Podcast appearances and mentions of Isaac Asimov

American writer (1920–1992)

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The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week
047: Christmas on Ganymede by Isaac Asimov - At Least One Vintage Sci-Fi Short Story In Every Episode

The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 44:16


Consider the problems of miners who work on Ganymede, moon of Jupiter, 390,000,000 miles from earth: isolated on a world so different from our own, surrounded by beings who know nothing of our traditions, how might these men teach their alien work-mates how we celebrate Christmas? Christmas on Ganymede by Isaac Asimov, that's next on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast, with at least one lost vintage sci-fi short story in every episode.Christmas on Ganymede is the first Isaac Asimov short sci-fi story on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast. Listener Sleepy Williams requested something from Asimov and since we're getting close to Christmas it seemed like a good time for this story. Asimov was born in Russia on January 2, 1920, his family immigrated to the United States in 1923, and he became a naturalized US citizen in 1928.He discovered science fiction through the magazines sold in his father's candy store.During World War II, he was employed as a chemist at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. That's when that he became acquainted with Robert Heinlein and L. Sprague de Camp, two other future science fiction writers.Asimov briefly served in the Army in 1946, and following his discharge, he received his Ph.D. and began teaching biochemistry at Boston University's School of Medicine. Asimov soon started writing short stories and then his first novel, Pebble in the Sky, in the 1940s and '50s. For the next 40 years, Asimov wrote hundreds of science fiction works.The 2021 Apple TV series Foundation is based on his writing, as is the 2004 movie I, Robot starring Will Smith and the 1999 Robin Williams movie Bicentennial Man.Asimov was given theScience Fiction Writers Association Grand Master Award in 1987 and was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 1997.A discussion of his accomplishments in sci-fi would take hours, so we'll save more of the Isaac Asimov story for another episode of the podcast.Christmas on Ganymede was written in December 1940, first published in the January 1942 issue of Startling Stories Magazine. The Yuletide Season Brings Turmoil on Jupiter's Moon and Ill Will Toward Everybody When Olaf Johnson Gets Sentimental! Our Christmas tale begins on page 83, Christmas on Ganymede by Isaac Asimov...Next week on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast… Undaunted by crazy tales of an indestructible presence on Asteroid Z-40, Harley 2Q14N20 sets out alone to face and master it. The Planetoid of Peril by Paul Ernst. That's next week on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast, with at least one lost vintage sci-fi short story in every episode.

The Dark Web Vlogs
ALIENS BUILT OUR MOON - HOLLOW MOON DOCUMENTARY

The Dark Web Vlogs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 44:47


ALIENS BUILT OUR MOON - HOLLOW MOON DOCUMENTARY The Hollow Moon hypothesis and the closely related Spaceship Moon hypothesis propose that Earth's Moon is either wholly hollow or otherwise contains a substantial interior space. No scientific evidence exists to support the idea; seismic observations and other data collected since spacecraft began to orbit or land on the Moon indicate that it has a thin crust, extensive mantle and small, dense core, although overall it is much less dense than Earth.The first publication to mention a hollow Moon was H. G. Wells' 1901 novel The First Men in the Moon. In 1970, two Soviet authors published a short piece in the popular press speculating that the Moon might be "the Creation of Alien Intelligence". Since the late 1970s, the hypothesis has been endorsed by conspiracy theorists like Jim Marrs and David Icke.he Hollow Moon hypothesis is the suggestion that the Moon is hollow, usually as a product of an alien civilization.[1][2] It is often called the Spaceship Moon hypothesis[1][2] and often corresponds with beliefs in UFOs or ancient astronauts.[2][3]The suggestion of a hollow moon first appeared in science fiction, when H. G. Wells wrote about a hollow moon in his 1901 book The First Men in the Moon.[1][4] The concept of hollow planets was not new; The first discussion of a Hollow Earth was by scientist Edmond Halley in 1692.[5][6] Wells borrowed from earlier fictional works that described a hollow Earth, such as the 1741 novel Niels Klim's Underground Travels by Ludvig Holberg.[7]In 1920, fringe author Marshall B. Gardner cited Wells's speculation of a Hollow Moon as support of the Hollow Earth theory.[8]Both Hollow Moon and Hollow Earth are now considered to be a fringe theories or conspiracy theories.[9][1][10][11] The concept of the Moon as a spaceship is often mentioned as one of David Icke's beliefs.[10][12][13]Claims and rebuttalsDensityThe fact that the Moon is less dense than the Earth is advanced as support for it to be hollow. The moon's mean density is 3.3 g/cm3, whereas the Earth's is 5.5 g/cm3.[14] One explanation of this discrepancy is that the moon may have been formed by a giant impact which ejected some of the early Earth's upper crust into its orbit.[4][15] The Earth's upper mantle and crust are less dense than its core.[16]The Moon rang like a bellBetween 1969 and 1977, seismometers installed on the Moon by the Apollo missions recorded moonquakes. The Moon was described as "ringing like a bell" during some of those quakes, specifically the shallow ones.[17] This phrase was brought to popular attention in March 1970[1] in an article in Popular Science.[18]On November 20, 1969, Apollo 12 deliberately crashed the Ascent Stage of its Lunar Module onto the Moon's surface; NASA reported that the Moon rang 'like a bell' for almost an hour, leading to arguments that it must be hollow like a bell.[1] Lunar seismology experiments since then have shown that the lunar body has shallow moonquakes that act differently from quakes on Earth, due to differences in texture, type and density of the planetary strata, but there is no evidence of any large empty space inside the body.[17]Vasin-Shcherbakov "spaceship" conjectureSpeculative cutaway model of a Spaceship MoonIn 1970, Michael Vasin and Alexander Shcherbakov, of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, advanced a hypothesis that the Moon is a spaceship created by unknown beings.[2] The article was entitled "Is the Moon the Creation of Alien Intelligence?" and was published in Sputnik,[10] the Soviet equivalent of Reader's Digest.[1][19] The Vasin-Shcerbakov hypothesis was reported in the West that same year.[20]Their hypothesis relies heavily on the suggestion that large lunar craters, generally assumed to be formed from meteor impact, are generally too shallow and have flat or even convex bottoms. They hypothesized that small meteors are making a cup-shaped depression in the rocky surface of the moon while the larger meteors are drilling through a rocky layer and hitting an armoured hull underneath.[14]The authors reference earlier speculation by astrophysicist Iosif Shklovsky, who suggested that the Martian moon Phobos was an artificial satellite and hollow; this has since been shown not to be the case. Sceptical author Jason Colavito points out that all of their evidence is circumstantial, and that, in the 1960s, the atheistic Soviet Union promoted the ancient astronaut concept in an attempt to undermine the West's faith in religion.[2]"Perfect" solar eclipsesIn 1965, author Isaac Asimov observed: "What makes a total eclipse so remarkable is the sheer astronomical accident that the Moon fits so snugly over the Sun. The Moon is just large enough to cover the Sun completely (at times) so that a temporary night falls and the stars spring out. [...] The Sun's greater distance makes up for its greater size and the result is that the Moon and the Sun appear to be equal in size. [...] There is no astronomical reason why Moon and Sun should fit so well. It is the sheerest of coincidence, and only the Earth among all the planets is blessed in this fashion."[21]Since the 1970s, conspiracy theorists have cited Asimov's observations on solar eclipses as evidence of the Moon's artificiality.[22][23] Mainstream astronomers reject this interpretation. They note that the angular diameters of Sun and Moon vary by several percent over time and do not actually "perfectly" match during eclipses.[24] Nor is Earth the only planet with such a satellite: Saturn's moon Prometheus has roughly the same angular diameter as the Sun when viewed from Saturn.[24]Modernly, some scholars have claimed that "the conditions required for perfect solar eclipses are the same conditions generally acknowledged to be necessary for intelligent life to emerge"; If so, the Moon's size and orbit might be best explained by the weak anthropic principle.[24][25][26]

ZiCast
ZiCast S2E48 - Inteligencia Artificial

ZiCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 91:32


Cabô é agora! Hoje Brunão, GG e Slow terminam a série de Ciência com um assunto que ainda vai dar muita dor de cabeça: Inteligência Artificial! Vamos conversar sobre os conceitos, os PREconceitos, as idéias do passado e as perspectivas para o futuro! Os robôs vão acabar com os humanos? E com os empregos? IA é capaz de compôr música ou produzir arte? Vem com a gente descobrir! Tempo de duração: 1h31min Link do APOIA.SE: https://apoia.se/zicast Mande sua opinião, xingamento ou correção para nosso e-mail que a gente lê mesmo: republicazicast@gmail.com Arte da vitrine: GG REDES SOCIAIS: Twitch: zicast_podcast Youtube: ZiCast Insta: @zicast twitter: @republicazicast Facetruck: /ZiCast Apoia.se: https://apoia.se/zicast

El Desván de los Cuentos Perdidos - Audiolibros
Amor Verdadero, Audiolibro de Isaac Asimov

El Desván de los Cuentos Perdidos - Audiolibros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 13:00


Amor Verdadero, Audiolibro de Isaac Asimov La historia está narrada por Joe, una computadora creada por Milton, quien la utilizará para encontrar, a través de la conexión Multivac, a la mujer perfecta para él. Para ello tendrá que llenar a Joe de información sobre sí mismo. El Desván de los cuentos perdidos. Relatos y audiolibros de misterio y terror de Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, .. y muchos más, narrados e interpretados con música y efectos. Narrado por: Ander Vildósola Música intro: Ander Vildósola Música: youtube studio Fuente: ciudadseva.com Para consultas escribe a: eldesvandlcp@gmail.com Para más información y/o leer los textos transcritos en la web: https://eldesvandlcp.wixsite.com/eldesvandlcp Sigue nuestras redes: - Facebook --- https://www.facebook.com/eldesvandlcp/ - Instagram --- https://www.instagram.com/desvandeloscuentosperdidos/ - Twitter --- https://www.twitter.com/eldesvandlcp

DIVERGENCIA CERO, con Marc R. Soto
CUANTO SE DIVERTIAN de ISAAC ASIMOV - Audiolibro - Voz humana- Dramatización

DIVERGENCIA CERO, con Marc R. Soto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 16:30


¿Qué opinarán de la escuela actual los niños de futuro siglo XXVI? Un relato breve y muy divertido del bueno de Isaac Asimov excelente para escuchar un viernes o cualquier otro día de la semana. ¡Espero que os guste!

Sci-Fi 5
I, Robot - December 2, 1950

Sci-Fi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 5:01


Borrowing the title of a sci-fi story he admired, Isaac Asimov explored the nature of morality through robots and his enduring Three Laws. Hear the origins of "I, Robot," released today in 1950, on today's Sci-Fi 5! Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Mike Richards Hosted by Jessica Lynn Verdi Music by Devin Curry

robots sci fi borrowing isaac asimov three laws devin curry jessica lynn verdi music
The Roddenberry Podcast Network
Sci-Fi 5 I, Robot - December 2, 1950

The Roddenberry Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 5:01


Borrowing the title of a sci-fi story he admired, Isaac Asimov explored the nature of morality through robots and his enduring Three Laws. Hear the origins of "I, Robot," released today in 1950, on today's Sci-Fi 5! Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Mike Richards Hosted by Jessica Lynn Verdi Music by Devin Curry

El Desván de los Cuentos Perdidos - Audiolibros
Amor Verdadero, Audiolibro de Isaac Asimov

El Desván de los Cuentos Perdidos - Audiolibros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 13:00


Amor Verdadero, Audiolibro de Isaac Asimov La historia está narrada por Joe, una computadora creada por Milton, quien la utilizará para encontrar, a través de la conexión Multivac, a la mujer perfecta para él. Para ello tendrá que llenar a Joe de información sobre sí mismo. El Desván de los cuentos perdidos. Relatos y audiolibros de misterio y terror de Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, .. y muchos más, narrados e interpretados con música y efectos. Narrado por: Ander Vildósola Música intro: Ander Vildósola Música: youtube studio Fuente: ciudadseva.com Para consultas escribe a: eldesvandlcp@gmail.com Para más información y/o leer los textos transcritos en la web: https://eldesvandlcp.wixsite.com/eldesvandlcp Sigue nuestras redes: - Facebook --- https://www.facebook.com/eldesvandlcp/ - Instagram --- https://www.instagram.com/desvandeloscuentosperdidos/ - Twitter --- https://www.twitter.com/eldesvandlcp

Sci-Fi 5
I, Robot - December 2, 1950

Sci-Fi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 5:01


Borrowing the title of a sci-fi story he admired, Isaac Asimov explored the nature of morality through robots and his enduring Three Laws. Hear the origins of "I, Robot," released today in 1950, on today's Sci-Fi 5! Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Mike Richards Hosted by Jessica Lynn Verdi Music by Devin Curry

robots sci fi borrowing isaac asimov three laws devin curry jessica lynn verdi music
DIVERGENCIA CERO, con Marc R. Soto
Making of — gatomaquia - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

DIVERGENCIA CERO, con Marc R. Soto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 103:28


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! En esta sección de DIVERGENCIA CERO exclusiva para quienes apoyan el podcast con un café al mes utilizando la opción APOYAR y seleccionando la cantidad de 1,49€ en la página del canal e iVoox, hoy hablamos de la importancia de tener un narrador confiable en una historia, las miguitas de pan que dejamos algunos autores cuando escribimos para que las recojan los lectores, las vicisitudes en la escritura de Gatomaquia, dónde ha aparecido publicado (en qué revistas de España y en Estados Unidos) y cuánto cobré en cada caso. Porque sí, por entonces aún existían revistas que PAGABAN por publicar historias, lo que hizo que durante un breve momento de mi vida rozase mi sueño de seguir los pasos de autores como Isaac Asimov u otros... Os hablo también de lo que tiene de autobiográfico este relato, mi trabajo en una fundición los fines de semana, los gatos, los bebés. Y en general, recorremos la vida de un relato que, leído así si más parece que tiene 30 páginas, pero que esconde mucho, pero que mucho más... Y lo que me dejo en el tintero daría para un par de making of más sobre el mismo relato. Aquí, el abuelo cebolleta...Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de DIVERGENCIA CERO - AUDIOLIBROS y Ficciones sonoras. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/666521

The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week
046: A Pail of Air by Fritz Leiber - At Least One Vintage Sci-Fi Short Story In Every Episode

The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 37:00


The dark star passed, bringing with it eternal night and turning history into incredible myth in a single generation! A Pail of Air by Fritz Leiber, that's next on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast, with at least one lost vintage sci-fi short story in every episode.Like the author we'll hear from next week, Isaac Asimov, today's author, Fritz Leiber had a long and successful sci-fi career. But he also had a fascinating life.Fritz Leiber was born on December 24, 1910, in Chicago, Illinois, to the actors Fritz Leiber and Virginia Bronson Leiber. For a time, he seemed inclined to follow in his parents' footsteps. At just 17 years old he was touring with his parents' Shakespeare company, Fritz Leiber & Co., before entering the University of Chicago.He appeared alongside his father in uncredited parts in several movies in the 1930s including 1939'sThe Hunchback of Notre Dame.His first novel, Conjure Wife, published in 1943 has been made into feature films four times under other titles.Two Leiber short stories were filmed for TV for Rod Serling's Night Gallery. The Girl with the Hungry Eyes and The Dead Man.His first short fiction story, Riches and Power, was published in 1934. He would go on to write around 200 short stories and 10 novels. There's much more to the Fritz Leiber story which we'll save for another podcast.Today's story was published in the December 1951 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction Magazine. You'll find our story on page 56. A Pail of Air by Fritz Leiber.Next week on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast…Consider the problems of miners who work on Ganymede, moon of Jupiter, 390,000,000 miles from earth: isolated on a world so different from our own, surrounded by beings who know nothing of our traditions, how might these men teach their alien work-mates how we celebrate Christmas? Christmas on Ganymede by Isaac Asimov. That's next week on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast, with at least one lost vintage sci-fi short story in every episode.

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons
Wonderful Counselor

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 42:04


QUOTES FOR REFLECTION“…the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness of God is stronger than men.”~St. Paul in 1 Corinthians 1:25 “At the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes—an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counterintuitive they may be, and the most ruthless skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new.”~Carl Sagan in The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark “I'm convinced that the best solutions are often the ones that are counterintuitive—that challenge conventional thinking—and end in breakthroughs.”~Nathaniel Wyeth, American inventor “Don't find fault, find a remedy; anybody can complain”~Henry Ford (1863-1947), founder of Ford Motor Company “It is the obvious which is so difficult to see most of the time. People say ‘It's as plain as the nose on your face.' But how much of the nose on your face can you see, unless someone holds a mirror up to you?”~Isaac Asimov (1920-1002) in I, Robot “Common sense is what tells us the earth is flat.”~Stuart Chase in Language in Thought and Action “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”~William Shakespeare (1564-1616) in As You Like It “Authority without wisdom is like a heavy axe without an edge, fitter to bruise than polish.”~Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), New England poet SERMON PASSAGEIsaiah 9:1-7 (ESV)1 But there will be no gloom for her who was in anguish. In the former time he brought into contempt the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, but in the latter time he has made glorious the way of the sea, the land beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations.2 The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shone.3 You have multiplied the nation; you have increased its joy; they rejoice before you as with joy at the harvest, as they are glad when they divide the spoil.4 For the yoke of his burden, and the staff for his shoulder, the rod of his oppressor, you have broken as on the day of Midian.5 For every boot of the tramping warrior in battle tumult and every garment rolled in blood will be burned as fuel for the fire.6 For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.7 Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 78 – Unstoppable Career Transformation Expert with Tony Pisanelli

