Podcasts about Northeastern University

Private university in Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Best podcasts about Northeastern University

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Latest podcast episodes about Northeastern University

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer

Dr Shira Lewibowitz is a  dynamic educator, author and entrepreneur, Shira is CEO and founder of both Revabilities and Discovery Village. Rev Abilities is a Professional Learning Academy helping educational business owners and directors bring their vision for learning to life so they can increase their income and improve the lives of their students. Discovery Village is a premier project and play based childcare center and preschool located in Tarrytown, NY. Shira is co-author of The Coach Approach To School Leadership: Leading Teachers to Higher Levels of Effectiveness. Her upcoming book, to be published summer 2022, is titled Havens of Hope: Ideas for Redesigning Education From The COVID-19 Pandemic.   Shira holds a Ph.D in Education and is an experienced school leader who served for 20 years as a principal of nursery through eighth grade independent schools in the greater New York City area. She is a faculty member in the doctoral program of education at Northeastern University; co-author of The Coach Approach to School Leadership: Leading Teachers to Higher Levels of Effectiveness; a national faculty member for the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development; and a leader of professional development for educators. Shira has been working with childcare centers regionally and nationally on how to navigate the health, financial, and educational challenges facing early childhood centers in the age of COVID-19. Throughout it educational programs have not only navigated through but have become dramatically better. At Revabilities, Shira shares the insights and inspiration that sparked their success.   Show Highlights Turn devastation into hope by going off script to create an oasis for learning grounded on the wellbeing of your community.  The highway to happiness protocol for curiosity and exploration to flip the magic “up” where kids need it most.  Insights when countering the negative, LOUD story of what goes on in education with hope and positivity. Teaching children to play and explore within the constraints of any environment is the necessary path. Overcome the two simultaneous narratives to every crisis to ensure your team comes out stronger. Examples on how to get teachers and parents comfortable with the evolution of change happening daily in education and the uniqueness of your school. Approach creativity in your leadership and switch your mindset from a matter of “if” to a matter of “how.   “When we say there is no other choice than to figure it out and to be present for our students, we do that. Figuring things out requires us to level up in ways that are profoundly uncomfortable and stretch ourselves in ways that, frankly, education doesn't support.” -Dr Shira Lewibowitz  Dr Shira Lewibowitz Transcript   Dr Shira Lewibowitz 's Resources & Contact Info: Havens of Hope Linkedin Twitter Instagram Read my latest book! Learn why the ABCs of powerful professional development™ work – Grow your skills by integrating more Authenticity, Belonging, and Challenge into your life and leadership.   Read Mastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School Leader today! Join the “Back to School Boot Camp” The one thing you need to start next year off with energy momentum is a solid 90-day plan.   In the “Back to School Bootcamp” I will teach you how to create your 90-day plan in just 5-days.   Join the challenge today! Apply to the Mastermind The mastermind is changing the landscape of professional development for school leaders.    100% of our members agree that the mastermind is the #1 way they grow their leadership skills.   Apply to the mastermind today!   SHOW SPONSORS: HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Transform how you lead to become a resilient and empowered change agent with Harvard's online Certificate in School Management and Leadership. Grow your professional network with a global cohort of fellow school leaders as you collaborate in case studies bridging the fields of education and business. Apply today at http://hgse.me/leader.   TEACHFX School leaders know that productive student talk drives student learning, but the average teacher talks 75% of class time! TeachFX is changing that with a “Fitbit for teachers” that automatically measures student engagement and gives teachers feedback about what they could do differently.  Learn more about the TeachFX app and get a special 20% discount for your school or district by visiting teachfx.com/blbs.   ORGANIZED BINDER Organized Binder is the missing piece in many classrooms. Many teachers are great with the main content of the lesson. Organized Binder helps with powerful introductions, savvy transitions, and memorable lesson closings. Your students will grow their executive functioning skills (and as a bonus), your teachers will become more organized too. Help your students and staff level up with Organized Binder.   Copyright © 2022 Twelve Practices LLC      

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast
203: Non-Nutritive Suck and Its Role in Oral Feeding

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 65:06


Guest: Emily Zimmerman, Ph.D, CCC-SLP - Have you ever heard of NNS? In this episode, Michelle is joined by Dr. Emily Zimmerman, a speech-language pathologist, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, the Associate Chair for Research and Innovation at Northeastern University, and director of the Speech and Neurodevelopment Lab (SNL). Dr. Zimmerman describes what a non-nutritive suck (NNS) is, the factors that can influence an NNS, and its role in oral feeding and then offers insight into where the future of pediatric feeding research is heading.

Free Library Podcast
Margaret A. Burnham | By Hands Now Known: Jim Crow's Legal Executioners

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 56:33


In conversation with Tracey Matisak Margaret A. Burnham is the founding director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project, an initiative to document every racially motivated killing in the South between 1930 and 1970. Also a law professor at Northeastern University and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve on the Civil Rights Cold Case Records Review Board, she formerly worked as a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, as a staffer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and as a judge in the Boston Municipal Court. In By Hands Now Known, Burnham expands her analysis of the astonishing violence of the Jim Crow era to investigate the legal apparatus that held up this infamously cruel system and its still-reverberating legacy. (recorded 9/29/2022)

Karen Hunter Show
Daniel Medwed - University Distinguished Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University; Author of BARRED: Why the Innocent Can't Get Out of Prison

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 29:47


In BARRED,Medwed reveals how convoluted legal procedures—essentially technicalities—make exonerations nearly impossible. The rules surrounding litigation after conviction are extremely complex, with narrow guidelines on how much time a defendant has to submit notice of an appeal, which court to file in, and whether they will be allowed to present new evidence or to raise errors that occurred at the initial trial. Because of deferential attitudes toward lower courts, higher courts also tend to uphold convictions, even when there is compelling evidence of a miscarriage of justice. With heart-wrenching stories of people who have been wrongfully convicted, BARRED  makes a powerful call for change.  Bio: Daniel Medwed has spent more than twenty years in the field of criminal justice, serving as a public defender, as cofounder of a law school clinic that investigated post-conviction innocence claims, and now as a professor advocating for justice reform. He's seen firsthand the deep-seated issues that plague the criminal process, namely how the system is complicit in putting innocent people behind bars. There are convictions that rest on dubious eyewitnesses. Possible police misconduct that goes uninvestigated. Subpar performance from overworked, even if well-meaning, defense attorneys.A renowned innocence advocate, he is the author of Prosecution Complex: America's Race to Convict and Its Impact on the Innocent.

Sounds Heal Podcast
Sounds Heal Podcast with John Yost and Natalie Brown

Sounds Heal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 50:21


John Yost has studied with master drummers in Africa, Japan, and the US and has a degree in percussion and a certificate in a Leadership and Organization Change, both from Northeastern University in Illinois. With his company Rhythm Revolution, he has been leading rhythm-based events for more than 30 years. He is certified as a drum circle facilitator by the Drum Circle Facilitator's Guild and Village Music Circle, for which he is a global trainer. Yost serves as co-chair of the Interactive Drumming Committee for the Percussive Arts Society and is an adjunct professor at Vandercook College of Music. He has facilitated interactive music-making activities and drum circles for conferences, corporations, schools, community groups, and at major events worldwide. Along with leading a free monthly community drum circle, he heads and performs in both Sound Magic (gong and bowl immersions) and Kaiju Daiko (Japanese-style drumming) and teaches both Daiko and West African drumming. On top of all that, he has created a best-selling instructional video series, “John Yost teaches” and is a parks and recreation professional certified by the National Recreation and Parks Association! http://www.drummingcircle.com/ Natalie Brown: http://www.soundshealstudio.com http://www.facebook.com/soundshealstudio.com http://www.instagram.com/nataliebrownsoundsheal Music by Natalie Brown, Hope & Heart http://www.youtu.be/hZPx6zJX6yA This episode is sponsored by The Om Shoppe.The OM Shoppe & Spa offers a vast array of Sound Healing and Vibrational Medicine tools for serious professionals and for those ready to make sound and vibration part of their ongoing lifestyle. More and more we are coming to understand that our individual wellness is a direct reflection of our personal vibration. How we care for ourselves, our physical bodies, our minds and our spirits. The OM Shoppe is ready to help you today in a variety of ways. They offer the countries largest showroom of Quartz Crystal Singing bowls, sound healing instruments and vibrational medicine tools. If you are ready to uplevel your sound healing practice The OM Shoppe is a great place to get guidance and direction. They are available to consult with you directly by phone or you can shop online. They really enjoy getting to know their clients and customers one on one to better help recommend the right sound healing tools in the right tones for you. Call them today or visit them at www.theomshoppe.com. If you are ever near Sarasota, Florida, do consider stopping in and visiting with them or enjoy a luxury spa treatment such as sound healing, energy work, massage, vibroacoustics or hypnotherapy. They truly offer a full holistic experience for practitioners and those seeking healing through natural means.

Post Game with Paul Golden
Josh Manson, Stanley Cup Champion

Post Game with Paul Golden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 29:18


2022 Stanley Cup champion Josh Manson is today's guest on the podcast. Josh is a defenseman for the Colorado Avalanche of the National Hockey League. Originally drafted by the Anaheim Ducks (2011), Josh made his NHL debut with the Ducks in 2014. Earlier this year, Josh was traded to the Avalanche and was a key contributor to their championship run in Denver. In this interview, Josh reveals the physical and mental challenges of the playoff run and winning the ultimate trophy in sports (including his day with Lord Stanley's Cup in Saskatchewan). He details the deal he made with God when his mom was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer and given only three months to live. Josh discloses the three books that have significantly impacted his faith and the spiritual disciplines that helped him this past season.  You will be encouraged as he shares about his faith (and role of hockey chapel), family (his wife and growing family) and storied career. Subscribe to the Post Game with Paul Golden podcast wherever you listen to podcasts.www.PaulGolden.orgColorado Avalanche defenseman Josh Manson shares the story of his BEST DAY EVER - YouTube

Art Beat
iDMAa Weird Media Conference '22: Infodemic

Art Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 23:01


Recently the iDMAa held a conference and exhibition here in Winona and we were there check out all the weird digital art being presented. Two of the artists that we spoke with, Jennifer Gradecki and Derek Curry, had a video piece in the exhibition titled: Infodemic. Both artists are also assistant professors at Northeastern University in Boston and their piece Infodemic deals with the way that misinformation spreads through todays social and digital media while gaining traction as truth. How do we discern what is truth and what is fiction in todays world? Well, Jennifer and Derek are here to help us figure that out. And to prompt us to think a little deeper when consuming today's digital media. I'm Bill Stoneberg with Jennifer Gradecki and Derek Curry at the iDMAa Weird Media conference, today on Art Beat.Original Air Date: 07/05/22.Art Beat is produced on the campus of Winona State University and is made possible by a grant from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

The Great Trials Podcast
GTP CLASSIC: Marc Diller | Cathrine Erickson v. Rosalie A. Cunio et al | $2.3 million verdict

