Follow us on Facebook facebook.com/sisterdspodcast   Twisted Sisterds is part of the Wild Goose GooseCast Network, a network of faith based podcasts discussing issues of inclusion and social justice. To learn more about The Wild Goose Festival, go to wildgoosefestival.org   This episode was edited by Natalie Wells.   Theme song by Michael Baysinger, cover performance by Key and Nuts.   New logo by Cheyenne Davis at Chey's Designs.   Transition bumpers by Sean Ozee.   Outro music by Andy Moore.

Marty Lurie Podcast
5-15 Bill Staples joins Talkin' Baseball with Marty to talk about his book: "Kenichi Zenimura, Japanese American Baseball Pioneer"

Marty Lurie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 17:49


Author Bill Staples joins Talkin' Baseball with Marty to talk about his book: "Kenichi Zenimura, Japanese American Baseball Pioneer". A talented player who excelled at all nine positions, Zenimura was also a respected manager and would become the Japanese American community's baseball ambassador. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
5-15 Bill Staples joins Talkin' Baseball with Marty to talk about his book: "Kenichi Zenimura, Japanese American Baseball Pioneer"

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 17:49


Author Bill Staples joins Talkin' Baseball with Marty to talk about his book: "Kenichi Zenimura, Japanese American Baseball Pioneer". A talented player who excelled at all nine positions, Zenimura was also a respected manager and would become the Japanese American community's baseball ambassador. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)
Renting Traditional Homes to Build Community in Nagano Snow Country - Ed Statham

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 62:44


Ed Stratham is one of the many inspiring people I met at the https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/minkasummit (#MinkaSummit) - here we talk about how he is making good use of abandoned MINKA (traditional Japanese houses) in the rural area of Nagano, in a beautiful mountaineous area called Nozawa. Ed is originally from the UK has been living a life of contrasts as a scuba dive instructor and business entrepreneur in Indonesia and now settled in rural Nagano where he has done a few renovation projects on 100+ year old houses https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/minka (#minka) https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/kominka (#kominka) Looking forward to a lively chat about the Minka Summit, Ed's remodel projects, and future potential he sees for reviving rural areas and making good use of Japan's abandoned Kominka houses. https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/kominka (#kominka) https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/japan (#japan) https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/nagano (#nagano) https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/nozawa (#nozawa) https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/communitybuilding (#communitybuilding) https://www.youtube.com/hashtag/rural (#rural) ~~~~ About the Seek-Sustainable-Japan Host, JJWalsh JJWalsh is the founder of Inbound Ambassador - a Hiroshima-based sustainability-focused consultancy, strategy, advising & content creation business. JJ is the producer, host, editor and marketer of Seek Sustainable Japan (previously Seeking Sustainability Live) talkshow & podcast - interviews with "Good People doing Great Things to keep People-Planet-Profit in balance." https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbjNoTTFPQ19rakltdldVN3ZaeVhSbGVjTU9OUXxBQ3Jtc0tsanVfVUZpeEkweTAtRGhESUhqNFhETHdUQ1lOQmRTdFNERi1ER0dVSkxzbTEzaGx1UzB4REMwNklkSzUxS09mSHdPYTJxaXRkdXBtdm5zeGVVeEFPUXJOQ0ZFdmZsVVB0WGFlQ1lJcE4tUlhGZkozVQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.inboundambassador.com&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://www.inboundambassador.com) | https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbGxvMU9QVWExQ3pYMVVEYjFOaVVoM243MElxUXxBQ3Jtc0ttdHM2R0ItNUE0cUZtcmpsWldDLW9OdTNqRGkwb05wbmFBOHBXVzRHcXNJZDJhdmVTNVFGX2RQTUdlR1FfNHJISHVXTHpxQXAwdEgtQ0lDay1DSi05MnhaWWxhZjYwdU9JMGZVYkxuTUttal9adUJrYw&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.SeekSustainableJapan.com&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://www.SeekSustainableJapan.com) All Links for JJWalsh: https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa21IdWd4Qzg4MmNkTHZxbENFTUd3eFBmcFFXd3xBQ3Jtc0tubV8tVjlaa215bFh3MF95ZS1qeExVUWVRdTlSVDc2M3Mxa2FvRkk1TGV3R2Q1bnRiczZzN3ZOazZ1RG1CQ2VrRWtybWlyZUdrcER6dFhHMFhYSTg2bU02dFFrVlp5NXQ0Qnc0MDYzUmVLczc0Zi1DZw&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2Fjjwalsh&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ~~~ Listen to the SeekingSustainability LIVE Talkshow on Podcast [AUDIO] http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/ (http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/) ALL Talks in Seek Sustainable Japan (April 2020~) https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP (https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP) JJWalsh Official InboundAmbassador Website: https://www.inboundambassador.com/ (https://www.inboundambassador.com/) Please join, become a monthly sponsor or a 1-time donation supporter on YouTube / Patreon / BuyMeACoffee / or KoFi - every little bit helps keep Seek Sustainable Japan going, thank you! All Links: https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ~~~ Music by Hana Victoria Music rights to "Won't you See" purchased for Seek Sustainable Japan 2022 Hana Victoria Short Bio My name is Hana Victoria, and I am a Japanese-American singer songwriter who dreams of inspiring, encouraging and empowering others through my music. Every word, melody, and visual comes straight from my heart, and I hope they influence you in some positive way :) YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria (https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria)...

What It Takes
Best of - Daniel Inouye and Norman Mineta: In Defense of Liberty

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 61:21


Norman Mineta spent three years in a internment  camp for Japanese-Americans when he was a child. But this shameful period in American history did not deter him from becoming a celebrated civil servant, one who broke racial barriers to become a 10-term U.S. Congressman from California and the first Asian-American member of the Cabinet.  In honor of Norm Mineta, who died last week at the age of 90,  and in celebration of Asian-American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we invite you to take a second listen to our episode from 2020. It also features  the story of long-serving U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye, a veteran of the most decorated regiment in US history, the 442nd. The 442nd was a segregated Japanese-American unit that fought in Europe after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  These two stories stand in stark contrast, and reflect some of the worst - and best - impulses in America. And they are a testament to the triumph of the human spirit.

Erasing Shame
When is the best time for Asian Americans to talk about mental health?

Erasing Shame

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 30:39


Japanese-American therapist Robyn Tamanaha talks with Erasing Shame co-host DJ Chuang during the month of May—AAPI heritage month and mental health month about those 2 themes. We chat about what helps Asian Americans most to get that first appointment with a therapist or counselor, the difference between Bipolar Disorder I and Bipolar II, some books Robyn's reading, and how she hosts 2 podcasts, and more. See the show notes at https://erasingshame.com/when-is-the-best-time-for-asian-americans-to-talk-about-mental-health/

World Book Club
Bryan Washington: Memorial

World Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 49:22


This month, in the next in our season celebrating The Exuberance of Youth, Harriett Gilbert and readers around the world talk to award-winning American writer Bryan Washington about his moving novel Memorial. Benson, a Black day-care teacher and Mike, a Japanese-American chef, live together in Houston, but are beginning to wonder why they're a couple. When Mike flies off to visit his seriously ill, estranged father in Osaka just as his acerbic Japanese mother arrives for a visit, Benson is stuck looking after his boyfriend's mother, in a very unconventional domestic set-up. As both men cope with their difficult circumstances they undergo life-changing transformations, learning more about love, anger, and grief than they had bargained for along the way. Poignant and profound, Memorial is about family in all its strange forms, becoming who you're supposed to be, and the outer limits of love. (Picture: Bryan Washington. Photo credit: Louis Do.)

Black Op Radio
#1092 – Col. Fletcher Prouty

Black Op Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 235:35


  UNDERSTANDING SPECIAL OPERATIONS (Ratcliffe 1999), CHAPTER 1 I came on duty before the beginning of WWII, an ROTC cavalry unit Active duty with the 4th Armored Division July 10th 1941 I reported to Creighton W. Abrams from my own home town I began flight training in Maxwell Field in Alabama about May of 1942 In February of 1943 I was in Africa with the Air Transport Command We flew General Smith into Saudi Arabia to meet representatives of Standard Oil That's the first clandestine exercise I was ever involved in We established an operating base during the Cairo Conference In Teheran, Churchill had no ID, the Russians weren't going to let him through Success at Teheran enabled Chiang Kai-shek to put more pressure on the Japanese American generals supported Ho Chi Minh against the Japanese A few miles below the Turkish Syrian border, 750 American former prisoners of war I realized that some of my passengers were Nazi intelligence officers This group did contain men who had been selected by Frank Wisner of the OSS I never saw devastation equal to what I saw in the Soviet Union January of '45 I began flying the Pacific, four-engine transport work The atom bomb had been used, this was mid-August, the Japanese had quit We flew up to Tokyo on September 1st, 1945 At Atsugi air base, here were our enemies, they came over and helped us Equipment for 500,000 men going to Hanoi in Indochina Hiroshima, I flew very low over the area and had a good look at it The decision had been made to establish an Air Force ROTC I taught a very interesting course called "The Evolution of Warfare" I visited Werner Von Braun to write about rockets and missiles The Korean War broke out in June of 1950 I was one of five officers selected to initiate a new Air Defense Command A difficult period, because of the enormous devastation power of the atom bomb Spring of '52, I was the Military Manager of Tokyo International Airport Out of Tokyo we ran a regularly scheduled Embassy Run Civil Air Transport, were delivering supplies to the French, fighting Ho Chi Minh I met Colonel Lansdale and his organization in Vietnam I was selected to attend the Armed Forces Staff College, in Norfolk, Virginia One of the courses was a hypothetical NATO confrontation through Europe It just shocked the whole group, the impact of what nuclear weapons could do The hydrogen bomb would wipe out any city, you cannot fight war with that I went to the Pentagon from that schoo, to the Air Force Plans Office, in July of 1955 General Thomas White told me NSC had published Directive Directive 5412, in 1954 The Department of Defense would provide support for clandestine operations "Military Support of the Clandestine Operations of the United States Government" I was the "Chief of Team B," in charge of clandestine operations, for the Air Force The Economy Act of 1932 became the heart of the covert program We created literally hundreds of false military organizations The 1234 Logistics Squadron really belongs to CIA This clandestine system we established, we called "Tab-6" Mr. Dulles sent me around the world to many of his stations In Athens there was a camp for people we call, "mechanics" (hit men, gunmen) Thousands of ex-Nazis were being brought to the US for their various skills We could paratroop people in following a massive nuclear attack "Special Forces" were created for that post-strike purpose Hitler's chief of intelligence, Reinhardt Gehlen, became a U.S. Army general European command began looking on CIA as a "Fourth Force" in nuclear warfare From 1945 until 1965, CIA was the operating command for military forces in Vietnam CIA had quite an air force, operated and maintained under "Air America" New Year's Eve of 1958-59, I waited for CIA orders to go into Cuba Senator Kennedy understood events going on in Vietnam ...