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 76:35


It is ok to step out and do something different with your life and career according to our guest on this episode, Tony Pisanelli. However, the people who are most successful at transforming their careers and lives are those who plan and then make informed decisions about where to go and what to do.   Tony tells about his Italian parents who moved while young from Italy to Australia. As he describes it, they mostly just took a leap of faith although they probably did some advanced planning. However, they did not teach Tony about what he calls “informed risk-taking”. You will hear how he figured that out and what he then did with his life.   In our episode, Tony will teach us how to make better decisions. He will give us the lessons and a plan to follow that all of us can use to make more informed decisions right from the outset of our careers. He will also describe his six concepts that go into making up an unstoppable mindset. I hope you enjoy listening to Tony as much as I did in interviewing him.     About the Guest:   Tony Pisanelli breathes new life into dying careers before they experience a major crisis. Having spent a lifetime in commerce, Tony Pisanelli finally tore himself free from the corporate world to launch a new career helping other professionals make this difficult transition.   He is the creator of the E3 Career Transformation Method, and author of ‘The Phoenix Career Principles' – a blueprint to finding fulfilment in a rapidly changing world by connecting careers to an inspiring purpose.       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:16 Well, hi again, and welcome to unstoppable mindset. Hope you're having a good week. And wherever you are, drive safe if you're driving, but we hope that you enjoy our episode today. Today we are interviewing Tony Pisanelli, who is an individual who came from the corporate world. And eventually is I don't think this is his exact terminology. But he kind of escaped from the corporate world and started his own business and he helps businesses thrive and deal with issues that they may be facing long before they become a crisis. And I'm sure that Tony is going to talk to us a lot about that. But Tony, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Tony Pisanelli  02:05 Well, thank you, Michael. and, thank you for having me on your show. I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  02:10 Where are you located?   Tony Pisanelli  02:12 I'm based in Melbourne, Australia.   Michael Hingson  02:15 So do you have any friends who are kangaroos? I have to ask what can I say?   Tony Pisanelli  02:21 I don't actually i,   Michael Hingson  02:23 i they receive a kangaroo.   Tony Pisanelli  02:25 I've actually encountered some on a golf course a few years ago. So you don't know whether they're friendly or not? So yes, to keep your distance?   Michael Hingson  02:33 Yes. It's sort of like bear as well. bears more are not friendly. But yeah, some kangaroos I understand can be and some are not friendly. So better to stay away. Exactly. Well, I appreciate you taking part of your morning because it's afternoon here of the previous day. But I really appreciate you taking the time to be with us today. Tell us a little bit about you, maybe your early life and some of the things that kind of got you to where you are,   Tony Pisanelli  03:03 I guess I grew up to parents who came out from Italy in the late 1950s. And they came out to create better lives for themselves and their children. And so it involves them leaving behind their loved ones. So which was a really difficult decision for them. And I learned a lot from my parents in terms of the courage it takes to leave the unknown, to leave the unknown behind and step into the greater No. And both my parents really appreciated the value of a good education, something they instilled into me. Because it was something they were deprived off in their childhood, given the finances of their family didn't allow it so it by instilling a strong education focus that led me to gaining accounting qualifications, and going to college getting tertiary qualifications. And it appeared that I had the world at my feet in terms of working for a large corporation earning a good income, working alongside professionals. Yet a few years into my career, I found myself deeply dissatisfied with my work. I found myself doing this boring routine accounting numbers work. And it was it operated on monthly cycles where the first week of the month you were collecting numbers. The second week you would organize and the third week you would analyze them and then you would report on them. And then their cycle repeated and I remember going going for walks at lunchtime, in nearby parks thinking to myself, surely I can't do this for the next 40 years of my life, this is just going to be held. But I thought I was fortunate in working for a large organization that I had opportunities to take my skills and move into more business areas. And that sort of made my working life far more interesting. So I got to experience very early, the depth of job dissatisfied satisfaction that a lot of people go through, and that the outside world don't necessarily understand it. There was really no one I could discuss or talk to about that it was something that I had to navigate of my own. And to the back end of my career, I saw a lot of people, I came to recognize the same element in people, you could see them come to work, bleary eyed, disengaged, disinterested, going through the motions, and then there was a select few people that had a spring in their step, kind of work focused, mission driven individuals. And so just a few who separated themselves from the crowd, and what was it about those individuals that actually made them inspired about coming to work, and I was fortunate to work alongside a young gentleman earlier in my career, who, we did the same accounting work. And here, I was just sore, it is pure, drudgery. And on the other hand, he was just deeply enthusiastic. And I turned to him one day and saying, what is it that makes you so energized, engaged by his work. And the reason was that his work was connected to a greater purpose. He had a vision 10 years out of one day, starting his own financial planning practice. And he saw his day to day work as an apprenticeship to that goal. Whereas for me, and a lot of my other work colleagues coming into work was really just simply an exchange of our time, labor to earn an income. And it doesn't quite, you can only do that for so long. If you're not connected to a higher purpose work can become extremely draining. I, I'm not sure I'm sure it will. I suspect you're familiar with the concept of the great resignation, where a lot of people as a result of the pandemic left their jobs to find something else, Michael. But what a lot of people have discovered is that the great resignation became the great regret. Yes, because they didn't plan it out. They simply move from one job to the next. Those who will be successful are those who stepped in, step out of a job, and into a job that's connected to who they are, their unique core talent, and some sort of purpose that allows them to make a difference in the world.   Michael Hingson  08:22 You know, it's interesting, your parents left all that they knew, and stepped out Why did what caused them to do that?   Tony Pisanelli  08:30 It was the pain of going without. So they went without an education. They didn't get the clothes that they would have wanted. The toys that a lot of people take for granted. So that became their ignition switch, if you like to search for a better life,   Michael Hingson  08:54 did they? Did they do much planning? Or did they just take the leap one day?   Tony Pisanelli  09:00 I think that they just put themselves on a boat. And as they came, I think the only planning they did was potentially through letter writing, communicate to others who they've may have known friends who had ventured before them. And ask them, Well, how is it over there? And so if they got positive feedback, that would have reinforced their decision. Obviously, you can leave Italy and come to Australia, if you find that it doesn't work, you can always return.   Michael Hingson  09:35 Sure. But still, you want it to work. But as you learned, spending more time and being very deliberate about trying to plan or create a vision adds a lot of value to   Tony Pisanelli  09:50 the process. Exactly. And their vision was to have their family in Australia and give them a greater opportunity than they had themselves.   Michael Hingson  10:00 See, the only thing they didn't do initially was to maybe think a little bit more about how to do that. But they were able to make it happen. And ultimately, that's what matters. Unfortunately, what they didn't I gather do was to really teach you a lot about that. So you went into the workforce, and didn't yet have that spirit or that plan or that idea of how to create that vision.   Tony Pisanelli  10:23 That's true. I mean, to the best of their knowledge, it was about getting a job earning a good salary. And you'd be set they didn't take into account well, hold on, your career needs to be connected to some higher purpose.   Michael Hingson  10:40 Well, so you worked in the corporate world, and then recognized, especially when your your colleague told you what his plan was, that had to turn on a light for you.   Tony Pisanelli  10:56 Exactly. I had other experiences in the corporate world where, you know, I worked on major initiatives for the company, and then in early 2000, was called into my manager's office. And it was basically put to me whether I would be interested in taking a payout and losing my job. And it came as a complete shock to me to find, here I was one minute was in high demand, because the company needed me to deliver a major project. And once that was delivered, they could easily dispose of you and they wouldn't think twice about how that would impact me as a person and my prevailing life circumstances, Michael. So it was a reality check to say, okay, the company you work for, is really not devoted to you and your career.   Michael Hingson  11:52 Yeah. I know, my first job that we talked about, well, the first job was with the National Federation of the Blind, but then I worked for the company in Massachusetts, that was purchased by Xerox. And I didn't know at the time, they really didn't care about my career, I had some suspicions near the end, that they were not going to want to keep me around or other salespeople who are already leaving. So the one thing I did do was, took some courses to learn how to plan to explore job searches and the things that people were looking for, and so on. And some of that I used and some of that I didn't. And then of course, sure enough, I received a letter one day late in June of 1984, saying no longer interested in having you work for us. What I learned much later was that Xerox had bought, the company wasn't interested in any of the people, but rather, the technology that they were purchasing. Some people were kept for a while because they were in the blindness part of the company. The product that I sold when I had to go into sales was the more commercial version. And what Xerox wanted was just that technology and not the salespeople. Now, I've come to believe that it's never a wise decision just to get rid of Salesforce that has a lot of tribal knowledge that you don't. And you think that Well, I don't need it because we're bigger, and we know all the stuff. And that's what corporations often do, which is such a horrible mistake.   Tony Pisanelli  13:34 It is so and that was something I saw in my corporate journey, the company, let go of people who had deep knowledge and wide knowledge. And it wasn't until a few months after they left, I came to realize the wheels have started to fall off certain processes and systems and delivery mechanism said hold on, we actually do need people with deep knowledge.   Michael Hingson  14:00 Yeah, it's a rude awakening for somebody who doesn't see it coming.   Tony Pisanelli  14:04 It is it's a rude awakening. But it's also it became the opportunity for me to say, Okay, I need to take control of my destiny. And like that gentleman said, Okay, well, what am I passionate about? And for me, it was, I really was immersed in the personal development world, and took an interest to coaching and human behavior. And to the back end of my corporate career, I started spontaneously, if you like Michael, just coaching the younger generation, in terms of their growth and development, and also alerting them to the realities of corporate life. And this sort of became the clue I needed to understand what it was that I would do after my corporate career would be coaching mentoring people in terms of their navigating their career journeys, both from a dissatisfaction perspective. Given also securing it beyond one employer to rely on one employment employment situation can be a bit tricky in today's world where we're experiencing rapid development and growth.   Michael Hingson  15:15 What was in you? Do you think that helped you take the leap of recognizing that you don't use your lack of excitement about a job as just an excuse, and you just kind of go on, but rather, I can go on and teach I can do other things. What, what do you think is the the thing within you that allowed for that to happen?   Tony Pisanelli  15:42 It was, it was really interesting. When I was in the corporate world, Michael, I became a keen observer of people and how they went about managing their career. By virtue, I suspect because of my own initial experience of deep dissatisfaction. And I remember a story of a gentleman who kept a counter on his desk. And each day each day after he finished work for the day, and he wrapped up his briefcase, it clicked over the counter, and he was counting down to the days towards his retirement. So in other words, instead of making these days counts, he was virtually wasting them. And he was a sad and forlorn figure. He brought misery if you like, wherever he went, because he complained. And so that became a really important catalyst for me to say, Do I want to stay here for the entire for my entire working life, becoming that person who based his his life? Or can I use my corporate career as a springboard for something else?   Michael Hingson  17:04 There is something to be said for today is the first day of the rest of your life.   Tony Pisanelli  17:10 There is and your career question is deeply connected to your life, your life journey. So in the early phase of your career is how do I get a job? How do I advance my career to a shift occurs typically at the mid age point in the 40s? Where, how can I be of service and contribution in the world? Can you relate to that? Michael?   Michael Hingson  17:41 I can. It's interesting that when I was in college, I wanted to graduate, go on and get advanced degrees and teach. I liked teaching. I worked at the campus radio station, I like doing a radio show, I like communicating with people. And I consider that certainly some of the qualifications that a good teacher needed to have. But then my first job came along. And it was working with Ray Kurzweil, the inventor of the Kurzweil Reading Machine, and a number of other things and the National Federation of the Blind, to further this concept of making a piece of technology that would read printed pages outlined for blind people. And what I, although I didn't know how to verbalize it, or maybe didn't even realize it was, what a great purpose in being involved in creating an exciting piece of technology and helping so many people. I was fortunate that I had that opportunity. But as I think about it, and began that job, as I think about it now, I got to teach because one of the things I had to do early on was write a training manual for the machine. And it very much warped my view of what technical manuals and training manuals should be about, which is not nearly what technical writers do today. I think that that material needs to be a little bit more interesting to read to draw people in. And you have to approach it at their level, not your level, because otherwise they won't truly understand it. But I got to teach, I got to observe people, I got to do a lot of those kinds of things. And then later when I needed to go into sales. I realized that good sales people are guiders are counselors. They're teachers, that you don't just sit there and say buy my product. It's all about not only assessing what a person's needs are, but it's also about helping them understand and maybe even coalesce more what they believe their needs need to be and then deciding whether what you have worked with him or not. So I still got to teach and I still get to teach today. And of course that's a lot of what this podcast is about helping people realize you can be more unstoppable than you think You can,   Tony Pisanelli  20:01 exactly the other catalysts for me was, and a lot of people experienced this when they work for large organizations is, you're a long way removed from the end customer in terms of the service the company provides. So you don't ever, ever get to see the difference you're making in people's lives. So you can't sort of speak to him at the end of the day and saying, How is this service or product working for you, because you're in some sort of Tower, producing reports or whatever it is you're working on. There's never a recognition that you're making a difference in someone else's world.   Michael Hingson  20:43 Well also recognize, though, that there are any number of people who truly are satisfied with that kind of a role.   Tony Pisanelli  20:51 Well, there is, I'm not having a go at these corporations, right? They serve. And they obviously need to provide what they do. But for someone like me, and from what you're telling me through your story, you reach a point where you say to yourself, I'm done. Okay, and I was done. Yeah, the question is, are you can stay there and burn and rot? Or are you going to grow to the next journey?   Michael Hingson  21:23 That's the issue, when, as I said, there are any number of people who like sort of doing things by rote, and that is perfectly okay. Because we're all different. There are people who like doing the same accounting tasks and so on, and don't want to explore alternatives, or looking higher, should they? That's their choice. And far be it from me today, that their choice is wrong, because every one is different, which is what you're saying. But it is also true that for me and for you, we like to look in different directions, and find that thing that really satisfies us. You know, one of my favorite science fiction stories is an Isaac Asimov story, in which everyone as they were growing up, at some point, took a test. And that test, analyzed your brain and basically told you what you were going to go into as a career. And then you were programmed to, to do that over the next several years. And then you took a test that validated that and showed that you are ready to go into that career, whether it was a technician or whatever. And there was this one young man who took the test initially. And the people doing it, it was all part of the government looked at his test and didn't say anything to him. And he went on and they said, We think you probably would do well in engineering, but he went on, and he continued to do stuff, and started feeling crazy. He said, I just don't like this. I don't I need more. And eventually, he kind of ran away and he got hunted down. And these are the people who found him said, what's the deal? And he said, I just don't think that that is for me. I, I don't think that I should be doing that job. I think that I need to be more creative. And you guys don't want me to do that. And they said, No, you don't understand. We saw that in you. And we needed you to grow and get to the point where you could recognize you're one of the few people who doesn't be a technician or doesn't just do a job, you're the creator who figures out the next thing that we need to do and so on. It's a great story.   Tony Pisanelli  23:54 It is and that's you make a perfect distinction. If you're comfortable, and you enjoy doing that basic routine job. And that fulfills you, then you belong there. But if you're someone that you outgrow that, or it's not you, then then you're hurting yourself significantly. By staying in that environment and not searching for the next your next journey.   Michael Hingson  24:23 You but you then have to develop the courage, really to do what your parents did. And that is to step out and what you did, which is to step out and be willing to take that risk. And not everyone is a risk taker and that's probably a lot of what it's all about.   Tony Pisanelli  24:41 Well, it was interesting because the later phase of my career, Michael, I specialized in risk management. Yes, that helped me enormously because in life and businesses you need to take risks. So there's no formed risk taking, and then there's just risk taking. Right? So I knew I was taking a risk by leaving. However, I understood what those risks were. And I developed a mechanism to manage those risks, which has become the mechanism I use for others who is equally looking to make that step. Yeah, really is you you're not, you're not going to potentially generate a consistent income in the first few years. Right? How do you manage that risk? One way is you build a financial reserve for yourself, to see you through that. Another way is you could develop a service or product and take it to that minimum viable product level. So you can start developing cash flow, rather than perfecting it for years, and never putting it out in the marketplace.   Michael Hingson  25:54 Another way is exactly what your colleague did. He knew what he wanted to do. And he knew that he would be doing taking a risk to do it. But he was willing to stay with the company until he had what he felt was necessary to leap off and start his own financial planning business.   Tony Pisanelli  26:16 Exactly. He had clarity as to who he was going to serve. And the problem he was going to solve for them. I'm sure you've attended a number of networking events, and you hear people communicating what it is they're doing, and they're trying to be everything to everyone. And you end up being nothing to nobody. Right? So and I get people to specifically hone in, what is the problem you solve? Who specifically do solve it for? How do you reach them? And that gives them the clarity that then to say, Okay, I'm actually stepping into a more certain world than where I actually don't know what I'm going to be doing.   Michael Hingson  26:59 So how long ago was it that you left corporate world as it were, and started your own company and became an entrepreneur,   Tony Pisanelli  27:08 I left in 2015. But I began the journey while I was still there. I'm a big believer, I'd, I'd watched a few savvy entrepreneurial corporate professionals who had started to develop side hustlers, Michael. And they were building their next career on the side, while still employed by the company, either because they had become dissatisfied, or they knew was only a matter of time where they be tapped on the shoulder.   Michael Hingson  27:38 Right? So did you start that side operation while you worked for a company? Or did you wait to you leave you left, but at the same time, you obviously knew when you were going to leave?   Tony Pisanelli  27:52 I started putting the building blocks together, Michael, so I was acquiring the qualifications in terms of coaching, I had also joined a entrepreneurial group, to understand how those people, the mindset of those people, because I knew I needed to think differently as an entrepreneur, than when I was employed by a company.   Michael Hingson  28:18 What do you believe an entrepreneur is? How would you define it?   Tony Pisanelli  28:23 An entrepreneur, I go, there's a definition of it. And I cover it in my book is someone who takes resources out of lower value activities into higher. So if you're in a basic job, performing a set of tasks, it has a certain value. If you're an entrepreneur, you're not doing tasks so much, is actually creating the future, or building new levels of wealth. So in the company, I got to see in the later phases, where they were shifting their employee profile, if you like Michael, where they were shedding the employee types who were holding on to the old, doing their daily tasks, to the entrepreneurs, from other companies, who were dismantling the status quo and creating whether the future was going in terms of technology. So I see the entrepreneur as someone who's disrupting, dismantling a ailing culture and creating the next is so do   Michael Hingson  29:36 you. Yeah. I think so. Do you think that a lot of people or a number of people at upper echelons of larger companies still maintain an entrepreneurial spirit or does it shift to something else?   Tony Pisanelli  29:52 I think companies who have people, the more senior levels, more entrepreneurial When they were, say 1520 years ago, you'd remember the story of Kodak. So they were in the photography, film business. So they fought the business they were really in, was in the memory business. Okay? Correct. And they didn't shift their thinking to understand their business from the customer's perspective they held on to the thinking from, we need to preserve the photographic film business, and not go down the digital world. And eventually, they demise. And that's because they applied an employee mindset to the business where they are holding on to the current world, rather than stepping into the new world, just as my parents could have easily held on to their old Italian world, rather than stepped into the new. It's interesting, a lot of Italians who moved from Italy, to Australia, or Italy to America, brought their world to Australia, and America. And you'll see a lot of restaurants and shops with that culture represented. Does that make sense?   Michael Hingson  31:16 It does. Well look at companies like, Well, what was Disneyland and the the organization that Walt Disney created, he clearly understood that what he was doing, was connecting with people. And he built the company. Along those lines, it was a great vision. And he was a kid at heart to a degree too. But he built a company that connected to and created memories and gave people what they wanted, which was escape and so on. But he saw that and was able to make the company successful because of it. I think now, I don't know whether I would say it's exactly the same or not. But clearly what Walt Disney created was a quite a monumental achievement, and definitely represented the entrepreneurial spirit.   Tony Pisanelli  32:16 I mean, you hit the nail on the head. If Walt Disney had an employee spirit, rather than an entrepreneurial spirit, he would have simply been satisfied with creating a set of cartoon characters Michael, Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse have left it at that. Agreed. Where is he and he understood he wasn't in the cartoon business. He was in the entertainment storytelling world. And so   Michael Hingson  32:47 those cartoons led to movies like Snow White, Cinderella, and other very innovative things. And then he said, Let's even connect with people in other ways and create a Disneyland that opened in 1955.   Tony Pisanelli  33:05 Exactly. So entrepreneur, he a Walt Disney is an example of applying the principle of transmedia, or creating an echo system. So he took his cartoon characters, and the next product became toys around those characters, Michael, right. So can you see how he's then evolved from that to something else. And then he created films, he created a film a theme park, that's the entrepreneur continually evolving from a base level, to something greater to something greater to something else, and creating   Michael Hingson  33:41 the films and the other things that he did. He also created and understood the need and value of creating the teams that could truly all work together to create that vision. And everything from the music in the movie to the artistic part of it to the dialogue and finding the right people. And then of course, all the other things that went into the theme park as well. But he understood very much also the value of teamwork and people sharing his vision and communicating that vision so they could understand it.   Tony Pisanelli  34:20 Exactly. I'm a firm believer that there's a level of entrepreneurial spark in everyone. Now, I even just going back to my parents, it wasn't just purely the fact that they stepped away from the country of birth and come into somewhere else. When they came to Australia, they eventually bought their own property, Michael, and one of the challenges they faced was making the home repayments and feeding a young family so they owned a large house house with four bedrooms in it. And they partition the house so that the family utilized two bedrooms. And the other two bedrooms were rented out to other Italian immigrants that were coming out to Australia at the time. And they were earning an income from that. So can you see that requires a level of entrepreneurial thinking to say, okay, how can I take these rooms and create an income stream for themselves, and to help others who are migrating to Australia?   Michael Hingson  35:36 And that, I don't know what the time whether it did or not, but certainly affected somewhere along the line, you're thinking and helping to enhance your understanding of getting this whole concept of a mindset of entrepreneurship or unstop. ability?   