The Great Trials Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 85:14


This week we're replaying a classic episode where your hosts Steve Lowry and Yvonne Godfrey interview Marc Diller of Diller Law, P.C. (https://www.dillerlaw.com/). Remember to rate and review GTP in iTunes: Click Here To Rate and Review   Episode Details: Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum member Marc Diller of Diller Law, P.C. explains how he secured justice for tenant Cathrine Erickson when her landlord failed to prepare her Watertown, Massachusetts rental property for winter, creating a dangerous situation that resulted in permanent injury to Cathrine's right leg. After being informed by Cathrine and other tenants that the drain at the end of the sloped driveway was not working properly, landlord Rosalie Cunio chose to withhold important property information and ignore the contractor's proposed solution in favor of a cheap fix. The repair was ineffective, as water continued to pool, taking days to drain. The drainage problem was compounded when winter came and Rosalie did not "winterize" the rental property, including shutting off the exterior water. In February 2013, Cathrine returned home from her job as head coach of Northeastern University's track and field team and slipped on black ice caused by water spraying from a hose. As a result, Cathrine sustained a serious injury requiring a titanium rod as well as seven screws to stabilize her right leg. Today, this accomplished coach struggles with mobility and suffers from chronic pain. In March 2019, trial lawyer Marc Diller detailed the landlord's negligence and violations of common sense safety practices to a Middlesex County, Massachusetts jury. The jury returned a verdict in favor of Cathrine, awarding $2,324,815.62 in damages. Read/Download Trial Documents   Guest Bio: Marc Diller On May 15, 1992, Marc Diller was a senior in high school in Brookline, MA. Brookline's local paper, The Brookline Citizen, profiled Marc Diller as its Brookline Student of The Week. The article was titled, “Diller, an attorney in training”. Even back then, Marc's passion for service and the law was evident. Nearly 30 years later, Marc uses that passion to deliver safety and justice to his clients. Marc helps people and their families during their most vulnerable times. It's his ethos to hold corporations and insurance companies accountable for wrongdoings. Marc fights corporate and individual wrongdoers when it results in wrongful death or catastrophic injury. Marc doesn't back down from the fight. Throughout his 20+ year career, Marc has held property owners, who maintain dangerous conditions, accountable for their wrongdoings. He has made companies take responsibility for the death or losses that result from making, designing or selling dangerous products. Marc also makes employers on construction sites answer for unsafe work conditions. When motorcyclists, pedestrians, bicyclists and those in cars are killed or injured by dangerous drivers and the companies that employ them, Marc seeks justice. He goes after the drunk, distracted and drowsy drivers, the companies that employ them and the restaurants, bars, and clubs that ignore safe service practices and let drivers drive dangerously. “Our client's trust us to do right by them,” says Diller “and I insist that all Diller Law, PC's lawyers care about safety and accountability in our community.” Marc grew up in Brookline, MA, the son of a lawyer and an educator. At the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor he wrote for the Michigan Daily newspaper, majoring in English and communications. From there, he went to Suffolk University Law School, his father William's alma mater. Marc worked with his dad at the Law Offices of William Diller starting in 1997. William mentored Marc until 2013. Marc learned a lot from William's 40+ years experience in law. William was the editor-in-chief of the Suffolk Law Review ('69), clerked for Justice Reardon at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ('70), was an associate at one of Boston's premier law firms, and during William's 40 years in private practice, he handled many complex and significant personal injury cases. In 2013 Marc started DILLER LAW, P.C. Marc's aggressive, yet practical approach to litigating and resolving personal injury cases has earned him recognition from his peers in the legal community. Professionally, Marc serves on numerous legal organizations and committees dedicated to the ethical and competent litigation of cases as well as the proper administration of justice. Personally, Marc is the father of two children. He coaches recreational basketball for his sons. In his free time, Marc enjoys golfing and watching movies. Lawyers all over the country consult Marc, who has appeared in State and Federal trial courts as well as our State's appellate court. Read Full Bio   Show Sponsors: Legal Technology Services - LegalTechService.com Digital Law Marketing - DigitalLawMarketing.com Harris Lowry Manton LLP - hlmlawfirm.com

The CGAI Podcast Network
The Global Exchange: Building Global Resilience

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 49:27


On this episode of The Global Exchange, Colin Robertson speaks to Stephen Flynn about resiliency and its importance for democratic stability. Participant's bio: Stephen Flynn is the Founding Director of the Global Resilience Institute at Northeastern University – https://globalresilience.northeastern.edu/about/team/stephen-flynn/ Host's bio: Colin Robertson is Senior Adviser and Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute Read: Charles Dickens – https://www.charlesdickensinfo.com/novels/complete-works/ Recording Date: 24 Aug 2022. Give 'The Global Exchange' a review on Apple Podcast! Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website www.cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Charlotte Duval-Lantoine. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

The Art of Being Human
The Art of Staying Hydrated with Drink Simple Co-founder Kate Weiler

The Art of Being Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 43:33


We've heard of coconut water...but have you heard of maple water? We delve into why hydration beyond just water is important, the ups and downs of founding a company, the different career paths we go through in life, balancing triathlons & entrepreneurship and more with Kate Weiler, co-founder of Drink Simple, cookbook author (she has her Masters in Nutrition from Northeastern University!), and Ironman triathlete.Find Drink Simple:IG: @drinksimple.Shop: www.drinksimple.comFollow Nancy:IG: @nancy.lin.chen @theartofbeinghumanpodSite: www.nancylinchen.com

The Emergency Management Network Podcast
How Do We Take Emergency Management Seriously If We Do Not Support Research?

The Emergency Management Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 9:29


How Do We Take Emergency Management Seriously If We Do Not Support Research?There has been a debate about whether or not someone should have a college degree to be an emergency manager. The second side of the argument is whether we should have emergency management degree programs. For full disclosure, I am an emergency management educator. If you read or listen to the Emergency Management Network, you know that I also write and research trends in emergency management. The field of emergency management is "the discipline and profession of applying science, technology, planning, and management to deal with extreme events that can injure or kill large numbers of people, do extensive property damage, and disrupt community life. When such events occur and cause extensive harm, they are called disasters" (Hoetmer, 1991). This definition eloquently defines emergency management, explaining what a disaster is, and exemplifies how academia and research provide conceptual and practical tools for emergency managers. Researchers tell us who we are, what we do, how and why we do the things we do, and provide guidance and advice as to where we should be going.Emergency management relies on researchers to observe, evaluate, and provide references and reports offering recommendations; reflect on how and what we have done; and help us define, recognize, and understand the multitude of issues we face in emergency management. Dr. Carol Cwick argues that similar disciplines fund research through education programs and advance beyond a mere job to a profession. She continues by stressing that without higher education programs, the field of emergency management is doomed to disappear and be absorbed by public safety programs. Her full interview will be published soon. How do we take a field or discipline seriously if we do not research the issues and the programs' effectiveness? There are areas of study dedicated to the supply chain in the business world. They study disruptions, forecast needs and increasing product varieties, shorter product life cycles, ever-growing expectations of consumers, and rising cost competition due to globalization. The business makes forecasting essential to matching supply with demand. Hundreds of publications, TV news programming, think tanks, and thousands of books are dedicated to business research. You rarely hear people questioning the need for business and MBA education programs.  Over the last few decades, Scholars researching emergency management have accumulated literature. This has opened great opportunities for further development of EM theories and strategies.I was asked why we even care to do disaster research. The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction estimates that globally from 2000 to 2012, disasters killed 1.2 million people, affected 2.9 billion others, and claimed $1.7 trillion in material damage. The United States has moved into a "new normal" of frequent, billion-dollar hurricanes, eight of the ten costliest occurring since 2004. The Department of Defense warns that climate change threatens national security and will cause global political instability due to "prolonged drought and flooding … food shortages, desertification, population dislocation, mass migration, and sea level rise." Not a week goes by without news of a new technological "accident" and the long-term malignant impacts of chemicals, radiation, plastics, and petroleum—the material markers of technological society—on our bodies, communities, and the planet.How do Colleges and Universities Make A Difference In Emergency Management? Academic research looks beyond emergency management's immediate needs; the university's role involves exploring all phases of disaster.  As an institution of higher education and research, they, by definition, are responsible for contributing to the body of knowledge for emergency management. And to society as a whole. In addition to expanding education programs, institutions study the intersection of disasters and policy. An example of how research contributes to society is the studies completed on post-disaster homelessness.  The roles of universities in researchResearch may be one of the most misunderstood components of emergency management. It is often regarded by disaster responders as an esoteric undertaking carried out by individuals with little understanding of "the real world" and less understanding of disaster issues.In reality, research into disasters is one of the most vital functions that can be carried out by those involved in such events. I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Daniel P. Aldrich, Director of the Security and Resilience Studies Program at Northeastern University. He researches post-disaster recovery. Aldrich's book "Black Wave: How Networks and Governance Shaped Japan's 3/11 Disasters" is an excellent example of how disaster research can shape policy and how emergency management professionals approach preparedness and recovery. I am not arguing that we need to have a bunch of academics lead the way. The best disaster researchers are practitioners with substantial experience in disaster response and planning because they know what questions must be asked. The research is to determine the truth about the event itself. As Craig Fugate stated, lessons learned and not implemented are lessons observed. Mistakes and missed steps will continuously be repeated without such efforts and application of the resulting knowledge to the disaster planning and response process.Until the last decade, disaster research had been limited to narrative descriptions of the event(s) that precipitated the disaster, reports on the number of persons killed, injured, or displaced, and descriptions of what interventions were or were not applied. After Action Reports (AAR) could be a way for researchers to learn how to improve response and explore how effective planning and exercises are. Unfortunately, many of these reports have been biased and self-serving, as the responding agencies have performed them. AARs have had little value in eliminating or modifying hazards, reducing risks, improving capacities, reducing vulnerability, enhancing preparedness for responses to future events, or designing and implementing future relief activities. AARs do not give much insight into how the response and actions may affect future responses. Disaster research is performed retrospectively, after the impact phase, and during the recovery activities. This is because collecting information during a disaster has ethical considerations and may be deemed inappropriate. The design, acceptance, and implementation of such studies in these settings remain tasks for the future. Universities and other agencies should jointly consider and improve the above matter. Why Emergency Management Must Support Education ProgramsThe roles of universities span all phases of the disaster cycle. The university is essential during the impact, emergency phase, risk reduction strategies, preparedness, and mitigation. The roles of the university in disaster management include disaster education, relief, and support to the affected community, and grasping the situation from a research perspective. We also have significant roles in mid-term and long-term support, such as academic contributions, policy proposals, A university also has a role in educating, developing scenarios, and providing basic and advanced training. Furthermore, by establishing coalitions, it becomes possible for the university to do research suited to the needs of the particular community.Universities provide a universe of knowledge and expertise that can be readily mobilized when needed. It is often in the interdisciplinary overlap of professional domains where the solutions lie. Universities can readily provide the breadth and width of skills conducive to finding the optimum solutions. With strong management skills and available assets, academia can make a significant and lasting contribution to the profession of emergency management.Register HereSupporters https://www.disastertech.com/https://www.titanhst.com/https://www.ndemevent.com/ Get full access to The Emergency Management Network at emnetwork.substack.com/subscribe

Brave New World -- hosted by Vasant Dhar
Ep 45: Joseph Aoun on Becoming Robot-Proof

Brave New World -- hosted by Vasant Dhar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 66:12


If robots and AI are replacing us, we need to reinvent ourselves. Joseph Aoun joins Vasant Dhar in episode 45 of Brave New World to discuss the role of education in making humanity robot-proof. Useful resources: 1. Joseph Aoun on Twitter, Google Scholar and Northeastern University. 2. Robot-Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence -- Joseph Aoun. 3. The Innovator's Dilemma -- Clayton Christensen. 4. Caitlin Zaloom on the Explosion of Student Debt -- Episode 37 of Brave New World. 5. Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost -- Caitlin Zaloom. 6.  Daniel Kahneman on How Noise Hampers Judgement -- Episode 21 of Brave New World. 7. The Future of Liberal Education -- Episode 11 of Brave New World (w Michael S Roth). 8. How Humans Judge Machines -- César Hidalgo. Check out Vasant Dhar's newsletter on Substack. Subscription is free!