With Good Reason
Legacies Of WWII

With Good Reason

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 52:00


In recent years, the incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII has gotten more attention. But most of that attention focuses on the West Coast, California in particular. Emma Ito studied the racism and incarceration that Virginians and other East Coast Japanese Americans faced during the war. And: Japanese Americans weren't the only immigrants persecuted during WWII–many German and Italian immigrants were also sent to incarceration camps and repatriated. John Schmitz's own family were German Americans who lived for three years in the Crystal City camp. Later in the show: When you think of archeology what comes to mind? Maybe paper maps and pickaxes in dusty places? Instead imagine precise instruments delicately probing what's below the surface to prevent destruction to sacred spaces. Richard Freund uses this less invasive archeology to help tell the stories of Jewish resistance in WWII. Plus: There are some well-known violent plots by Germans designed to overthrow the Nazi regime. But what about the quieter acts of resistance? Donald Sunnen studies some of the Germans whose brave, but more conservative resistance saved lives during WWII.

ASCO Daily News
How AA & NHPI Aggregation Masks Cancer Disparities

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 23:08


Guest host Dr. Fumiko Chino, a radiation oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, leads a discussion on how the continual improper aggregation of Asian American (AA) and Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHPI) populations downplays cancer disparities with Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostats at UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Dr. Kekoa Taparra, a radiation oncology resident at Stanford University.   Transcript Dr. Fumiko Chino: Hello, I'm Dr. Fumiko Chino, a radiation oncologist and Health Equity researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and the guest host of the ASCO Daily News Podcast today.  In today's episode, we'll explore the unequal burden of cancer across diverse communities, specifically looking at how the continual improper aggregation of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islander populations mask cancer disparities.  Joining me for this discussion are Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostats at the UCSF, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Dr. Kekoa Taparra, a radiation oncology resident at Stanford University.  My guest and I have no conflicts related to our topic today. Our full disclosures are available in the show notes and disclosures for all guests on the podcast can be found on our transcripts at ASCO.orgpodcasts. We've all agreed to go by our first names. Scarlett and Kekoa, it's great to have you on the podcast today.  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: Thank you so much. Great to be here.  Dr. Kekoa Taparra: Thank you.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: I'm so excited to start. My first question is just really general, which is can you describe your background, how you got into this research and why it's really meaningful for you and your community.  I can start just a little bit with myself. I'm Japanese American, my grandfather came to the United States before World War II and was actually excluded from coming into the United States under the Asian Exclusion Act.  He managed to come into the country walking up from Chile, ultimately started a farm in the United States, but was interned during World War II under Executive Order Act 9066. And he and my father and the family suffered some hardships from that but managed to rebuild.  I think kind of overall, I've been interested in how Asian communities and groups within Asian America and other race and ethnicity groups have had differing experiences within the American history and within American health, and specifically within cancer. Scarlett, can you go ahead and tell me just a little bit about yourself?  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: Absolutely. I think that we find amongst ourselves who identify as Asian-American, Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander, that many of our unique experiences, life experiences, do have an impact on the cancer research that we do today.  I am a first-generation Taiwanese American. My family came over after the repeal of the Asian Exclusion Act in the early-mid-70s. Like many Asian American families, we settled where we already had some family here in the United States, and so that happened for us to be in central Washington state.  I grew up in central Washington, a very largely rural homogeneously non-Hispanic White population, and went to school largely in Spokane, Washington. So, eastern Washington.  During my time growing up there, I certainly, and my family had experiences with structural racism. I definitely saw firsthand among my family and our social networks cancer as a very strong cultural stigma.  For example, my grandmother's colorectal cancer diagnosis was actually never disclosed to her. In fact, this is very common among many Asian cultural populations. I also observed firsthand the relevance of our neighborhoods, our neighborhood environments, our social environments, and the structural context within which we live, work, and play, and how that really has a strong impact, not only on our access to health care but health behaviors and degree of social connections.  I then moved to the San Francisco Bay Area. You can certainly imagine the vastly different cultural and structural and neighborhood environments of that in the Bay Area compared to growing up in central and eastern Washington.  This is in fact—little to my knowledge—actually largely shaped the area of research that I chose to go into. In my doctoral dissertation, I had the opportunity to be introduced to and become involved with working with cancer registry data.  I was actually surprised to learn that in fact, within Cancer Registry data, there were some several dozen codes for distinct Asian American, Native Hawaiian, [and] Pacific Islander ethnic groups, yet for me, it was surprising: why don't we see any statistics by these specific ethnic codes?  In fact, we continue to see statistics for the Asian American population, Asian American Pacific Islander population aggregated as a whole. So, I set out for my dissertation to understand a very non-sexy doctoral dissertation topic to understand the quality of that data and how can we get the data to a point where we could start to report on statistics for disaggregated populations. That has really become a whole research program for my group today.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: It's so nice to hear the history of how you got into that and even just if you had happened to end up in New York City, maybe your research could have gone a different direction. Kekoa, can you tell me a little bit about your history and what brought you to do the research that you do today?  Dr. Kekoa Taparra: Yeah, absolutely. I am part Native Hawaiian from both my mom's and my dad's side. And just as a note, when we say Native Hawaiian, it's not the same as saying, native Californian or native Texan. That's not what I'm talking about. I'm indigenous Native Hawaiian, from both my mom's and my dad's side.  I actually had the good fortune to attend the Kamehameha schools. That's a school for indigenous Native Hawaiian youth in Hawaii.  And so, I grew up learning a lot about our history or culture throughout the Pacific, from Melanesia to Micronesia, and Polynesia. And so, with that kind of sense of identity, I really got a grasp of our community and our community's needs. And within my own family, I've had 10 family members, all of whom were Native Hawaiian, all die from cancer.  That was something that I grew up with just thinking that cancer was just something that people couldn't overcome. It wasn't really until college that I got really interested in research, and that led to my eventual attending of Johns Hopkins. I was in the lab of Dr. Phuoc Tran, who was an MD, PhD, radiation oncologist, and he was really the first to bring me into the clinic and I'll never forget, the first time he ever told the patient, “Let's cure your cancer.”  That was just something that I'd never heard before, given all my family members really struggled with different types of cancer diagnoses, none of them had the same thing. And so, really, from that point on, that's what inspired me to go to medical school. And towards the end of my medical school years, when I was actually applying for radiation oncology, I was a true bench scientist, and I'm a lab rat—that's where I've always belonged and felt like I belonged. But towards the end of medical school, when I was interviewing for radiation oncology, I met one of my mentors, Dr. Curtiland Deville Jr., at [Johns] Hopkins.  He was really the first to, at least through my application, recognize the kind of cultural and historical context of what I've been through, what my family and my community in Hawaii, we call lāhui, what our lāhui has gone through. And so, he really encouraged me to write about it.  That's kind of how I've ended up in this niche of speaking on Pacific Islander health. Again, just full disclosure, as a part Native Hawaiian, I can't even speak for the whole lāhui. I'll speak for myself and what I know.  Again, the Native Hawaiian lāhui is very different from the rest of the Pacific Islands. But overall, I do research Pacific Islander health.    Dr. Fumiko Chino: I love having both of you on this podcast because I feel your voices are so unique, but again, you also represent sort of different ends of the spectrum in terms of your research career, someone who's a little bit more senior and someone who's more junior.  I think that really gives us a well-rounded perspective. Scarlett, can you tell me just a little bit about the history of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander aggregation and why it might be a problem?  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: I honestly don't know why the data are aggregated for. We're talking about people who come from 30 different countries and speak more than 100 different languages.  My guess is that historically, we have tended to aggregate because of convenience, but potentially also just lack of knowledge about the vast heterogeneity among these populations.  And so, I think for us who do research in this field, our hope is that by continually putting out the data that we can start to educate folks about why it is harmful, in fact, to aggregate.  Why is this a problem? I think that we hide disparities. In fact, if you look, I think part of the reason why the practice of aggregation has continued is because when you look at the aggregated statistics, with regards to cancer, it actually paints a very rosy picture for the most part, for most cancer statistics that we look at.  That's because the data are largely based on the largest groups, statistically the largest groups of those who potentially have been here the longest, but in fact, when we disaggregate, we know dramatic heterogeneity, as we would expect, because we know socio-demographically and based on immigration patterns and language patterns, these populations are really different.  So, we would expect, in fact, we do see that translate into differences in cancer outcomes. I will give a direct answer to your question about why this is a problem. I like to note the very poignant story of Susan Shinagawa, who is a Japanese American woman who was diagnosed with breast cancer. She's also my friend and colleague, and she was one of the first advocates who really inspired me in doing this research.  And so, her story is that she had to go to 3 different surgical oncologists to finally have her very prominent breast lump biopsied and looked at. She will recall that the reasons why she had to go to all these different surgeons was because they continuously told her, “You can't have breast cancer. You're Asian, and you're too young. Asian women don't get breast cancer." Her story isn't unusual.  I think the other harm in aggregation is that the community then thinks that our risks of cancer are low and that this doesn't affect us, and in some of the first publications we put out, there was a paper where we documented both high survival rates among Asian immigrant women, as well as high rates among young Asian American women for breast cancer. This was published in the American Journal of Public Health in 2011.  