Tony Pisanelli  35:55 Exactly. If to humble Italian people who had a limited education had that level of entrepreneurialism about them. I believe it's in most people, I remember speaking to a cleaner, who went round houses, cleaning them. And then he would compile a list of 20 customers he cleaned houses for. And then he would sell that business with the 20 clients to the next cleaner who came along, Michael, can you see even a cleaner, who's not highly rigger with all due respect to cleaner, we're not highly regarded by most people can think entrepreneurial.   Michael Hingson  36:41 And he also became somewhat of a franchisor. Exactly. And I'm sure that he was very much involved in either not selling to someone who he felt would lower the standards, or he taught them what they needed to have and do in order to take the business and run with it.   Tony Pisanelli  37:00 Yeah, and he was very big on at the heart of running as successful businesses, look after the customer. And then the rest will will, will look after itself. So I thought, Michael, that we look at this unstoppable mindset from an entrepreneurial perspective.   Michael Hingson  37:22 And I was actually just going to ask you about that. But but let's do that. Let's do that. So first of all, do you think an unstoppable mindset is different than an entrepreneurial mindset?   Tony Pisanelli  37:35 There's a lot of correlation. If you look at the story of Steve Jobs, for example, Michael, there's certain points in his career where he would come up with an idea to create something designed something new, he would go to his engineering people. And they would say, No, you can't do that. It's not possible technology doesn't allow it. Did Michael? Michael? Did Steve allow their limited mindset? Can't do that mindset stop his vision of what he wanted to do. No, it's personal. He turned back and said, find a way of doing it. He has. Okay, that's the entrepreneurial mindset. Hopefully those engineers and those systems people worked out that he was actually attempting to program them to think entrepreneurial in that moment.   Michael Hingson  38:32 I wonder how successful he was, of course, we don't know much about what happened in in internal meetings. So um, but I wonder how successful he was? Maybe a better way to put it is he created a number of new technologies. And since he is left us, how has apple evolved into more innovations?   Tony Pisanelli  38:58 Exact I would suspect even though he's left, he's left an imprint, not only in terms of the products that are available in the marketplace, but the way different people think about their working life. I have an element of the entrepreneurial mindset is that you need to be true to who you are. If you looked at Steve Jobs. He spoke the way he would speak as a person, not as a corporate individual with a corporate voice. He dressed as Steve Jobs, not in a suit and tie and whatever he was being that being true to himself.   Michael Hingson  39:42 Right. And he wasn't ashamed of that either.   Tony Pisanelli  39:45 No, he loved telling stories. And that's another great way of connecting with people. He also as an entrepreneur, had a love of calligraphy. So he drew on other things. yields to come back to his main area of development of technology and design, simple design. So that's another element of entrepreneurial isms of drawing ideas from other fields to add value to your field. But to your question of being unstoppable, I would say, Steve, it was about not allowing naysayers convincing him that it can't be done. And I think we're seeing that same quality today in someone like Elon Musk.   Michael Hingson  40:34 Oh, I think absolutely. So now, if you would only make an accessible vehicle, so my wife could drive it, we'd be in great shape. But that's another story.   Tony Pisanelli  40:45 So yeah, I think there are a strong correlation back to your question between an unstoppable mindset and entrepreneur. However, they're also elements of an unstoppable mindset that can serve you in different aspects of your life, whether that's as a leader or as a parent. But I think the traits and I've looked at a couple of key traits, because I'm a keen student of studying the leaders, and the entrepreneurs, and their habits, and how they can be developed in each of us to be successful in terms of our next career path. And I think, if I had to single down an unstoppable mindset, there's about seven key areas that I think it comes down to or boils down to. And I'm happy to share those with your audience, please. Okay. I think, just by the word unstoppable, Michael, I think the first area is persistence. I came across a story in one of the Polian Hills early, earlier books on the laws of success. And he shared a story of a young man who applied for a job as a salesman. With your sales background, you'll, you'll appreciate the story of Michael Vick and his prospective employer was reluctant to employ him because this young man didn't come across as confident and strong that he would last in the sales field. Because in the sales field, as you know, you've cop a lot of rejections. True. Sure. And you need to be able to handle those and bounce back. So anyway, he fought the prospective employer for well, I've got nothing to lose, I'll give this young man a job. So the role of this young man was to sell advertising space back then in just your local magazine, journals, to the storekeepers in the area. So involved going knocking on their doors and selling advertising space. So in the first day of his job, he managed to sell three advertising spots. And then for the remainder of the month, he sold another eight. To get his bonus, he needed to sell 12. So he missed out by one. So he made it his priority in the following month, to make sure he sold to that one gentleman that one store owner that he never sold to. And he would turn up as of his door each morning when the store owner arrived, asking for the sale. And for the bulk of the month. The store owner said I'm not interested and explained his objection. And then it got to the last day of the month, and the young man was there again. And the owner turned to the young man and said, Have you got to buy now that I'm not interested, you have wasted a whole month of your time trying to sell me something that I don't want or not interested in. To which the young man turned around to the store owner and said, I haven't wasted my tail time. I have got to learn all the objections that someone can throw at me develop a response that will melt make me a better salesman in the future. To which the store owner said, Young man, you have just taught me a valuable lesson in persistence. I will buy your advertise.   Michael Hingson  44:17 I I once heard a story sort of in a sense, the opposite of that. But just as valuable in the sales world of someone who was selling to the government and specifically to a particular person in an office and I don't remember what it was but he we were talking about sales philosophies one day and he went in to this office after making some presentations and been there a number of times and he said okay, and now I've explained what I what I can to you and we've gone through all of this. I would like you to order our product and And he didn't say another word. And the person across the desk from him, didn't say another word. And this went on for about 15 minutes. And then the customer said, All right, you convinced me, most people would come in here and they'd ask for the order, and then they keep talking and not shut up. And you clearly understand the value of once you ask for the order, you've got to wait for a response. And he ordered.   Tony Pisanelli  45:30 Silence is very powerful, isn't it? Why isn't it though.   Michael Hingson  45:34 And it wasn't that this guy was becoming uncomfortable, because they were both solid silent. He was waiting to see if the sales guy was going to cave in because he understood the value of it. And the sales guy didn't cave in. Again, another lesson, you ask for the order. And then once you've asked for the order, you've done what you can do until, and of course, there is truth to the fact that a lot of times selling really begins once you have an objection. But the sales men that you're talking about, took the opportunity to really learn. And that's what it's all about.   Tony Pisanelli  46:11 Exactly. So that's a powerful lesson in persistence is part of the unstoppable mindset. The second element of an unstoppable mindset is going the extra mile. There's a story I read about Abraham Lincoln, Abraham, because of his family circumstances, grew up not getting the formal education that he wanted. So Michael, that meant he had to resort to his own resources. And he started reading books, to educate himself. And one day, in the district he grew up in, he found out that there was a farmer who owned a book that Abraham wanted to read. So and he knew he couldn't afford the book. So he went, walked to the farmers property and said, Can I have this book, and Abraham couldn't afford to pay for the book. So he agreed to work on this gentleman's property for a number of days in exchange for the book. And he walked miles to get there and back home. And by the time he got home, he'd already read the book. But so that's another example of an unstoppable mindset about going the extra mile and paying the price in order to get what you want, and being willing to pay the price. Exactly. Again, an attribute that you equally applies in terms of an entrepreneurial mindset. The third element of an unstoppable mindset is a person's attitude to failure. There's a lady called Sara Blakely, who is a famous American businesswoman who started the company called Spanx. And it's a hosiery company. And she got turned down. When she presented this idea to company representatives. She could have allowed that to stop her. But it became the catalyst for her to spur her own business. And her attitude to failure. She acknowledges was growing up with a father who around the dinner table each night would ask her and her brother what they did each day, that was a failure, what they learned from it. So the unstoppable mindset sees failure, as an experiment as an opportunity to learn rather than something that stops you in your tracks. So that's the attitude. Another unstoppable mindset. The fourth one is, people with an unstoppable mindset, are prepared to ask, ask for help when they get stuck. I came across a story of one day, a man with no legs, met a blind man. And the man with no legs said to the blind man, would you mind if I hop onto your shoulders and I will be your eyesight and you can be my legs. That way. We can both support each other's journey. And that's really a key secret in life is that we're all country we all have strengths and weaknesses, but we can still all contribute to one another in terms of our own journey.   Michael Hingson  50:00 It makes perfect sense, of course. Okay, did you want to I mean, we all we all have gifts. And I think if we look at it in terms of the entrepreneurial world, if our company is going to involve other people, we need to understand the gifts of the people around us. And sometimes reshape our thinking to take into account those gifts, or figure out how to bring those gifts into what we're doing. And the either way, is important to address. But we all have gifts. And we don't need to all have the same gifts, in fact, in an accompany environment, is probably best if we don't all have the same gifts.   Tony Pisanelli  50:53 Exactly. It's actually a setback. If you do. You don't have the diversity. There's two ways you can spell disability, Michael, you can spell it D is ability, or you can spell it T H is ability. Again, it's the way you frame your mindset isn't really, absolutely. Okay, so that was asking for help. The next one is, and I see that with this see this quality in a lot of unstoppable people is they are highly focused individuals, they're focused on one key goal, which then they break down into small chunks. I've recently written a book. So the one big goal was writing the book, but you chunk that down. So you don't let anything stop you. And you break it down into a daily writing routine, that then eventually becomes a chapter. You can also then delegate some of the activities to others in terms of someone to edit the book, someone else to design a cover someone else to work on the layout of the book, someone else to to help you promote it. So then work teamwork, or so that's number five. The sixth element I've looked at for the unstoppable mindset is a person's beliefs. Henry Ford said, If you think you can, or you can't, either way you will be right. And it really comes down to your beliefs. I another interesting theme around beliefs is when I speak to a lot of people, they tell me that typically in their lives, they've had one group of people who believed in them, even to the extent that they believed in them more than they believe in themselves. And then they had one or other people who didn't believe in them. Does that make sense? So you got the two opposing forces, right. And I had that experience when I was contemplating getting a tertiary qualification telling one of my friends, I've been accepted, to go to college. And he turned around in that moment and said, You're going to college, you're not going to last a month. Clearly, he didn't believe in me. So there's two ways you can go with that dynamic. So the way I see it, the people who believe in you give you have the competence to keep going. Even when you feel like stopping the people who don't believe in you, give you the determination to keep going when you're thinking about stopping.   Michael Hingson  53:52 And again, it helps if your vision and your your conviction is strong enough. I talked to somebody earlier today who will be a guest on an upcoming episode. And she talked about when she was in high school. She really wasn't a very good student. She was just a young woman and wasn't hadn't found herself. She wanted to go to college. And she went to her guidance counselor near the end of school and she was all excited because she wanted to go and she wanted advice from this counselor. And the counselor said, Oh, I'm not gonna waste my time with you. You're just going to start having babies and have a bunch of babies over the next few years. You're not going to do anything and be successful in college. And the woman said, but I want to go to college. Well, I'm not going to waste my time. You're not going to do that. You're just gonna have babies. So I'm done with you. And literally ushered her to the door and she went out after which time she went to college and she now has a dog doctorate degree, and her own career got married later. But she did have the conviction. And she would not be talked out of it. And unfortunately, sometimes people think that when somebody who they believe is more knowledgeable than you say something you buy into it rather than sticking to your convictions to but it's the same thing. And going back to what you said about Henry Ford, another version of that is the next time you come to a fork in the road. Take it.   Tony Pisanelli  55:33 Yeah. So this lady, you're talking about what was her great aspiration, Michael,   Michael Hingson  55:41 she wanted to become well, actually, she wanted to become an Egyptologist. And she eventually did some of that, but now has her CIDOC, her doctorate degree in, in psychology and, and she has her own coaching career. She did do Egyptology and studied African Studies, and so on, and worked with African Studies for a while. And that evolved into what she's doing today. And I say that because she never was unhappy with Egyptology and so on. It's been an interest of hers, but that has evolved into what she's doing today, which is helping women.   Tony Pisanelli  56:18 Exactly. So she's working at something that serves a higher purpose. Correct. And so that's the number seven, quality of an unstoppable mindset is what's either called a chief aim, a burning desire, an inspirational purpose, call it what you like. But there is something driving these individuals, just as we spoke about Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, they're driven by a bigger picture, a higher purpose. And there was a Indian wise man by the name of Panther jolly. And he said, When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts, break their bonds, your mind transcends limitations. Your conscious expands in every direction. And you find yourself in a great, new, wonderful world. And I see that people who have left employment land behind and to become entrepreneurs, have expanded who they are as individuals, and step into more wonderful worlds, and to look back on your life, and to have missed that, I would call that a real life of regret. And that's what inspires me to help people take that step. Is this greater purpose beyond an income beyond my own sort of power and status, but it's to help people step into that greater purpose?   Michael Hingson  58:06 Do you think that an A person with what we're defining as an unstoppable mindset needs to be an entrepreneur?   Tony Pisanelli  58:15 No, I don't. They can express that in other ways. They can be a leader. They can be a leader in a company, they can be a parent who has an unstoppable mindset in terms of doing what they do, and bringing up a quality family, giving someone a quality family, right. So the unstoppable mindset has application beyond just the entrepreneur.   Michael Hingson  58:44 Take it the other way. Do you think that an entrepreneur has to have an unstoppable mindset?   Tony Pisanelli  58:52 I do believe they need to have an element of an unstoppable mindset.   Tony Pisanelli  58:56 I agree.   Tony Pisanelli  58:57 They're ushering in a new world, they will always come across come up against those folk who want to hold on to the safe, secure world of today. If they allow those people and their reasons and excuses and rationale to stop them, then they're not going to achieve the New World. And Michael, when I was back in corporate life, that became one of the reasons a lot of people lost their jobs. It wasn't because they weren't good at what they did. Or because the company didn't need them. They became stoppers in terms of the where the company needed to go. Does that make sense?   Michael Hingson  59:43 Yeah, it does. And they weren't able to take that next step, and stick to perhaps what their convictions were. And so they prevented progress. They can prevented the change in the world that they could bring about or help bring about   Tony Pisanelli  1:00:00 exactly because of their own insecurity. So, hence, the importance of an entrepreneurial mindset and having an unstoppable mindset full stop.   Michael Hingson  1:00:12 So entrepreneurs, I'll be it with unstoppable mindsets, do sometimes have challenges, and maybe they fail at what they do. I would assume that you've had experiences like that, how do you bounce back from big failures?   Tony Pisanelli  1:00:29 Well, again, goes back to how do you define failure? I mean, do you allow that to stop you? Or do you say, I need to do something different? And then refine yourself? So if I look back in terms of a failure in terms of my coaching practice, I would say one area that I failed quite early was I allowed my lack of understanding around technology to slow me down. Now, do I then say to myself in that moment? Well, technology is just going to become more and more invasive. In the world? Do I just throw the coaching business away? Because I'm never going to be able to deal with it? Or do I say to myself, I need to slowly get my head around it. Or I need to potentially delegate the elements that I don't understand to others. And thirdly, in appreciate the value of technology in terms of automating parts of my business, that actually frees up my time, you can automate a lot of functions in the business through the use of technology that frees up a person's time. So it depends how you look at that I could have used technology as a big excuse to stop my business, or to say, how do I work around that?   Michael Hingson  1:02:06 Exactly the real point, it's not an excuse, it's a it's a learning experience, and what people call failures ought to be the best learning experiences that we can imagine. Because a failure is nothing but an opportunity to move beyond it, and learn from it. Because there's always a reason that you quote, fail, what you're really doing is you haven't found yet all you need to fully succeed, it doesn't mean that your vision is bad, or that there is a real problem. But there are always lessons to be learned. And good people, entrepreneurs, and people with unstoppable mindsets, do like to learn or should try to do their best to learn.   Tony Pisanelli  1:02:55 Exactly. I mean, and that's another point around the unstoppable mindset, Michael, is, and I'm keen to get your perspective of it is the importance of observing your own mindset. Right, each time you hit an obstacle, what's your mind doing? Is it shrinking and moving away from that obstacle and allowing yourself to be stopped? Or are you trying to develop an alternative and see another solution and grow, grow beyond it. But that moment, involves you looking at yourself and your reaction to that situation?   Michael Hingson  1:03:37 And one of the things that I love to recommend to people is that at the end of every day, take a few moments to look at what happened that day, even what you regard as successes. And think about what could I have done different to make it better? Or when you have a failure? What is it that I can learn from that so that that won't happen again? And if we don't take that time to ponder and think and as a result, learn and grow, then we never will.   Tony Pisanelli  1:04:10 Exactly. And can I just add one more component to that is if I allow that moment of failure to stop my journey. Then not only have I failed, but I have failed the people who I meant to serve in the future. Right? Okay, you've created a podcast. And it's an opportunity for you to allow others to share their message with the world. Had you allowed a whole host of excuses, Michael to stop you, or a moment of failure to bring an end to what your journey was about this opportunity that you've given me, today would not have happened.   Michael Hingson  1:05:06 Oh, look, and I can come up with all sorts of excuses. There is a lot of technology that would allow me to do more editing of this podcast and the sound improvement, and a lot of other stuff that is totally inaccessible or extremely inaccessible. Should that be an excuse for me? No. Either I get someone else to do it. And I have done some of that. Or even for me more fun and more creative. I have gone to the people who develop the technology, and we have begun a dialogue, and I was the first one to approach them, but I've helped improve even more their thoughts of doing it. We are now discussing how to make the products accessible and usable. And that's what really needs to be done, of course, and we're having, we're gonna have a lot of fun, dude.   Tony Pisanelli  1:06:00 Perfect. And in that little story in that little snippet, Michael, you exhibited both the unstoppable mindset and the entrepreneurial mindset,   Michael Hingson  1:06:10 right? Tell me about your book, you refer to it. And we've been talking for a while, and I'm sure people want to know. So Inquiring minds want to know about your book.   Tony Pisanelli  1:06:20 Okay, so the book is called the Phoenix career principles. And the big idea about the book is moving someone from this employee mindset into an entrepreneurial way of thinking. And I have organized the book that lays the ground, the builds a bridge that helps them cross over that path. So an employee, typically Michael, is immersed in their day to day. And I'm saying, as an entrepreneur, start having a purpose and a vision that encapsulates your life and the life of others, not just about earning an income for yourself. And that helping to create that is having a longer term plan that helps you to stand in the future, like that young gentleman, and start seeing it. The next element of transition from employee to entrepreneur is about a person's attitude to change. Change isn't something to be feared, resistant. It's actually to be embraced, and actually turned into an opportunity. The other element, and we spoke about this earlier is if you find yourself hitting the dissatisfaction brick wall, recognize that that's a sign from inside you, your heart, your spirit color, what you like, but you're not meant to be here, you're meant to be something else greater this waiting for you. And don't just blindly step into that something else. But transition towards it, by developing a picture of what that needs to look like, by understanding who you are, you mentioned that that lady, you need to find yourself first, to understand what your strengths are, and what it is you really are here to do. And then the fifth element, I talk about the entrepreneurial mindset, and I share this story of Jeff, in that chapter. So Jeff, one day, he worked at a large company, I think it was in the finance field. And he said to his boss, are thinking of starting an online company. And the boss turned around to Jeff and said, Don't be silly. That's for people who don't already have a job. You've got a great job. Jeff wasn't prepared to be stopped. And Jeff, developed a company called Amazon Amazon. Yes,   Michael Hingson  1:09:17 I knew you were going there.   Tony Pisanelli  1:09:20 And lo and behold, if you want to buy that book, it's now available on Jeff's platform called Amazon. So can you see how he has created an opportunity for someone like me? To get my message out in the world? It could have been stopped by his managers voice that said, Don't be crazy. That's for someone else, not for someone like   Michael Hingson  1:09:46 Jeff took the time to prepare. And when he started the company, he clearly had a vision and even went through many years of unprofitability but he knew where he was headed. And he got there. Now he owns a newspaper and all sorts of things, and it clearly has become a force in the world. And probably very much still has Well, certainly an unstoppable mindset and, and I would think, in a lot of ways, still very entrepreneurial. In in nature, personally speaking at least.   Tony Pisanelli  1:10:26 Exactly. And I, in writing the book, Michael, it was my hope that after someone had read it, it activated a sparking them to awake, do their own Walt Disney inside them their own Jeff Bezos, their own Richard Branson, or whoever, and created a major difference in the world, at whatever magnitude they want to play at is their call. But I hopefully the book awakens the entrepreneurial flame in people who find themselves trapped in the concrete cage, that corporate life company life can become. For some people, as you said, not everyone, but for some that is their existence. And I just want to show people that it is possible to create a bridge outside that will be on that   Michael Hingson  1:11:32 road. And I can't think of a better way to end this podcast than to really give people the opportunity to reflect on what you just wished for. And I hope that people will do that. I've always believed that if I don't learn more from doing these interviews, and meeting and having the opportunity to talk with people, if I don't learn more than than they do, then I'm not doing my job well. And I really appreciate all that you have given us the time and the opportunity to hear and hopefully we'll learn from today. So I want to thank you very much for being here. And I know you've got plans coming up for the future. And I want you to keep us apprised of them, we'll probably have to just have you back on again, to continue some of these discussions. I know you're looking at doing some summits and some other things if people want to reach out to you and learn more about you. And again, I'll put this in and learn more about the book and so on how do they do that? I can   1:12:37 find the at Tony Pisanelli.com Or could you spell so Tony T O N Y  and Pisanelli P I S A N E double L I.com. And the book is called the Phoenix Career principles, which I hope people go to Amazon and buy and truly appreciate its value. And Michael, I want to also extend my thank you for allowing me to speak on your podcast, and also for being someone who is a true representation of someone who's unstoppable. Thank you.   1:13:25 Well, thank you. And I hope that people will take to heart all that we've had the opportunity to discuss today and that they will reach out to you and want to learn more about you and and that they will get the book. And I am very serious. We need to do this again, and continue the discussion, I think we can have a lot of fun doing it. So I do again, thank you for being here. And for those of you listening, wherever you are, please feel free to reach out to Tony. And also I'd love to hear from you. So you can reach me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com. That's M I C H A E L H I  at A C C E S S I B E.com. Or go to Michael hingson.com/podcast. And of course, as we always ask very seriously, hope that you'll give us a five star rating, because your comments and input are valuable. And I hope that you'll give us a five star rating for what we've been able to do today. So thank you for listening. And again, Tony, thank you very much for being here. Thank you. Bye, everyone.   Michael Hingson  1:14:37 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