On Religion
On Literary Persecutions, Sex Scandals, and American Minority Religions

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 68:34


Megan Goodwin, Ph.D., is Program Director for Sacred Writes, a Luce-funded project promoting public scholarship on religion hosted by Northeastern University. Her first book, Abusing Religion: Literary Persecutions, Sex Scandals, and American Minority Religions is available through Rutgers. Visit Dr. Megan Goodwin's website here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Voices of Women Physicians
Ep 12: How to Build a Career in Pharma & Biotech With Dr. Nerissa Kreher

Voices of Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 27:35


If you are interested in learning about a transition to a fulfilling career in pharma/biotech, listen to this episode!Nerissa C. Kreher, MD, MBA is the CEO/Founder of The Pharma IndustryMDCoach, LLC.  She is also the Chief Medical Officer of a biotech company, member of the Board of Directors of a public biotech company and a pediatric endocrinologist. The Pharma IndustryMDCoach is a coaching and consulting group that guides physician through career transition to the pharmaceutical industry. They steer physicians through the exploratory phase of understanding if pharma is the correct career path, and when the physician is ready to pursue this fulfilling career transition, they help you navigate the process.She brings more than 15 years of experience working in biopharma. Her career in pharma started in Medical Affairs as a Medical Director.  She then strategically moved to another company to gain Clinical Development experience and expertise. She has worked in small to large biopharma organizations including both private and public companies. She also holds an MBA from Northeastern University. She is passionate about her work and wants to help other physicians understand the possibilities of a fulfilling career in the pharma/biotech industry.Some of my favorite takeaways:How to land a job in the Pharma or biotech industryIf research experience is a mustWhat websites physicians can use to apply for jobs in pharmaThe difference between a CV and a resumeHow physicians keep their licenses/credentials active while working for pharmaBooks, websites, and other resources that can help physicians be prepared3 tips for success in the pharma industrySchedule a FREE coaching call with me:https://www.joyfulsuccessliving.comContact Dr. Nerissa Kreher:The IndustryMDCoachwww.industryMDCoach.comfacebook:https://www.facebook.com/industrymdcoach/

In This Climate
Diversifying Power with Jennie Stephens

In This Climate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:47


To open our fourth season, we chat with Northeastern University professor of sustainability science and policy Jennie Stephens about climate movement leadership and how it needs to shift if we want to see transformative change.  https://www.jenniecstephens.com/

Family Business Today
Episode 60: Buy-Sell Agreements, The Last Will & Testament for Your Business with Paul Hood

Family Business Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022


Our guest today is Paul Hood with Paul Hood Services located in Sylvania, Ohio. Paul is an author, a speaker, and an advisor to family owned businesses.Paul obtained his undergraduate and law degrees from Louisiana State University and a Master's degree in taxation from Georgetown University Law Center. Paul has taught at the University of New Orleans, Northeastern University, The University of Toledo College of Law and Ohio Northern University Pettit College of Law.Paul is a highly sought-after speaker and consultant due to his innate ability to see through complexities and explain difficult and even boring subjects in understandable and entertaining language. He minces no words in doing so.Paul has authored or co-authored nine books and over 500 professional articles on estate and tax planning and business valuation. Paul is the author of Buy-Sell Agreements, The Last Will & Testament for your Business as well Yours, Mine, & Ours, Estate Planning for People in Blended or Stepfamilies.Both books can be purchased on Amazon Books or at his website paulhoodservices.comIn this episode of Family Business Today, Paul will:Expand on this importance of Buy-Sell AgreementsEncourage family businesses to have a facilitator at business meetingsTouch on how blended families can prepare for estate planningShare why kids (of all ages) should be involved in business meetingsAnd more…You can find out more about Paul Hood here. To learn more about his books, click here.At the Tennessee Center for Family Business our passion is to help business owners create a positive environment in which their family THRIVES, their business performs and working together create a lasting family legacy. To learn more about the Tennessee Center for Family Business visit www.tncfb.com.Would you like the opportunity to be in a small group community of like-minded family business owners/leaders and get access to years of experience and wisdom from other family business executives just like you?If you answered yes, I would like to invite you to consider joining a family business mastermind group. To learn more visit our website at www.thefamilybusinessmastermind.com.Until next time, There's No Business Like Family Business…..We Know!

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition
The Power of Black Twitter (feat. Michael Harriot) - Beyond the Scenes

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 56:37


From hashtag activism to action offline, Black Twitter has been a vehicle for real change. Host Roy Wood Jr. chats with author of the book, Black AF: The Un-Whitewashed Story of America, Michael Harriot and Professor of Media Studies at Northeastern University, Meredith D. Clark about how Black Twitter has changed the narrative around policing, its influence on elections, how Black Twitter bailed Michael out of jail, and why Roy has a 36-hour tweet rule.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

You're Great with Unique Hammond
Stevie Smith- Bloodwork

You're Great with Unique Hammond

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 45:08


In this episode, I sit with Stevie Smith, a registered Dietitian from InsideTracker, to talk about all things bloodwork. I partnered with InsideTracker because I realized not all bloodwork is created equal, and InsideTracker met my high standards as they test optimal ranges for our biomarkers. I like the idea of optimal for myself and my clients. Hey, I've got my long-term health goals of no flares for life, and I want to ensure my biomarkers are on point.I tried out InsideTracker on myself and was so taken by the experience that I signed on immediately to offer it to my wonderful clients! Also, tracking bloodwork for my clients was a great way to show how diet alone can make such a significant impact. I also love that InsideTracker has a great app and gives you food options for bringing up your biomarkers. As you know, I am food forward or food first. I have been off supplements for 10 years, and yep, food has been enough despite the rhetoric that our food is depleted of nutrients. Kinda wild, right? Anyway, I hope you enjoy our chat!Interested in trying InsideTracker? You can get 25% off w/code: UNIQUEPRO25INSIDETRACKERStevie Smith is an experienced Registered Dietitian, board certified in sports nutrition, with a demonstrated history of working with individuals, groups, and also in clinical settings. In her work with InsideTracker, Stevie helps athletes like Shalane Flanagan use the platform's analysis of blood biometrics, DNA insights and fitness tracker data to create science-backed recommendations for nutrition and lifestyle interventions and optimize for strength, endurance and longevity. She holds a Bachelor of Science (BS) focused in Dietetics and Nutrition from State University of New York College at Buffalo and Masters of Science (MS) in Applied Nutrition with a sports and fitness concentration from Northeastern University.

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Author Michael Patrick MacDonald

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 53:09


Michael Patrick MacDonald grew up in the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston, a neighborhood that held the highest concentration of white poverty in the United States. After losing four of his eleven siblings and seeing his generation decimated by poverty, crime, addiction, and incarceration, he learned to transform personal and community trauma by becoming a leading Boston activist, organizer and writer. McDonald serves as Author-in-Residence & Professor of the Practice at Northeastern University's Honors Department, where he teaches his curricula: “Non-Fiction Writing & Social Justice Issues” and “The North of Ireland: Colonialism, Armed Resistance and the Struggle for Peace with Justice" every fall. Regular contributor to the program Michael Patrick MacDonald is the author of the book All Souls: A Family Story From Southie and the acclaimed Easter Rising: A Memoir of Roots and Rebellion. On this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large, activist Michael Patrick McDonald will focus on Queen Elizabeth's Complicated Relationship with Ireland, Britain's First Colony on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

AlertsUSA Homeland Security Weekly Update
Homeland Security Weekly Update - Sept 17, 2022

AlertsUSA Homeland Security Weekly Update

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 6:46


In this week's update we look at the curious situation surrounding an exploding shipping case at the virtual reality center at Northeastern University in Boston, as well as provide an update on events in Ukraine and on the Korean Peninsula. An expanded written version of this report can be found within our weekly Threat Journal email newsletter. You can subscribe for FREE by simply visiting https://www.ThreatJournal.com . A link to this issue will immediately be sent to you via email.AlertsUSA Homepagehttp://www.AlertsUSA.com – (Emergency Alerts for Mobile Devices) Now in our 20th year!AlertsUSA on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/alertsusaAlertsUSA on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/alertsusaThreat Journal on Gettrhttps://gettr.com/user/threatjournalThreat Journal on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/threatjournalThreat Journal Homepage (For Daily News)https://www.ThreatJournal.com