I actually received personally several emails from Asian women out in the community saying, because we had received quite a bit of press, this was reported out in the media, and they noted to me that they themselves were shocked when they were diagnosed with the disease because they thought that this was a “white old woman disease.” But in fact, it's not.  I have a strong family history of breast cancer, as many of us do, and other cancer sites. And so, I think that perpetuates not only the model minority myth but the cultural stigma of cancer as a disease.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: I can't wait until those oncologists that passed her by find out about the history of lung cancer in young Asian American women.  Scarlett, can you talk a little bit and I know you had mentioned this before, in terms of when you first started digging into some of the data, how challenging this research can be in terms of, for example, do every databases have granular data in terms of the Asian races and countries of origin, ethnicities?  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: I think it's incredibly challenging and as an epidemiologist, we need the data. That's if we don't have the data, we don't even have a place to start. I think we've been fortunate to some extent within the cancer space in that the major databases that we really rely on to report the burden of cancer among our various groups do, in fact, have a fairly good capture of detailed Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander codes, yet there is much that can be improved. The information on place of birth, for example, is really incomplete.  Also, our group has really started working with data from electronic health records. And that is highly variable in terms of data capture availability, the granularity of codes, and the availability of the relevant variables like birthplace and language across the different groups.  So, I do firmly believe, and I would call to action that I think we need to make a concerted effort to improve the granularity of data that are being collected.  I think the other challenge that has really come about is the small data problem. I think that our epidemiologic and clinical toolbox is very limited in terms of what we can do, analytically with small populations. But I would put forth that just because a population is small in numbers doesn't mean that they're any less important.  And so, I think that we need to do better in terms of developing better methodological and statistical approaches to being able to not only quantify but understand the burden of cancer in all of our populations.    We also need better approaches to begin to study the intersectionality of multiple marginalized social determinants, statuses, language, and ensure language inclusion in terms of really being able to adequately study and incorporate and include these populations.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: Can you talk specifically about some of the disparities that you've actually uncovered with your research? What are we talking about when we say that aggregation masks disparities? If I just say, Asian Americans are doing great from a cancer standpoint, what am I missing?  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: One particular disparity I can certainly highlight is the high burden that we recently documented in a publication last year in the Journal of National Cancer Institute that documented the high rates of lung cancer among certain groups of Asian-American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander females who have no history of smoking.  Ours was the first study to actually show what the rates of lung cancer are in these particular groups. And it's particularly high—1.5 to 2 times higher among some of the Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander groups compared to non-Hispanic White female never smokers.  When we look across the Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander ethnic groups, we note that there are differences in that risk. One example is that among Chinese American females 80% who have been diagnosed with lung cancer have no history of smoking, the vast majority, 80% have never smoked, in contrast to smaller percentages among, for example, Native Hawaiian and some Pacific Islander groups.  Another pattern in terms of heterogeneity is that we actually did not notice the higher rates of lung cancer among Japanese American female never smokers. And this is an interesting observation, we actually note similar patterns for Japanese American women for breast cancer as an example, and this is something that definitely needs further follow-up.  In fact, we're conducting a study right now called “FANS: Female Patient Never Smokers,” which is the first study to try to identify genetic and epidemiological risk factors for lung cancer among Asian-American females who have never smoked.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: Kekoa, can you speak about what your research has shown?  Dr. Kekoa Taparra: Yeah, definitely. From the perspective of a recent paper that we published in the JAMA Network Open, we looked specifically at the Hawaii Tumor Registry looking at patients in Hawaii, who were treated for premalignancy, the DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ).  What we found were the patients who ended up developing a second breast cancer after being treated for that first DCIS [that] the rates of the second malignancies both from ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancer were primarily seen in Native Hawaiians. Also, to some extent, Filipinos as well compared to other Asian ethnic groups.  I think that there are definitely some trends that we continue to see in terms of who might potentially be at higher risk, but in other work that we have presented at [2021] ASCO Quality Care Symposium (Abstract 80) with yourself, we found that in terms of it in things like overall survival, there are potential differences in terms of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders as well as even Southeast and East Asian groups.  And so, I think there's a lot of work to be done in terms of what are the kind of implications for disaggregation? What are appropriate techniques for data disaggregation? What is too much to disaggregate because we can disaggregate for a Native Hawaiian female who is from a specific zip code and who never smoked, and like, is that kind of the data disaggregation that we end up wanting, or is there something a little bit broader, that still tells us the same story of who should we be paying attention to?  And so, I think there are a lot of unanswered questions. I think that Scarlett is doing amazing, amazing work that I continually follow. So, I think there's a lot to be done still.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: So, I guess that leads to my next question, which is the concluding question, which is, what is the next step? So, how do we either: get better data or how do we actually intervene?  So, Scarlett, I know you had talked a little bit about the FANS study. Can you talk a little bit about your breast cancer cohort study in terms of really thinking about getting together diverse data sets and making sure that it's powerful enough to actually draw some conclusions?  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: Absolutely. Breast cancer is actually a really interesting disease that I think we are in the midst of seeing a very interesting and dynamic pattern of breast cancer.  We actually noted recently, in a small study in the Bay Area, that we may be seeing a reversal of higher rates among Asian American immigrant women compared to those who were born here. I think actually, this makes sense.  If we think about, especially in the San Francisco Bay Area, who were the immigrants over the past 10, 20, and 30 years. And in fact, we are seeing very high, rapidly increasing rates of breast cancer within many of the East Asian countries.  And so, I think we are really undertaking work to try to understand what some of these patterns are, but I think we are really well-positioned to invest in cancer research among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders, because of these dynamic patterns, and the vast heterogeneity that we know exist within these groups.  I think that investing in research among these groups can really tell us a lot in terms of the discovery of novel risk factors. My last final thought would be to the funders out there to really think about what we can learn by focusing on these populations, but also being able to study the disparities that really have gone ignored for a long time.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: Kekoa, can you talk about some research that you have coming up that may or may not have recently been funded?  Dr. Kekoa Taparra: Absolutely. One of the things I definitely have to appreciate from ASCO is having the opportunity to kind of publish our work in JCO Oncology Practice on a paper with the historical context of Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders with cancer.  Actually, a recent project that I have had, and I've been working on for the past year, really came about from a physician out actually in Micronesia, who read the paper and then contacted me, and this is a project specifically on betel nut induced oral cavity cancer.  Betel nut is something that is consumed throughout the Pacific Islands as well as Southeast Asia, but something specific to islands in Micronesia is that according to the WHO (World Health Organization), they have the highest rates of elementary and middle school students who consume betel nuts.  So, they had a very, very concerning epidemic right now of betel nut-induced oral cavity cancer. And so, one of the projects that I've been working on is a clinical trial, which we're calling NEO-CORAL. But the trial is specifically looking at a neoadjuvant immunotherapy approach to local or regionally advanced betel nut-induced oral cavity cancer.  We're really excited to be working with teams from Guam, which is in Micronesia, as well as Queen's Medical Center in Hawaii, where I'm from, and at Stanford as well. And this tri-site approach we're hoping to kind of conduct a culturally careful and culturally aware clinical trial so that we can really try and make a difference in these patients' lives because the biology and just the aggressiveness are nothing like we've ever seen with tobacco-induced oral cavity cancer alone.  I'm really grateful for certain funders that we've had recently who have funded this grant. I think it really just goes to show the kind of excitement around really helping a very marginalized community.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: I think that that study and I think putting in the context of what Scarlett just said in terms of, we need this data, we need granular data, we need funding so that we can actually design interventions that are really tailored to unique, vulnerable communities to really provide the resources, education, and culturally competent care that actually gets people the best outcome so that there are not haves and have-nots in terms of health care, and that's really again everyone's goal.  I'm wrapping up now. I really like to thank Dr. Scarlett Gomez and Dr. Kekoa Taparra for sharing your really valuable insights with us today and for your dedication to addressing the unequal burden of cancer across diverse communities.  Dr. Kekoa Taparra: Thank you.  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez: Thank you.  Dr. Fumiko Chino: Thanks to our listeners for your time today; you will find links to all of the studies and presentations discussed today in the transcript of this episode. And, if you're enjoying the content of the ASCO Daily News podcast, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe.    Disclosures:  Dr. Fumiko Chino: None disclosed.  Dr. Scarlett Lin Gomez:  Employment: Bioinspire (Immediate Family Member), Valentia Bioanalytics (Immediate Family Member)  Stock and Other Ownership Interests: Amgen (Immediate Family Member), Bioinspire (Immediate Family Member)  Consulting or Advisory Role: GRAIL  Page Break  Dr. Kekoa Taparra: None disclosed.  Disclaimers: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.  Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product service organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.   