KPFA - Bookwaves/Artwaves
Bookwaves/Artwaves – November 24, 2022: Isaac Asimov – Ray Bradbury

KPFA - Bookwaves/Artwaves

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 59:59


Bookwaves/Artwaves is produced and hosted by Richard Wolinsky. Links to assorted local theater & book venues   Bookwaves Isaac Asimov (1920-1992), in conversation with Richard Wolinsky, recorded in New York City on August 10, 1983. Isaac Asimov, who died at the age of 72 in 1992, was considered, along with Ray Bradbury and Robert Heinlein, one of the three great masters of American science fiction in the 20th century. Isaac Asimov began sending in stories and getting published in science fiction magazines at the age of nineteen, and at the age of 21, with the publication of the short story “Nightfall” in John W. Campbell's Astounding Stories magazine. moved into the first ranks of science fiction writers. That status was confirmed a year later with the publication of the short story, “Foundation,” later renamed “The Encyclopedists,” which would be the first of several short stories and novellas republished as the three volumes of the Foundation trilogy. In the 1940s, he turned to a series of stories focused on robots, which became the collection I Robot and then in the 1950s turned to novels, including Pebble in the Sky, The Caves of Steel and The End of Eternity. Along the way, through his entire career, he wrote dozens of non-fiction books on a wide variety of topics, along with young adult novels, and mystery novels and short stories. In the end, the number of books he wrote or edited exceeded 500, not counting separate short stories and articles. This interview was conducted in a New York City bookstore Asimov was visiting to sign copies of a new collection, The Union Club Mysteries, a year after his return to the world of the Foundation trilogy, Foundation's Edge, was published. Because his two –volume autobiography had come out a couple of years earlier and dealt with the plots and themes of his fiction, the interview focused instead on his life as a writer and his work with editors and publishers. Isaac Asimov Wikipedia entry. Complete 47-minute Radio Wolinsky podcast.   Bookwaves Ray Bradbury, the legendary author who passed away in 2012, sat down for an interview with Richard Wolinsky and Richard A. Lupoff in 1992 at his home in Los Angeles. Though called a science fiction or fantasy writer, Ray Bradbury spanned all genres, from poetry to mystery to mainstream fiction. Among his works include The Martian Chronicles, Something Wicked This Way Comes, Farenheit 451 and The Illustrated Man. This interview has been digitized and re-edited by Richard Wolinsky. Complete 38-minute Radio Wolinsky podcast. Ray Bradbury Wikipedia entry   Book Interview/Events and Theatre Links Note: Most in-person events still require proof of full vaccination for all audience members over 12 and masks. Many venues will require proof of boosters. Shows may unexpectedly close early or be postponed due to actors' positive COVID tests. Check the venue for closures, ticket refunds, and vaccination status requirements before arrival. Dates are in-theater performances unless otherwise noted. All times Pacific Standard Time. Book Stores Bay Area Book Festival  Highlights from this year's Festival, May 7-8, 2022 and upcoming calendar. Book Passage.  Monthly Calendar. Mix of on-line and in-store events. Books Inc.  Mix of on-line and in-store events. The Booksmith.   Monthly Calendar. On-line events only. Center for Literary Arts, San Jose. See website for Book Club guests in upcoming months. Kepler's Books  On-line Refresh the Page program listings. Live Theater Companies Actor's Reading Collective (ARC).  See website for past streams. Alter Theatre. Upcoming: Snag by Tara Moses, Pueblo Revolt by Dillon Chitto American Conservatory Theatre  A Christmas Carol, November 30 – December 24, Toni Rembe Theater. Aurora Theatre Colonialism is Terrible, but Pho is Delicious by Dustin Chinn, November 4 – December 4, in theatre. Streaming: December 3-4. Awesome Theatre Company. Check website for upcoming live shows and streaming. Berkeley Rep Wuthering Heights, adapted and directed by Emma Rice, November 18 – January 1, Roda Theatre. Remember This: The Lesson of Jan Karski, December 8-22, 2022, Peets Theatre. Boxcar Theatre. See website for event. Brava Theatre Center: See website for events. BroadwaySF: Ain't Too Proud November 9 – December 6, 2022, Golden Gate. Disney's Frozen,  November 18 – December 30, 2022 at the Orpheum. Broadway San Jose: The Book of Mormon, Nov. 22-27, 2022 California Shakespeare Theatre (Cal Shakes). 2023 Season to be announced. Center Rep: Clue based on the screenplay, Lesher Center, Walnut Creek, October 29 – November 20, 2022. Central Works The Museum Annex by Mildred Inez Lewis, now through Nov. 20, 2022. Cinnabar Theatre. Daddy Long Legs,  January 6 – 22, 2023. Contra Costa Civic Theatre To Master the Art by William Brown and Doug Frew, April 21 – May 21, 2023. Curran Theater: Kiki and Herb, December 9, 2022. Custom Made Theatre. Shoshana in December. November 18 – December 18, Phoenix Theatrre, 414 Mason St., San Francisco. 42nd Street Moon. Anything Goes, February 23 – March 12, Gateway Theatre. Golden Thread  See website for upcoming productions. Landmark Musical Theater. The Addams Family, now through November 20, 2022. Lorraine Hansberry Theatre. Halie! The Mahalia Jackson Musical, world premiere. December 2 – 24, at the Magic. Magic Theatre. The Travelers by Luis Alfaro, February 15 – March 5, 2023. See website for other theatre events at the Magic. Marin Theatre Company Two Trains Running by August Wilson, November 25 – December 18, 2022. Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts Upcoming Events Page. New Conservatory Theatre Center (NCTC) A Picture of Two Boys by Nick Malakhow now through November 27, 2022. Oy Vey in a Manger, by the Kinsey Sicks, December 7 – 31, 2022. Oakland Theater Project. Book of Sand: A Fairy Tale by Lisa Ramirez, November 11 – December 4, livestream/on demand November 26. The Oakland Theatre at FLAX. Pear Theater. Frankie and Johnny at the Claire de Lune by Terrence McNally, December 1- 18, 2022. PianoFight. Calendar of shows. PlayGround. See website for upcoming shows. Presidio Theatre. Sleeping Beauty: Panto at the Presidio, December 1 – 30, 2022. Ray of Light: See website for upcoming productions. San Francisco Playhouse.  As You Like It, a musical adaptation of the play by William Shakespeare, November 17, 2022 – January 14, 2023. SFBATCO See website for upcoming streaming and in- theater shows. San Jose Stage Company: Meet John Doe, a stage adaptation of the Frank Capra film, November 23 – December 18, 2023. Shotgun Players. Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812 by Dave Malloy. November 5 – January 15, Streaming November 17, December 1. South Bay Musical Theatre: The Spitfire Grill, January 28-February 18, 2023. The Breath Project. Streaming archive. The Marsh: Calendar listings for Berkeley, San Francisco and Marshstream. Theatre Rhino  A Slice of Life, world premiere by John Fisher, November 5-27. At Theatre Rhino (formerly Spark Arts). Streaming: Essential Services Project, conceived and performed by John Fisher, all weekly performances now available on demand. TheatreWorks Silicon Valley. Little Shop of Horrors, November 30 – December 24, Lucie Stern Theater, Palo Alto. Word for Word. See schedule for live and streaming works. Misc. Listings: BAM/PFA: On View calendar for BAM/PFA. Berkeley Symphony: See website for listings. Chamber Music San Francisco: Calendar, 2023 Season, starting February. Dance Mission Theatre. On stage events calendar. Oregon Shakespeare Festival: Calendar listings and upcoming shows. San Francisco Opera. Calendar listings. San Francisco Symphony. Calendar listings. Playbill List of Streaming Theatre: Updated weekly, this is probably the best list you'll find of national and international streaming plays and musicals. Each week has its own webpage, so scroll down. National Theatrical Streaming: Upcoming plays from around the country. Filmed Live Musicals: Searchable database of all filmed live musicals, podcast, blog. If you'd like to add your bookstore or theater venue to this list, please write Richard@kpfa.org The post Bookwaves/Artwaves – November 24, 2022: Isaac Asimov – Ray Bradbury appeared first on KPFA.

Quarter-Bin Classics
QBP #132 - All-New X-Men 32

Quarter-Bin Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022


Quarter-Bin Podcast #132Original air date: March 26, 2019All-New X-Men #32What happens when the younger versions of the original X-Men find themselves on an alternate Earth? How does X-23 deal with landing in the middle of a football game -- or is it a match? How does Jean Grey deal with hanging out Miles Morales? How does Iceman deal with landing UNDER the Earth? And how does Professor Alan deal with the first ever X-book covered her on the podcast? Right-click to download episode directly Next Episode: Gene Roddenberry's Lost Universe #1 & Isaac Asimov's I-Bots #9 Send e-mail feedback to relativelygeeky@gmail.com, no matter how long ago this episode originally posted.

Malhete Podcast
O MEDIDOR DE 24 POLEGADAS: UMA MEDIDA DE DISTÂNCIA E TEMPO.

Malhete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 9:07


Por Douglas Messimer Como a maioria dos símbolos maçônicos, ele esconde muito mais do que revela. Como muitos, a explicação do ritual lida apenas com o significado óbvio, deixando o simbolismo interno enterrado na verborragia. A Maçonaria revela a todos, se você apenas buscar o real significado. Com o início das civilizações, a medição das coisas parece ter se originado em quase todas as culturas, usando partes do corpo humano, o pé, a mão, a palma da mão, o dedo e o côvado (medido do cotovelo à ponta do dedo médio). Alguns afirmam que a origem de uma polegada foi realmente baseada na articulação do polegar. Mas o importante não é o nome da medida, mas sim a divisão da medida em unidades e sua aplicabilidade ao tempo. A relação de vinte e quatro polegadas com as vinte e quatro horas do dia é certamente bastante óbvia, mas quando examinamos exatamente o que é dividido em vinte e quatro partes, a explicação se torna um pouco mais difícil. Lembro-me de quando, no início da adolescência, li os livros de bolso do meu pai, escritos pelo escritor de ficção científica Isaac Asimov... e depois meu pai e eu tivemos algumas discussões filosóficas sobre o mundo tridimensional em que vivemos, e meus pensamentos sobre a quarta dimensão... ..não sabia que tínhamos uma quarta dimensão, sabia? Eu afirmo que a quarta dimensão é a do tempo. Então, o que é o tempo? Para a maioria de nós, é a duração entre duas horas específicas, o intervalo decorrido entre quaisquer dois eventos; a passagem de uma certa fração da vida. Ah, sim, mas para o filósofo o tempo é uma quantidade desconhecida e, como o espaço, parece ser um conceito da mente, sem existência objetiva. Os matemáticos modernos afirmam que o tempo e o espaço são apenas duas faces do mesmo conceito, como os dois lados de uma moeda de um dólar. Embora possamos compreender um sem necessariamente referenciar o outro, não podemos "usar" um sem o outro. Cada coisa material ocupa espaço por um certo tempo; e, por sua vez, toda coisa material existente por um determinado período de tempo, ocupa um certo espaço. Nós, como humanos, passamos ou ocupamos o espaço em três direções, para cima e para baixo, esquerda e direita, para frente e para trás. Passamos pelo tempo continuamente, aparentemente em apenas uma direção... do nascimento à morte. Não podemos voltar nem por uma fração de segundo. Na verdade, tendo chegado a este momento da minha vida, não tenho certeza se quero voltar e recuperar algum do meu tempo... e você? Da sua aula de inglês 101 do ensino médio ou da faculdade .... você deve se lembrar desta passagem escrita por Omar ... "O dedo que se move escreve; e tendo escrito, segue em frente; nem toda piedade nem inteligência o atrairão de volta para cancelar meia linha, nem todas as suas lágrimas lavarão uma palavra dela." Um lembrete sutil de que nunca podemos voltar e recuperar o que passou. Então, como a medição e o tempo se relacionam com a Maçonaria? O trabalhador operativo mede sua pedra com seu medidor; se a cantaria é muito longa, ele a encurta. Se for muito largo, ele o estreita. Se estiver torto demais para fazer um quadrado, ele o joga no lixo e começa de novo com uma cantaria tosca. Mas o maçom especulativo, medindo seu tempo com o medidor de vinte e quatro polegadas, não tem essa latitude. O minuto arruinado se foi para sempre; a hora torta nunca pode ser endireitada. O dia impróprio para a Edificação Não Feita por Mãos jamais poderá ser fixado em seu Muro Eterno. Temos apenas "...oito horas para o serviço de Deus e o alívio de um irmão aflito e digno, oito para nossas vocações habituais e oito para descanso ". Dividir nossas vinte e quatro horas em três partes iguais é realmente uma advertência muito prática e cotidiana. O maçom interessado em uma interpretação adicional de nossas vinte e quatro horas (divididas por três) não precisa procurar além da Grande Luz sobre o Altar - na verdade, volte de Eclesiastes XII a Eclesiastes I para encontrar a inspiração para esta advertência --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/malhete-podcast/message

Classic Radio Theater
Dimension X Ep. #94

Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 62:55 Transcription Available


Enjoy two free sci-fi episodes of Dimension X A) 4/15/50 With Folded Hands w/ Peter Capell B) 5/6/50 Knock w/ Arnold Moss Hosted by Norman Rose, Dimension X was one of radio's first adult science-fiction series and made its mark by adapting short stories by acknowledged masters in the field, including Isaac Asimov, Robert Bloch, Ray Bradbury, Fredric Brown, Robert. A. Heinlein, Clifford D. Simak, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. and William Tenn. Scriptwriters, Ernest Kinoy and George Lefferts, who also contributed their own original material, adapted the stories. At the start of every broadcast, host Norman Rose promised us Adventures in time and space, told in future tense! You knew you were about to be transported from your everyday existence to somewhere completely different -- maybe even a distant planet. Radio was a fertile medium for science fiction. It was easy to visit other planets, interact with aliens or fly in a rocket ship simply by using your imagination. Dimension X debuted over NBC on April 8, 1950 accumulated some 50 episodes with its final broadcast on September 29, 1951. There was a five-month hiatus during the winter and spring of 1951.

Luces en el Horizonte
ISAAC ASIMOV: una vida escribiendo - Luces en el Horizonte

Luces en el Horizonte

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 39:36


La biografía de alguien tan único como Isaac Asimov. Multitud de curiosidades y citas geniales rodean la vida de uno de los padres de la Ciencia Ficción. Espero que os guste. Con Luis Martínez Vallés Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Aparici en Órbita
Aparici en Órbita s05e05: ¿Podrían existir los gigantes?