Podcast Talent Coach
Build Your Marketing Strategy With Chioma Njoku – PTC 406

Podcast Talent Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 51:10


Many podcast experts will teach you how to launch your podcast. Some try to help you monetize the show. But, they are all missing your marketing strategy. Chi's Podcast "Cheers to Your Prosperity" HERE Find Chi the Mindful Bookkeeper at HERE Enroll in podcast training "How To Grow Your Audience" HERE The experts want you to believe you should grow your audience large enough to land some sponsors. That is the biggest mistake you could make. When looking for a traditional sponsor, you need more than 5,000 downloads per episode. According to Rob Walch, VP of Podcaster Relations at Libsyn, the July 2022 statistics across all Libsyn podcasts shows the median downloads is 165 downloads per episode. The median is the middle. If you stack them up smallest to largest, the one right in the middle is the median. Therefore if you are getting more than 165 downloads an episode, you are better than 50% of all podcasts. Only 8% of all podcasts on Libsyn get more than 5,000. That means the other 92% of us aren't playing in the sponsor atmosphere. Only 20% of all podcasts get more than 1,300 downloads per episode. We need to devise another way to monetize our show. Chasing sponsors is a waste of time for you. Instead, use your podcast as a marketing tool for your business. Incorporate it into the rest of your marketing to attract your ideal clients or market your affiliate products and services. Before we get into the most effective way to use your podcast, let's talk about growing your audience. Even though we aren't looking to attract sponsors, the larger our audience the more effective our call to action will be. GROW YOUR AUDIENCE If you would like to grow your audience, join me for a free workshop. It's called "How To Grow Your Audience In 30 Days Or Less". It happens online Thursday, September 22nd. You will discover… The exact step-by-step process to fill your audience with your ideal clients The most effective way to get new listeners and increase your downloads How to overcome the common challenges podcasters face to get results quickly You can get registered at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com/training. If you're like most podcasters, you have struggled to grow your audience. It has been a challenge to fill your pipeline with qualified prospects for your business. I know you don't want to spend a ton of money on ads that don't work. Let me help. I'll show you a much more effective process without throwing away good money. Join us on Thursday, September 22nd at 2pm Central Time, Noon Pacific Time. Register at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com/training. Let's build your growth strategy. PODCAST MARKETING FUNNEL While you are growing your audience, you need to also be growing the business. I'm sure you've heard of a marketing funnel. You bring people into your world by making them aware of you. They are given content to make them interested in what you have to offer. Once they are interested, you get them engaged by getting them to take action. Finally, you convert the engaged into clients. It is a marketing funnel. Fewer people move through to each level making the process look like a funnel. The first step is awareness. Everything you do to make people aware of you and familiar with what you do, who you help and what you help them do sits at the top of the marketing funnel. Awareness activities include blog posts, social media, website, search, newsletters, marketing campaigns, conversations, media mentions and a variety of others. This is where your podcast sits. Use the podcast as part of the marketing strategy to make people aware of who you are, who you help and what you help them do. Create your marketing plan and incorporate it into your business. Maintain a consistent message and call to action in all of your marketing pieces. When people become aware of you through any of these methods, get them on your email list, not to your podcast. If they listen to your show without subscribing and never come back, they are gone forever. You can no longer reach them. If these new people get on your email list, you can now email them every time you release a new episode until they unsubscribe from the list. You can now nurture the relationship and get them to subscribe to your podcast. CHIOMA NJOKU Chioma Njoku helps entrepreneurs with their bookkeeping as founder of the Mindful Bookkeeper. She is a lifestyle accountant, intuitive financial coach, and a cash flow warrior on a mission to help more amazing souls prosper. Chioma has been an accountant for over thirteen years. She has a BA in economics from Northwestern University. She also holds an MBA as well as a Master of Science degree in Accounting from Northeastern University. Her podcast is "Cheers to Your Prosperity". You can find Chi, her podcast, and the Mindful Bookkeeper at https://www.themindfulbookkeeper.com. Today, we help Chi find ways to incorporate her podcast into the marketing plan of the Mindful Bookkeeper and grow the audience in a methodical way. Enjoy my coaching session with Chi Njoku. NEXT WEEK Thanks for being here this week. Don't forget to get registered for my next workshop "How To Grow Your Audience In 30 Days Or Less". It happens online Thursday, September 22nd. You will discover… The exact step-by-step process to fill your audience with your ideal clients The most effective way to get new listeners and increase your downloads How to overcome the common challenges podcasters face to get results quickly You can get registered at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com/training. I look forward to seeing you there. Do you struggle with producing your show on a consistent basis? Getting your show published every week can sometimes be a challenge. Next week, I will show you how to create a production process that makes it easy to create an episode with regularity. You will also get another sneak peek at a podcast coaching session where we help Ryan Fairbanks create a process that allows him to publish an episode each week, create great lead magnets and attract his ideal clients. I'll see you next week. If you don't have a mentor who can take your hand and walk you every step of the way, go to www.PodcastTalentCoach.com/apply, click the button and apply to have a chat with me. We will develop your plan and see how I can help and support you to achieve your podcast goals.

Beat the Press
Beat The Press with Emily Rooney - Episode 16: Queen Elizabeth passes and news media around the world takes over, CNN in a state of change and turmoil, an escalation of violence against American journalists, and a tween pitcher suggests ESPN is controllin

Beat the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 38:17 Transcription Available


On this episode of Beat the Press, former NECN anchor Mike Nikitas fills in for Emily Rooney to discuss the media coverage of the death of Queen Elizabeth II, the ongoing changes at CNN, the safety of journalists following the murder of Las Vegas investigative reporter Jeff German, and how a hot mic at the ESPN Little League World Series shows how far distrust of the media has gone.  Joining Mike on this episode are media consultant Susie Banikarim, Joanna Weiss of Experience Magazine, and Dan Kennedy of Northeastern University.

Accepted: A College Admissions Podcast
#83 - Interview with a Northeastern University Student

Accepted: A College Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 30:12


This week, Tyler sits down with one of his former students, Hana, currently studying at Northeastern University. They discuss major selection, internships and how to get the most out of high school in preparation for college. 

Engadget
The verdict on the iPhone 14 and 14 Pro

Engadget

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 4:22


Northeastern University targeted by anti-VR bomber, The verdict on the iPhone 14 and 14 Pro, ‘The Sims 4' will be free to play starting next month.

Engadget Morning Edition
The verdict on the iPhone 14 and 14 Pro

Engadget Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 4:22


Northeastern University targeted by anti-VR bomber, The verdict on the iPhone 14 and 14 Pro, ‘The Sims 4' will be free to play starting next month.

The Weekly Wrap-Up with J Cleveland Payne
Things You Might Not Have Heard For September 15, 2022

The Weekly Wrap-Up with J Cleveland Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 30:09


Today Featuring: R. Kelly, Adnan Syed, Prince Harry, and more... Today's Sponsor: YouTubeTVhttp://thisistheconversationproject.com/youtubetvToday's Rundown:Injuries, note suggest reported explosion at Northeastern University may be a hoaxhttps://www.cbsnews.com/boston/news/northeastern-university-boston-suspicious-package-explosion-college-note-virtual-reality-mark-zuckerberg/Texts reportedly show Brett Favre seeking millions in federal welfare funds for Southern Miss volleyball stadiumhttps://sports.yahoo.com/texts-reportedly-show-brett-favre-seeking-millions-in-welfare-funds-for-southern-miss-volleyball-stadium-182548071.htmlBaltimore prosecutors move to vacate Adnan Syed conviction in 1999 murder case brought to national fame in ‘Serial' podcasthttps://www.npr.org/2022/09/14/1123039224/serial-podcast-adnan-syed-murder-convictionIn a surprise, the defense rests early in the Parkland school shooting trialhttps://wusfnews.wusf.usf.edu/courts-law/2022-09-14/in-a-surprise-the-defense-rests-early-in-the-parkland-school-shooting-trialLatino San Francisco cop branded ‘racist' for arresting Hispanic drug dealers in San Franciscohttps://nypost.com/2022/09/13/latino-sfpd-cop-branded-racist-for-arresting-hispanic-drug-dealers/Former US ambassador Bill Richardson attends meetings in Russia amid Brittney Griner's detentionhttps://www.foxnews.com/sports/former-us-ambassador-bill-richardson-attends-meetings-russia-amid-brittney-griners-detention-reportR. Kelly Guilty of Child Pornography in Illinois Federal Trial, Not Guilty on Other Chargeshttps://www.tmz.com/2022/09/14/r-kelly-guilty-verdict-federal-trial-child-pornography-chicago-illinois/R&B singer Jesse Powell dies at 51https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/rb-singer-jesse-powell-dies-51-rcna47692The CW's Gotham Knights Series Officially Starts Productionhttps://www.superherohype.com/tv/519123-the-cws-gotham-knights-series-officially-starts-productionTaco Bell brings Mexican Pizza back this week - supposedly for good, this timehttps://ktla.com/news/taco-bell-brings-mexican-pizza-back-this-week-supposedly-for-good-this-time/Millions of borrowers may be eligible for a refund on student loan payments made https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamminsky/2022/09/14/millions-of-student-loan-borrowers-will-get-refunds-of-payments-under-bidens-loan-forgiveness-initiative/?sh=30cf3208233dWebsite: http://thisistheconversationproject.comFacebook: http://facebook.com/thisistheconversationprojectTwitter: http://twitter.com/th_conversationTikTok: http://tiktok.com/@theconversationprojectYouTube: http://thisistheconversationproject.com/youtubePodcast: http://thisistheconversationproject.com/podcasts#yournewssidepiece #coffeechat #morningnewsSeptember 15 Birthdays Include: Tommy Lee Jones (76)Oliver Stone (76)Prince Harry (38) Plus, Today We Celebrate: "Someday" https://www.checkiday.com/9928cf84a43ea53f72763cea0745c06e/someday

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

¿Se puede erradicar a los mosquitos? / Instagram sufre para replicar TikTok / Móviles 5G superan a los 4G / Los Sims 4 será gratuito / Vulnerabilidad en Microsoft Teams Patrocinador: En las estaciones de servicio de BP puedes conseguir un ahorro de hasta 40 céntimos por litro y participar en el sorteo de 1.000 repostajes gratis cada día. Descárgate la app Mi BP para tu Android o iPhone, y úsala cuando vayas a repostar BP Ultimate con tecnología Active. — Lo mejor para tu coche y tu bolsillo. ¿Se puede erradicar a los mosquitos? / Instagram sufre para replicar TikTok / Móviles 5G superan a los 4G / Los Sims 4 será gratuito / Vulnerabilidad en Microsoft Teams

The Loop
Morning Report: Thursday, September 15, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 7:05


Two planes drop off fifty migrants at Martha's Vineyard, the explosion at Northeastern University is likely a hoax and a tentative deal averts a strike on the nation's railways Five minutes of news that will keep you in "The Loop."

5 Things
Why doctors struggle to identify treatments for long COVID

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 12:22 Very Popular


Patient safety reporter Karen Weintraub reports. Plus, President Joe Biden praises inflation legislation despite concerning numbers, the Jan. 6 House panel sets a date for its next hearing, money reporter Terry Collins explains how coding boot camps offer a career switch and a package explodes at Northeastern University.(Audio: Associated Press)Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Kirk Minihane Show
Thrice Weekly Podcast

The Kirk Minihane Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 133:11 Very Popular


A package exploded at Northeastern University last night and people like Rex Chapman immediately politicize the incident (00:10:00). Steve Robinson pitches Kirk and his "thrice weekly podcast" to a literary agent (00:07:00). Harrison is back in the fold to handle social media (00:11:00). Steve Snell really hates Dave (00:14:30). Fred Couples is doing interviews... Just only with friends like George Brett (00:43:00). Max Kellerman apologizes to Albert Pujols (00:49:45). A teacher is fired to defending "MAPS" - Minor Attracted Persons (01:13:45). Episode 1 of Barstool Mini Golf is released, Kirk appears on The Dave Portnoy Show & much more.

The GetUp Crew
GetUp Crew: What's Hot and Trending (Wednesday,9/14)

The GetUp Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 10:35


A package explodes on the campus of Northeastern University, Leo and Gigi are official. Dionne Warwick makes hilarious comment about his 25 year rule

CBS This Morning - News on the Go
9/14: Stocks look to rebound after suffering through worst day since 2020. Twitter whistleblower accuses company of putting its users at risk.

CBS This Morning - News on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 15:40


Wall Street plunges on worse-than-expected news on prices -- even as President Biden celebrates his Inflation Reduction Act. At the same time, there's a looming threat of a railway strike, which could have a big impact on supply chains. In London this morning, huge crowds have gathered to see Queen Elizabeth's coffin carried in a grand procession through the city this morning. Senator Lindsey Graham proposes a nationwide abortion ban -- after fifteen weeks of pregnancy. In Boston, an investigation is underway after a package exploded on the campus of Northeastern University. Police say a 45-year-old university staff member suffered "minor hand injuries" in the blast. This morning, Ukraine's army is regaining more Russian-held territory, and the country's president is celebrating. Twitter's former head of security is telling Congress the social media platform has put its users at risk. Ken Starr, who led the Whitewater investigation that brought the House to impeach President Bill Clinton, died yesterday in a Houston hospital.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Gary and Shannon
(09/14) GAS Hour 1 - Queens Procession & #WhatchaWatchinWednesday

Gary and Shannon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 27:31


Shannon is out and Marla Tellez from Fox 11 fills in. Heathrow Airport cancels flights to keep London quiet for the Queens procession. One person is injured at Northeastern University in Boston after a package detonated on the campus. #WhatchaWatchinWednesday.