The Daily Gardener
May 3, 2022 Garden Meditation Day, Thomas Tusser, Martha Crone, Japanese Internment Gardens, Frida Kahlo, Understanding Orchids by William Cullina, and May Sarton

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 14:51


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events Happy National Garden Meditation Day! 1580 Thomas Tusser (English poet and farmer) died. In 1573, Thomas wrote his Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry, where he advised: In January, the housewife should be busy planting peas and beans and setting young rose roots.  During March and April, she will work 'from morning to night, sowing and setting her garden or plot,' to produce the crops of parsnip, beans, and melons which will 'winnest the heart of a laboring man for her later in the year.  Her strawberry plants will be obtained from the best roots which she has gathered from the woods, and these are to be set in a plot in the garden.  Berries from these plants will be harvested later the same year, perhaps a useful back-up if the parsnips have failed to win the man of her dreams.   1941 During this week, Martha Crone, American botanist and horticulturist, wrote some entries in her Minneapolis diary that reflect the wild swings in temperatures that can be so frustrating to gardeners in the shoulder seasons. At the start of May: [The weather is] still very warm (81 hi 59 lo) and flowers coming out everywhere, everything at least 2 weeks in advance, like midsummer, many insects and flies out. Violets - never so beautiful - as well as Trillium and other flowers. On the 3rd of May: Bitter cold all day [49-41] stove going continuously... but no mosquitoes. On the 8th: Heat unbearable [88-60]  On the 19th: Hottest so far...   1942 On this day, Charles Kikuchi wrote in his Japanese Tanforan Internment camp journal: These industrious Japanese!  They just don't seem to know how to take it easy. They've worked so hard all their lives that they just can't stand idleness or waste . Two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were mandated to relocate to one of the ten relocation camps in the “exclusion zone” of Oregon, California, western Washington, and southern Arizona by order of the president.  Ken Helphand's fantastic 2006 book, Defiant Gardens: Making Gardens in Wartime, tells the story of the gardens that were created in the camps. The gardens were part of the effort to make the camps more bearable. In addition to gardens, there were orchards, parks, baseball diamonds, playgrounds, and farms. In Defiant Gardens, Ken wrote, Entry gardens were part of the Japanese tradition of dooryard gardens, linking household to community, and functioning as entry and marker, displaying the craft and skill of the resident and embellishing both the barracks and the community space....Many persons inscribed their names in cement at the doorstep.  Barracks gardens displayed great variety, using gathered cacti and rocks, transplanted plants, and plants propagated in the camp nursery.  While people waited daily for the communally served meals, they enjoyed the elaborate displays of great artistry and effort that characterized the mess-hall gardens. Created with rocks and water as well as plants, these gardens were most closely identified with the Japanese American garden tradition.  All these gardens brought beauty to the camps and reinforced the internees' sense of cultural identity…   1946 On this day, Frida Kahlo (books about this person) gave a painting called Weeping Coconuts to her friends Lina and Arcady Boitler as a wedding gift. Frida used two weeping coconuts to represent her pain and deteriorating health in the painting.  Frida was mixing prescription painkillers and alcohol by this point in her life. The coconuts were one of fifty-five self-portraits. Her best-known self-portrait is ‘Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird.' Kahlo said, I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best.   Four years later, Frida's pain became unmanageable. In 1953, her right foot - and later right leg - were amputated.  Frida died shortly after her 47th birthday in the summer of 1954. Before she died, she wrote in her journal: I hope the exit is joyful — and I hope never to return — Frida.   Coconuts are an ancient plant that initially hailed from the South Pacific, and because of their buoyancy, coconuts can travel the world on the ocean's waves. Plant Explorers found the coconut growingng throughout the Pacific, the Indian Ocean regions, and Africa. Like mangoes, cashews, and cherries, the coconut is actually a drupe and not a nut. The drupe is an item that has a fleshy outer around a pit. Coconuts are anti-viral, fungal, bacterial, and anti-parasite. There are more than twenty billion coconuts produced each year. The coconut palm is actually the national tree of The Maldives. Before the dominance of soybean oil in the 1960s, Coconut oil was the world's leading vegetable oil. May 8th is National Coconut Creme Pie Day. Falling coconuts kill 150 people every year – 10 times the number of people killed by sharks.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Understanding Orchids by William Cullina This book came out in 2004, and the subtitle is An Uncomplicated Guide to Growing the World's Most Exotic Plants. Well, I myself have become an orchid lover and an orchid fan. They're my favorite plant to send to a family member for a birthday or an anniversary because they last so long, and now because orchids cost as much as the bouquet. I often opt to send an orchid instead of a bouquet of fresh-cut flowers. As a little bonus for me, some of my family members will actually bring me the orchid after it's bloomed. And then I get the honor of taking care of repotting it and getting it healthy and ready to go again so that it will bloom again - hopefully on their next birthday or anniversary. And so that's what I love to do - take care of orchids after they've bloomed. But you know, orchids are a little bit of a mystery to many, many gardeners. So if you haven't gone down the orchid path yet, but you're on the edge, and you want to become more skilled in the area of orchids will, then William Cullina's book is the perfect guide for you. William knows what it's like to be in your shoes. He writes at the end of his introduction, I still get that spine-tingling toe-tickling feeling of, wow that hooked me at the beginning. And if you're just starting out with orchids, you are in for quite an adventure. Learning to grow orchids and understand their idiosyncrasies is a true journey. The sheer number of orchid species estimates range between 25 and 40,000, including hybrids means that there will always be something new to learn something new to explore.   And then he writes this incredible fact. You could start acquiring an orchid a day when you were 20 years old and still not have grown them all when you turned 80 and there is no other family of plants that offers such incredible diversity.   Before I close out this review, I'll just say that the first part of William's book covers all the basics of orchids. Next, William gives an excellent overview of an area that people often struggle with:  how to care for orchids. How do they like to be watered? What should you do about fertilization? How should you pot them? If you're going to Mount them? How does that happen? Then William talks about what to do if you have a pest or disease issue with your orchid. Then, if you are getting into next-level orchid growing, William will be your guy to introduce you to reproduction. He'll tell you how to hand-pollinate and propagate and hybridize orchids. And there will be no mystery to any of this. William is very clear through every page of his book. Finally, William wraps things up with a look at over a hundred of the most popular orchids to get you on your way and to get you thinking about what you want on your orchid wishlist. This book is 272 pages of orchids by an orchid lover - for orchid lovers - or for people thinking about becoming orchid lovers. You can get a copy of Understanding Orchids by William Cullina and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $20.   Botanic Spark 1912 Birth of May Sarton (books by this author), Belgian-American writer and poet.  In Nelson, New Hampshire, May's tiny home was her happy place. She had a garden that she loved and cared for many houseplants. She once wrote these relatable garden witticisms: I am not a greedy person except about flowers and plants, and then I become fanatically greedy.   In her seventies, May reflected, A garden is always a series of losses set against a few triumphs, like life itself.   Still, May could not help striving for the glory of success when it came to her garden. Living a mostly simple life, May's garden was the one place she dreamed big. What a relief it was to me when I read that Vita Sackville-West kept a pile of metal labels in a shack at Sissinghurst as proof of all the experiments that had failed!   Finally, some of May's thoughts on gardening are prayerlike: Help us to be ever faithful gardeners of the spirit, who know that without darkness nothing comes to birth, and without light nothing flowers. and Everything that slows us down and forces patience, everything that sets us back into the slow circles of nature, is a help.  Gardening is an instrument of grace.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Short History Of...
Pearl Harbor, Part 3 of 3

Short History Of...

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 59:26


As the smoke clears after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the blame game begins. President Roosevelt knows that military and intelligence heads must roll, but questions remain about who should be held to account. So what were the longer term consequences of the attack? How did life change for Japanese-Americans, and what fates awaited the Japanese servicemen on their return? And as the memory of Pearl Harbor fades, what lessons were learned?  This is the last episode in this special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O'Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melba, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)
Women to Inspire a Sustainable Japan / Minka Summit Recap / MUJI's New Store | Tove & Joy

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 31:26


Announcing the 5/14 "Women to Inspire a Sustainable Japan" event in both Tokyo and Hiroshima with an online option. Also Sustainable Short-Takes updates, Minka Summit 2022 & MUJI sustainable focus at Hiroshima flagship store. Find out more about the May 14th Event in Hiroshima and Tokyo: https://sites.google.com/globalperspectives.biz/wisj/home (https://sites.google.com/globalperspectives.biz/wisj/home) #SeekSustainableJapan #sustainableshorttakes #womentoinspiresustainablejapan ~~~~ About the Seek-Sustainable-Japan Host, JJWalsh JJWalsh is a Hiroshima-based sustainability-focused consultant & content creator who hosts the weekly "Seeking Sustainability LIVE in Japan" talkshow and podcast - interviews with "Good People doing Great Things to keep People-Planet-Profit in balance." https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbjNoTTFPQ19rakltdldVN3ZaeVhSbGVjTU9OUXxBQ3Jtc0tsanVfVUZpeEkweTAtRGhESUhqNFhETHdUQ1lOQmRTdFNERi1ER0dVSkxzbTEzaGx1UzB4REMwNklkSzUxS09mSHdPYTJxaXRkdXBtdm5zeGVVeEFPUXJOQ0ZFdmZsVVB0WGFlQ1lJcE4tUlhGZkozVQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.inboundambassador.com&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://www.inboundambassador.com) | https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbGxvMU9QVWExQ3pYMVVEYjFOaVVoM243MElxUXxBQ3Jtc0ttdHM2R0ItNUE0cUZtcmpsWldDLW9OdTNqRGkwb05wbmFBOHBXVzRHcXNJZDJhdmVTNVFGX2RQTUdlR1FfNHJISHVXTHpxQXAwdEgtQ0lDay1DSi05MnhaWWxhZjYwdU9JMGZVYkxuTUttal9adUJrYw&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.SeekSustainableJapan.com&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://www.SeekSustainableJapan.com) All Links for JJWalsh: https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa21IdWd4Qzg4MmNkTHZxbENFTUd3eFBmcFFXd3xBQ3Jtc0tubV8tVjlaa215bFh3MF95ZS1qeExVUWVRdTlSVDc2M3Mxa2FvRkk1TGV3R2Q1bnRiczZzN3ZOazZ1RG1CQ2VrRWtybWlyZUdrcER6dFhHMFhYSTg2bU02dFFrVlp5NXQ0Qnc0MDYzUmVLczc0Zi1DZw&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2Fjjwalsh&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ~~~ Listen to the SeekingSustainability LIVE Talkshow on Podcast [AUDIO] http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/ (http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/) ALL Talks in Seek Sustainable Japan (April 2020~) https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP (https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP) JJWalsh Official InboundAmbassador Website: https://www.inboundambassador.com/ (https://www.inboundambassador.com/) Please join, become a monthly sponsor or a 1-time donation supporter on YouTube / Patreon / BuyMeACoffee / or KoFi - every little bit helps keep Seek Sustainable Japan going, thank you! All Links: https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ~~~ Music by Hana Victoria Music rights to "Won't you See" purchased for Seek Sustainable Japan 2022 Hana Victoria Short Bio My name is Hana Victoria, and I am a Japanese-American singer songwriter who dreams of inspiring, encouraging and empowering others through my music. Every word, melody, and visual comes straight from my heart, and I hope they influence you in some positive way :) YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria (https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria) INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/ (https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/) SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg (https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg) APPLE MUSIC: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/hana-victoria/1550597954 (https://music.apple.com/us/artist/hana-victoria/1550597954)