Aparici en Órbita

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 13:03


Desde que el mundo es mundo las historias de fantasía han incluido fábulas sobre seres gigantescos y seres diminutos, a veces enemigos de los humanos y a veces aliados. Esta corriente ha llegado también hasta nuestros días, en los que seguimos viendo historias de monstruos gigantes, como Godzilla o los titales de Attack on Titan. Hoy nos planteamos qué tiene que decir la ciencia sobre esos seres de nuestra imaginación: está claro que no existen, pero ¿podrían existir? ¿Son física y biológicamente posibles? Basándonos en un ensayo del siempre gigante Isaac Asimov (éste sí) analizamos la cuestión desde un punto de vista científico, y concluimos que esos gigantes quizá podrían existir, pero habrían de ser un poco diferentes a como los solemos imaginar. Como apéndice a lo que contamos en el programa os dejo aquí por escrito que *no* serían posibles seres arbirtariamente gigantes (digamos, de 100 metros de altura, o de 3 kilómetros de altura). La razón es doble: por un lado, la carne y los tejidos de esos seres no pueden ser arbitrariamente fuertes. Cuanto más grandes se hagan más estrés soportará cada centímetro cúbico de su cuerpo; llegará un punto en que la única manera de que ese centímetro cúbico no se rompa es que sea de titanio o de algún otro material que, hasta donde sabemos, no forma parte de los tejidos biológicos; y aunque algún ser vivo lo pudiera integrar en sus tejidos, si el bicho sigue creciendo llegará un momento en que ni siquiera esos materiales exóticos podrán soportar la carga: a partir de cierto tamaño (probablemente algunas decenas de metros), el ser vivo literalmente se rompe bajo su propio peso. La segunda razón es aún más sencilla: los seres vivos tienen que comer; y los animales, en concreto, somos seres vivos muy poco económicos: consumimos a otros seres vivos. Un bicho de 1 kilómetro de altura ¿cuánta comida necesita para dar de comer a un cuerpo así de grande? Obviamente llegará un punto (más difícil de calcular en este caso) en que ningún ecosistema podría producir suficiente alimento para un ser tan gigantesco. Es mi sospecha que éste sería el caso, por ejemplo, de los gusanos de Arrakis, en Dune. Todas estas cosas querríamos haberlas contado, pero tuvimos un problema de tiempos y se hubieron de quedar fuera. Aquí tenéis un resumen ;) Este año hace 30 años que nos dejó el bueno de Asimov. Hace 5 años, en el 25 aniversario de su muerte, le dedicamos también unos minutos en nuestro pódcast hermano, La Brújula de la Ciencia. Si queréis repasarlo lo tenéis en el capítulo s06e35. Este programa se emitió originalmente el 10 de noviembre de 2022. Podéis escuchar el resto de audios de Más de Uno en la app de Onda Cero y en su web, ondacero.es

Ler é Verbo - Podcast
[1900-1960] TOP 10 obras de Ficção Científica

Ler é Verbo - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 11:46


[1900-1960] TOP 10 obras de Ficção Científica. A Princesa de Marte por Edgar Rice Burroughs (1912) https://amzn.to/3sMerLL Nós de Yevgeny Zamyatin (1924) https://amzn.to/3fhBiMg Metropolis por Thea von Harbou (1925) https://amzn.to/3SGDlXW Admirável Mundo Novo de Aldous Huxley (1932) https://amzn.to/3DKHiXu BOX de Arthur C. Clarke(1937-1999) https://amzn.to/3DILGGh BOX de Robô por Isaac Asimov (1939-1977) https://amzn.to/3Tj569f 1984 por George Orwell (1949) https://amzn.to/3FsUIbQ Astro Boy de Osamu Tezuka (1952-1968) https://amzn.to/3UDPxtZ Fahrenheit 451 por Ray Bradbury (1953) https://amzn.to/3fhCwak Tropas Estelares por Robert A. Heinlein (1959) https://amzn.to/3WezqEv Um Cântico para Leibowitz por Walter M. Miller Jr. (1959) https://amzn.to/3gSkJqP ________________________________ ⚡️ A Alta Performance de Kobe Bryant e David Goggins https://www.lereverbo.com/mentalidade-do-vencedor

Science Fiction Book Review Podcast » Podcast Feed
SFBRP #500 – The First Science Fiction Story Luke Read

Science Fiction Book Review Podcast » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 83:42


Luke goes waaay back to re-read the first story that introduced him to science fiction: It’s Such a Beautiful Day by Isaac Asimov. Discuss this book at Goodreads.com Support Luke and Juliane financially via Patreon.com/lukeburrage Follow Luke on twitter: https://twitter.com/lukeburrage Luke writes his own novels, like “Minding Tomorrow”, “Combat”, “Get that rat off my face!” […]

CUENTOS DE LA CASA DE LA BRUJA
EXTRA: Primera Ley, de Isaac Asimov

CUENTOS DE LA CASA DE LA BRUJA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 10:45


Mi nombre es Juan Carlos Albarracín y te ofrezco mi voz como locutor online y narrador de audiolibros profesional, con estudio propio. Si crees que mi voz encajaría con tu proyecto o negocio contacta conmigo sin compromiso. Contacto profesional: info@locucioneshablandoclaro.com www.locucioneshablandoclaro.com También estoy en Twitter: @VengadorT Estudio de narración: - Micrófono: Neumann TLM-103 - Interfaz: Universal Audio Apollo Twin - Cabina: Demvox ECO100 - Plugins: Universal Audio ¿Quieres anunciarte en este podcast? Hazlo con advoices.com/podcast/ivoox/421745 Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Free To Choose Media Podcast
Episode 179 – Isaac Asimov (Podcast)

Free To Choose Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022


Today's podcast is titled, “Isaac Asimov.” Renowned science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov explores the appeal of science-fiction as well as the consequences of scientific understanding in popular culture. Listen now, and don't forget to subscribe to get updates each week for the Free To Choose Media Podcast.

New Books Network
Alastair Reynolds, "Eversion" (Orbit, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 50:31


In Alastair Reynolds' Eversion (Orbit, 2022), the setting keep changing—the epoch, location, and technology—but the characters remain more or less the same as they carry out an expedition to a mysterious object at the behest of a private investor. The novel starts on a tall ship in the early 1800s in waters in the Arctic, then jumps to a paddle-steamer near the Antarctic, then a dirigible over Antarctica, and eventually concludes in the future on a submarine-like explorer under the ice of Europa, the Jupiter moon. The story is a puzzle, challenging the reader to figure out which if any place and time is real. Adding to the mystery is the reader's dependence on a first-person narrator Silas Coade, the expedition's physician. Is the story a book he is writing, a delusion, a series of alternate realities or something else? Reynolds says his original intention with Eversion was to “recap the entire history of science fiction … We were going to start in a kind of Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe mode. And then it was going to go into sort of Jules Verne and then maybe a bit of H.G. Wells, then a sort of early pulp sleuth thing.” That would have been followed by classic space opera and episodes in the styles of Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov followed by 1960s and '70s new wave. “But once I started writing the book, I realized that there was no way I could bring sufficient variety to the craft to make those episodes work,” he says. “So I cut it down drastically to four or five episodes for the finished product. Reynolds is a former research fellow at the European Space Agency. He's been writing fiction full-time since 2004 and has 19 novels and more than 70 short stories to show for it. His work has been shortlisted for the Hugo, Arthur C Clarke and Sturgeon awards. He's won the Seiun, Sidewise, European Science Fiction Society and Locus awards, and his stories have been adapted for stage and television. Brenda Noiseux are Rob Wolf are co-hosts of New Books in Science Fiction. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Science Fiction
Alastair Reynolds, "Eversion" (Orbit, 2022)

New Books in Science Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 50:31


In Alastair Reynolds' Eversion (Orbit, 2022), the setting keep changing—the epoch, location, and technology—but the characters remain more or less the same as they carry out an expedition to a mysterious object at the behest of a private investor. The novel starts on a tall ship in the early 1800s in waters in the Arctic, then jumps to a paddle-steamer near the Antarctic, then a dirigible over Antarctica, and eventually concludes in the future on a submarine-like explorer under the ice of Europa, the Jupiter moon. The story is a puzzle, challenging the reader to figure out which if any place and time is real. Adding to the mystery is the reader's dependence on a first-person narrator Silas Coade, the expedition's physician. Is the story a book he is writing, a delusion, a series of alternate realities or something else? Reynolds says his original intention with Eversion was to “recap the entire history of science fiction … We were going to start in a kind of Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe mode. And then it was going to go into sort of Jules Verne and then maybe a bit of H.G. Wells, then a sort of early pulp sleuth thing.” That would have been followed by classic space opera and episodes in the styles of Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov followed by 1960s and '70s new wave. “But once I started writing the book, I realized that there was no way I could bring sufficient variety to the craft to make those episodes work,” he says. “So I cut it down drastically to four or five episodes for the finished product. Reynolds is a former research fellow at the European Space Agency. He's been writing fiction full-time since 2004 and has 19 novels and more than 70 short stories to show for it. His work has been shortlisted for the Hugo, Arthur C Clarke and Sturgeon awards. He's won the Seiun, Sidewise, European Science Fiction Society and Locus awards, and his stories have been adapted for stage and television. Brenda Noiseux are Rob Wolf are co-hosts of New Books in Science Fiction. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-fiction

New Books in Literature
Alastair Reynolds, "Eversion" (Orbit, 2022)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 50:31


In Alastair Reynolds' Eversion (Orbit, 2022), the setting keep changing—the epoch, location, and technology—but the characters remain more or less the same as they carry out an expedition to a mysterious object at the behest of a private investor. The novel starts on a tall ship in the early 1800s in waters in the Arctic, then jumps to a paddle-steamer near the Antarctic, then a dirigible over Antarctica, and eventually concludes in the future on a submarine-like explorer under the ice of Europa, the Jupiter moon. The story is a puzzle, challenging the reader to figure out which if any place and time is real. Adding to the mystery is the reader's dependence on a first-person narrator Silas Coade, the expedition's physician. Is the story a book he is writing, a delusion, a series of alternate realities or something else? Reynolds says his original intention with Eversion was to “recap the entire history of science fiction … We were going to start in a kind of Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe mode. And then it was going to go into sort of Jules Verne and then maybe a bit of H.G. Wells, then a sort of early pulp sleuth thing.” That would have been followed by classic space opera and episodes in the styles of Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov followed by 1960s and '70s new wave. “But once I started writing the book, I realized that there was no way I could bring sufficient variety to the craft to make those episodes work,” he says. “So I cut it down drastically to four or five episodes for the finished product. Reynolds is a former research fellow at the European Space Agency. He's been writing fiction full-time since 2004 and has 19 novels and more than 70 short stories to show for it. His work has been shortlisted for the Hugo, Arthur C Clarke and Sturgeon awards. He's won the Seiun, Sidewise, European Science Fiction Society and Locus awards, and his stories have been adapted for stage and television. Brenda Noiseux are Rob Wolf are co-hosts of New Books in Science Fiction. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

Ron's Amazing Stories
RAS #566 - Robot Killer

Ron's Amazing Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:22


On Ron's Amazing Stories we have a pseudo theme on the life and times of Isaac Asimov. We review an audiobook written by him called Robot Dreams. We even play a game of Johnny Is It True where you get to pick which famous Asimovian quote I faked. Add to that a story from the OTR series 2000 plus that is titled Robot Killer, well I think you get the idea. Not too worry though it is not all robots there are two ghost stories sent in by Richard and Tambra that are quite creepy.  Featured Story - Killer Robot Our featured story comes from the short lived radio series 2000 Plus. It ran on the Mutual Broadcasting System for a little over a year ending in 1952. It was the first adult science fiction series on radio, airing one month prior to the better-known Dimension X.  The tale is called Robot Killer and is one that Isacc Asimov would be proud of. It takes a good look at the pitfalls of owning a robot. It aired in Late 1950. Other Stories Include - A Bit Of Logic, Eyes Do More Than See, Kids In The Woods, A Wolf Encounter, Robot Killer, And Johnny Is It True - Isaac's Quotes Ron's Amazing Stories Is Sponsored by: Audible - You can get a free audiobook and a 30 day free trial at   and - Good Treats for your dog to eat. Your Stories: Do you have a story that you would like to share on the podcast or the blog? Head to the main website, click on Story Submission, leave your story, give it a title, and please tell me where you're from. I will read it if I can. Links are below. Program Info: Ron's Amazing Stories is published each Thursday. You can download it from , stream it on or on the mobile version of . Do you prefer the radio? We are heard every Thursday at 10:00 pm and Sunday Night at 11:00 PM (EST) on . Check your local listing or find the station closest to you at this . Social Links:Contact Links:

Hardly Working with Brent Orrell
Erik Brynjolfsson and Michael Strain on The Costs of Labor-Replacing Technology

Hardly Working with Brent Orrell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 51:40


Erik Brynjolfsson's paper “The Turing Trap: The Promise and Peril of Human-Like Artificial Intelligence” argues that the “imitation game” of creating tech that mimics humans has increased productivity and living standards, but does not exist without costs. Those costs make up “The Turing Trap” which happens when humans not involved in creating AI cannot compete with the productivity and efficiency of the robots designed to do their jobs, and lose control of their economic and political futures. The Turing Trap sits at the center of contemporary labor force struggles, including the Great Resignation, the fight for “good jobs” and cratering male labor force participation. Michael Strain, who directs AEI's Economic Policy Studies, joins Dr. Brynjolfsson and I to discuss what economic policy can do to encourage more innovators aim higher and create machines that augment rather than replace human labor, and how that effort is crucial to the American Dream. Mentioned in the episode https://www.brynjolfsson.com/ (Erik Brynjolfsson) https://www.amazon.com/Utopia-Thomas-More/dp/1512093386 (Utopia Paperback by Thomas More) https://www.amazon.com/Foundation-Isaac-Asimov/dp/0553293354 (Foundation Mass Market Paperback by Isaac Asimov) https://www.amazon.com/Worldly-Philosophers-Economic-Thinkers-Library/dp/1441743669 (Heilbronner's Worldly Philosophers) https://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/5075.html (Doug Hofstadter) https://digitaleconomy.stanford.edu/news/the-turing-trap-the-promise-peril-of-human-like-artificial-intelligence/ (The Turing Trap by Erik Brynjolfsson) https://www.aei.org/profile/michael-r-strain/ (Michael R. Strain) https://www.amazon.com/American-Dream-Not-Dead-Populism/dp/159947557X (The American Dream is Not Dead) https://www.city-journal.org/html/when-high-schools-shaped-americas-destiny-15254.html (The High School Movement) https://taxfoundation.org/tax-basics/pigouvian-tax/#:~:text=A%20Pigouvian%20tax%2C%20named%20after,sugar%20taxes%2C%20and%20carbon%20taxes. (Pigouvian Tax) https://taxfoundation.org/tax-basics/consumption-tax/ (Consumption Tax) https://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/taxreformact1986.asp (Tax Reform Act of 1986) https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/mankiw/files/smart_taxes.pdf (Greg Mankiw Pigou Club)

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2776: Asimov & Energy Storage

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 3:49


Episode: 2776 Isaac Asimov's fantastic worlds, robots that roam among us, and energy storage methods.  Today, our guest Haleh Ardebili talks about Isaac Asimov and Energy Storage.

Archer Dentin
Key Item Isaac Asimov

Archer Dentin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 6:57


Multivac has problems. It does not respond to commands, and isn't following its built-in program to self-diagnose the cause. As the global economy depends on Mulitvac, this could result in panic across the world. Teams of technicians have been trying to identify what is wrong for three days. Finally, a scientist discovers the “key item” needed to fix the problem. It is a simple thing that we are all taught to use as children. Jack Weaver came out of the vitals of Multivac looking utterly worn and disgusted. From the stool, where the other maintained his own stolid watch, Todd Nemerson said, “Nothing?” “Nothing,” said Weaver. “Nothing, nothing, nothing. No one can find anything wrong with it.” “Except that it won't work, you mean.” “You're no help sitting there!” “I'm thinking.” “Thinking!” Weaver showed a canine at one side of his mouth. Nemerson stirred impatiently on his stool. “Why not? There are six teams of computer technologist roaming around in the corridors of Mulitvac. They haven't come up with anything in three days. Can't you spare one person to think?” “It's not a matter of thinking. We've got to look. Somewhere a relay is stuck.” “It's not that simple, Jack!” “Who says it's simple? You know how many million relays we have there?” “That doesn't matter. If it were just a relay, Multivac would have alternate circuits, devices for locating the flaw, and facilities to repair or replace the ailing part. The trouble is, Mulitvac won't only not answer the original question, it won't tell us what's wrong with it… And meanwhile, there'll be panic in every city if we don't do something. The world's economy depends on Mulitvac, and everyone knows that.” “I know it, too. But what's there to do?” “I told you, think. There must be something we're missing completely. Look, Jack, there isn't a computer bigwig in a hundred years who hasn't devoted himself to making Mulitvac more complicated. It can do so much now — it can even talk and listen. It's practically as complex as the human brain. We can't understand the human brain, so why should we understand Mulitvac?” “Aw, come on. Next you'll be saying Multivac is human.” --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hmphaudiobooks/support

HKW Podcast
Chapter 2: How Loud is the Sun | Cosmic Awakening

HKW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 18:15


In the approach to Jupiter, the sun can be heard singing. But apart from the soundscapes on neighboring planets or in black holes, according to probability theory there is also extraterrestrial music. Science fiction literature has made it possible to understand how it might sound: a cacophony of smells or a symphony of free energy flows. Speakers: Sarj Lynch, Sasha Perera. Editing and production: Julia Vorkefeld. Recordings: Matthias Hartenberger. Concept and script: Arno Raffeiner. With quotes from works by Isaac Asimov, Octavia E. Butler, Becky Chambers, Edward George, Stanislav Lem, Andi Petculescu, Sun Ra. Music: Elysia Crampton – Morning Star-Red Glare-Sequoia Bridge; Ursula K. Le Guin & Todd Barton – Heron Dance; Ursula Bogner – Sun = Blackbox; Janelle Monáe – Neon Gumbo; Earth, Wind & Fire – Star; Rashad Becker – Themes II; Klein – ray; Flying Lotus – Camel; Sun Ra & His Arkestra – Rocket Number Nine; Ursula K. Le Guin & Todd Barton – A Teaching Poem