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv End of COVID pandemic is in sight WHO chief Bogus Supervisor Sheila Kuehl blasts search warrant served at her home CBS Los Angeles Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk Adnan Syed Prosecutors seek new trial in Serial podcast case Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace Pieper Lewis GoFundMe soars past 150,000 she must pay estate of accused rapist she killed Pelosi mocks GOP on abortion Life begins at the candlelight dinner Little Mermaid Halle Bailey in awe of childrens reaction to Disney trailer Ukraine war Olaf Scholz says Vladimir Putin does not see war as mistake US midterms 2022 Tracking Trumps extraordinary endorsement spree R. Kelly Disgraced R and B star guilty of child abuse Live updates Russias war in Ukraine Republican primary for Senate in New Hampshire too close to call between Bolduc, Morse Update on Northeastern University explosion WPRI Don Bolduc Pro Trump candidate wins New Hampshire primary CNN cuts away from Biden inflation reduction party as stocks plunge Magdalena Andersson Swedish PM resigns as right wing parties win vote Baltimore prosecutors move to vacate Adnan Syed conviction in 1999 murder case brought to national fame in Serial podcast Queen Elizabeth II lies in state as throngs pay respects Ethereum Merge A cryptocurrency going green

News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Adnan Syed Prosecutors seek new trial in Serial podcast case Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk Ethereum Merge A cryptocurrency going green Ukraine war Olaf Scholz says Vladimir Putin does not see war as mistake Update on Northeastern University explosion WPRI Republican primary for Senate in New Hampshire too close to call between Bolduc, Morse Queen Elizabeth II lies in state as throngs pay respects Live updates Russias war in Ukraine Magdalena Andersson Swedish PM resigns as right wing parties win vote Bogus Supervisor Sheila Kuehl blasts search warrant served at her home CBS Los Angeles End of COVID pandemic is in sight WHO chief R. Kelly Disgraced R and B star guilty of child abuse CNN cuts away from Biden inflation reduction party as stocks plunge US midterms 2022 Tracking Trumps extraordinary endorsement spree Pelosi mocks GOP on abortion Life begins at the candlelight dinner Little Mermaid Halle Bailey in awe of childrens reaction to Disney trailer Pieper Lewis GoFundMe soars past 150,000 she must pay estate of accused rapist she killed Baltimore prosecutors move to vacate Adnan Syed conviction in 1999 murder case brought to national fame in Serial podcast Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace Don Bolduc Pro Trump candidate wins New Hampshire primary

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
FBI Investigating After Package Explodes At Northeastern University

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 0:38


World News Roundup
World News Roundup: 09/14

World News Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 7:40


Negotiators try to head off a railroad strike. Investors on edge after stock plunge. Northeastern University package explosion. CBS News Correspondent Steve Kathan has today's World News Roundup.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Loop
Afternoon Report: Wednesday, September 14, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 6:38


Investigators are looking into whether the Northeastern University explosion was a hoax. An MBTA oversight panel hears that it will take years to make the system better. Animal cruelty charges against a Rowley kennel owner. 5 minutes of news that will keep you in The Loop.

The Loop
Mid Day Report: Wednesday, September 14, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 7:13


Lawmakers gather on Beacon Hill to look at safety on the MBTA, students at Northeastern University return to class after a hectic night on campus and a Quincy landmark has a new name. Five minutes of news that will keep you in "The Loop."

The Loop
Morning Report: Wednesday, September 14, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 6:55


The campus at Northeastern University is expected to be open after a package exploded last night, oversight hearing for the T on Beacon Hill today and local t-shirt entrepreneurs open up shop. Five minutes of news that will keep you in "The Loop."

News Headlines in Morse Code at 25 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Magdalena Andersson Swedish PM resigns as right wing parties win vote Adnan Syed Prosecutors seek new trial in Serial podcast case Clarence House staff told jobs are at risk Little Mermaid Halle Bailey in awe of childrens reaction to Disney trailer Update on Northeastern University explosion WPRI Queen Elizabeth II lies in state as throngs pay respects CNN cuts away from Biden inflation reduction party as stocks plunge Pelosi mocks GOP on abortion Life begins at the candlelight dinner Don Bolduc Pro Trump candidate wins New Hampshire primary R. Kelly Disgraced R and B star guilty of child abuse US midterms 2022 Tracking Trumps extraordinary endorsement spree Ethereum Merge A cryptocurrency going green End of COVID pandemic is in sight WHO chief Pieper Lewis GoFundMe soars past 150,000 she must pay estate of accused rapist she killed Republican primary for Senate in New Hampshire too close to call between Bolduc, Morse Kharkiv offensive Ukraine targets Donbas as advance gathers pace Baltimore prosecutors move to vacate Adnan Syed conviction in 1999 murder case brought to national fame in Serial podcast Bogus Supervisor Sheila Kuehl blasts search warrant served at her home CBS Los Angeles Ukraine war Olaf Scholz says Vladimir Putin does not see war as mistake Live updates Russias war in Ukraine

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy
West Coast Cookbook and Speakeasy - Smothered Benedict Wednesdays 14 Sept 22

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 63:12


West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy is Now Open! 8am-9am PT/ 11am-Noon ET for our especially special Daily Specials, Smothered Benedict Wednesdays!Starting off in the Bistro Cafe, more portions of the Mar-a-Lago search warrant affidavit have been unsealed.Then, on the rest of the menu, the FBI is investigating a package bomb explosion that injured one at Northeastern University in Boston, and another suspicious package at a prominent Arts college; an independent commission recommended that the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery be removed; and, the rubberstamp Tennessee Charter School Commission expressed alarm as local school officials vote down charter schools affiliated with MAGA darling, Hillsdale College.After the break, we move to the Chef's Table where lights on the Eiffel Tower will soon be turned off more than an hour earlier at night to save energy; and, Twitter's former security chief told Congress that both China and India had agents working for the social media company.All that and more, on West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy with Chef de Cuisine Justice Putnam.Bon Appétit!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"To those of us who believe that all of life is sacred every crumb of bread and sip of wine is a Eucharist, a remembrance, a call to awareness of holiness right where we are. I want all of the holiness of the Eucharist to spill out beyond church walls, out of the hands of priests and into the regular streets and sidewalks, into the hands of regular, grubby people like you and me, onto our tables, in our kitchens and dining rooms and backyards.” -- Shauna Niequist "Bread and Wine: A Love Letter to Life Around the Table with Recipes"~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Show Notes & Links:https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2022/9/14/2122734/-West-Coast-Cookbook-amp-Speakeasy-Daily-Special-Smothered-Benedict-Wednesdays

Badass Confidence Coach
097. How to Microdose Bravery with Dr. Kristen Lee

Badass Confidence Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 57:45


This week's episode is with Dr. Kris around the science of behavioral change.  I loved this conversation! When we take those small, everyday risks in life we start to develop a deeper sense of bravery within ourselves.  Dr. Kris is an internationally recognized, award-winning behavioral science clinician, researcher, educator, speaker, and comedian from Boston, Massachusetts. As the Lead Faculty for Behavioral Science and Faculty-in-Residence at Northeastern University, Dr. Kris's research and teaching interests include individual and organizational well-being and resilience, particularly for marginalized and underserved populations.  Dr. Kris works with organizations and leaders around the world on how to use the science of behavioral change and human potential to build healthy mental health cultures that help prevent burnout and promote organizational and human sustainability.  She is the author of RESET: Make the Most of Your Stress, winner of the Next Generation Indie Book Awards Motivational Book of 2015, best-selling Mentalligence: A New Psychology of Thinking-Learn What it Takes to be More Agile, Mindful and Connected in Today's World and Worth the Risk: Learn to Microdose Bravery to Grow Resilience, Connect More, and Offer Yourself to the World, a 2022 Next Big Idea Book Club nominee. She is the host of Crackin' Up: Where Therapy Meets Comedy and is a regular contributor to Psychology Today and Thrive Global. Dr. Kris's work has been featured at Harvard and on NPR, Fast Company, Forbes, and CBS radio. Her TedX talk, The Risk You Must Take (425K views)  is featured on Ted.  In her spare time, she can be found out on the running trails, attempting tricky yoga poses, eating peanut butter cups and drinking kale juice—but not all at once. Connect with her at www.kristenlee.com or @TheRealDrKris (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat).  

The Classical Ideas Podcast
EP 251: Stealing My Religion w/Dr. Liz Bucar

The Classical Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 45:00


Dr. Elizabeth Bucar is the Director of Sacred Writes, Professor of Religion, and Dean's Leadership Fellow at Northeastern University. An expert in comparative religious ethics who has published on topics ranging from gender reassignment surgery to the global politics of modest clothing, Bucar's current book, Stealing My Religion: Not Just Any Cultural Appropriation, is on the ethics of religious appropriation. She is also the author of the award-winning trade book, Pious Fashion: How Muslim Women Dress (Harvard University Press, 2017). Bucar's public scholarship includes bylines in The Atlantic, The Los Angeles Times, Teen Vogue, and Zocalo Public Square as well as several podcasts. She has a PhD in religious ethics from the University of Chicago's Divinity School. Follow her on Twitter @BucarLiz.   Link to her Pious Fashion episode on NBN: https://newbooksnetwork.com/141-on-pious-fashion-and-muslim-women

Fit Cookie Nutrition Podcast
All About Stress Fractures with Dr. Regi DeGeorges

Fit Cookie Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 58:33 Very Popular


In this episode, I chat with physical therapist Dr. Regi DeGeorges about stress fractures in runners. Regi is a Southern California bred surfer and soccer player and traded coasts after gaining her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Northeastern University. Do you have ACL injuries, running pain, or hurt yourself doing a board sport? Regi's got you. She loves working with female athletes and is Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist in which she utilizes principles of safe and effective loading in addition to manual techniques to help you take an active role in your recovery. Dr. DeGeorge's goal is to get you back in the gym, on the roads, on the mountain, or in the water stronger than ever. Thank you to The Feed for sponsoring this episode of the show! For 15% off your order, use code FITCOOKIE15 at checkout.