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)
Giant Salamander Habitat Conservation & Sustainable Tourism in Tottori Japan with Richard Pearce

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 61:56


Richard Pearce is the Founding Director at Bushido Adventure Travel Ltd and Owner at Richiyado Guesthouse who has a passion for sustainable travel and tourism in the Tottori area of Japan. https://youtu.be/8x4yAbk5vNo (Watch the video of our talk) Richard also started a new organization in recent years to protect the Giant Salamanders of Mt.Daisen and in the process realized the need is beyond the animals themselves, as it is necessary to take on sustainability focused projects that enhance the level of environmental protection for the area. The Sustainable Daisen NPO which Richard co-founded does lots of great work in the Tottori area to reduce the use of plastics, increase environmental and social impact awareness, and plant trees to regenerate the forest, streams and natural areas around Daisen. LINKS https://www.bushidojapan.com/ (https://www.bushidojapan.com/) https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-pearce-141ab5176/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-pearce-141ab5176/) ~~~~ About the Seek-Sustainable-Japan Host, JJWalsh JJWalsh is a Hiroshima-based sustainability-focused consultant & content creator who hosts the weekly "Seeking Sustainability LIVE in Japan" talkshow and podcast - interviews with "Good People doing Great Things to keep People-Planet-Profit in balance." https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbjNoTTFPQ19rakltdldVN3ZaeVhSbGVjTU9OUXxBQ3Jtc0tsanVfVUZpeEkweTAtRGhESUhqNFhETHdUQ1lOQmRTdFNERi1ER0dVSkxzbTEzaGx1UzB4REMwNklkSzUxS09mSHdPYTJxaXRkdXBtdm5zeGVVeEFPUXJOQ0ZFdmZsVVB0WGFlQ1lJcE4tUlhGZkozVQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.inboundambassador.com&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://www.inboundambassador.com) | https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbGxvMU9QVWExQ3pYMVVEYjFOaVVoM243MElxUXxBQ3Jtc0ttdHM2R0ItNUE0cUZtcmpsWldDLW9OdTNqRGkwb05wbmFBOHBXVzRHcXNJZDJhdmVTNVFGX2RQTUdlR1FfNHJISHVXTHpxQXAwdEgtQ0lDay1DSi05MnhaWWxhZjYwdU9JMGZVYkxuTUttal9adUJrYw&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.SeekSustainableJapan.com&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://www.SeekSustainableJapan.com) All Links for JJWalsh: https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa21IdWd4Qzg4MmNkTHZxbENFTUd3eFBmcFFXd3xBQ3Jtc0tubV8tVjlaa215bFh3MF95ZS1qeExVUWVRdTlSVDc2M3Mxa2FvRkk1TGV3R2Q1bnRiczZzN3ZOazZ1RG1CQ2VrRWtybWlyZUdrcER6dFhHMFhYSTg2bU02dFFrVlp5NXQ0Qnc0MDYzUmVLczc0Zi1DZw&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2Fjjwalsh&v=xnKGZAeDMvI (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ~~~ Listen to the SeekingSustainability LIVE Talkshow on Podcast [AUDIO] http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/ (http://www.inboundambassador.com/ssl-podcasts/) ALL Talks in Seek Sustainable Japan (April 2020~) https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP (https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcyYXjRuE20GsvS0rEOgSiQVAyKbEFSRP) JJWalsh Official InboundAmbassador Website: https://www.inboundambassador.com/ (https://www.inboundambassador.com/) Please join, become a monthly sponsor or a 1-time donation supporter on YouTube / Patreon / BuyMeACoffee / or KoFi - every little bit helps keep Seek Sustainable Japan going, thank you! All Links: https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh (https://linktr.ee/jjwalsh) ~~~ Music by Hana Victoria Music rights to "Won't you See" purchased for Seek Sustainable Japan 2022 Hana Victoria Short Bio My name is Hana Victoria, and I am a Japanese-American singer songwriter who dreams of inspiring, encouraging and empowering others through my music. Every word, melody, and visual comes straight from my heart, and I hope they influence you in some positive way :) YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria (https://www.youtube.com/c/HanaVictoria) INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/ (https://www.instagram.com/hanavictoria_cozycorner/) SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3CHm2w1lJWuiu9txD1wYyq?si=oF7shMElTiid46ZZerCbIg...

KCPW | Salt Lake City News and Information | 88.3 FM
Capitol exhibit highlights Topaz stories, Tracy Aviary takes precautions against bird flu

KCPW | Salt Lake City News and Information | 88.3 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 24:59


On this week's episode of “In the Hive…” A new exhibit on the third floor of the Utah State Capitol features stories of the survivors of the Topaz War Relocation Center, the concentration camp in central Utah that housed more than 11,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. The exhibit, sponsored by the San Franciso-based […]

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 120 with traci kato-kiriyama, Thoughtful and Reflective Artist, Creative, Historian, and Activist, and Writer of the Work of Art that is Navigating With(out) Instruments

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 79:51


Episode 120 Notes and Links to traci kato-kiriyama's Work         On Episode 120 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes traci kato-kiriyama, and the two discuss, among other topics, traci's upbringing with her thoughtful and well-read curators of history and art-her parents-her life as a creative, both as an individual and in collective spaces, themes from her work that are inspired by various muses within and without her family and her local communities, racism against Japanese and Japanese-American and other marginalized communities, and her creative and thought-provoking Navigating With(out) Instruments.      traci kato-kiriyama (they+she), author of Navigating With(out) Instruments--based on unceded Tongva land in the south bay of Los Angeles-- is an award-winning multi-, inter- and transdisciplinary artist, recognized for their work as a writer/performer, theatre deviser, cultural producer, and community organizer. As a storyteller and Artivist, tkk is grounded in collaborative process, collective self-determination, and art+community as intrinsically tied and a critical means toward connection and healing. She is a performer & principal writer for PULLproject Ensemble, two-time NET recipient; NEFA 2021-22 finalist for their show TALES OF CLAMOR.  tkk —presented for over 25 years in hundreds of venues throughout North America as a writer, actor, poet, speaker, guest lecturer, facilitator, Artist-in-Residence, and organizing / arts & culture consultant— has come to appreciate a wildly hybrid career (w/ presenters incl. LaMaMa Cabaret; Enwave Theatre; The Smithsonian; The Getty; Skirball Cultural Center; and Hammer Museum, to Zero Gravity; Grand Park; Whisky a Go Go; Hotel Cafe; House Of Blues Foundation Room; and countless universities, arts spaces, and community centers across the country).  Their work is also featured in a wide swath of media and print publications (incl. NPR; PBS; Elle.com; Entropy; Chapparal Canyon Press; Tia Chucha Press; Bamboo Ridge Press; Heyday Books; Regent Press). tkk is a core artist of Vigilant Love, member of the H.R. 40 Coalition and organizer with the Nikkei Progressives & NCRR joint Reparations Committee, and Director/Co-Founder of Tuesday Night Project (presenter of the Tea & Letterwriting initiative and Tuesday Night Cafe series in Little Tokyo).     traci kato kiriyama's website   Buy Navigating with(out) Instruments   traci's profile on DiscoverNikkei.org   traci's bio for Tuesday Night Project   traci reads "Remember All the Children Who Were Never Born to Me" for Poetry Lab At about 4:00, Pete asks traci about notions of the “writer as speaker,” including a profound quote from Zora Satchell   At about 6:20, traci's cat makes an appearance!   At about 6:30, traci talks about her background and her parents' focus on education and intellectual and historical curiosity, including how The Japanese American Historical Society was founded by her parents    At about 8:30, traci discusses what stories drew her interest in adolescence, including song lyrics, theater, and art of all types   At about 11:30, Pete and traci freak out over their collective love and admiration for Tori Amos   At about 12:25, traci describes the artists and writers-often playwrights-who thrilled her through high school into college and beyond, such as Wakako Yamauchi, Rumi, Yusuf, Adrienne Rich, Nikki Giovanni, and Janice Mirikitani    At about 15:30, Pete wonders about the connection between natural sociability and performance for traci   At about 17:30, traci responds to Pete's question about which artists and creatives inspires her Nancy Keystone and Kennedy Kabasares, Howard Ho, and LA and West Coast standouts Writ Large Press, Not a Cult, Kaia Press, The Accomplices   At about 21:20, traci discusses ideas of “representation,” especially with regard to her childhood and the Japanese-American communities of which she was part   At about 23:15, traci recounts her experience in seeing Sixteen Candles and the thought process that followed the viewing-regarding racist representations in Hollywood and beyond   At about 27:45, traci gives background knowledge on a poem from her collection that references her mother and Dec. 7; it is instructive about the ways in which memory works   At about 30:35, traci talks about the aforementioned incident in the school and connections to Michi Weglyn's book/if and how the story was a microcosm   At about 33:35, traci gives background on the book, includiing an impetus from Ed Lin that didn't exactly bring immediate publication   At about 34:40, traci discusses inspiration for the book's title   At about 38:00, traci discusses the idea of the “muse,” including inspiration from her grandfather, Taz Ahmed, her mom, and others   At about 40:00, traci responds to Pete's questions about the rationale for the many different forms used in her collection   At about 45:50, Pete and traci discuss “Where We Would Have Gone” and the ideas of “what if” and “predicting the past”   At about 48:10, the two talk about the spectrum of sexuality as a theme in traci's collection, as well as meanings of “queer” and pronoun usage and comfortability with names   At about 51:20, traci references her longest acronym and ideas of a “collective coming out” that comes from real life and a poem of hers   At about 53:20, traci explains some background on “Death Notes” that are featured in the collection, as well as ideas/themes associated with being close to death; she highlights editor Chiwan Choi's great help in sharing difficult and “heavy and important” moments   At about 58:00, traci discusses her use of “bury” throughout her work   At about 59:25, the two explore ideas of racism, family, and resistance in traci's family; traci shows the photo of her bearded grandfather and talks of discovering his rebellion, which is instructive in many ways   At about 1:02:55, traci talks about her mother's political awareness and Yuri Kochiyama's “massive impact”; she talks about how traci spoke at a Los Angeles memorial   At about 1:06:00, traci connects the “collectivity” of art with artists and the “continuum” of the world's people and the world's artists and activists; traci cites WorldMeter as an addictive and important website    At about 1:07:45, traci talks about the poems/letters in the collection that serve as conversations between her and Taz Ahmed, including conversations where the subject matter evolved   At about 1:09:45, traci and Pete discuss ideas of “eminent domain” that populate her work   At about 1:10:50, traci reads a poem about her grandfather/reparations after reminding listeners about the annual visits/pilgrimages to Manzanar   At about 1:14:25, traci reads “Remember All the Children who were Never Born to Me”    You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 121 with Michael Torres, a VONA distinguished alum and CantoMundo fellow. His first collection of poems, AN INCOMPLETE LIST OF NAMES, (Beacon Press, 2020) was selected by Raquel Salas Rivera for the National Poetry Series, named one of NPR's Best Books of 2020, and was featured on the podcast Code Switch. He teaches in the MFA program at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and through the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop.    The episode will air on May 3. 