Archer Dentin
The Machine That Won the War Isaac Asimov

Archer Dentin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 12:37


The celebration had a long way to go and even in the silent depths of Multivac's underground chambers, it hung in the air. If nothing else, there was the mere fact of isolation and silence. For the first time in a decade, technicians were not scurrying about the vitals of the giant computer, the soft lights did not wink out their erratic patterns, the flow of information in and out had halted. It would not be halted long, of course, for the needs of peace would be pressing. Yet now, for a day, perhaps for a week, even Multivac might celebrate the great time, and rest. Lamar Swift took off the military cap he was wearing and looked down the long and empty main corridor of the enormous computer. He sat down rather wearily in one of the technician's swing-stools, and his uniform, in which he had never been comfortable, took on a heavy and wrinkled appearance. He said, “I'll miss it all after a grisly fashion. It's hard to remember when we weren't at war with Deneb, and it seems against nature now to be at peace and to look at the stars without anxiety.” The two men with the Executive Director of the Solar Federation were both younger than Swift. Neither was as gray. Neither looked quite as tired. John Henderson, thin-lipped and finding it hard to control the relief he felt in the midst of triumph, said, “They're destroyed! They're destroyed! It's what I keep saying to myself over and over and I still can't believe it. We all talked so much, over so many years, about the menace hanging over Earth and all its worlds, over every human being, and all the time it was true, every word of it. And now we're alive and it's the Denebians who are shattered and destroyed. They'll be no menace now, ever again.” “Thanks to Multivac,” said Swift, with a quiet glance at the imperturbable Jablonsky, who through all the war had been Chief Interpreter of science's oracle. “Right, Max?” Jablonsky shrugged. Automatically, he reached for a cigarette and decided against it. He alone, of all the thousands who had lived in the tunnels within Multivac, had been allowed to smoke, but toward the end he had made definite efforts to avoid making use of the privilege. He said, “Well, that's what they say.” His broad thumb moved in the direction of his right shoulder, aiming upward. “Jealous, Max?” “Because they're shouting for Multivac? Because Multivac is the big hero of mankind in this war?” Jablonsky's craggy face took on an air of suitable contempt. “What's that to me? Let Multivac be the machine that won the war, if it pleases them.” Henderson looked at the other two out of the corners of his eyes. In this short interlude that the three had instinctively sought out in the one peaceful corner of a metropolis gone mad; in this entr'acte between the dangers of war and the difficulties of peace; when, for one moment, they might all find surcease; he was conscious only of his weight of guilt. Suddenly, it was as though that weight were too great to be borne longer. It had to be thrown off, along with the war; now! Henderson said, “Multivac had nothing to do with victory. It's just a machine.” --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hmphaudiobooks/support

Feedback with EarBuds
Inside Cults: Podcast Recommendations

Feedback with EarBuds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 15:43


Welcome to Feedback with EarBuds, the podcast recommendation podcast. Our newsletter brings you five podcast recommendations each week according to a theme, and curated by a different person. Our podcast is an audio version of the newsletter.Subscribe to the newsletter here: http://eepurl.com/cIcBuHThis week's theme is Listening is Inside Cults. Our curator is Dr. Tricia Jenkins.Why did Tricia choose this theme? "I grew up in a doomsday apocalyptic cult and have noticed a rise in cult mentalities in U.S. society. Cults are also at the forefront of popular culture, as seen in shows like The Vow, Keep Sweet, and Scientology: The Aftermath.Podcasts that can help educate people about what defines a cult, how to talk to someone who is in one, and stories about people who have successfully gotten out are both fascinating and inspiring."This week's podcast and newsletter are sponsored by Vocaster from FocusriteVocaster is the easiest way to bring broadcast-quality sound to your podcast. Easily set recording levels, enhance your voice, connect your phone to record calls or stream to apps, connect your camera, and more. Discover Vocaster today! Learn more: https://focusrite.com/en/vocaster?utm_source=media-partner&utm_medium=email-third-party&utm_campaign=mk_vocaster_sustaining&utm_term=earbudsWe are also sponsored by Podcast MagazineFind even more podcasts with a lifetime subscription to Podcast Magazine®. Podcast Magazine is the preeminent magazine dedicated to podcasts, podcast culture, and the podcasters fans love.With the Beyond The Microphone Interviews, independent reviews, and podcast charts, every issue is full of hundreds of podcasts you may not have heard of, but ought to be listening to. Learn more: https://podcastmagazine.com/We are also sponsored by: The Madness of ChartruleanA science fantasy audio drama with amazing performances, cinematic sound design, and a haunting original score. The story follows Chartrulean, the inventor of a new form of energy, as he ponders whether his work will save or doom his world. It has been enjoyed by fans of Dune, Isaac Asimov's Foundation, Game of Thrones, and 2001: A Space Odyssey. Listen: http://chartrulean.com/Links mentioned in this episode:- Dr. Tricia Jenkins: https://www.triciajenkins.com/- The Europeans Podcast: https://pod.link/1315776736- Hello Menopause: https://pod.link/1650262252- My Worst Date Show at Dynasty Typewriter: https://www.dynastytypewriter.com/- 844-POD-AT-ME- The Song Will Go On: https://pod.link/1629927418Here are this week's podcast picks from Jordan:- The Influence Continuum- Worldwide: The Unchosen Church- A Little Bit Culty- Heaven's Gate- Twin FlamesThis week's podcast spotlight is Trail WeightThis season explores how we can navigate the great outdoors while supporting the ecosystem.Follow along as critically acclaimed host Andrew Steven discovers the forgotten story of Walt Disney's failed ski resort in the California wilderness, travels to the Sierra Nevadas to grapple with the mountain range's seemingly inevitable future of consistent wildfires, and more. Listen: https://link.chtbl.com/Tq-uEiTv?sid=Earbuds_____Apply to have your podcast spotlit: https://www.earbudspodcastcollective.org/podcast-spotlightsSubmit to our Community section: https://962udey3mps.typeform.com/to/zZadg6y2EarBuds Blog: http://earbuds.audio/blogCurate a list: https://www.earbudspodcastcollective.org/earbuds-podcast-curators-formFollow us on Twitter @earbudspodcol: https://twitter.com/EarbudsPodColFollow us on Facebook at EarBuds Podcast Collective: https://www.facebook.com/earbudspodcastcollectiveFollow us on Instagram @earbudspodcastcollective: https://www.instagram.com/earbudspodcastcollective/Website: http://earbuds.audio/Tee Public: https://www.teepublic.com/user/earbuds-podcast-collective

CUENTOS DE LA CASA DE LA BRUJA
Espacio vital, de Isaac Asimov

CUENTOS DE LA CASA DE LA BRUJA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 39:47


Mi nombre es Juan Carlos Albarracín y te ofrezco mi voz como locutor online y narrador de audiolibros profesional, con estudio propio. Si crees que mi voz encajaría con tu proyecto o negocio contacta conmigo sin compromiso. Contacto profesional: info@locucioneshablandoclaro.com www.locucioneshablandoclaro.com También estoy en Twitter: @VengadorT Estudio de narración: - Micrófono: Neumann TLM-103 - Interfaz: Universal Audio Apollo Twin - Cabina: Demvox ECO100 - Plugins: Universal Audio Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Seldon Crisis – The Podcast
Search by the Foundation, Part III

Seldon Crisis – The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 75:47


Script by Joel McKinnonVoices by Megan Skye Hale, Jon Blumenfeld, Amanda Kreitler, Zac Kreitler, and Joel McKinnonTheme Orchestration by Tom BarnesSound Design by Jeremy MacKinnonArt by Mike Topping – despotica.comMusic by:Scott Buckley - JuggernautScott Buckley - PermafrostScott Buckley - CelestialAdditional music by Musictown on PixabayScott Buckley's twitter: @musoscientificBased on the novels of Foundation by Isaac Asimov.Podcasts and other links for voice talent on this episode:Amanda Kreitler Severed Fate Dimension Door @MargeGunderson4 on Twitter Jon Blumenfeld Stars End Podcast @jblumenfeld100 on Twitter Megan Skye Hale Professional website @skyesidhe on Twitter Joel's personal Twitter handle is @joelgmckinnon and the SeldonCrisis official account is @SeldonCrisisPod.Also, please visit SeldonCrisis.net and the Seldon Crisis YouTube channel for the video trailer, intro promos, and video versions of the podcast episodes.Want to help me make these shows? Please consider becoming a patron!

HKW Podcast
Chapter 1: In Space No One Can Hear You Scream | Cosmic Awakening

HKW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 15:21


The slogan used to advertise Ridley Scott's science fiction film “Alien” is nothing more than a statement of fact: In space, no one can hear you scream. But isn't the idea of sound everywhere in space, which is permeated to the last corner by cosmic background radiation, like an echo of the Big Bang? Speakers: Sarj Lynch, Sasha Perera. Editing and production: Julia Vorkefeld. Recordings: Matthias Hartenberger. Concept and script: Arno Raffeiner. With quotes from works by Isaac Asimov, Jimmy Carter, Samuel R. Delany, Donna Haraway, N.K. Jemisin, Ursula K. Le Guin, Stanisław Lem, Sun Ra, Arkadi and Boris Strugazki. Music: Elysia Crampton – Morning Star-Red Glare-Sequoia Bridge; Hama – Terroir; Ornette Coleman – Science Fiction; Debit – 3rd Night; Bebe and Louis Barron – Ancient Krell Music (Forbidden Planet;); Muhal Richard Abrams – Conversations With The Three Of Me; HHY & The Macumbas – Gysin Version (feat. Adrian Sherwood); Chuck Berry – Johnny B. Goode; Mahi Musicians of Benin – Cengunmé; Sun Ra & His Arkestra – Space is the Place

Unspookable
Episode 40: Artificial Intelligence

Unspookable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 21:41 Very Popular


Many of us have smart devices in our homes. Siri, Alexa, robot vacuums, and more have become a part of our daily lives. They learn our tastes and preferences, our routines... but what if that wasn't where the learning stopped? What would happen if these devices could learn just like humans, replicate our behaviors, and maybe, just maybe, become smarter than us? We'll discuss that and more as we tackle all things artificial intelligence on this episode of Unspookable.  Host: Elise ParisianWritten by: Ellenor Riley-Condit Created, Produced, Edited by: Nate DuFortMusic Direction and Composition: Jesse Case: https://www.jessecasemusic.com/Logo by: Natalie Khuen http://nataliek.myportfolio.comSpecial thanks this week to: Blythe, Bella, and Al Episode artwork by: graphicsm_  https://www.instagram.com/graphicsm_You can find Unspookable on Twitter and Instagram at:https://twitter.com/ImUnspookablehttps://www.instagram.com/unspookablepodcast/Unspookable is a production of Soundsington Media committed to making quality programing for young audiences and the young at heart. To find out more go to http://www.soundsingtonmedia.com 

Troubled Minds Radio
Asimov's Ghost - Modern Robots and the Return of the Three Laws

Troubled Minds Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 143:57


Isaac Asimov's three laws of robotics began a thought experiment that has been mostly dormant for decades - but with the coming release of Tesla's Optimus robot, the day is here to regulate robotics, and the White House finally agrees. http://www.troubledminds.org Support The Show! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/troubledminds https://rokfin.com/creator/troubledminds https://troubledfans.com https://patreon.com/troubledminds#aliens #conspiracy #paranormalRadio Schedule Mon-Tues-Wed-Thurs 7-9pst - https://fringe.fm/iTunes - https://apple.co/2zZ4hx6Spotify - https://spoti.fi/2UgyzqMStitcher - https://bit.ly/2UfAiMXTuneIn - https://bit.ly/2FZOErSTwitter - https://bit.ly/2CYB71UFollow Algo Rhythm -- https://bit.ly/3uq7yRYFollow Apoc -- https://bit.ly/3DRCUEjFollow Ash -- https://bit.ly/3CUTe4ZFollow Daryl -- https://bit.ly/3GHyIaNFollow James -- https://bit.ly/3kSiTEYFollow Jennifer -- https://bit.ly/3BVLyCMFollow Joseph -- https://bit.ly/3pNjbzb Matt's Book -- https://bit.ly/3x68r2d -- code for free book WY78YFollow Nightstocker -- https://bit.ly/3mFGGtxRobert's Book -- https://amzn.to/3GEsFUKFollow TamBam -- https://bit.ly/3LIQkFw--------------------------------------------------Biden proposes new “Bill of Rights” to protect Americans from AI harms | Ars Technicahttps://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2022/10/biden-proposes-new-bill-of-rights-to-protect-americans-from-ai-snooping/Tesla Reveals Optimus, a Walking Humanoid Robot You Could Buy in 2027 - CNEThttps://www.cnet.com/home/smart-home/tesla-reveals-optimus-a-walking-humanoid-robot-you-could-buy-in-2027/Amazon's Robot Can Now Call The Copshttps://www.slashgear.com/1029784/amazons-robot-can-now-call-the-cops/The White House released a non-binding AI Bill of Rights | CNN Businesshttps://www.cnn.com/2022/10/04/tech/ai-bill-of-rights/index.htmlThe White House just moved to hold AI more accountablehttps://www.technologyreview.com/2022/10/04/1060600/white-house-ai-bill-of-rights/amp/Blueprint for an AI Bill of Rights - The White Househttps://www.whitehouse.gov/ostp/ai-bill-of-rights/Robot law: Public policy, legal liability, and the new world of autonomous systems – GeekWirehttps://www.geekwire.com/2022/robot-law-public-policy-legal-liability-and-the-new-world-of-autonomous-systems/Robot laws: 5 new rules that could save human lives (at least on TV) | New Scientisthttps://www.newscientist.com/article/2175195-robot-laws-5-new-rules-that-could-save-human-lives-at-least-on-tv/Three Laws of Robotics ( Complete Details) - Thordrchttps://thordrc.com/three-laws-of-robotics/Robot Laws: How to Regulate Driverless Cars & Robo-Surgeons | Live Sciencehttps://www.livescience.com/48319-laws-for-robots.htmlIsaac Asimov's Laws of Robotics Are Wronghttps://www.brookings.edu/opinions/isaac-asimovs-laws-of-robotics-are-wrong/What Are The Laws Of Robotics?https://bartleylawoffice.com/the-main/what-are-the-laws-of-robotics.htmlRobots and the Law: Introduction - Robotics Business Reviewhttps://www.roboticsbusinessreview.com/legal/robots_and_the_law_introduction/Robot laws: Why we need a code of conduct for AI – and fast | New Scientisthttps://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23931892-400-robot-laws-why-we-need-a-code-of-conduct-for-ai-and-fast/4 Reasons America's Laws Governing Robots Are Terrifyingly Outdatedhttps://www.inverse.com/article/13428-america-s-laws-governing-robots-terrifyingly-outdatedThe legal issues of robotics - Robohubhttps://robohub.org/the-legal-issues-of-robotics/Artificial Intelligence & Autopilot | Teslahttps://www.tesla.com/AITesla AI Day 2022 - YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODSJsviD_SU&t=2407s&ab_channel=Tesla

Soonish
Bonus Episode: TASTING LIGHT Publication Day

Soonish

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 58:59


Why does the world of young adult fiction seem to have more wizards, werewolves, and vampires in it than astronauts and engineers?And why have the writers of the blockbuster YA books of the last 20 years fixated so consistently on white, straight, cisgender protagonists while always somehow forgetting to portray the true diversity of young people's backgrounds, identities, orientations, and experiences?Well, you could write a whole dissertation about those questions. But instead, my friend and colleague A. R. Capetta and I went out and assembled a counterweight. It's a YA science fiction collection called Tasting Light: Ten Science Fiction Stories to Rewire Your Perceptions, and after more than two years of work, it comes out today—October 11, 2022.Tasting Light highlights the plausible futures of science fiction rather than the enticing-but-impossible worlds of fantasy. Don't get me wrong: I love both kinds of stories. But fantasy doesn't need any extra help these days—just turn on your favorite streaming TV network and you'll see show after show featuring dragons, magic, and swordplay. There's some great science fiction out there too (The Expanse, For All Mankind, the never-ending Star Trek universe), but it isn't nearly as pervasive.The two genres do different kinds of work, and I think Hollywood and the mainstream publishing world have been focusing so hard on one that the other has been getting edged out. That's too bad, because to me, fantasy is the literature of escape, longing, and lost worlds, while science fiction is the literature of hope and possibility. And hope is something we need more of these days.As a project, Tasting Light was born at Candlewick Press, a prominent publisher of YA and middle-grade books based here in the Boston area. Candlewick had formed a pair of collaborations with the MIT Press called MITeen Press and MIT Kids Press, and they were looking for someone to put together a YA-oriented science fiction collection under the MITeen Press imprint—a book that would do for the YA market what the MIT Press and MIT Technology Review's Twelve Tomorrows books (one of which I edited in 2018) was doing for mainstream sci-fi. Namely, prove that it's stil possible to create technically realistic “hard” science fiction in the style of Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, or Robert Heinlein from the 1950s and 1960s, but do it in a way that speaks to readers now in the 2020s. (For more on the Twelve Tomorrows vision listen to my 2018 episode Science Fiction That Takes Science Seriously.)At the same time, though, MITeen Press wanted to open up space for stories that reflect a wider range of human experiences and perspectives. So they recruited A. R. and me to edit, and we went out and recruited the smartest, most accomplished, most diverse set of authors we could find to write hard sci-fi stories with heroes who would be recognizable and relatable to young adults today.As you'll hear in today's episode, that includes William Alexander, whose story “On the Tip of My Tongue” follows two young people of unspecified gender as they attempt to tame the loopy orbital mechanics of a space station suspended at the L1 LaGrange point. It includes the Chicago-based thriller and sci-fi writer K. Ancrum, who wrote a lovely story called “Walk 153” about a the complex relationship that develops between a lonely, infirm, elderly woman and the college student who helps her experience the outside world through his GoPro-like body camera. And it includes the prolific Elizabeth Bear, who wrote a story called “Twin Strangers” that tackles the issues of body dysmorphic disorder and anorexia through a story about two teenage boys and their misadventures programming their “dops” or metaverse avatars. There's also a luminous story by A. R. themself called “Extremophiles,” set amidst the ice of distant Europa. And there are five more remarkable stories by Charlotte Nicole Davis, Nasuġraq Rainey Hopson, A.S. King, E.C. Myers, and Junauda Petrus-Nasah, as well as a gorgeous comic / graphic novella by Wendy Xu about a sentient robot and the teen girl who discovers it in the forest.The reviews of Tasting Light have been wondrous and welcome. Kirkus Reviews gives it a rare starred review and says “Capetta and Roush introduce engaging, thoughtful, beautifully written entries about identity and agency, all unfolding within the bounds of real science.” Publishers Weekly calls it “dazzling” and notes that “the creators seamlessly tackle relevant issues such as colonization, misogyny, transphobia, and white entitlement in this eclectic celebration of infinite possibility and the ever-present human spirit.” Buzzfeed says “Each story is unique, brilliant, and brimming with hope.”I hope the three excerpts you'll hear in today's episode will entice you to get a copy of Tasting Light for yourself; it's available at Amazon and everywhere you buy books. Or if you decide to become a new supporter of Soonish on Patreon at the $10-per-episode level or above, between now and December 31, 2022, I'll send you a free signed copy of the book!For more about this episode, including a full transcript, please visit http://www.soonishpodcast.org/soonish-509-tasting-light

Space Mummies From Planet-X
Episode 6 - Isaac Asimov/Foundation Part 2

Space Mummies From Planet-X

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 33:38


On this episode I briefly discuss The Woman King and Octopath Traveler before bringing my overview of sci-fi legend Isaac Asimov and the Foundation saga to a close. You won't need psychohistory to figure out where this is going (he wrote more books). How did it translate to the small screen? You'll just have to listen to find out! Part 2 of 2, so make sure you've already heard Part 1 (don't be weird). Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
SiFi Friday: Dimension X: The Outer Limit (08-50- 2004)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 30:37


Dimension X was an NBC radio program broadcast mostly on an unsponsored, sustaining basis from April 8, 1950, to September 29, 1951. The first 13 episodes were broadcast live, and the remainder were pre recorded. Fred Wiehe and Edward King were the directors, and Norman Rose was heard as both announcer and narrator, opening the show with: "Adventures in time and space... told [or transcribed] in future tense..." For two months, beginning on July 7, 1950, the series was sponsored by Wheaties. Overview: Preceded by Mutual's 2000 Plus (1950–52), Dimension X was not the first adult science fiction series on radio, but the acquisition of previously published stories immediately gave it a strong standing with the science fiction community, as did the choice of established writers within the genre: Isaac Asimov, Robert Bloch, Ray Bradbury, Fredric Brown, Robert A. Heinlein, Murray Leinster, H. Beam Piper, Frank M. Robinson, Clifford D. Simak, William Tenn, Jack Vance, Kurt Vonnegut, Jack Williamson and Donald A. Wollheim. Ernest Kinoy and George Lefferts adapted most of the stories and also provided original scripts. In Science Fiction Television (2004), M. Keith Booker wrote: It was not until the 1950s that science fiction radio really hit its stride, even as science fiction was beginning to appear on television as well. Radio programs such as Mutual's 2000 Plus and NBC's Dimension X were anthology series that offered a variety of exciting tales of future technology, with a special focus on space exploration (including alien invasion), though both series also often reflected contemporary anxieties about the dangers of technology. The series opened with "The Outer Limit," Ernest Kinoy's adaptation of Graham Doar's short story from The Saturday Evening Post (December 24, 1949) about alien contact. A week later (April 15, 1950), the program presented Jack Williamson's most famous story, "With Folded Hands," first published in the July 1947 issue of Astounding Science Fiction. With a five-month hiatus from January 1951 to June 1951, the series spanned 17 months. All 50 episodes of the series survived and can be heard today. Later, NBC's X Minus One (1955–58) utilized many of the same actors and scripts.