The Gestalt Education Show
Clinical Savant Series: Brad Scott, Atlanta Braves Head Performance Coach

The Gestalt Education Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 37:23


Brad Scott is known in baseball for his ability to manage his players' workload and connect with players on a personal level. Brad Scott, Head Performance Coach for the Atlanta Braves, just completed his 21st year in strength and conditioning and 7th in professional baseball (2016 – 2022). Before assuming his current position, Brad was extensively involved in collegiate sports. After graduating from the University of Massachusetts – Boston in 2001, he gained experience in strength and conditioning first as an Intern Assistant at Northeastern University in Boston 2001 and then as a graduate assistant at the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ from 2002-2004. He worked as the Assistant Director of Strength and Conditioning at Velocity Sports Performance in Irvine California (2004-2005) before becoming the Director of Strength and Conditioning at California State University Northridge in Los Angeles in 2005. In 2006, he became Director of Strength and Conditioning for Men's and Women's Basketball and Volleyball at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. In 2007, he became the Associate Athletics Director / Director of Athletic Performance at the University of Portland, a position he held for 10 years before joining the Braves in 2016. Enjoy! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gestalt-education/support

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 96: The People Side of Lean

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 49:37


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. The topic is "The People Side of Lean." Our guest is Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way (https://www.amazon.com/Toyota-Way-Management-Principles-Manufacturer/dp/B09BDC3525/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2JABTVWQBAZC8&keywords=the+toyota+way&qid=1661872838&sprefix=the+toyot%2Caps%2C107&sr=8-1). In this conversation, we talk about how to develop internal organizational capability and problem-solving skills on the frontline. If you liked this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Lean is about motivating people to succeed in an industrial organization more than it is about a bundle of techniques to avoid waste on a factory production line. The goal is to have workers always asking themselves if there is a better way. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is the People Side of Lean. Our guest is Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way. In this conversation, we talk about how to develop internal organizational capability, problem-solving skills on the frontline. Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Jeffrey, how are you? Welcome to the podcast. JEFFREY: Thank you. TROND: So I think some people in this audience will have read your book or have heard of your book and your books but especially the one that I mentioned, Toyota. So I think we'll talk about that a little bit. But you started out as an engineering undergrad at Northeastern, and you got yourself a Ph.D. in sociology. And then I've been reading up on you and listening to some of the stuff on the musical side of things. I think we both are guitarists. JEFFREY: Oh, is that right? TROND: Yeah, yeah, classical guitar in my case. So I was wondering about that. JEFFREY: So I play also a classical guitar now. I played folk and rock earlier when I was young. But for the last more than ten years, I've been only studying classical guitar. TROND: Well, so then we share a bunch of hours practicing the etude, so Fernando Sor, and eventually getting to the Villa-Lobos stuff. So the reason I bring that up, of course, beyond it's wonderful to talk about this kind of stuff with, you know, there aren't that many classical guitarists out there. But you said something that I thought maybe you could comment on later. But this idea of what happened to you during your studies of classical guitar actually plays into what you later brought into your professional life in terms of teaching you something about practicing in particular ways. So I hope you can get into that. But obviously, you've then become a professor. You are a speaker and an advisor, and an author of this bestseller, The Toyota Way. Now you run some consulting. And I guess I'm curious; this was a very, very brief attempt at summarizing where you got into this. What was it that brought you into manufacturing in the first place? I mean, surely, it wasn't just classical guitar because that's not a linear path. [laughs] JEFFREY: No. So for undergraduate, I had basically studied industrial engineering because I didn't really know what I wanted to do with my life. And my father was an engineer. And then I literally took a course catalog and just started reading the descriptions of different kinds of engineering. And industrial engineering was the only one that mentioned people. And in theory, industrial engineering is a systems perspective which integrates people, materials, methods, machines, the four Ms. And in the description from Northeastern University, they said it's as much about human organization as it is about tools and techniques. So that appealed to me. When I got to Northeastern...I was not a particularly good high school student. So I didn't have a lot of choices of what colleges I went to, so Northeastern was pretty easy to get into. But they had a cooperative education program where you go to school, and you work. You go back and forth between school and work and had a pretty elaborate system for setting you up with jobs. I got one of the better jobs, which was at a company called General Foods Corporation at the time, and they make things like Jell-O, and Gravy Train dog food, and Birds Eye vegetables, and a lot of other household names, Kool-Aid, all automated processes, even at that time in the 1970s. And they had been experimenting with something called socio-technical systems, which is supposed to be what I was interested in, which is bringing together the social and technical, which no one at Northeastern University had any interest in except me. But I was very interested in this dog food plant where they were written up as a case study pioneer. And the basic essence of it was to give groups of people who are responsible, for example, for some automated processes to make a certain line of Gravy Train dog food, give them responsibility for all their processes, and they called them autonomous workgroups. And what we try to do is as much as possible, give them all the responsibility so they can work autonomously without having to go and find the engineer or deal with other support functions, which takes time and is kind of a waste. So that fascinated me. I studied it. I wrote papers about it even in courses where it didn't fit. But the closest I could get to the social side was through sociology courses which I took as soon as I was able to take electives, which was about my third year. And I got to know a sociology professor closely and ultimately decided to get a Ph.D. in sociology and did that successfully, published papers in sociology journals at a pretty high level. And then discovered it was really hard to get a job. TROND: Right. [laughs] JEFFREY: And there happened to be an advertisement from an industrial engineering department at University of Michigan for someone with a Ph.D. in a social science and an undergraduate degree in industrial engineering. And I was probably the only person in the world that fit the job. And they were so excited to hear from me because they had almost given up. And I ended up getting that job quickly then getting to Michigan excited because it's a great university. I had a low teaching load. They paid more than sociology departments. So it was like a dream job. Except once I got there, I realized that I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing [chuckles] because it wasn't a sociology department. And I had gotten away from industry. In fact, I was studying family development and life's course development, and more personal psychology and sociology stuff. So I was as far away as I could be. So I had to kind of figure out what to do next. And fortunately, being at Michigan and also being unique, a lot of people contacted me and wanted me to be part of their projects. And one of them was a U.S.-Japan auto study comparing the U.S.-Japan auto industry going at the same time as a study at MIT and Harvard that ultimately led to the book The Machine That Changed the World, which defined lean manufacturing. So this was sort of a competitive program. And they asked me to be part of it, and that's what led to my learning about Toyota. I mean, I studied Toyota, Nissan, Mazda mainly and compared them to GM, Ford, and Chrysler. But it was clear that Toyota was different and special. And ultimately, then I learned about the Toyota Production System. And from my perspective, not from people in Toyota, but from my perspective, what they had done is really solve the problem of socio-technical systems. Because what I was seeing at General Foods was workers who were responsible for technical process and then were given autonomy to run the process, but there was nothing really socio-technical about it. There was a technical system, and then there was social system autonomous work groups and not particularly connected in a certain way. But the Toyota Production System truly was a system that was designed to integrate people with the technical system, which included things like stamping, and welding, and painting, which were fairly automated as well as assembly, which is purely manual. And Toyota had developed this back in the 1940s when it was a lone company and then continued to evolve it. And the main pillars are just-in-time and built-in quality. They have a house, and then the foundation is stable and standardized processes. And in the center are people who are continuously improving. Now, the socio-technical part the connection is that just-in-time for Toyota means that we're trying to flow value to the customer without interruption. So if what they do is turn raw materials into cars that you drive, then anything that's turning material into a component or car physically is value-added, and everything else is waste. And so things like defects where you have to do rework are waste. And machines are shut down, so we have to wait for the machines to get fixed; that's waste. And inventory sitting in piles doing nothing is waste. So the opposite of waste is a perfect process. And Toyota also was smart enough, and all that they figured out was more like folk learning or craft learning. It was learning from doing and experience and common sense. And they didn't particularly care about linking it to academic theories or learning from academic theories, for that matter. So their common sense view is that the world is complicated. Humans are really bad at predicting the future. So the best we can do is to get in the ballpark with what we think is a good process and then run it and see how it fails. And then the failures are what lead to then the connection of people who have to solve the problems through creative thinking. So that was the integration that I did not see before that. TROND: Just one thing that strikes me...because nowadays, comparing the U.S. or Europe and Asia in terms of business practices, it's sort of like, oh, of course, you have to compare them because they are culturally different. But it strikes me that in the automotive industry, was it immediately really clear to you at the outset that there would be such striking differences between the Japanese and the U.S. auto industry? Or is that actually something that had to be studied? Or was it something that was known, but no one really knew exactly what the differences were? JEFFREY: So it wasn't like the American auto companies figured out that if they get good at using chopsticks, they'll be good at making cars. They weren't looking for something peculiar in Japanese culture. But they were addressing the more general problem, which was that Japanese companies were making small fuel-efficient cars at low cost with high quality. And none of the American companies could do that. The costs were higher. The quality was terrible compared to Japan. They took a long time to do everything, including developing cars. So somehow, the Japanese were purported, they weren't convinced this was true, but according to the evidence, the Japanese were purported to be better at just about everything. And the Americans wanted to know why particularly. And at that time, there had been an oil crisis, and there was a demand for small cars. The real question they were interested in is how could they make small cars that were competitive with the Japanese? So they had to understand what the Japanese were doing. Now, they realized that some of what the Japanese were doing were purely technical things that had nothing to do with culture. And then there was also a level of attention to detail and motivation that maybe was, for some reason, peculiar to Japan. But they needed to figure out how to replicate it in the United States. And then, in addition to that, they had Americans like Dr. Deming, who had gone to Japan and taught the Japanese supposedly quality control methods. And Japanese companies had taken quality control methods that were created in the United States more seriously than the American companies. So part of it was relearning what came from America to Japan and got done better. So it wasn't necessarily this kind of strange place, and how can we emulate this strange culture? TROND: Right. But that becomes then your challenge then, right? Because what you then discover is that your field is immensely important to this because what you then went on to do is...and I guess part of your consulting work has been developing internal organizational capability. These are skills that particular organizations, namely Toyota, had in Japan. So you're thinking that this then became...it's like a learning process, the Japanese learned some lessons, and then the whole rest of the automotive industry then they were trying to relearn those lessons. Is that sort of what has been happening then in the 30 years after that? JEFFREY: Yeah, the basic question was, why are they so good? Why are we so bad? And how can we get better in America? Then there were lots of answers to that question coming from different people in different places. My particular answer was that Toyota especially had developed a socio-technical system that was extremely effective, that was centered on people who were developed to have the skills of problem-solving and continuous improvement. And while the study was going on, they were doing a study out of MIT that led to The Machine That Changed the World. And around that same time, a joint venture between Toyota and General Motors had been formed called NUMMI. It was in California. And in their first year, it was launched in 1983, and in the first year, they had taken what was the worst General Motors plant in the world, with the worst attendance, the worst morale, workers who were fighting against supervisors every day, including physically fighting with them, terrible quality, and General Motors had closed the plant because it was so bad. And then, in the joint venture, they reopened the plant and took back 80% of the same workers who were like the worst of the worst of American workers. And within a year, Toyota had turned the plant around so that it was the best in North America with the best workers. TROND: That's crazy, right? Because wouldn't some of the research thesis in either your study or in the MIT study, The Machine That Changed the World, would have to have been around technology or at