Radio Times
The Regional Roundup: April 25th 2022

Radio Times

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 49:15


Gun violence increases in Philadelphia, recreational cannabis is legal in New Jersey, a story of resistance to the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII

The Avid Reader Show
Episode 655: Alma Katsu - The Fervor

The Avid Reader Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 47:09


The acclaimed author of the celebrated literary horror novels The Hunger and The Deep turns her psychological and supernatural eye on the horrors of the Japanese American internment camps in World War II.1944: As World War II rages on, the threat has come to the home front. In a remote corner of Idaho, Meiko Briggs and her daughter, Aiko, are desperate to return home. Following Meiko's husband's enlistment as an air force pilot in the Pacific months prior, Meiko and Aiko were taken from their home in Seattle and sent to one of the internment camps in the Midwest. It didn't matter that Aiko was American-born: They were Japanese, and therefore considered a threat by the American government. Mother and daughter attempt to hold on to elements of their old life in the camp when a mysterious disease begins to spread among those interned. What starts as a minor cold quickly becomes spontaneous fits of violence and aggression, even death. And when a disconcerting team of doctors arrive, nearly more threatening than the illness itself, Meiko and her daughter team up with a newspaper reporter and widowed missionary to investigate, and it becomes clear to them that something more sinister is afoot, a demon from the stories of Meiko's childhood, hell-bent on infiltrating their already strange world.   Inspired by the Japanese yokai and the jorogumo spider demon, The Fervor explores the horrors of the supernatural beyond just the threat of the occult. With a keen and prescient eye, Katsu crafts a terrifying story about the danger of demonization, a mysterious contagion, and the search to stop its spread before it's too late. A sharp account of too-recent history, it's a deep excavation of how we decide who gets to be human when being human matters most. Buy the book here:  https://wellingtonsquarebooks.indiecommerce.com/book/9780593328330

Keen on Yoga Podcast
#90 – Keen on Yoga Podcast with Govinda Kai

Keen on Yoga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 58:54


Govinda Kai has studied and dedicated himself to martial arts, meditative disciplines and yoga for over 20 years. At the age of 30, Govinda discovered the practice of Ashtanga vinyasa yoga and immediately fell in love with the practice. He is one of the select individuals in the world who are certified to teach the Ashtanga Yoga Method by its founder, Sri K. Pattabhi Jois. In 1995, Govinda made his first trip to Mysore, India to practice with Sri K. Pattabhi Jois. From 1995 to 2015, Govinda made over 20 trips to Mysore to practice Ashtanga, with each trip lasting an average of 3-4 months. He is of Japanese-American descent, born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. From a very young age, Govinda took a passionate interest in meditation, yoga and spiritual philosophy. Govinda's father, Edward Yamaguchi, was a highly respected practitioner and teacher of martial arts (he held a high ranking in both Judo and Aikido) and like Govinda, nurtured a strong attraction to spirituality and philosophy from a very young age. Govinda began the practice of martial arts while in high school and began yoga, meditation, and devotional chanting at age 18, studying with respected teachers such as Swami Muktananda and Sogyal Rimpoche. Govinda's father died of colon cancer at the age of 49 years old, when Govinda was only 16. The passing of his father affected Govinda deeply and inspired him to begin reading books on spirituality and meditation at the age of 16. After university, Govinda considered becoming a Buddhist monk, but was advised by his teacher Sogyal Rimpoche to enter into a more worldly career. Thus, Govinda became a practicing professional in the area of real estate, all the while still devoting much of his time to spiritual practice. He is currently teaching in Bellingham, Washington state and you can find him at @govindakai If you enjoy the Keen on Yoga Podcast and would like to support us you can share this post, give us a review on Apple or Spotify or make a donation .  We appreciate your help to us keep creating free content for all.  

The Third Window Films Podcast
Episode 8 - Zokki

The Third Window Films Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 56:56


This episode Adam and Ben share their experiences with the latest idiosyncratic release from Third Window Films "Zokki". Three of Japan's most talented and prolific actor-directors have joined forces to adapt Hiroyuki Ohashi's cult manga series about characters in "an obscure corner" of the world. The film's five loosely connected storylines concern the secrets and lies, fears and tears, and puerile potty jokes that punctuate their daily (and in one eerie case, nightly) encounters.     Adam also explains the difference between bringing a brand new film like this to the western audience was why he got started in film distribution in the first place, and how releasing legacy films just became part of the game thanks to an ever-changing market.     They also discuss how #metoo has finally arrived in Japan thanks to a Japanese-American actor who began to talk about what he saw during one of these director workshops.     Zokki is out on April 25th and available to buy now at an introductory offer price from Terracotta Distribution via this link - https://shop.terracottadistribution.com/products/zokki-bluray     If you like our show then please tell you friends, share our posts and rate or review us wherever you can. Every little helps. Also, if you have any questions for Adam or Ben then get in touch via twitter @thirdwindow and @BenjyBox and they will read out your questions on the next episode.

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Japanese American writer shares insights into San Luis Obispo's prewar Japanese immigrant community

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 38:32


Writer Shizue Seigel's immigrant grandparents' contributions to San Luis Obispo's Japantown and farming operations were swept away through the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Work From The Inside Out
171: Make Your Mess Your Message - Shari Leid

Work From The Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 56:49


Shari Leid's life started out “a little messy” as she refers to it. Born in Seoul, South Korea, she was abandoned as a baby and has never known her actual birth date, birthplace, or birth name. After being moved to approximately four different locations, Shari was adopted by a Japanese American couple from Seattle. They were older parents, both had been interned in camps during World War Two. Shari reflects on her identity struggles resulting from her own adoption by parents who had their own unresolved issues. Yet, she sees her glass as half full. Shari is grateful for the opportunities she has had, assuming that if her life had not started as it did, she would have grown up under very different circumstances. She studied psychology in college, expecting that she would go on to pursue a graduate degree. Finding that she was moved by her sense of justice, Shari decided to go to law school. She became a litigator because she wanted to have a voice for those who could not speak for themselves. Shari practiced law for 14 years as a criminal prosecutor and as a defense attorney on civil cases for an insurance company. She reached a point where she did not feel as if she was living her purpose. At the same time, Shari was starting her own family by adopting a baby from China who was soon after identified as having developmental delays. Two weeks after bringing the baby home, Shari discovered she was pregnant. She decided to take a break from the law and dedicate herself to being at home with her children. Shari said this was the hardest work she has ever done. During this time Shari got into fitness and became a trainer. Once her kids were in school she opened a fitness studio but decided to close it when she had to have double hip replacement surgeries in her 30s. In her 40s, she went through a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. She asked herself, “What am I doing here?” This led her to start a coaching practice and writing. Today, Shari operates An Imperfectly Perfect Life, LLC, a professional mindset coaching business serving clients who are in those tricky middle-age years, helping them create the life of their dreams. In this week's Work From The Inside Out podcast, learn more about Shari's journey: Shari is the author of the Friendship Flow transformational book series, which includes The 50/50 Friendship Flow: Life Lessons From and For My Girlfriends and Make Your Mess Your Message  - More Life Lessons From and For My Girlfriends. She is a certified Life Coach, a Core Dynamic Specialist, and a graduate of the Happiness Studies Academy. Learn more and connect with Shari here:  https://www.facebook.com/shari.leid/ https://twitter.com/AnImperfectly www.animperfectlyperfectlife.com https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCWc1RpzZfTK8hgagC0xEpw https://www.instagram.com/an_imperfectly_perfect_life/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/shari-leid-51a53b10/ https://www.facebook.com/animperfectlyperfectlife

The Last Tenth Podcast
E.4.10: Build it, We're Here!