Space Mummies From Planet-X
Episode 5 - Isaac Asimov/Foundation Part 1

Space Mummies From Planet-X

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 30:44


On this episode I briefly talk a little Stone Ocean Part 2 and Beast (the one with the lion) before tackling a truly remarkable science fiction series, Foundation, along with the visionary legend who created it, Isaac Asimov. The plan was to do this as one episode but it got unwieldy so I'm splitting it in two. Check back next episode for the thrilling conclusion! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

• El siglo 21 es hoy •

Chatbot es un software que se comunica con personas a través de mensajes de texto.Un chatbot, también llamado "Bot conversacional", sostiene una conversación con una persona real. Puede hacerlo en sitios web pero también puede sostener una conversación de WhatsApp entre un usuario final y una marca comercial o una institución o sistema de ambiente educativo.Hay marcas de chatbots de todos los colores y sabores. En serio, están por ejemplo:- Chatbotchocolate- Chatbot.com- AWS contact-center: Amazon Connect, concebido como un “chat call center”- Oracle: IA conversacional de nombre "Oracle Digital Assistant"- Cliengo- Clientify- Hello My BotEn este episodio conversamos con un humano: Gilberto Garza, Vicepresidente de Zendesk LATAM, a partir de su artículo titulado: "¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Transcribimos a continuación su artículo:¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Por Gilberto Garza Es muy probable que ya te haya respondido un chatbot cuando llamas al soporte de una empresa o pides ayuda a través del chat de una aplicación. Si tuviste la impresión de hablar con un robot, impersonal y distante, debes saber que esto está cambiando. Cada vez son más las empresas que invierten en hacer estas conversaciones más personalizadas y humanizadas, deconstruyendo algunos mitos sobre la tecnología. También llamados asistentes virtuales, los chatbots son programas preconfigurados que pueden descifrar preguntas de forma inmediata, consultar bases de datos y responder a las preguntas de los usuarios, mediante respuestas automatizadas o creadas por la Inteligencia Artificial (IA). Sin embargo, es un error pensar que los humanos no son necesarios. Como todo software, el chatbot funciona a base de programación, que puede variar en complejidad y debe estar bien orientada. A principios de la década de 1940, el escritor Isaac Asimov planteó por primera vez el tema de los robots inteligentes con capacidad de diálogo y pensamiento en el libro "I Robot". Sin embargo, no fue hasta la década de 1960 cuando se introdujo oficialmente la tecnología a través del programa informático Eliza, de 1965. Creada por el investigador del Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT) Joseph Weizenbaum, Eliza consistía en un programa para reconocer palabras o frases clave y mostrar en respuesta preguntas construidas a partir de esas palabras, con capacidad para identificar unos 250 tipos de frases. Aunque rudimentaria, llegó a confundir a algunas personas durante su uso y así preparó el camino para el desarrollo de la tecnología en las décadas siguientes. Desde entonces, los cambios tecnológicos han seguido los parámetros cada vez más exigentes de naturalidad y fluidez con los interlocutores. Entró en juego una mirada cada vez más precisa sobre la experiencia del usuario. Esto se debe a que uno de los principales objetivos de la inteligencia artificial en su conjunto es optimizar las interacciones entre las personas y los servicios para mejorar la experiencia. Otro mito es que el uso del chatbot se limita a las actividades de atención al cliente. En marketing, los chatbots pueden configurarse tanto para realizar los contactos iniciales con los potenciales clientes, siendo muy efectivos en la prospección, como en la generación y cualificación. Sin olvidar que un chatbot puede generar conexión con la audiencia de una marca, haciendo que se identifique y se comprometa con ella. Un ejemplo es la influencer virtual de origen brasileño, "Lu", de Magalu, que recientemente ganó un León de Oro en la categoría “Social & Influencer Lyons 2022” en el más reciente Festival Internacional de Creatividad de Cannes. De haber sido creada como una voz de asistencia virtual para un sitio de comercio electrónico en 2003, pasó a ser una influencer en redes sociales y ahora es toda una celebridad virtual que habla, baila, interactúa y toma partido en diversas causas, como la lucha contra la violencia de género. De hecho, encabeza la lista como influencer digital con más seguidores, dejando en segundo lugar nada menos que a Barbie. El informe CX Trends 2022 demostró que estamos en el buen camino: el 88% de los consumidores ya aprueba el uso de la IA como algo bueno para la sociedad. Sin embargo, dejando a un lado el optimismo, está claro que todavía hay que mejorar en términos de efectividad y resolutividad con el uso del chatbot, y es imposible decir que funcionará al 100% en todas las ocasiones, entre otras cosas porque cada empresa programa el flujo de respuestas de forma diferente. El propio estudio de Zendesk reveló cierta frustración por parte de los clientes en este sentido: el 54% de los participantes en la encuesta dijo que se necesitan muchas preguntas para que el bot reconozca que no es posible responder al problema. En este sentido, es fundamental destacar que para que un chatbot desempeñe su papel con éxito, la injerencia humana es imprescindible, ya que es el hombre quien configura, entrena y optimiza el software. Para evitar el ruido de la comunicación y la frustración, es fundamental poner al cliente en el centro a la hora de planificar, analizar y establecer la estrategia para el uso del chatbot en la rutina de la empresa, definiendo incluso cuándo es conveniente utilizarlo o no. Aunque la mayoría sigue prefiriendo la IA para resolver problemas sencillos y de mayor volumen, los más complejos y estratégicos suelen acabar pasando por el servicio humano. Todo es cuestión de tiempo, desarrollo tecnológico y adaptación por parte de los clientes y las empresas. Pero esa pregunta siempre permanece: si en los años 60 algunos dudaban con el uso de Eliza, ¿alguna vez te ha asistido (bien) un chatbot sin darte cuenta?

El Siglo 21 es Hoy
Chatbots 🤖

El Siglo 21 es Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:11


Chatbot es un software que se comunica con personas a través de mensajes de texto.Un chatbot, también llamado "Bot conversacional", sostiene una conversación con una persona real. Puede hacerlo en sitios web pero también puede sostener una conversación de WhatsApp entre un usuario final y una marca comercial o una institución o sistema de ambiente educativo.Hay marcas de chatbots de todos los colores y sabores. En serio, están por ejemplo:- Chatbotchocolate- Chatbot.com- AWS contact-center: Amazon Connect, concebido como un “chat call center”- Oracle: IA conversacional de nombre "Oracle Digital Assistant"- Cliengo- Clientify- Hello My BotEn este episodio conversamos con un humano: Gilberto Garza, Vicepresidente de Zendesk LATAM, a partir de su artículo titulado: "¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Transcribimos a continuación su artículo:¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Por Gilberto Garza Es muy probable que ya te haya respondido un chatbot cuando llamas al soporte de una empresa o pides ayuda a través del chat de una aplicación. Si tuviste la impresión de hablar con un robot, impersonal y distante, debes saber que esto está cambiando. Cada vez son más las empresas que invierten en hacer estas conversaciones más personalizadas y humanizadas, deconstruyendo algunos mitos sobre la tecnología. También llamados asistentes virtuales, los chatbots son programas preconfigurados que pueden descifrar preguntas de forma inmediata, consultar bases de datos y responder a las preguntas de los usuarios, mediante respuestas automatizadas o creadas por la Inteligencia Artificial (IA). Sin embargo, es un error pensar que los humanos no son necesarios. Como todo software, el chatbot funciona a base de programación, que puede variar en complejidad y debe estar bien orientada. A principios de la década de 1940, el escritor Isaac Asimov planteó por primera vez el tema de los robots inteligentes con capacidad de diálogo y pensamiento en el libro "I Robot". Sin embargo, no fue hasta la década de 1960 cuando se introdujo oficialmente la tecnología a través del programa informático Eliza, de 1965. Creada por el investigador del Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT) Joseph Weizenbaum, Eliza consistía en un programa para reconocer palabras o frases clave y mostrar en respuesta preguntas construidas a partir de esas palabras, con capacidad para identificar unos 250 tipos de frases. Aunque rudimentaria, llegó a confundir a algunas personas durante su uso y así preparó el camino para el desarrollo de la tecnología en las décadas siguientes. Desde entonces, los cambios tecnológicos han seguido los parámetros cada vez más exigentes de naturalidad y fluidez con los interlocutores. Entró en juego una mirada cada vez más precisa sobre la experiencia del usuario. Esto se debe a que uno de los principales objetivos de la inteligencia artificial en su conjunto es optimizar las interacciones entre las personas y los servicios para mejorar la experiencia. Otro mito es que el uso del chatbot se limita a las actividades de atención al cliente. En marketing, los chatbots pueden configurarse tanto para realizar los contactos iniciales con los potenciales clientes, siendo muy efectivos en la prospección, como en la generación y cualificación. Sin olvidar que un chatbot puede generar conexión con la audiencia de una marca, haciendo que se identifique y se comprometa con ella. Un ejemplo es la influencer virtual de origen brasileño, "Lu", de Magalu, que recientemente ganó un León de Oro en la categoría “Social & Influencer Lyons 2022” en el más reciente Festival Internacional de Creatividad de Cannes. De haber sido creada como una voz de asistencia virtual para un sitio de comercio electrónico en 2003, pasó a ser una influencer en redes sociales y ahora es toda una celebridad virtual que habla, baila, interactúa y toma partido en diversas causas, como la lucha contra la violencia de género. De hecho, encabeza la lista como influencer digital con más seguidores, dejando en segundo lugar nada menos que a Barbie. El informe CX Trends 2022 demostró que estamos en el buen camino: el 88% de los consumidores ya aprueba el uso de la IA como algo bueno para la sociedad. Sin embargo, dejando a un lado el optimismo, está claro que todavía hay que mejorar en términos de efectividad y resolutividad con el uso del chatbot, y es imposible decir que funcionará al 100% en todas las ocasiones, entre otras cosas porque cada empresa programa el flujo de respuestas de forma diferente. El propio estudio de Zendesk reveló cierta frustración por parte de los clientes en este sentido: el 54% de los participantes en la encuesta dijo que se necesitan muchas preguntas para que el bot reconozca que no es posible responder al problema. En este sentido, es fundamental destacar que para que un chatbot desempeñe su papel con éxito, la injerencia humana es imprescindible, ya que es el hombre quien configura, entrena y optimiza el software. Para evitar el ruido de la comunicación y la frustración, es fundamental poner al cliente en el centro a la hora de planificar, analizar y establecer la estrategia para el uso del chatbot en la rutina de la empresa, definiendo incluso cuándo es conveniente utilizarlo o no. Aunque la mayoría sigue prefiriendo la IA para resolver problemas sencillos y de mayor volumen, los más complejos y estratégicos suelen acabar pasando por el servicio humano. Todo es cuestión de tiempo, desarrollo tecnológico y adaptación por parte de los clientes y las empresas. Pero esa pregunta siempre permanece: si en los años 60 algunos dudaban con el uso de Eliza, ¿alguna vez te ha asistido (bien) un chatbot sin darte cuenta?