least some sort of ingenious plan that these people had, you know, some secret sauce that someone had? Would you say that these two research teams were surprised at finding that the people was the key to the difference here or motivating people in a different way? JEFFREY: Well, frankly, I think I probably had a better grasp that people were really the key than most other researchers because of my background and my interest in human-centered manufacturing. So I was kind of looking for that. And it was what the Toyota people would say...whenever they made a presentation or whenever you interviewed them, they would say, "People are kind of distracted by the tools and methods, but really at the center are people." And generally, most people listening to them didn't believe it, or it didn't register. Because Toyota did have cool stuff, like, for example, something called a kanban system, which is how do you move material around in the factory? They have thousands of parts that have to all be moved and orchestrated in complicated ways. And Toyota did it with physical cards. And the concept was a pulse system that the worker; when they see that they're getting low on parts, they take a card and they post it. They put it in a box, and then the material handler picks it up. And they said, okay, they need another bin of these. On my next route, I'll bring a bin of whatever cards I get. So they were replenishing the line based on a signal from the operator saying, "I need more." So it was a signal from the person who knows best what they need. And it also, from Toyota's point of view, put the employee in the driver's seat because now they're controlling their supply in addition to controlling their work process. And it didn't require that you predict the future all the time because who knows what is happening on the line and where they're backed up, and where they maybe have too many parts, and they don't need more? But the worker knows. He knows when he needs it and when he doesn't. It was kind of an ingenious system, but the fact that you had these cards moving all over the factory and thousands of parts are moving just to the right place at the right time based on these cards, that was fascinating. So a lot of the consumers were more interested in that than they were in the people aspect, even though Toyota kept talking about the people aspect. TROND: But so this is my question, then there was more than one element that they were doing right. JEFFREY: There were multiple elements, yeah. TROND: There were multiple elements. Some of them were structural or visual, famously. JEFFREY: Right. TROND: But you then started focusing, I guess, on not just the people aspect, but you started structuring that thinking because the obvious question must have been, how can we do some of this ourselves? And I guess that's my question is once you and the team started figuring out okay, there are some systematic differences here in the way they motivate people, handle the teams, but also structure, honestly, the organizational incentives minute by minute, how then did you think about transferring this? Or were you, at this point, just really concerned about describing it? JEFFREY: Like I said, I was kind of unusual in my background, being somewhere between industrial engineering and sociology and being in industrial engineering departments. So maybe I wasn't as constrained by some of the constraints of my academic colleagues. But I never believed this whole model that the university gathers information structures that formulates it, then tells the world what to do. I never thought that made any sense. And certainly, in the case of lean, it didn't, and it wasn't true. So the way that companies were learning about this stuff was from consultants, largely, and from people who had worked for Toyota. So anybody who had worked for Toyota, even if they were driving a forklift truck, in some cases, suddenly became a hot commodity. I consulted to Ford, and they were developing the Ford Production System. They were using a consulting firm, and all their consulting firm's business was to poach people from Toyota and then sell them as consultants to other companies. And that company literally had people every day of the week who were in their cars outside the gates of Toyota. And as people came out, they would start talking to them to try to find people that they could hire away from Toyota. TROND: It's funny to hear you talking about that, Jeff, right? Because in some way, you, of all people, you're a little bit to blame for the fame of Toyota in that sense. I mean, you've sold a million books with The New Toyota -- JEFFREY: Well, that was -- TROND: I'm just saying it's a phenomenon here that people obsess over a company, but you were part of creating this movement and this enormous interest in this. [laughs] JEFFREY: I didn't feel that that was...I personally had a policy because I had a consulting company too. So I personally had a policy that I would not hire somebody away from Toyota unless they were leaving anyway. That was my personal policy. But the important point was that there were a lot of really well-trained people coming out of Toyota who really understood the whole system and had lived it. And they could go to any other company and do magic, and suddenly things got better. [laughs] And what they were doing was setting up the structures and the tools, and they also were engaging the people and coaching the people. They were doing both simultaneously, and that's how they were trained. Toyota had sent an army of Japanese people to America. So every person who was in a leadership position had a one-on-one coach for years, a person whose only reason for being in the United States was to train them. So they got excellent training, and then they were able to use that training. And then other people once they had worked with a company and then that company got good at lean, then, within that company, you'd spawn more consultants change agents. Like, there was a company that I was studying called Donnelly Mirrors that made exterior mirrors for cars. And one of the persons that was trained by a Toyota person became a plant manager. And he ended up then getting offered a job as the vice president of manufacturing for Merillat Kitchen Cabinets. And now he's the CEO of the parent company that owns Merillat. And he's transformed the entire company. So little by little, this capability developed where most big companies in the world have hired people with lean experience. Sometimes it's second generation, sometimes third generation. And there are some very well-trained people. So the capability still resides within the people. And if you have someone who doesn't understand the system but they just set up a kanban system or they set up quality systems, and they try to imitate what they read in a book or what they learned in a course; usually, it doesn't work very well. TROND: Well, that was going to be my next question. Because how scalable is this beyond the initial learnings of Toyota and the fact that it has relied so heavily on consulting? Because there is sort of an alternate discourse in a lot of organizational thinking these days that says, well, not just that the people are the key to it but actually, that as a leader, however much you know or how aware you are of people processes, it is the organization itself that kind of has to find the answers. So there's perhaps some skepticism that you can come in and change a culture. Aren't there organizations that have such strong organizational practices, whether they are cultural in some meaningful way or they're simply this is the way they've done things that even one person who comes in has a hard time applying a Toyota method? What do you think about that kind of challenge? JEFFREY: Okay, so, anyway, I think what you said is...how I would interpret it is it's a gross oversimplification of reality. So first of all, in the second edition of The Toyota Way, because I realized from the first edition, which was fairly early back in the early 2000s, I realized that some people were taking my message as copy Toyota, even though I didn't say that in the book. And I specifically said not to do that, but I said it in the last chapter. So I put out the second edition a year ago, and I say it in the first page or first few pages. I say, "Don't copy Toyota," and explain why. And then, throughout the book, I say that, and then, in the end, I say, "Develop your own system." So it's probably repeated a dozen times or more with the hope that maybe somebody would then not ask me after reading it, "So, are we supposed to copy Toyota?" So the reason for that is because, as you said, you have your own culture. And you're in a different situation. You're in a different industry. You're starting in a different place. You're drawing on different labor. You have maybe plants around the world that are in different situations. So the other thing I said in the book, which is kind of interesting and counterintuitive, is I said, "Don't copy Toyota; even Toyota doesn't copy Toyota." TROND: So what does that mean? Did they really not? JEFFREY: What it means is that...because Toyota had this dilemma that they had developed this wonderful system in Japan that worked great, but they realized that in auto, you need to be global to survive. So when they set up NUMMI, that was the first experiment they did to try to bring their system to a different culture. And in reality, if you look at some of the cultural dimensions that make lean work in Japan, the U.S. is almost opposite on every one of them, like, we're the worst case. So if you were a scientist and you said, let's find the hardest place in the world to make this work and see if we can make it work, it would be the United States, particularly with General Motors workers already disaffected and turned off. So Toyota's perspective was, let's go in with a blank sheet of paper and pretend we know nothing. We know what the total production system is and what we're trying to achieve with it. But beyond that, we don't know anything about the human resource system and how to set it up. And so they hired Americans, and they coached them. But they relied a lot on Americans, including bringing back the union leader of the most militant union in America. They brought him back. TROND: Wow. JEFFREY: And said, "You're a leader for a reason. They chose you. We need your help. We're going to teach you about our system, but you need to help make it work." So that created this sort of new thing, a new organizational entity in California. And then what Toyota learned from that was not a new solution that they then brought to every other plant, whether it was Czechoslovakia, or England, or China. But rather, they realized we need to evolve a cultural system every time we set up a plant, starting with the local culture. And we need to get good at doing that, and they got good at doing it. So they have, I don't know, how many plants but over 100 plants around the world and in every culture you can imagine. And every one of them becomes the benchmark for that country as one of their best plants. And people come and visit it and are amazed by what they see. The basic principles are what I try to explain in The Toyota Way. The principles don't change. At some level, the principle is we need continuous improvement because we never know how things are going to fail until they fail. So we need to be responding to these problems as a curse. We need people at every level well trained at problem-solving. And to get people to take on that additional responsibility, we need to treat people with a high level of respect. So their model, The Toyota Way, was simply respect for people and continuous improvement. And that won't change no matter where they go. And their concept of how to teach problem-solving doesn't change. And then their vision of just-in-time one-piece flow that doesn't change, and their vision of building in quality so that you don't allow outflows of poor quality beyond your workstation that doesn't change. So there are some fundamental principles that don't change, but how exactly they are brought into the plant and what the human resource system looks like, there'll be sort of an amalgam between the Japanese model and the local model. But they, as quickly as possible, try to give local autonomy to people from that culture to become the plant managers, to become the leaders. And they develop those people; often, those people will go to Japan for periods of time. TROND: So, Jeff, I want to move to...well, you say a lot of things with Toyota don't change because they adapt locally. So my next question is going to be about future outlook. But before we get there, can we pick up on this classical guitar lesson? So you were playing classical guitar. And there was something there that, at least you said that in one interview that I picked up on, something to do with the way that guitar study is meticulous practice, which both you and I know it is. You literally will sit plucking a string sometimes to hear the sound of that string. I believe that was the example. So can you explain that again? Because, I don't know, maybe it was just me, but it resonated with me. And then you brought it back to how you actually best teach this stuff. Because you were so elaborate, but also you rolled off your tongue all these best practices of Toyota. And unless you either took your course or you are already literate in Toyota, no one can remember all these things, even though it's like six different lessons from Toyota or 14 in your book. It is a lot. But on the other hand, when you are a worker, and you're super busy with your manager or just in the line here and you're trying to pick up on all these things, you discovered with a colleague, I guess, who was building on some of your work some ways that had something in common with how you best practice classical guitar. What is that all about? JEFFREY: Well, so, first of all, like I said, the core skill that Toyota believes every person working for Toyota should have is what they call problem-solving. And that's the ability to, when they see a problem, to study what's really happening. Why is this problem occurring? And then try out ideas to close the gap between what should be happening and what is happening. And you can view that as running experiments. So the scientific mindset is one of I don't know. I need to collect the data and get the evidence. And also, I don't know if my idea works until I test it and look at what happens and study what happens. So that was very much central in Toyota. And they also would talk about on-the-job development, and they were very skeptical of any classroom teaching or any conceptual, theoretical explanations. So the way you would learn something is you'd go to the shop floor and do it with a supervisor. So the first lesson was to stand in a circle and just observe without preconceptions, kind of like playing one-string guitar. And the instructor would not tell you anything about what you should be looking for. But they would just ask you questions to try to dig deeper into what's really going on with the problems or why the problems are occurring. And the lesson length with guitar, you might be sweating after 20 minutes of intense practice. This lesson length was eight hours. So for eight hours, you're just on the shop floor taking breaks for lunch and to go to the bathroom and in the same place just watching. So that was just an introductory lesson to open your mind to be able to see what's really happening. And then they would give you a task to, say, double the productivity of an area. And you would keep on trying. They would keep on asking questions, and eventually, you would achieve it. So this on-the-job development was learning by doing. Now, later, I came to understand that the culture of Japan never really went beyond the craftsman era of the master-apprentice relationship. That's very central throughout Japan, whether you're making dolls, or you're wrapping gifts, or you're in a factory making a car. So the master-apprentice relationship system is similar to you having a guitar teacher. And then, if you start to look at modern psychology leadership books, popular leadership books, there's a fascination these days with the idea of habits, how people form habits and the role of habits in our lives. So one of my former students, Mike Rother, who had become a lean practitioner, we had worked together at Ford, for example, and was very good at introducing the tools of lean and transforming a plant. He started to observe time after time that they do great work. He would check in a few months later, and everything they had done had fallen apart and wasn't being followed anymore. And his ultimate conclusion was that what they were missing was the habit of scientific thinking that Toyota put so much effort into. But he realized that it would be a bad solution to, say, find a Toyota culture -- TROND: Right. And go study scientific thinking. Yeah, exactly. JEFFREY: Right. So he developed his own way in companies he was working with who let him experiment. He developed his own way of coaching people and developing coaches inside the company. And his ultimate vision was that every manager becomes a coach. They're a learner first, and they learn scientific thinking, then they coach others, which is what Toyota does. But he needed more structure than Toyota had because the Toyota leaders just kind of learned this over the last 25 years working in the company. And he started to create this structure of practice routines, like drills we would have in guitar. And he also had studied mastery. There's a lot of research about how do you master any complex skill, and it was 10,000 hours of practice and that idea. But what he discovered was that the key was deliberate practice, where you always know what you should be doing and comparing it to what you are doing, and then trying to close the gap. And that's what a good instructor will do is ask you to play this piece, realize that you're weak in certain areas, and then give you an exercise. And then you practice for a week and come back, and he listens again to decide whether you've mastered or not or whether he needs to go back, or we can move to the next step. So whatever complex skill you're learning, whether it's guitar, playing a sport, or learning how to cook, a good teacher will break down the skill into small pieces. And then, you will practice those pieces until you get them right. And the teacher will judge whether you got them right or not. And then when you're ready, then you move on. And then, as you collect these skills, you start to learn to make nice music that sounds good. So it turns out that Mike was developing this stuff when he came across a book on the martial arts. And they use the term kata, which is used in Japanese martial arts for these small practice routines, what you do repeatedly exactly as the master shows you. And the master won't let you move on until you've mastered that one kata. Then they'll move to the second kata and then third. And if you ask somebody in karate, "How many katas do you have?" They might say, "46," and you say, "Wow, you're really good. You've mastered 46 kata, like playing up through the 35th Sor exercise. So he developed what he called the improvement kata, which is here is how you practice scientific thinking, breaking it down into pieces, practicing each piece, and then a coaching kata for what the coach does to coach the student. And the purpose of the scientific thinking is not to publish a paper in a journal but to achieve a life goal, which could be something at work, or it could be that I want to lose weight. It could be a personal goal, or I want to get a new job that pays more and is a better job. And it becomes an exploration process of setting the goal. And then breaking down the goal into little pieces and then taking a step every day continuously toward, say, a weekly target and then setting the next week's target, and next week's target and you work your way up the mountain toward the goal. So that became known as Toyota Kata. He wrote a book called Toyota Kata. And then, I put into my model in the new Toyota Way; in the center of the model, I put scientific thinking. And I said this is really the heart and soul of The Toyota Way. And you can get this but only by going back to school, but not school where you listen to lectures but school where you have to do something, and then you're getting coached by someone who knows what they're doing, who knows how to be a coach. TROND: So my question following this, I think, will be interesting to you, or hopefully, because we've sort of gone through our conversation a little bit this way without jumping to the next step too quickly. Because the last question that I really have for you is, what are the implications of all of this? You have studied, you know, Toyota over years and then teaching academically, and in industry, you've taught these lessons. But what are the implications for the future development of, I guess, management practice in organizations, in manufacturing? Given all that you just said and what you've previously iterated about Toyota's ideas that not a lot of things change or necessarily have to change, how then should leaders go about thinking about the future? And I'm going to put in a couple of more things there into the future. I mean, even just the role of digital, the role of technology, the role of automation, all of these things, that it's not like they are the future, but they are, I guess, they are things that have started to change. And there are expectations that might have been brought into the company that these are new, very, very efficient improvement tools. But given everything that you just said about katas and the importance of practicing, how do you think and how do you teach preparing for the future of manufacturing? JEFFREY: And I have been working with a variety of companies that have developed what you might call industry 4.0 technologies, digital technologies, and I teach classes where a lot of the students are executives from companies where in some cases, they have a dual role of lean plus digitalization. So they're right at the center of these two things. And what I learned going back to my undergraduate industrial engineering days and then to my journey with Toyota, I was always interested in the centrality of people, whatever the tools are. And what I was seeing as an undergraduate was that most of the professors who were industrial engineers really didn't have much of a concept of people. They were just looking at techniques for improving efficiency as if the techniques had the power themselves. And what I discovered with people in IT, and software development, and the digital movement is often they don't seem to have a conception of people. And people from their point of view are basically bad robots [laughs] that don't do what they're supposed to do repeatedly. So the ultimate view of some of the technologists who are interested in industry 4.0 is to eliminate the people as much as possible and eliminate human judgment by, for example, putting it into artificial intelligence and having the decisions made by computers. I'm totally convinced from lots of different experiences with lots of different companies that the AI is extremely powerful and it's a breakthrough, but it's very weak compared to the human brain. And what the AI can do is to make some routine decisions, which frees up the person to deal with the bigger problems that aren't routine and can also provide useful data and even some insight that can help the person in improving the process. So I still see people as the ultimate customer for the insights that come out of this digital stuff, Internet of Things, and all that. But in some cases, they can control a machine tool and make an automatic adjustment without any human intervention, but then the machine breaks down. And then the human has to come in and solve the problem. So if you're thinking about digitalization as tools to...and sometimes have a closed loop control system without the person involved. But in addition, maybe, more importantly, to provide useful data to the human, suddenly, you have to think about the human and what makes us tick and what we respond to. And for example, it's very clear that we're much better at taking in visual information than text information. And that's one of the things that is part of the Toyota Production System is visual management. So how can you make the results of what the AI system come up with very clear and simple, and visual so people can respond quickly to the problem? And most of these systems are really not very good. The human user interface is not well designed because they're not starting with the person. And the other thing is that there are physical processes. Sometimes I kind of make a sarcastic remark, like, by the way, the Internet of Things actually includes things. TROND: [laughs] JEFFREY: And there's a different skill set for designing machines and making machines work and repairing machines than there is for designing software. There are a lot of physical things that have to go on in a factory, changing over equipment, be it for making different parts. And the vision of the technologists might be we'll automate all that, which may be true. Maybe 30 years from now, most of what I say about people will be irrelevant in a factory. I doubt it. But maybe it's 100 years from now, but it's going to be a long time. And there was an interesting study, for example, that looked at the use of robots. And they looked at across the world jobs that could be done by a human or could be done by a robot. And they found that of all the jobs that could be done by a human or a robot, 3% were done by robots, 97%...so this kind of vision of the robots driven by artificial intelligence doing the work of people is really science fiction. It's mostly fiction at this point. At some point, it might become real, but it's got a long way to go. So we still need to understand how to motivate, develop people. But particularly, the more complex the information becomes and the more information available, the more important it is to train people first of all in problem-solving and scientific thinking to use the data effectively and also to simplify the data because we're actually not very good at using a lot of data. We actually can't handle a lot of bits of data at a time like a computer can. So we need simple inputs that then allow us to use our creativity to solve the problem. And most of the companies are not doing that very well. They're offering what they call digital solutions, and I hate that term, on the assumption that somehow the digital technology is the solution. And really, what the digital technology is is just information that can be an input to humans coming up with solutions that fit their situation at that time, not generic solutions. TROND: It's fascinating that you started out with people. You went through all these experiences, and you are directly involved with digital developments. But you're still sticking to the people. We'll see how long that lasts. I think people, from the people I have interviewed, maybe self-selected here on the podcast, people and processes seem enormously important still in manufacturing. Thank you for your perspective. It's been a very rich discussion. And I hope I can bring you back. And like you said if in X number of years people are somehow less important...well, I'm sure their role will change, will adjust. But you're suspecting that no matter what kind of technology we get, there will be some role, or there should be some role for people because you think the judgment even that comes into play is going to be crucial. Is that what I'm -- JEFFREY: There's one more thing I want to add. If you look at industry 4.0, it'll list these are the elements of industry 4.0, and they're all digital technologies. But there's something that's becoming increasingly popular called industry 5.0, where they're asking what's beyond industry 4.0? Which has barely been implemented. But why not look beyond it? Because we've talked about it enough that it must be real. Once we kind of talk about something enough, we kind of lose interest in it. We want to go on to the next thing. So none of these things necessarily have been implemented very well and very broadly. But anyway, so industry 5.0 is about putting people back in the center. So I call it a rework loop. Uh-oh, we missed that the first time. Let's add it back in. TROND: So then what's going to happen if that concludes? Are we going to then go back to some new version of industry 4.0, or will it -- JEFFREY: Well, industry 4.0 is largely a bunch of companies selling stuff and then a bunch of conferences. If you go and actually visit factories, they're still making things in the same way they've always made them. And then there's a monitor that has information on a screen. And the IT person will show you that monitor, and the person on the floor may not even know what it is. But there's a disconnect between a lot of these technologies and what's actually happening on the shop floor to make stuff. And when they do have a success, they'll show you that success. You know, there's like hundreds of processes in the factory. And they'll show you the three that have industry 4.0 solutions in there. And so it's a long way before we start to see these technologies broadly, not only adopted but used effectively in a powerful way. And I think as that happens, we will notice that the companies that do the best with them have highly developed people. TROND: Fantastic. That's a good ending there. I thank you so much. I believe you've made a difference here, arguing for the continued and continuing role of people. And thank you so much for these reflections. JEFFREY: Welcome. Thank you. My pleasure. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was the People Side of Lean. Our guest was Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way. In this conversation, we talked about how to develop internal organizational capability. My takeaway is that Lean is about motivating people to succeed in an industrial organization more than it is about a bundle of techniques to avoid waste on a factory production line. The goal is to have workers always asking themselves if there is a better way. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean. Hopefully, you will find something awesome in these or in other episodes. And if you do, let us know by messaging us, and we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Jeffrey Liker.

Bigger Than Us
#204 Nick Myers, Co-Founder and CEO of Phoenix Tailings

Bigger Than Us

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 35:15 Very Popular


Nick Myers is the co-founder and CEO of Phoenix Tailings, a company building a sustainable future by refining metals from mining waste with zero direct carbon emissions or toxic byproducts. Before founding Phoenix Tailings, Nick worked in Venture Capital at Techstars and was the Director of Finance and Partnerships for Meenta, a medical diagnostic testing startup. He also co-founded Huntington Angels, a strategic angel investment group where he now serves as the lead outside adviser. Nick was also a founding member of Tengu, an early Web3 startup that created one of the first stable coins. At Tengu, Nick briefed the IMF about decentralized finance and cryptocurrencies' impact on the world economy. Nick has a Bachelor's Degree from Saint Michael's College, where he was a starting pitcher for the college's baseball team. He also has an MBA from Northeastern University. https://www.phoenixtailings.com/ https://nexuspmg.com/