The Last Tenth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 61:38


Alissa (Cheatham) Lay is dedicated to sharing her knowledge to help others reach their physical goals. She is a Certified Personal Trainer, a Pro Card competitive body builder and figure competitor in the National Gym Association (NGA), a wife and soon to be mom of twins. Alissa recently completed a 250+ mile bike ride, with several other women of color, from Harlem to D.C with MajorKnox Adventures as part of their 1928 Legacy Tour. Being an athlete has allowed Alissa to take up space as a black woman and show others they can do so too! Ayako Sawanobori is a Japanese-American runner, outdoor adventurer, food lover, and nonprofit professional in San Francisco. She started her athletic career as a competitive gymnast, but after recovering from a spine injury, Ayako became a track & field athlete. In her 30's, Ayako turned to endurance and trail running. Ayako is passionate about diversity & representation in the outdoors and beyond. Kelsey Long's pronouns are she/her. She is Navajo and her clans are Kinyaa'áanii nishłį́, tł'ogi bashishchiin, kin łichíínii dashicheii, naakai dine'é dashinalí. She currently lives in Southeast Oklahoma on the Choctaw Nation Reservation. Kelsey's first trail run was in 2017 at the State Games of Oklahoma. She recalls that the race kicked her butt! However, Kelsey fell in love with trail running. Her ultimate goal is to be an ultramarathoner. Kelsey has used running to bring awareness to issues that affect Indigenous communities. Kelsey is inspired by runners like Jordan Marie Brings Three White Horses Daniel to use her running as a form of advocacy. Rebecca Bowman is a former local Austin resident who took off in her van a couple of years ago to explore the mountains, climbing and trail running spaces. Rebecca is a trail runner, climber and dancer. Through her platform, Coffee & Climbs, Rebecca is moved by others individual stories. Rebecca is passionate about exploring mental health through movement. She is committed to learning about Indigenous lands in both her personal and professional work. She feels incredibly grateful to be in these spaces and with like minded individuals, like the Dirtbags Run Core Team - Pilar, Kelsey, Ayako, and Alissa! ****To follow the Dirtbags Run Team visit them on Instagram: @dirtbagsrun https://www.instagram.com/dirtbagsrun/). To apply to the 2022 DBR Team visit: http://t.ly/AvJT . On IG, please follow Ayako Sawanobori @ninjayako (https://www.instagram.com/ninjayako/), Alissa Cheatham @queen_the_machine (https://www.instagram.com/queen_the_machine/), Kelsey Long @longcommakelsey (https://www.instagram.com/longcommakelsey/ and Rebecca Bowman @groundingclimbs (https://www.instagram.com/groundingclimbs/)*** ****Host, Coach Pilar Arthur-Snead, https://linktr.ee/mindfulrunner **** Leave me a message at https://anchor.fm/pilar-arthur-snead/message*** ***Please Like and Subscribe to The Last Tenth Podcast on You Tube: https://bit.ly/37foa2f ***Listen toThe Last Tenth Podcast on: Anchor.fm (https://anchor.fm/pilar-arthur-snead), Apple Podcasts (https://apple.co/3lXB5ek), Please be sure to leave your positive feedback and 5 star review on Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts (https://bit.ly/3oqGUTo), Spotify (https://spoti.fi/37Oowgm) and so much more! *** ****THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!! *****If you like what you've heard on the show, please consider contributing to or sponsoring the show. Contact the host Pilar Arthur-Snead for more information on sponsorship! A portion of the sponsorship dollars and donation proceeds will benefit my charity of choice. So consider a monthly donation of $1.00, $5.00 or even $10.00.*** --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pilar-arthur-snead/support

Criminal
Episode 186: The Magpie

Criminal

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 40:27


When Shigeru Yabu was 9 years old, he and his family were incarcerated at Heart Mountain Internment Camp, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese American families. One day, Shigeru discovered a baby magpie that had fallen out of its nest. He named her Maggie. “That bird walked up my arm all the way to my shoulder, and we looked at each other, eye to eye.” Shigeru Yabu's book is Hello Maggie! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Honoring Japanese-American WWII internment hero, Jimi Yamaichi

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 54:27


A year before Jimi Yamaichi died in 2018 he talked about life as a Japanese American and his time in WWII internment camps and refusing draft orders.

KoreKara Podcast: An Inside Look Into Japan
#78 Mayuko - Japanese American Software Engineer and Content Creator

KoreKara Podcast: An Inside Look Into Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 27:21


This week we talked to @mayuko , a Japanese-American software engineer and content creator! We get into her experience growing up bilingual, going to Japanese school in the US and other cultural parts of Japan in the podcast. ► Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Korepoddo $10 free italki credits (after first lesson) → https://go.italki.com/korekara Our Links: ► Eric's Twitter: https://twitter.com/reysuing ► Raza's Twitter: https://twitter.com/razatalks ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/korepoddo

Club Book
Club Book Episode 136 Julie Otsuka

Club Book

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 65:33


Chart-topping novelist Julie Otsuka is the daughter of Japanese immigrants, and a poignant chronicler of the Japanese American experience across the first half of the twentieth century. Her breakout debut […]

From Where We Are
From 3 billion dollars to making amends

From Where We Are

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 20:06


On today's show, Japanese American students during WWII get honorary degrees from USC, Elon Musk buys nine percent of Twitter for about three billion dollars and a conversation with a Muslim journalist about Ramadan.

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 3.31.22 Campu: Stories from the Japanese American Incarceration Paper

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 38:00


The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life
Episode 206 - I Am Able to Shine (ft. Korey Watari & Mike Wu)

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 46:25


In this episode of the podcast Joe talks to dynamic duo author Korey Watari and Illustrator Mike Wu about their book "I Am Able to Shine"!  It's a timely conversation here at the end of Women's History Month about the lessons we can teach our daughters. We also get into a discussion around AAPI Heritage Month in May (when this book releases) as well representation in general.  You may even shed a tear or two. I cannot thank Korey & Mike enough for coming on the show and I look forward to their return in the future. Enjoy! About Korey Watari Korey is a sansei, or third-generation Japanese American, born and raised in Los Angeles. She played basketball for a Japanese American league, graduated from the University of California, Riverside, and studied at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. Korey has worked in the animation and fashion industries for companies such as Disney and the Gap. I Am Able to Shine is her first picture book and first collaboration with her husband, artist Mike Wu, the creator of Disney's Ellie series. About Mike Wu Mike Wu was accepted into the Character Animation program at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, CA. He graduated in 1996 with a BFA in Character Animation and was recruited by Walt Disney Feature Animation Studios where he worked for the next six years on such films as Hercules, Tarzan, Atlantis, and Mulan. Shortly thereafter, Mike followed his childhood dream of working for the studio that created Luxo Jr.. He moved to the Bay Area and started at Pixar Animation Studios where he animated on the Oscar-winning The Incredibles, Ratatouille, Up, Toy Story 3, Coco and Soul among other films.   About I Am Able to Shine An affirmative, empowering story about embracing your identity and finding your voice, inspired in part by debut author Korey Watari's experiences growing up Asian American, and illustrated by her husband, Mike Wu, Pixar artist and creator of the Ellie series. I am beautiful. I belong here. What I do matters. I am able to shine. Each night Keiko whispers to her crane, “I wish to change the world.” She is kind, and she has big dreams. But at times she feels invisible; she knows some people misjudge her. Keiko is also loved, so she perseveres and stands strong. Over time, her confidence grows, she shares more of herself, and she helps lift up others―and eventually lead them. She understands that no matter what, she can shine. To quickly and easily leave a rating/review for this podcast please go to:  https://ratethispodcast.com/dtalkspodcast Thanks to Snuffy for this episode of the podcast! Snuffy is a clothing brand about empowering you to show your weird - unapologetically, with bravery and confidence. 10% of profit goes to LGBTQ+ organizations led by Trans* people of color. Shop online now at snuffy.co Also, thanks to Empire Toys for this episode of the podcast! Nostalgia is something everyone loves and Empire Toys in Keller Texas is on nostalgia overload.   With toys and action figures from the 70's, 80's, 90's, and today, Empire Toys is a one-stop-shop for a trip down memory lane and a chance to reclaim what was once yours (but likely sold at a garage sale)   Check out Empire Toys on Facebook, Instagram, or at TheEmpireToys.com The DTALKS Podcast has also been ranked #9 in the "Top 40 Detox Podcast You Must Follow in 2020" according to Feedspot.com for our work in the Cultural Detox space. Thank you so much to the Feedspot team!  https://blog.feedspot.com/detox_podcasts/

ABC Adopted Babies from China
I was afraid I was a sort of imposter claiming Japanese heritage with Kelli

ABC Adopted Babies from China

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 64:27


I had the opportunity to speak with Kelli about her adoption to Japanese American parents. Kelli is at a university in California with a focus on Asian American and plans to pursue more research and education in the future. This conversation has resources and explanations about Asian American and adoption. @kaleidoscope_for_kelli on instagram where you can see her art! If you would like to share your story please email adoptedbabiesfromchina@gmail.com or @adoptedbabiesfromchinapod on Facebook, Instagram, and @ChineseAdoptPod on Twitter. Thank you for listening!