The Bledsoe Show
How Training Your Eyes Will Make you Better at Everything

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:34


00:10.29 Dr_ Placebo Welcome back to Monday mornings with max and Mike Today we're going to talk about Mike's funny glasses and we're gonna continue to cut through the Bs where we see it and then we're gonna add some BS. of our own Mike what's up and what's up with the glasses. 00:33.17 mikebledsoe Absolutely only the most helpful BS in the world. So ah, you know I had to get the we've already used that title. Ah. 00:38.00 Dr_ Placebo Oh can we call this episode constructive lives fuck. Okay I Guess that's really all there is is that all language Anyway, whatever right. 00:48.14 mikebledsoe ah ah I mean the enlightened folk out there I think I would tell you that. So yeah, the glasses are to solve ah a problem that was created by trying to solve a problem that we're trying to solve a problem. So. Ah, basically well these are blue light blocking glasses. So these are not my I still have twenty I'm forty years old 2020 vision to this day I ah I have to acknowledge my parents for their good genetics. 01:19.73 Dr_ Placebo Quit bragging. 01:26.50 mikebledsoe And ah and and my own personal work of doing a lot of things outdoors. No but ah, it's funny because I did start getting some floaters in my eyes and but not I mean I don't even notice them unless I'm like staring at the blue sky you know type of thing. But I. 01:37.10 Dr_ Placebo E. 01:46.21 mikebledsoe Was somebody asked me about their floaters and I go I go you know I'm not really sure what it is but I'm sure that if your body is incredibly healthy and doesn't carry a heavy toxic load and a lot of inflammation your eyes are probably eye health overall is going to do well. But so um. Was like you know what? and it's funny after that conversation I started noticing I was like oh when I'm looking at screens all day. My eyes I can tell like there's I go from being in my living room and then I sit down I have this I have a really big screen at my desk and I got the screen. 02:22.70 Dr_ Placebo Um. 02:23.68 mikebledsoe To improve my posture. So if you if you've got a tiny screen you're more likely to be hunched over trying to look at it and your head's gonna jut forward. But if you have a big screen. It's positioned right? You actually have to like sit back a little bit your chin tucks and you go into a much better posture. So I got this big screen and then I. 02:33.46 Dr_ Placebo Yep. 02:42.81 mikebledsoe Realize that my eyes are just getting blasted by a ton of blue light when I'm looking. There's artificial light I'm just staring right at it for hours and hour hours and hour hours and hours a day and I was like oh I need to get some blue light blocking glasses. So these are like my daytime I have some that. 02:47.24 Dr_ Placebo And. 03:01.32 mikebledsoe When the sun goes down I just swap it out with something that's more heavy duty. Ah and when I wear these glasses my eyes like my nervous system. Overall it's not just my eyes. My nervous system tends to be calmer throughout the day so looking into the blue light all day without anything to block it. Yeah. It was frying me. So yeah, we'll see. We'll see if. 03:21.60 Dr_ Placebo I Smell a sponsor. 03:30.11 mikebledsoe You got to be on my email list be on my email list. You might get links to the you know these products these magical products. 03:31.34 Dr_ Placebo Ah, ah, um, man and ah, all right all right I like it. You know I noticed um because I play tennis and. I Don't know if you know but you really need to be able to see quite well to play tennis at a distance in a variety of light scenarios and I noticed a couple times when I was on the computer a bunch before it Just absolutely. Put my ability to see the tennis ball in the basement. It was really rough. So I try to think of it like you know, um, like rpgs like role-playing video games and some you know you're you're going around. Maybe you're fighting monsters or some shit. But occasionally you find yourself. 04:10.54 mikebledsoe Here. 04:28.90 Dr_ Placebo A little console and I kind of think of ah life that way a little bit. It's a role-playing game and I try to be really mindful of how much time I'm spending at the console.. There should be a really compelling Reason. To use the screens basically and we we really we really don't know what the total cost is um, certainly there's the old ah example of the accountant becomes nearsighted and the farmer becomes farsighted. Right? And so I think the cycling between is the key. 05:06.54 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, dude I I agree this is a I love we're talking about this because Ashley and I oh my my mistake, my fiance and I forget her name. Ah yeah. 05:21.39 Dr_ Placebo Jennifer should come up with a fake name. 05:23.75 mikebledsoe Do that now I'm gonna be in trouble. Ah, she'll be the last person listen to this show. She she hears me rant enough. Ah the we we were having date night last night and one these little fancy blind bars. We had bread and accoutrements. 05:34.68 Dr_ Placebo Oh. 05:41.63 mikebledsoe And i't know what that word means but I know when I order it I Love the food that's put in front of me So the ah the oh yeah, the charouty as well. 05:53.29 Dr_ Placebo Charcotery is what I like I can say feed me meat and cheese in like 10 languages. 06:00.81 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean that's that's that's the necessary skills to have any travel. So. It's basically food and and bathrooms. But ah ah we were talking about Myopia and so I had I. Talked about ah I saw a study there day and said there's a huge rides in Myopia and that is nearsightedness that means that people can see just fine something that's in the room with them but something that they try to see far away appears to be blurry and um. You know it's attributed to the fact that everyone's looking at things really close but hardly ever looking at anything very far away and ah that that had me thinking about a concept and I don't know where I picked this up but I I didn't invent it myself. 06:45.19 Dr_ Placebo Edit. 06:56.68 mikebledsoe Which is ah basically the idea is that the more time you spend looking close if you're in a room and all that your your brain actually has a hard time conceptualizing very far out into the future your ability to project. Further out your ability to consider more is hindered and so your eyes are basically just like your your brain is reaching out in front to try to capture some sense of the world and ah if you spend a lot of time. 07:29.63 Dr_ Placebo A. 07:34.42 mikebledsoe And a small space. You're probably gonna think small thoughts. You're gonna have there's gonna small thinking your ability to think into the future is gonna be minimized and you know what? what? Mate. What I thought about next is you know the last two and a half years people spent. There's a 2 wo-year period where a lot of people probably the most people most people who were already indoors way too much now decide to lock themselves inside a house and stare at screens instead of. 07:52.34 Dr_ Placebo Um. 08:08.21 mikebledsoe Instead of looking at somebody who's ten feet away they're always eighteen inches away and if you're on your phone dude it's it's like it's one foot away from your face. So now you have an entire population of people who are near so ah near sighted they're they're myopic their thinking becomes myopic. So. 08:09.71 Dr_ Placebo M. 08:27.38 mikebledsoe As above so below. So whatever's happening in your physical world is going to dictate how your internal world is if you're living in a messy chaotic space your mind is likely gonna be a little messy and chaotic. So this I remember back to when I was living in California and remember. You remember my house and had that big window that was just dude I spent most of my time like I would wake up and walk in the backyard and look over the cliff into the expanse of the ocean and all that and at any time I could leave my computer and put my eyes out there. And it was all it was really nice to be able to get that that contrast and I and it felt good now. You had the practice of looking across the way and trying to spot little boats or a house down the way and to help with my eyesight and. 09:14.56 Dr_ Placebo A. 09:23.80 mikebledsoe And it got me thinking about just my ability to operate in business if I'm in front of a computer screen all the time you know how does that hinder my ability to plan for the future to see greater opportunities or am I going to be able to just see what's in front of me right now. 09:42.42 Dr_ Placebo Man I love what you said there starting about ah 2 two and a half minutes ago in case, anyone wants to timestamp this for later ah, because as soon as you said myopia I was thinking ah visual and psychological right? You get totally locked in. 09:54.20 mikebledsoe Yeah. 10:00.19 Dr_ Placebo Your your world literally shrinks your peripheral vision goes away and from just a more mechanical standpoint your muscles in your eyes and just outside your eyes are going to learn to stay frozen. In that certain area. You know most people are looking between twelve inches and twenty four inches away from their face all the time and if you want to do that. That's fine, but just understand there are going to be tremendous costs to this behavior right. The muscles on the inside of your eyes and outside of your eyes are going to start to freeze into that position because remember your body is always and exactly adapting to whatever you do so just the same way if you sit in a chair all the time your body is going to go. Okay, we sit in a chair a lot How do we make sitting in a chair easier. So if you're looking at a screen that's right in front of you or even papers that are right in front of you which I would argue is a little healthier for you to not have light emitting straight at you but instead have it be bouncing off a page but. Ah, you know before there were screens people were still damaging their ability to see further away by honing in on something really close like a scholar or an accountant or something like that. 11:32.78 Dr_ Placebo Going to get really good at looking at little spreadsheets but they're not going to be very good at seeing far away and it kind of reminds me once again of specialization. It's so useful to have you know 1 person counting the beans. They're locked away in an office all day. And then you have the visionary who never has to look at a spreadsheet in his life. He just looks up from the highest tower to survey the whole situation and lets someone else take care of the details and probably the best. Progress I've made in my life was when I had a clear um separation between those activities. So someone who was really specialized in those minor details. Would take care of that while I was able to see more like the big picture and connecting all these different ideas. So the ah connection between your vision. Ah,, let's call it physically. And your vision psychologically is completely interlinked and there are even um, different physiological responses to the position of your eyes even just looking up for a while. 13:02.96 Dr_ Placebo Been playing a little volleyball recently and so of course I've I've tried to break down all of the volleyball shots and the stances that you find yourself in and sort of like deconstruct volleyball because I don't like to be bad at Sports I like to be good enough to really enjoy them. And I was just thinking how in volleyball you're basically looking straight ahead or up the entire time and I was like wow this would probably be 1 of the best things for people to do just force them to look up and extend. If they're spending tons of time looking. Let's say down at a 30 to sixty degree angle now they're looking up at a 30 to sixty degree angle and everything is up and the hand-eye coordination. Everything is pointed upwards so that. Ah, equal and opposite force could be really beneficial. So just not only the um the distance away from the object and certainly being able to track an object in and out is one of the more fundamental visual skills but also just the angle. Of your eyes has a big influence on your nervous system. You know you snap your eyes up. You should be going into extension. You snap your eyes down. You should be going into flexion so like a fetal position so the position of your eyes and the distance away. 14:33.56 Dr_ Placebo Is going to have a big influence on your nervous system Vision's really complex. So one of the most complex things to understand. 14:37.96 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the other thing is is I mean if you study any body language like I I watched a bunch of videos by this guy who worked for some intelligence agency where he was. Talking about? Well you can you know their eyes do this. It's a tell right? and then I got into a little bit of Nlp and it's you and you can you can watch people when you're talking to them now and you'll I'll ask somebody a question and they'll start looking up into the right or up into the left. 15:00.00 Dr_ Placebo E. 15:08.26 Dr_ Placebo Oh. 15:14.15 Dr_ Placebo Right. 15:16.38 mikebledsoe And then if I ask them how they're feeling and if they're going to be honest with me a lot of times they'll look down like their eyes will will settle straight ahead into my eyes or they'll drop down or they'll they'll want to close their eyes and so yeah, well the the idea the idea that I'm thinking about. 15:30.00 Dr_ Placebo Submissive. 15:35.59 mikebledsoe Is is when the eyes go up a lot of times they're searching for something in the mind they're looking for a memory right in some people say I don't know how accurate this is up into the right you know is more creative processes are going and that part of the brain up into the left is a little more linear thinking more organized. 15:40.36 Dr_ Placebo E o. 15:55.40 mikebledsoe And so I mean I've watched people as I ask them questions and be in conversation. They're looking up and then they're looking to the right and up to the left and I can I can like I can actually see them searching for the information they're looking for. 15:57.51 Dr_ Placebo I. 16:09.28 Dr_ Placebo That's why I always just roll my eyes whenever you talk so you can't get a read on. 16:14.86 mikebledsoe Um, but yeah, ah I mean try try looking up and looking down and see how that impacts. 16:15.40 Dr_ Placebo But but. 16:23.73 mikebledsoe Your experience in that moment. I mean anyone can try this right now just look down or close your eyes see what happens look up see what goat happens and to me for me. It does it shifts I can I can watch my awareness. Go up into my head or my awareness fall into my body. 16:43.60 Dr_ Placebo Well, that's amazing I Think a good example is the connection I'll just bring it back to movement because that's sort of my thing still I Guess if you want to like mellow yourself out. You would basically take a lightweight and do some Romanian Deadlifts and you would look down you would you would you would look down. 17:18.10 Dr_ Placebo You would kind of bend over so you're folding into that fetal Position. You wouldn't stand all the way up and that's going to bring you down that's going to take your nervous system way way down and then um, the opposite would be. You're doing something where you're looking up. And exploding upward whether that's throwing a medicine ball or a sandbag in the air. Um, ah, jumping all that kind of stuff you go up explosively man you are going to jack your nervous system up big Time. So. 1 of the things I've noticed is you can use the eye position as a way to influence the nervous system. Especially if you sync it up with ah synergistic movements along those lines is really powerful. Yeah, you take someone in the very beginning of a session. 18:01.19 mikebledsoe I Like that. 18:08.51 Dr_ Placebo And they're all lethargic and you have them throw a medicine ball up overhead as high and far as they can and snap their eyes upward and within a few repetitions they're they're just absolutely bringing up the level into more sympathetic which is where you're going to get a little more aggression. And then at the end if you want to bring someone back down, you just have them do something kind of eyes down and I'll just say fetal Ish position. Yeah. 18:38.65 mikebledsoe Interesting I like that a lot I like that a lot um are you familiar with Paul check's totem. 18:47.15 Dr_ Placebo No, ah no. 18:51.21 mikebledsoe Basically has a hierarchy of of what dictates the health of the body. So at the bottom of the totem pole is the Musculo skeletal system and then you have the organs and then you have ah ah I think breath. And then you have ah your jaw basically your ability to masticate and then you go up level the stibular system and then you go to the ocular system which is the eyes and then above that is consciousness and all of all of like. 19:12.31 Dr_ Placebo Oo a. 19:26.83 mikebledsoe The idea is consciousness as we were talking about last week is what if something's off in your consciousness. It's going to filter down into your ocular vestibular your jaw your breath your organs and your musculoskeletal system. So if you end up with an injury. It may not just be 1 thing so ah say more. 19:47.18 Dr_ Placebo It reminds me of the neural hierarchy. That's what I've heard which is visual vestibular and propriepptive so visual is the highest vestibular is second inropriacceptive which is your your body and your stuff is third and I've had. Lots of firsthand experience where improving someone's ability to see whether that's just moving their eyes or tracking an object through space has had a really significant difference I mean it feels like Voodoo almost. The fact that some people can have a pain in their back or their shoulder. We do something with their eyes and then it resolves itself and the the criticism of stuff like that is they're like oh well, it won't maybe it won't stay that way but I I would say that anything you can do. To get someone out of the fire basically and into a situation where they can move. Well again is really valuable. So I've seen how that neural hierarchy has played out to be true. You know if someone's got a visual problem. And they don't know that they have a visual problem and their leg hurts. You can do leg circles forever. But it doesn't resolve the root cause which is higher up on the hierarchy just like you know if you. 21:20.50 Dr_ Placebo Give someone liposuction but you'd never repair their relationship with food. They're just going to get fat Again, you know what I mean so it's about addressing things at the root cause of it and the neural hierarchy is a top-down understanding I mean that's why I say vision is so complex because. 21:24.84 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 21:39.70 Dr_ Placebo Our whole frame of the world is based on our ability to distinguish 1 thing from another and being able to label those things so when you see something it's fucking insane. But is actually really going on like we talk about all the different words that the eskimos or inuits have for snow a lot of different words for green and all of it has to do with being able to distinguish 1 thing from another and initially it was just ah like which way is up. Ah, is this thing going to eat me or not in fact, the evolution of the eye is a really interesting thing. There's a book ah by Isaac Asimov who I thought was just a sci-fi writer but he was also a science writer and it's called the human body structure and operation and it talks about. 22:33.29 Dr_ Placebo Evolution of an eye which started out just as a few um photosensitive cells that could basically just detect photons so you know on the body of some organism. They can detect light or no light and then it turned into a little cup. So It could take in a little bit more light and then this eyeball evolved over time and that's also why like a lot of sea creatures are black on the top and white on the bottom so they are camouflaged against the surrounding environment. If You're an orcca whale and you're above something you're coming out of the they're coming out of the light so you want your belly to be light colored and if you're lower, You're going to be coming out of the darkness so you want the top to be darkly colored and a lot of fish are colored that way specifically. So It's a. Quite an interesting game of cat and mouse between vision and camouflage. Really interesting. 23:33.73 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, just goes back and forth. Yeah I think I was watching one of these dock 2 series on like a planet earth or something like that and they were talking about the evolution of the eye and how basically. The the basic functions of our eyes are the same as the a fish and just kind of basically well really. 24:00.33 Dr_ Placebo I think I was saying that last week. Yeah, maybe to you maybe to someone else I talk about that all the time because um, that's there's more similar than there is different. With animals and the fact that a fish eye in your eye are so crazy similar is that blows my mind really because that's a very different creature but in a lot of ways you know they eat or get eaten. 24:27.13 mikebledsoe It's tripping. 24:35.48 Dr_ Placebo Shit stuff out and they have to see what's going on and we're not that different fundamentally. Of course we have all this other ah different stuff like language and metaphor and symbolism and arguably more complex relationships. But even a lot of very simple creatures. Have eyes I mean even ah tardigrades which are like the little water bears. Um, there are really really tiny microorganisms that can survive the. 25:02.68 mikebledsoe Are they that that like the smallest are they the smallest living Organism or. 25:11.15 Dr_ Placebo They no no, no, no, no, they're really weird. They have like 6 legs they're they can survive the vacuum of space they can turn into a crystal if there's not enough water it can survive like radiation. They're really weird. Ah they're. Called water bears but the real name is a tardigrade and they have tiny little eyes. It's a single cell little black spot here and here just in the same place that you would imagine an eye should be and even they have these little eyes. It's it's really trippy. It's it's a huge advantage in the primordial soup to be able to see a little bit further and we talk about ah projection on this show quite a lot and so being able to see further literally with your eyes. And then being able to see further. Let's say ah philosophically or symbolically with like your third eye and being able to project and plan into the future goes right in line with what you were saying before about that myopia of we could call it a. Mindopia like myopia of the mind. Basically that is ah synchronous with the myopia of the vision and once again, it's it's fine because that's how we get the comparative advantage of having someone who's purely focused on a few details. 26:25.82 mikebledsoe Ah. 26:42.81 Dr_ Placebo While someone else can be focused on the big picture and not bother with those details so much. 26:57.23 Dr_ Placebo It's like having a lookout on a ship. Their job is to see and the Captain's job is to choose what to do about that. 27:03.46 mikebledsoe Very specialized. 27:08.14 Dr_ Placebo That's that's the name of our game. We specialize you you go kill the stuff I'll cook it I don't know why I made myself the lady in that example, right? there but but that's what it is specialization. Yeah no. 27:21.87 mikebledsoe Ah I'll be the dude I'll be the dude I okay well at the end of the conversation I had with my fiancee last night was you know what do we do because you know I did go we but we both left. 27:25.38 Dr_ Placebo No, one's going to believe that though. 27:38.90 mikebledsoe California we're living in Texas and there you know, depending on where you live you may have some views that you can look out really far but where we live that's not really the case so spend a lot of time indoors especially because it gets so hot and we get outdoors quite a bit but. If I were to look at the amount of time I spend indoors and looking at screens versus out in nature and looking far away. The ratio is skewed a bit so we've made a commitment to spend more time outdoors my birthday. We're going to go backpacking. We'll be in tahoe next week um 28:16.85 Dr_ Placebo Ah, nice. 28:17.90 mikebledsoe You know? So we'll be so we're doing that and spend a lot of time in nature. Go hiking every day and yeah, so I think that I mean the way I I typically run my life is and ah you know just a sequence of extreme events and it's like. Extreme smallness in my my office and then going out and being nature for 3 4 or five days and then come back to the office for a week and then back and forth which I think is okay for a period of time but the overall goal is to live somewhere where I can regularly. Exercise my vision and and yeah and have that balance. 29:00.98 Dr_ Placebo Yeah, maybe take up bird watching probably some birds down there in Texas really you have a little journal. 29:06.50 mikebledsoe Dude I did so much bird watching when I was in California I ah I you know I lived on that lagoon and I had those I had those? no but I would go out there and I I could I got to where I could predict. No. Every month there was a different type of bird that was coming into the trees these trees in the backyard and they'd be migrating and coming through and then these birds would come hang out for February and then they would disappear and then in April another different type of bird would be hanging out in the same trees. Ah, and. 29:24.50 Dr_ Placebo Ah. 29:28.93 Dr_ Placebo O. 29:38.11 mikebledsoe Yeah I spent a lot of time out there just checking the birds out. 29:44.63 Dr_ Placebo Yeah that's a really ah engaging activity. Actually it's really weird. It's kind of like ah I had this idea that if you see a shooting star. It's lucky, but really. Is it lucky because you are making a wish on the shooting star because if you are that's cool. You're setting an intention. But also if you just happen to be outside looking at the night sky enough that you see shooting stars then that already means like you're bringing that luck. Into your life like that's a healthy behavior and you know it's not like ah this is good and this is bad kind of thing but you know if you are looking at something like straight. Ah you know eighteen inches in front of you ah getting that tunnel vision versus. Actually laying outside and looking at the stars. It's a very different kind of experience. So even if you don't make a wish you just happen to put yourself in a situation where you can see some some shooting stars. It's like you already did the thing that sets you up. For a little bit more peace of mind and relaxation. 30:57.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, how often do use Stargas I don't do it hardly at all anymore it it only happens when I'm traveling and I'm out of the city because the city really messes it up. 31:08.20 Dr_ Placebo Um. 31:13.30 Dr_ Placebo Um, ah the last few weeks of having puppies I've done very little I've done more helping them chase crickets so ah, looking down I'll like find 1 and point it out and then let them go like try to catch it. 31:21.52 mikebledsoe Perfect. 31:30.91 Dr_ Placebo At night but I would say at least once a week I was ah laying outside at night. Um, and just looking up and it's it's ah another one of those really soothing experience it and it's not for everybody like I mean you don't have to do any of that shit it just. Can be a ah nice way to sort of temper the constant ah dopamine buffet that we have available to us. 31:59.24 mikebledsoe All right? This is probably the first time I mean since the invention of the light bulb is you know the last hundred hundred and fifty years I mean really for the average person hundred years the first time that star gazing was not a thing. 32:16.28 Dr_ Placebo M. 32:18.67 mikebledsoe Sun goes down. Everyone's hanging out there's little to do after dark. Maybe you got some candlelight but the stars I mean when you know when you go out into the country you get away from the city. The the stars are so much easier to see it's It's something worth looking at. But if you're. 32:22.37 Dr_ Placebo Oh. 32:30.35 Dr_ Placebo And. 32:36.30 mikebledsoe And L a and you're trying to look at the stars. Good luck. 32:40.86 Dr_ Placebo Right? I mean you'll still see stars. You just won't see as many and I would argue that you're better off to to look up at least a little bit I mean should we just call that ah call this episode look up even. 32:42.61 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 32:57.26 Dr_ Placebo Even that the metaphor of look up is ah synonymous with having a positive attitude right? You can you can look up. You can also look down on somebody. That's a pretty ah unhealthy behavior I would argue you. 33:11.24 mikebledsoe Look up to look down on. 33:15.53 Dr_ Placebo Look up to somebody yeah look up to look down on. Yeah, it's It's pretty big. 33:18.41 mikebledsoe You know. 33:35.10 Dr_ Placebo Ah, do you do any? ah exercises for your vision. 33:39.25 mikebledsoe Ah, there's one I don't do it frequently enough. But um one I like to do is I wrap a towel around my head um Criss Crosss it to basically keep my head from being the thing that turns basically stabilize that and then take my eyes I got a mandala. 33:50.92 Dr_ Placebo And. E. 33:56.77 mikebledsoe Hangs in my garage gym and I circle the mandala with my eyes and I'm I'm really focused on going slow and smooth and then if I find an area where my eyes want to skip which everyone will find some area. It's like oh down and to the right. 34:13.19 Dr_ Placebo E. 34:16.27 mikebledsoe My eye kind of jumped from here to here. Can I go back smooth it out and then keep going and if you can if you can go each way you know from right? you know, clockwise and counterclockwise around the mendala smoothly then you're going to be in a pretty good space. Ah. 34:18.90 Dr_ Placebo In a. 34:36.36 mikebledsoe That's also one way that they're able to see if you had a concussion in the past is if you're if you're either unable to I remember I was I being worked on once and I couldn't look up to the right I think it was. 34:40.10 Dr_ Placebo He. 34:52.91 mikebledsoe Was having trouble looking up to the right? they were doing an eye test on me and they were like oh did you have a concussion and you know where were you hit now. Of course I don't know which concussion they're talking about ah but the the ah. 35:05.10 Dr_ Placebo So. 35:10.14 mikebledsoe They they said oh yeah, a lot of times people they were hit up and to the right, their nervous system remembers that it basically thinks it's still happening and then it's that reaction to try to you know your eyes lead the way and you and you get away from whatever. Ah. 35:19.74 Dr_ Placebo 6 35:29.69 mikebledsoe Force was coming at you and having maybe having some damage to the brain in that area keeps your eyes from being able to go back up and so one of the ways to help heal. The brain is through vision. 35:47.54 Dr_ Placebo Absolutely I think being able to or not being able to but doing a few um circles with the eyes closed and then with the eyes open really smooth is a very simplified and good way to. Improve your ah overall ability to interact with your environment and then another good thing to add is throwing a ball against a wall with some letters drawn on it and calling out the letter that you see right before you catch it. So You're really tracking something in space I would say. 36:21.42 mikebledsoe So you got letters on the wall. Oh on the ball. 36:24.80 Dr_ Placebo Those are probably 2 of the biggest ones on the ball so you take a tennis you take a tennis ball and if you imagine the tennis ball is a cube you draw a letter or a number on each of the 6 faces of the cube. So whatever, whatever you see last you call that out. And do you have to draw anything on it. No, but if you do you're going to track it a little bit longer. So it's going to make you a little more attentive to staying focused on the ball. So even if that was all you did I mean I've written tons of stuff. About vision. It's in a