Outspoken: A COPH Podcast
Episode 21: One Book, One CSUF - Japanese American Archival Collections

Outspoken: A COPH Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 39:37


In Episode Twenty-one, Dr. Benjamin Cawthra is joined by COPH archivist, Natalie Garcia; Director of Special Collections, Lisa Mix; and Special Collections archivist, Patrisia Prestinary. The group discuss the 2021-22 One Book, One CSUF selection, "They Called us Enemy," by George Takei, and talk about collaborating on a corresponding event on April 11th, which will highlight Japanese American archival materials held in the Center for Oral and Public History and the University Archives and Special Collections. Later, in our Out of the Archives segment, archivist Natalie Garcia presents oral history clips from interviews with Georgia Day Robertson, Seiko Ishida, Hitoshi Nitta, and Clarence I. Nishizu.

Seattle Now
Keeping memory alive

Seattle Now

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 12:51


Tomorrow marks 80 years since the U.S. sent 120,000 Japanese Americans to internment camps, starting here on Bainbridge Island. We'll hear how younger generations are keeping memory alive from Yoko Fedorenko, founding president of the UW's Nikkei Student Union.Find out more about the March 30 anniversary event on Bainbridge Island:https://bijac.org/event/commemoration-of-the-80th-anniversary-of-the-exclusion/?event_date=2022-03-30

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast
GO FOR BROKE THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE JAPANESE-AMERICAN 442ND BRIGADE IN WWII FRANCE

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 65:37


In this story we follow the lives of three Japanese-American marines who joined the newly created 442nd division in France in 1943- leaving behind their families on the US west coast- families which had been forced to give up their possessions and move to internment camps due to a national panic caused by fear of a Japanese attack on the west coast. The legendary tenacity of the Japanese-American Regimental Combat Division throughout 7 campaigns in Italy and France made them the most decorated unit for their size and length of service in US history. Credits: 'Honor Before Glory' One hour docudrama 'Go For Broke' 1951 classic movie; www.the442nd.org www.goforbroke.org Books: Honor Before Glory Scott McGough deCapo Press 2016  Shenkle, Kathryn (May 2006). "Patriots under Fire: Japanese Americans in World War II". United States Department of Defense, Department of the Army, Center of Military History ANDROID USERS- 1001 Radio Days right here at Google Podcasts FREE: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20radio%20days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales at Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5tZWdhcGhvbmUuZm0vQURMNzU3MzM0Mjg0NQ== 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries at Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20heroes 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories (& Tales from Arthur Conan Doyle) https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20sherlock%20holmes 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre on Spotify: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20ghost%20stories 1001 Stories for the Road on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20stories%20for%20the%20road Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20greatest%20love%20stories 1001 History's Best Storytellers: (author interviews) on Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/1001-historys-best-storytellers APPLE USERS Catch 1001 Heroes on any Apple Device here (Free): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2  Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at Apple Podcast App Now: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at Apple Podcast now:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901 NEW Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-greatest-love-stories/id1485751552 Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 NEW 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre is now playing at Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-ghost-stories-tales-of-the-macabre/id1516332327 NEW Enjoy 1001 History's Best Storytellers (Interviews) on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-historys-best-storytellers/id1483649026 NEW Enjoy 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories and The Best of Arthur Conan Doyle https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-sherlock-holmes-stories-best-sir-arthur-conan/id1534427618 Get all of our shows at one website: https://.1001storiespodcast.com REVIEWS NEEDED . My email works as well for comments: 1001storiespodcast@gmail.com SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY BECOMING A PATRON! https://.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork. Its time I started asking for support! Thank you. Its a few dollars a month OR a one time. (Any amount is appreciated). YOUR REVIEWS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS AT APPLE/ITUNES AND ALL ANDROID HOSTS ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED! LINKS BELOW... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Made in Japan-- Conversations with Meljo Catalan
Ep. 55– Miko Hayashi, Embroidery Artist of Mimi Hana Threads

Made in Japan-- Conversations with Meljo Catalan

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 45:43


Spring is upon us! How fitting it would be to have an episode showcasing my friend Miko, who is a self taught embroidery artist handcrafting unique and customizable 3D embroidered accessories and jewelry. When I learned that she will be having her first gallery exhibition this month at the Design Festa Gallery in Harajuku, I knew I had to whip up an episode to not only promote her craft but also to share her story as a 4th generation Japanese American exploring her roots and literally flourishing. Say hello to Miko if you are living in Japan and want to stop by Design Festa Gallery this month or if you'd like to see Miko's embroideries, check out https://www.mimihanathreads.com For more info on the Nakameguro Taproom and other Baird Beer taprooms, please visit: http://Bairdbeer.com/ To donate and buy drinks for the guests of my podcast: https://ko-fi.com/madeinjapanpodcast IG & FB: @madeinjapanpodcast Email: japanmademepodcast@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/madeinjapanpodcast/message

Throughline
Our Own People (2021)

Throughline

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 51:10


A Japanese American activist whose early political awakenings came while incarcerated in the internment camps of World War II America, Kochiyama dedicated her life to social justice and liberation movements. One year after the spa shooting that killed eight people in Atlanta, Georgia — including six women of Asian descent — Throughline reflects on her ideas around the Asian American struggle, and what solidarity and intersectionality can mean for all struggles.

In Between The Pages with James Lott Jr.
All Sorrows Can Be Borne by Loren Stephens

In Between The Pages with James Lott Jr.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 25:30


James Lott Jr chats with the author of a page turner of a book,All Sorrows Can Be Borne, Loren Stephens! Inspired by true events, All Sorrows Can Be Borne is the story of Noriko Ito, a Japanese woman faced with unimaginable circumstances that force her to give up her son to save her husband. Set in Hiroshima, Osaka, and the badlands of eastern Montana and spanning the start of World War II to 1982, this breathtaking novel is told primarily in the voice of Noriko, a feisty aspiring actress who fails her audition to enter the Takarazuka Theater Academy. Instead, she takes the “part” of a waitress at a European-style tearoom in Osaka where she meets the mysterious and handsome manager, Ichiro Uchida. They fall in love over music and marry. Soon after Noriko becomes pregnant during their seaside honeymoon, Ichiro is diagnosed with tuberculosis destroying their dreams.Noriko gives birth to a healthy baby boy, but to give the child a better life, Ichiro convinces her to give the toddler to his older sister and her Japanese-American husband, who live in Montana. Noriko holds on to the belief that this inconceivable sacrifice will lead to her husband's recovery. What happens next is unexpected and shocking and will affect Noriko for the rest of her life.Eighteen years later, her son enlists in the U.S. Navy and is sent to Japan. Finally, he is set to meet his birth mother, but their reunion cracks open the pain and suffering Noriko has endured.With depth and tenderness, All Sorrows Can Be Borne is a harrowing and beautifully written novel that explores how families are shaped by political and economic circumstances, tremendous loss and ultimately forgiveness.

Lake Effect: Full Show
Thursday on Lake Effect: teaching financial literacy, 'Then They Came For Me' exhibit, comedian Tig Notaro, Buy Nothing project

Lake Effect: Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 51:30


We look at a push to teach students in Wisconsin about the importance of financial literacy. Then, learn about an exhibit at Jewish Museum Milwaukee, exploring the impact of Japanese-American internment. We speak with comedian Tig Notaro, then tell you about a project that hopes to connect neighbors while having a positive impact on the environment.

Soundside
Visiting the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial

Soundside

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 16:11


On Bainbridge Island, just across Eagle Harbor from the ferry terminal in Winslow, there sits an idyllic 8-acre site, with water lapping at a small dock and light filtering down through towering trees. But the beauty of the space belies its dark history.

TRUST & THRIVE with Tara Mont
157: Creating Your Own Definition of Success - with Brandon A. Shindo, Licensed Clinical Social Worker & Co-Founder of K&B Therapy

TRUST & THRIVE with Tara Mont

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 39:52


Brandon A. Shindo is a fourth generation Japanese American. He was born and raised in the City of Los Angeles, CA. Brandon is the Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California, and the CEO and Co-Founder of K&B Therapy Inc.Over Brandon's professional career, he has served as an in-and-outpatient clinical therapist, field-based clinical supervisor at a non-profit community mental health agency, and as a field instructor for graduate level Master of Social Work students. He is also a keynote speaker for events discussing mental health within communities of color.He specializes and is passionate in working with and advocating for young professionals, college students, and people of color (particularly those who identify as Asian American Pacific Islander).Ultimately, he aims to help his clients find their optimal balance between success and happiness in their lives, and create a life that they feel is authentic and genuine to themselves.In this episode, we discuss men's mental health, cultural expectations, healthy vs. unhealthy masculinity, ending the stigma of mental health, being proactive over reactive, and more.FOLLOW BRANDON:INSTA: @@bashindo.lcswWEBSITE:  www.kandbtherapy.comSTAY CONNECTED:INSTA: @trustandthriveTIKOK:@trustandthriveTWITTER: @trustandthriveFACEBOOK: bit.ly/FBtaramontWEBSITE: www.tara-mont.com EMAIL: tara@tara-mont.com 

Warp Five: A Star Trek Enterprise Podcast

“Detained” 20th-anniversary reflections. After the Enterprise accidentally enters a military zone around the second moon of Tandara Prime, Captain Archer and Ensign Mayweather are captured and find themselves in Detention Complex 26, a facility that is home to 89 Suliban prisoners. The events and interaction that follow shed light on the Suliban in unexpected ways and also introduces links to the Temporal Cold War though a story that is classic Star Trek allegory. In this episode of Warp Five, hosts C Bryan Jones and Matthew Rushing continue our 20th-anniversary retrospective that takes you through all of Star Trek: Enterprise, one episode at a time. In this installment, we explore “Detained” and how this story meant as commentary on the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II has a much more timeless message about wrongs repeated throughout history. We also discuss how the story connects with the modern-day tendency to pass judgment in the court of public opinion and why it is vital that we listen to one another. Hosts C Bryan Jones and Matthew Rushing Production C Bryan Jones (Editor and Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer)