Podcasts about EMT

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  • 1,377PODCASTS
  • 2,456EPISODES
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  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about EMT

Show all podcasts related to emt

Latest podcast episodes about EMT

Designing Futures
Getting To Know Angela Yeh: Part Two

Designing Futures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 49:56


On the last episode of Designing Futures, we got to listen Angela's journey and how she started her journey with her as a child empath, a middle school Dr. Ruth, and all the way to college as a rat pup EMT.   In this episode, we will hear Angela's stories of how she found out about her mentorship talent that she discovered in grad school as well as how she pivoted from being a designer and into a creative recruiter. Angela also shared with us her experiences working for other recruitment agencies and what made her decide to build her own.   Angela Yeh is a Talent Strategist, public speaker, and industry expert on career transformation. She has helped hundreds of professionals pivot their careers to success. With decades of executive career coaching and recruitment experience, Angela founded Yeh IDeology, a talent strategy consulting firm, that helps employers nurture, cultivate and evolve the best talent teams through Talent Strategies, a proprietary methodology developed to align talent to the corporate mission.   www.yehideology.com

Something to Hold Onto
Episode #61: “Short but Forever” Gregory Dunnavant

Something to Hold Onto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 61:07


This dynamite couple met on Match. What drew Cindy to Greg was his drive for life. He had so many careers. He was a sharp shooter for the special forces in the Army. He was a pilot and an ER doctor. He was the medical director for many companies but loved being the medical director and trainer over the California state parks. He taught so many life guards and EMT's setting in motion protocols that would save thousands of lives. He had an enthusiasm for life that drew Cindy to him. They traveled and had adventures together. She's so grateful for the time they had together. She misses him so much but tries to remember the good to stay positive. He influenced so many for good

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
Jerry Bowyer: The Thanksgiving Gift of Gratitude

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 1:12


Some 2,000 years ago in a letter to Rome, the Rabbi known to history as the Apostle Paul said “they did not acknowledge God, neither were they thankful.” At that time Rome had been rocked by riots and counter riots and escalating street violence. Paul didn't focus on the need for more law enforcement—though later in the letter he did affirm the need for the state to punish evil—he focused on gratitude. Rioting is ingratitude. Gratitude says, “Thank you for giving us so much that is good.” Ingratitude says—essentially—that what we have is worthless, fit only to burn down. Europe in the 20th century was the theater of violent clashes between community and fascist street mobs, and things got much worse before they got better. So, yes, we need police, national guard, firefighters, EMTs to fight the violence. We also need to get past the symptoms and to the disease itself: ingratitude. May your Thanksgiving be blessed—and filled with gratitude. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WorkPlay Solutions Podcast
Bonus Ep. 01 | Extra Time with Teddy

WorkPlay Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:53


Bonus Time with Teddy. Deleted scenes from Mailbag Questions- Part 2. Host: Mark SuroviecGuest: Teddy Sanders | Talent Acquisition Specialist, EMT, counselor, and "Sneakerhead"For more info visit www.workplaysolutions.com or email mark@workplaysolutions.comFollow us on Facebook: WorkPlaySol

WorkPlay Solutions Podcast
Ep. 09 | Mailbag Questions - Part 2 of 2. With guest Teddy Sanders

WorkPlay Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:32


Part 2 of 2. Mark and Teddy respond to listener questions, share stories, and spin the Wheel of Embarrassing Moments. What's the difference between being content and being fulfilled? What is a professional blunder you made and what did you learn from it? Tell us about a catalytic event that you still remember? How would you take pro wrestling to the next level? And more!Shoutouts and References: Host: Mark SuroviecGuest: Teddy Sanders | Talent Acquisition Specialist, EMT, counselor, and "Sneakerhead"For more info visit www.workplaysolutions.com or email mark@workplaysolutions.comFollow us on Facebook: WorkPlaySol

You Just Have To Laugh
Police Chief Jan Zimmerman keeps us SAFE

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:18


Raymore Chief of Police Jan Zimmerman began her career in law enforcement in 1979 as a dispatcher before attending the Police Academy at Kansas City and being sworn in as a Police Officer in 1982. She rose through the ranks and was ultimately promoted to Major, which was her rank when she retired to accept the Chief's position in Raymore in 2012. Chief Zimmerman holds a Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice and a Masters Degree in Public Administration from Park University. She is a proud alumnus of both the FBI National Academy in Quantico and the Southern Police Institute at the University of Louisville. Her proudest accomplishment is her family. SAFE The mission of SAFE is to provide immediate financial assistance of $25,000 to the families of Firefighters, Police Officers and EMT's who are killed or suffer career-ending injuries in the line-of-duty protecting their communities. Supported entirely through private donations and fundraising efforts, SAFE covers all first responders in 12 counties in the greater Kansas City area. Chief Zimmerman is proud to serve as the Executive Director of SAFE.

Leadership Under Fire
Miracle in Afghanistan‘s Hindu Kush with Shaun Cullen, FDNY and Air National Guard

Leadership Under Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 86:41


This episode of the Optimizing Human Performance Podcast is hosted by Leadership Under Fire Founder Jason Brezler. Our guest is Shuan Cullen, a native New Yorker who graduated from Iona College in 2001 with a Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance and International Business. He played Division 1 water polo and swam for the Gaels while attending Iona. Upon graduation, Shaun went to work for Goldman Sachs in August of 2001. He left Goldman in August of 2002 to take an EMT course and joined the ranks of the FDNY in February of 2003. Upon completion of Proby school, Shaun was assigned to 54 Engine in Midtown Manhattan. He transferred to Squad 1 in 2013, was promoted to Lieutenant in 2017 and is presently assigned to Ladder 1 in Lower Manhattan. Shaun entered the Air National Guard in 2004 and was commissioned in 2005. He completed Undergraduate Pilot Training at Laughlin AFB in Del Rio, Texas, and rotary qualification at Fort Rucker, Alabama. Upon graduation from pilot training, he was assigned to a Combat Search and Rescue/Personnel Recovery unit in Westhampton Beach, NY. Shaun made two combat deployments to Afghanistan and participated in hurricane rescue and recovery, wildfire support, NASA Shuttle launch and recovery, and civilian SAR missions.

Dreamers & Doers Podcast by Loveworks Leadership
Biz Boot Up Episode 27: Stick with it with Allen Todd and Jack's Jellies

Dreamers & Doers Podcast by Loveworks Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 19:18


While Allen was born in Oklahoma, his family relocated to Wyoming where they started their family business, Timco Service and Supply. Timco is an Oil field equipment supplier that now has offices in both Central Wyoming and Oklahoma City.  Allen started sweeping floors and dusting shelves when he was just 10 years old.  After getting married and settling down in Virginia with his wife received a call from his father to return to Wyoming to help with the family business. He knew nothing about running a business except a few classes in accounting and computers.  Blessed to have a business mentor that helped see the potential and future of the company, they expanded their products and sales efforts. Allen has successfully managed the business for over 33 years, becoming a business partner in 1994. He met his wife on a high school  mission trip to Guatemala and has two grown sons, one of which works in the family business.  In addition to running Timco, he has also served the community as an EMT, deputy coroner and as a board member for several local non-profit organizations. He currently volunteers as a business mentor for SCORE, the largest network of free volunteer small business mentors in the nation and serves at LifeChurch Moore as an Operations Team member. Jack's Jellies is a family run business started in 2021 by 4th grader Jack Rosas. Jack and his mother Erin spend a lot of time in the kitchen together cooking so when Erin showed Jack the process of making pepper jelly, Jack's Jellies was born. Jack's Jellies are homemade using a simple recipe, come in several flavors from smokey to sweet, and each batch is crafted with love.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – November 17, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 150:36


The Verve Pipe play live for us, Kelly Stafford v. 49er fans, Bezos booed, Britney Spears new found "voice", Maz checks in, President Biden visits Michigan, Young Dolph shot dead, and Lyla's streak ends.Sales are low at drewandmikestore.com. We're never doing merch again.Tom Labuda's art is kinda for sale on the web now that it's appreciated. He and Marcus tore up the strip clubs yesterday and were allowed to take pictures for some reason.Tennis star, Peng Shuai, stood up to a Chinese big shot and now she'll never be heard from again.Lyla's Joe DiMaggio's streak is back to zero.Brian Vander Ark and The Verve Pipe join the show via Zoom to promote their 9th record, Threads. Check out their new tunes.The "Brothers in Bands" list is quite impressive.Drew just found out we did a FB live today.Trudi is still recovering from the Rolling Stones concert/date.Our listeners gave us a bunch of "celebrity" phone numbers and they all suck. Send REAL celebrity numbers to 209-66-Boner.Kelly Stafford threw a pretzel at 49er fans for ragging Matthew's poor performance vs. San Francisco. She took full responsibility.MSU is looking to lock in Mel Tucker for 10 years with a contract he'll eventually break.Britney Spears finally "got her voice back" and she's over using it.Jeopardy hates Mayim Bialik.We miss Chris Harrison so much that no one even knows that The Bachelor is still on TV.The Kyle Rittenhouse verdict is still up in the air as of our recording. A cell phone video caused a ruckus.President Biden is in town visiting a GM plant. His health is being discussed just like every 80-year-old.OSHA pauses the mandates after they lost the ping pong match.Jeff Bezos donated $500,000.00 (or 4 minutes of work) and it wasn't enough.Killer Cares is back December 2nd. Meet Bran-Don, White Boy Rick and Tommy Hearns.Mike Tyson licks frogs. It sounds like Drew REALLY wants to do micro dose.Tom Mazawey joins the show to discuss Mike Utley, CFP rankings, Detroit's brand-new quarterback Tim Boyle, Mel Tucker's supposed contract and take a look at OSU vs MSU. Bill Dooley is a penis.Righteous Rick's son could use some help and prayers.Music: Vinnie Dombroski has yet ANTOHER band. Roger Daltrey beefs about the Rolling Stones. Paul McCartney called them a cover band. 60 Minutes previewed The Beatles doc out Thanksgiving on Disney+.Bloomfield Hills High School has a graffiti problem.Where has Gretchen Whitmer been? The state could use some EMT's.Tim Edmunds had a great time burning through all of the UAW's money.Young Dolph has been murdered. These dudes should be the 1st suspects.Leonardo DiCaprio is going to don the shoe polish and play Jim Jones.Kanye and Drake have squashed their beef. Drake recently dropped $1,000,000.00 at a strip club. He's also named in the $750,000,000.00 lawsuit filed by victims of the Astroworld crowd crush.Tiger King 2 is out. Trudi is watching Dexter.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Buffalo Community Podcast
#83 Wright County Frontline Outreach

Buffalo Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 33:04


Donate   https://www.wcflo.org/donateApologies for the poor audio. Technical difficulties. Wright County Frontline Outreach is a Non-Profit Organization consisting of First Responders within Wright County.  Our vision is to proactively engage with our communities through acts of kindness, charitable giving, and offering a helping hand to individuals in a time of need.  This outreach is made possible by donors who share our vision.  Wright County First Responders are working on the frontline in the service of others, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are often in a unique position to interact with and identify people in need.  We hope that these interactions will foster relationships with individuals who may otherwise harbor negative or unpleasant stigmas often associated with issues that precipitate our response. Simply said, we are not often called to interact with people under optimal circumstances or on their best day.  WCFLO is also committed to engaging with the youth in our communities and offering aid to those in need of food, shelter, and transportation expenses.As a huge supporter of our LEO's, EMT's, Firefighters, Vets, Buffalo Community Podcast was thrilled to sit with the representatives of WCFLO about getting this excellent program running.  These first responders do an amazing job out of the kindness of their own hearts, and now there is a way for us to join.  Please help support not only these brave men and women, but help out your neighbor that me be in need of something when it is needed most.  God Bless America!If you are looking for a media guy, you can find Luke Edlund on his social accounts.https://www.facebook.com/edlundluke​​https://www.instagram.com/lukeedlund5/​​https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWLA...You can follow the "Buffalo Community Podcast"Facebook: @buffalocommunitypodcastTwitter: @PodcastBuffaloInsta: @buffalocommunitypodcastThank you,Mark Benzer & Tyler ReissThe Buffalo Community Podcast guysTyler Reiss is the lead agent with HR Team at Edina Realty in Buffalo MN.you can contact him about your real estate needs at https://www.tylerreiss.com/​​Buffalo MN Real estateMonticello MN Real estateMontrose MN Real EstateMaple Lake MN Real EstateDelano MN Real Estate

2Coin Podcast
Ep. 37: The Gridiron Guru

2Coin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:06


On this episode we are joined by Marcus: a friend, supporter of the podcast & former EMT, to weigh in on the recent tragedy that unfolded @ Travis Scott's Astro-world Festival. We also discuss current affairs in the NFL, Marcus' surprise connection to a well-known NFL player, and much more. Tune in on YouTube, Apple, and Spotify!

It's All About the Questions
Worries and Buts - Control them and they don't control you - Rene Brent

It's All About the Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 52:55


Do you find yourself getting angry more frequently? Crying more or sometimes feel like you have a rogue persona inside of you that takes control and sends you into worry tail spins or eating binges? My guest on this episode is Rene Brent, RN and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist/Instructor. Today Rene shares a quick, and I mean quick, exercise you can do to calm your mind and your nervous system plus she shares her favorite phrase for shifting that rogue persona from control to the backseat. Rene and I discuss how to give yourself permission to change your behavior that no longer serves you and a few questions you can ask yourself to gain awareness of patterns that build worry and increase your use of the but. Rene Brent has been a RN for 30 years and has worked in ICU, Trauma/ER and the Recovery Room. In her experience, she was inspired by the powerful mind/body connection and how self-awareness and reframing negative thoughts helps us heal emotionally and physically. It was a natural transition for Rene Brent to go from being a healer of the body to a healer of the mind. She is passionate about helping her clients use the power of the mind and move forward in their lives and reach personal and professional goals. Rene attended The Institute of Interpersonal Hypnotherapy (IIH in Tampa, Fl.) IIH is the only state licensed school of Hypnotherapy in Florida. Rene has trained over 1000 hours. Rene Brent's solo practice is located in Maitland, Florida. She is certified as a Clinical and Transpersonal Hypnotherapist. She is highly trained and uses a variety of modalities including Hypnotherapy, NLP, EMT and EFT. She finds these protocols help her clients change negative habits and behaviors. When her clients release false beliefs and let go of past hurts and events, then true healing can occur. Rene Brent is an International speaker and a #1International Best Selling Author of  “How Big Is Your BUT?”. On March 16th, 2021 Rene released her latest book “Breaking the Worry Agreement” and has already reached International Best Seller status on Amazon. Rene Brent is a registered member of The American Council of Hypnotherapist (ACHE) and the International Association of Interpersonal Hypnotherapist (IAIH) 

WorkPlay Solutions Podcast
Ep. 08 | Mailbag Questions - Part 1 of 2. With guest Teddy Sanders

WorkPlay Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:07


Mark and Teddy respond to listener questions (Part 1 of 2). Who was your best boss? What do you think of the Great Resignation? What do you wish people knew about you?Shoutouts and References: Ricky Escobar. Creativity Inc, by Ed CatmullHost: Mark SuroviecGuest: Teddy Sanders | Talent Acquisition Specialist, EMT, counselor, and "Sneakerhead"For more info visit www.workplaysolutions.com or email mark@workplaysolutions.comFollow us on Facebook: WorkPlaySol

Good Jibes with Latitude 38
John Taussig's Sailing Adventure Lessons as a Paramedic

Good Jibes with Latitude 38

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 53:14


This week's host, John Arndt, is joined by John Taussig to chat his craziest sailing stories and top safety tips. John Taussig is a paramedic, USCG 50-Ton Master License holder, adventure sailor, and Executive Director for Backcountry Medical Guides. He's been an EMT and paramedic professional for 20 years and a lifelong sailor. Hear how to be safely prepared for your afternoon sail, rescue someone who's hypothermic, the importance of communication on an adventure, John's experience with the Panama Canal, and the time he was surrounded by a dozen orcas. Learn more at https://www.latitude38.com/lectronic/immediate-range-pac-cup-prep/

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Rittenhouse Prosecution has No Case and they Know it - 11.15.21 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 40:20


The Rittenhouse case has gone into their closing arguments and it's nothing short of a clown show with ridiculous statements from the prosecution like Rittenhouse is a liar for saying he was an EMT and even pointing a gun at the jury.

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show
11/15/21 Monday, Hour 3: Amazing Calls!

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 60:00


Eric from Oregon thanks Jesse. Bill from Detroit, MI answers the biblical question. Don Lemon…; Scott from Phoenix, AZ asks how can Jesse be perfect if Paul wasn't. --- Back to Scott… Matthew from Montreal, Canada Percy from North Carolina asks if Christians should celebrate. 13 year old no EMT.

ShandeeLand
Never Bet Against Chef Martha Morgan, Founder of Allergy Dragon

ShandeeLand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:40


Chef Martha Morgan is Founder of Allergy Dragon YouTube Channel (Awarded Top 15 Allergy YouTube Channel) and she recently started a website of the same name.  She is a specialty diet and food allergy chef. She started cooking in restaurants with her first job at 16 years of age and has been cooking professionally for almost 30 years. In 2003 she became a reluctant food allergy chef due to her child's first anaphylactic reaction. In 2009, she became a gluten-free chef due to her and her children's diagnosis of Celiac Disease.  She shares the incredible story of her child's first anaphylactic reaction to food and the thoughtfulness of the EMT that arrived.  She talks the obstacles of working as a chef outside the home and inadvertently bringing home her child's allergen on her clothing and how stressful it was that her calling and passion could negatively impact the quality of life of her child.  She shares how her passion and her family's needs merged into the creation of Allergy Dragon.  She hopes to help tame your Allergy Dragon.

127 Fit Podcast
NPC Bodybuilder & Coach Austyn Richardson

127 Fit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 70:06


Episode 60 of "Behind the Muscle" features NPC Bodybuilder & Coach Austyn Richardson!   Austyn is not only a competitive NPC Athlete, he is also currently in firefighter & EMT academy! For a 25 year old, Austyn is well-rounded, focused, and a wealth of insights! I truly enjoyed our conversation! Austyn and I discuss: What's it worth to me?, pursuing passion, pushing food for serious growth, what to look for in a coach, and more!     Please subscribe to the YouTube channel and share this episode on all of your social media platforms!  Thank you!     Connect with Austyn: https://www.instagram.com/austyn.jayce/     Connect with "Behind the Muscle:" https://www.instagram.com/behindthemusclepodcast1/     "Remember, behind the muscle, there's always a story!"

Church of Lazlo Podcasts
Wednesday 11.10.2021 - The Church of Lazlo Podcast

Church of Lazlo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 106:22


Yo! What the hell day is it? I could have sworn it was Friday. It's not. Forget about it. Let's move on. *Julia's boyfriend won a major award today! Let's quiz Julia and see how much she actually knows about her bae. *Doomscrolling! Pfizer wants boosters for everyone and I'm in. Trump got some bad news from a judge today but it might not mean much. Aaron Rodgers got fined by the NFL, no word on whether or not Joe Rogan is gonna split the bill. Paul Rudd is so sexy. How sexy is he?! He's the sexiest man alive! Brian Williams bids us adieu again. EMT's and fire firefighters are speaking out against the Travis Scott show. BJ's for microchips is the best offer you're gonna get this year. Legalize it!! *Outside of stepson porn, what job can a man have that excites women the most? *Have you finished holiday shopping? If no, Dakota Johnson has got you covered. *It's time for another round of "What Was Julia Thinking?" *Millennials are at that age where they catch themselves saying some seriously middle-aged stuff. *Imagine waking up to a confusing world filled with potty humor and mediocrity. This is Julia's new normal. *Have a great day! I know things got a little awkward tonight but I really like you and I hope you'll give us another chance. -Everybody Wang Chung!!!! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Talk of the Towns 11/10/21: Recruiting the next generation of volunteer firefighters

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 58:31


Producer/Host: Ron Beard Community concerns and opportunities: Recruiting the next generation of volunteer firefighters -What led to your involvement in your town fire department? Who invited you to get involved? Is this a family tradition for you? Why is the role volunteer fire fighter important to you and your community? -How are changes in your community affecting your ability to staff your department with volunteers? If you look back in time, what were the most effective ways that you brought new volunteers into your department? What works today? -In general, what are you looking for in volunteers… is there a range of duties and skills that volunteers can contribute? What is the range of time commitments and training expected? -Please share your top reasons for why you became a firefighter in your town and why you continue to serve Guests: Stephan Blanchard, Lieutenant, Blue Hill Fire Department Ryan Hayward, Chief, Stonington Fire Department Brent Morey, Chief, Deer Isle Fire Department David Carter, Chief, Sedgwick Fire Department Zach Soares, volunteer firefighter, Bar Harbor Fire Department Cynder Johnson, volunteer firefighter and EMT, Bar Harbor Fire Department About the host: Ron Beard is producer and host of Talk of the Towns, which first aired on WERU in 1993 as part of his community building work as an Extension professor with University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant. He took all the journalism courses he could fit in while an undergraduate student in wildlife management and served as an intern with Maine Public Television nightly newscast in the early 1970s. Ron is an adjunct faculty member at College of the Atlantic, teaching courses on community development. Ron served on the Bar Harbor Town Council for six years and is currently board chair for the Jesup Memorial Library in Bar Harbor, where he has lived since 1975. Look for him on the Allagash River in June, and whenever he can get away, in the highlands of Scotland where he was fortunate to spend two sabbaticals. The post Talk of the Towns 11/10/21: Recruiting the next generation of volunteer firefighters first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Heavy Lies the Helmet
Episode 83 - A Few Good Mentors w/Adam Tresidder & Shane Turner

Heavy Lies the Helmet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 45:00


If "you can't handle the truth", you can't handle a mentor. Mentors come in the form of leaders, educators, guides, and advisors to help you with honest self-reflection in order to improve yourself and your practice. Join us from AMTC21 where we discuss the importance of this arrangement with our close friends and fellow mentors, Adam Tresidder and Shane Turner. Get CE hours for our podcast episodes HERE! -------------------------------------------- Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavyliesthehelmet Instagram @heavyliesthehelmet YouTube /heavyliesthehelmet Website heavyliesthehelmet.com Email contact@heavyliesthehelmet.com Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed on the Heavy Lies the Helmet podcast are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of their employers and their employees. Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any information available for listening on this platform. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform, but it is not a substitute for your local laws, medical direction, or sound judgment. --------------------------------------------  Crystals VIP by From The Dust | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

Riding Shotgun With Charlie
RSWC #129 Heidi Bergmann Schoch

Riding Shotgun With Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:46


Riding Shotgun With Charlie#129 Heidi Bergmann-SchochCompass Defense LLC   This past fall I had a trip to New Jersey to hang out with John Petrolino (RSWC #093).  As we  were talking, I mentioned that this was my first trip in over 2 years without having filmed a show someplace. After some brainstorming of previous New Jersey passengers, we came up with Grant Gallagher (coming soon) and Grant told Heidi Bergmann-Schoch about this and asked if she wanted to be on the show, too. He said she's a great instructor and she has worked with him for years. After lunch, we filmed the shows then I headed home.    Heidi started her career as a police officer, specifically a K-9 officer.  She started the K-9 officer program in her town and was the K-9 officer in several towns.  After being an officer for 7 years, she contracted Lyme's disease and had to retire. Wanting to still give to the community, she got into paramedics. Before being a paramedic, she had to train for an EMT position. She was a paramedic for about 10 years before she bought a farm and got into raising and training horses.    Heidi eventually decided to get back into firearms and training.  She connected with Grant Gallagher from ScotShot (his episode is coming soon). She taught with Grant for 5 years before starting out on her own. She's certified to teach NRA & USCCA courses at many levels and disciplines. I always find it interesting that unlike Massachusetts, New Jersey doesn't have “approved courses”. But that doesn't mean the process is easy or quick.    We talk about some issues that new students of the gun have. Things like buying a gun that isn't good for the student. She calls the new students with new guns the “2A Minnie Pearls''. Yes, you have to be of a certain age to get that reference! I share some stories with some gun clients that I had as well. She also shares a story about some students with snub revolvers who shouldn't have had snub revolvers due to the size of the gun and the size of the student.    Besides being an instructor, Heidi is also involved with The DC Project and The Well Armed Woman. She started with The Well Armed Woman by getting ‘sucked in'. She was teaching at a range and the range wanted to start a program.  She did all the paperwork and legal stuff to start a chapter, including making some videos and passing a qualification on video. Her chapters meet once a month and have an education section and live fire, then dinner with the girls.    Her involvement with The DC Project is helping “educate over legislate”, which is the group's motto. The DC Project is aiming to get women to speak to their legislators at the national  and state levels, and share their stories about why they own firearms and why the 2A issue is a women's issue.    It's really great to have the chance to meet more folks in the firearm community.  Gun people really are the best people. And Heidi is one of them.  Favorite quotes “The police classes were more practical.” “That's why I started to change over more to the United States Concealed Carry Association. Their curriculum is more towards the practical use of a firearm in a defensive sense.' “They come in with the tag on it. They come in, they're a 2A Minnie Pearl.”   “I can't explain how good the gals are that I have. They are so generous. They are so kind. They support one another.”   Compass Defense https://compassdefense.net/   Compass Defense LLC https://www.facebook.com/compassdefense.net   The Well Armed Woman https://www.facebook.com/TheWellArmedWoman/   The Well Armed Woman https://thewellarmedwoman.com/   The DC Project https://www.dcproject.info/   We Shoot Shooting Range https://weshootusa.com/ Second Amendment Foundation http://saf.org/   Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms https://www.ccrkba.org/     Please support the Riding Shotgun With Charlie sponsors and supporters.    Buy RSWC & GunGram shirts & hoodies, stickers & patches, and mugs at the store! http://ridingshotgunwithcharlie.com/rswc-shop/   Keyhole Holsters  Veteran Owned, American Made http://www.keyholeholsters.com/   Dennis McCurdy Author, Speaker, Firewalker http://www.find-away.com/   Self Defense Radio Network http://sdrn.us/   Or watch on: OpsLens App on iPhone & iPad https://apps.apple.com/us/app/opslens-network/id1498033459

Dead Rabbit Radio
EP 769 - Was Travis Scott's Astroworld A Satanic Sacrifice?

Dead Rabbit Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 40:01


Today we find a stolen diary that shouldn't exist, and then we investigate the Travis Scott Satanic Conspiracy!   Patreon  https://www.patreon.com/user?u=18482113 MERCH STORE!!! https://tinyurl.com/y8zam4o2   Help Promote Dead Rabbit! Dual Flyer https://i.imgur.com/OhuoI2v.jpg "As Above" Flyer https://i.imgur.com/yobMtUp.jpg “Alien Flyer” By TVP VT U https://imgur.com/gallery/aPN1Fnw   Links: EXCLUSIVE SOURCE: Biden Daughter's Diary Details ‘Not Appropriate' Showers With Joe As Child https://nationalfile.com/exclusive-source-biden-daughters-diary-details-not-appropriate-showers-with-joe-as-child/ Archive https://archive.md/ObWGv Fox News Legal Analyst: Law Doesn't Care How Ashley Biden's Diary Was Obtained, FBI Wrong To Investigate https://nationalfile.com/fox-news-legal-analyst-slams-fbi-over-ashley-biden-diary-investigation/ F.B.I. Searches James O'Keefe's Home in Ashley Biden Diary Theft Inquiry https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/06/us/politics/james-okeefe-project-veritas-ashley-biden.html this is crazy https://twitter.com/officialshaane/status/1456898085792124936 8 people were killed at Houston's Astroworld Festival after crowd rushed the stage https://www.npr.org/2021/11/06/1053177597/houston-concert-deaths-astroworld-festival-travis-scott UPPER ECHELON of all songs dude https://twitter.com/vibeistan/status/1457013356079075332 Travis Scott https://twitter.com/taeesaaa/status/1457041936615985163 Travis Scott Ritual + dot https://archive.md/4nONf Travis Scott performed a satanic ritual yesterday https://archive.md/II7GQ Houston Disaster Now A Criminal Investigation, Cops Say https://knewz.com/houston-disaster-now-a-criminal-investigation-cops-say/ POLICE CONSIDER HOUSTON CONCERT DISASTER A CRIMINAL CASE, REPORTS OF PEOPLE BEING INJECTED WITH SUBSTANCE https://www.frontpagedetectives.com/p/houston-concert-death-injection-drugs-criminal-investigation-police EMT https://twitter.com/mattpatnonnon/status/1456858162359906306/photo/1   ------------------------------------------------ Logo Art By Ash Black Opening Song: "Atlantis Attacks" Closing Song: "Boys Don't Cry" Music By Simple Rabbitron 3000 created by Eerbud Thanks to Chris K, Founder Of The Golden Rabbit Brigade Dead Rabbit Archivist Some Weirdo On Twitter AKA Jack YouTube Champ Stewart Meatball The Haunted Mic Arm provided by Chyme Chili Thanks to Fabio N! Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/basque5150/jason-carpenter-hood-river/ http://www.DeadRabbit.com Email: DeadRabbitRadio@gmail.com Twitter: @DeadRabbitRadio Facebook: www.Facebook.com/DeadRabbitRadio TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@deadrabbitradio Jason Carpenter PO Box 1363 Hood River, OR 97031   Paranormal, Conspiracy, and True Crime news as it happens! Jason Carpenter breaks the stories they'll be talking about tomorrow, assuming the world doesn't end today. All Contents Of This Podcast Copyright Jason Carpenter 2018 - 2021  

Bloody Good Film Podcast
No Time To Cry: James Bond, No Time To Die

Bloody Good Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 77:53


Thankful For Action November is kicking off with none other than Bond, James Bond. All action movies all month, and what better way to start than with the latest entry in the 007 franchise. This week we break down the final entry in the Daniel Craig era, No Time To Die. We discuss all things James Bond and take the time to rank our three favorite Bonds, fims, villains, and most importantly Bond girls. We talk about the Daniel Craig era of 007 films, and see if this film is the proper send off that he deserves. We discuss the differences between babies and toddlers and an EMP and EMT, and share all of our feelings and emotions that this film gave us. MMost importantly we give you the answer to our weekly question...Is No Time To Die a bloody good film?We encourage everyone to watch along while you listen and make sure to comment and let us know what you think. If you haven't already please follow us on Facebook and Instagram @bloodygoodfilmpodcast and remember...Keep it bloody buddies!!!...#BloodyGoodFilm #BloodyGoodFilmPodcast #Podcast #FilmPodcast #MoviePodcast #Film #Movie #Movies #Action #Horror #ActionFilm #ActionMovie #ActionMovies #HorrorFilm #HorrorFilms #HorrorMovie #HorrorMovies #ActionPodcast #HorrorPodcast #JamesBond #007 #NoTimeToDie #DanielCraig #Bond #Bond25 

ELECTRICIAN LIVE- PODCAST
Let's Ask Paul | GFCI's on Mini-Splits and EMT used as a support component

ELECTRICIAN LIVE- PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 29:22


Listen as Paul Abernathy, a nationally recognized expert on the National Electrical Code answers questions that have been submitted via Ask Paul, the portal for anyone to ask electrical-related questions located at www.PaulAbernathy.com. This episode address the question can EMT support TC Cable and also the GFCI issues on HVAC Mini-Splits. Listen as Paul explains them in only a way he can.

Master The NEC Podcast
Master The NEC | GFCI's on Mini-Splits HVAC Systems and EMT as a support component

Master The NEC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 29:22


Listen as Paul Abernathy, a nationally recognized expert on the National Electrical Code answers questions that have been submitted via Ask Paul, the portal for anyone to ask electrical-related questions located at www.PaulAbernathy.com. This episode address the question can EMT support TC Cable and also the GFCI issues on HVAC Mini-Splits. Listen as Paul explains them in only a way he can.

Heavy Lies the Helmet
Episode 82 - Love and Haiti w/Charlie Lazar

Heavy Lies the Helmet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 66:11


Charlie Lazar is an American HEMS nurse who has volunteered to work in Haiti on multiple tours. In this podcast episode, we discuss the history of Haiti, its effects on healthcare, and the current climate that requires charitable organizations such as Haiti Air Ambulance (HAA) to exist. We also touch on some of her personal experiences and why she fell in love with the people and culture there. Get CE hours for our podcast episodes HERE! -------------------------------------------- Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavyliesthehelmet Instagram @heavyliesthehelmet YouTube /heavyliesthehelmet Website heavyliesthehelmet.com Email contact@heavyliesthehelmet.com Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed on the Heavy Lies the Helmet podcast are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of their employers and their employees. Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any information available for listening on this platform. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform, but it is not a substitute for your local laws, medical direction, or sound judgment. --------------------------------------------  Crystals VIP by From The Dust | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Shares of Ford are on the rise but the company is warning that the shortage of computer chips could easily last into 2023

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Americans are lighting up more today than they have been—or are more illegals that are making their way in the country smoking more—either way—more cigarettes are being sold—   TWO— Shares of Ford are on the rise—but the company is warning that the shortage of computer chips could easily last into 2023—meaning it will be tough sledding until then—   THREE— A judge in New York denied the police union bid—to stop vax mandates—and it could usher in a severe and dangerous situation—as cops—firefighters—EMT's – ambulance drivers—doctors—nurses and teachers that are being told get the jab or lose your job—are saying see you later—   It is creating a huge issue—and it has people across the country concerned that when they call 911—nobody is going to answer—  

Your Stupid Minds
179 - Halloween: Resurrection

Your Stupid Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 80:36


In honor of Halloween Kills slicing up the box office (and the holiday of Halloween in general) we reviewed a less successful foray into the franchise with possibly its worst entry, 2002's Halloween: Resurrection! After decapitating Michael Myers in the last film, the embarrassingly titled but by all accounts decent Halloween H20: 20 Years Later, this movie opens with Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) in a mental institution. The exposition nurse reveals that in a stunning plot twist that allows them to make more Halloween movies, Michael switched his outfit with that of an innocent father of three EMT, who was the person Laurie actually decapitated. Michael is still alive. Laurie is in a constant state of pretend shock one year later, but lies in wait for Michael to come for her on Halloween so she can unleash her trap. Unfortunately for Laurie (and fortunately for Jamie Lee Curtis, who desperately wanted to stop making these movies) Michael slips out of the trap and kills her. A year later, and unrelated to everything that just happened, some college students sign up to star in a livestreamed internet reality series called Dangertainment. After being recruited by Freddie Harris (Busta Rhymes) and Nora Winston (Tyra Banks), the cadre of horny teens are locked in Michael Myers's childhood home and must search for clues as to why he's so crazy. But what's really crazy is Michael has been living under the house this entire time and emerges to kill them off!

UFO Chronicles Podcast
Ep.39 The Sensation Of Death (Throwback Thursday)

UFO Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 47:59


 (Re-upload)For the next few weeks I will be doing a Throwback Thursday, where I re-release old episodes from the archives. So don't worry if you have heard it already as a 'New episodes' will continue to come out on Sundays. The idea is to get some of the old episodes heard as they have very little downloads from the first season, compared to newer episodes. Our guests this episode is Melissa from Florida, having worked as a first-responder for over 29 years she has encountered her fair share of paranormal encounters but nothing could have prepared her for what she experienced at a call out to a house fire. Melissa's encounters have been featured on the tv show Paranormal911. Link to Melissa's ebooks:Something in the Dark: Gettysburg Ghosts Something in the Dark 2: Haunted Family. https://www.amazon.in/Something-Dark-Gettysburg-Melissa-Drewry-ebook/dp/B083H4CGS2More info on this episode:https://ufochroniclespodcast.com/ep-39-the-sensation-of-death/Want to share your encounter on the show? Email: UFOChronicles@gmail.comPodcast Merchandise:https://www.teepublic.com/en-gb/user/ufo-chronicles-podcast Help Support UFO CHRONICLES by becoming a Patron:https://patreon.com/UFOChroniclespodcastTwitter:https://twitter.com/UFOchronpodcastThank you for listening!Please leave a review if you enjoy the show, and everyone that leaves a five-star rating and review on iTunes will get a shout out on the following show.Like share and subscribe it helps me when people share the show on social media, it means we can reach more people and more witnesses and without your amazing support, it wouldn't be possible.Music Credits:Artist: Patrick McFadden Jr Track: War of Independencehttps://soundcloud.com/patrick-mcfadden-jr

UFO Chronicles Podcast
Ep.39 The Sensation Of Death (Throwback Thursday)

UFO Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 47:59


 (Re-upload)For the next few weeks I will be doing a Throwback Thursday, where I re-release old episodes from the archives. So don't worry if you have heard it already as a 'New episodes' will continue to come out on Sundays. The idea is to get some of the old episodes heard as they have very little downloads from the first season, compared to newer episodes. Our guests this episode is Melissa from Florida, having worked as a first-responder for over 29 years she has encountered her fair share of paranormal encounters but nothing could have prepared her for what she experienced at a call out to a house fire. Melissa's encounters have been featured on the tv show Paranormal911. Link to Melissa's ebooks:Something in the Dark: Gettysburg Ghosts Something in the Dark 2: Haunted Family. https://www.amazon.in/Something-Dark-Gettysburg-Melissa-Drewry-ebook/dp/B083H4CGS2More info on this episode:https://ufochroniclespodcast.com/ep-39-the-sensation-of-death/Want to share your encounter on the show? Email: UFOChronicles@gmail.comPodcast Merchandise:https://www.teepublic.com/en-gb/user/ufo-chronicles-podcast Help Support UFO CHRONICLES by becoming a Patron:https://patreon.com/UFOChroniclespodcastTwitter:https://twitter.com/UFOchronpodcastThank you for listening!Please leave a review if you enjoy the show, and everyone that leaves a five-star rating and review on iTunes will get a shout out on the following show.Like share and subscribe it helps me when people share the show on social media, it means we can reach more people and more witnesses and without your amazing support, it wouldn't be possible.Music Credits:Artist: Patrick McFadden Jr Track: War of Independencehttps://soundcloud.com/patrick-mcfadden-jr

The Backpacking Podcast
83 NIKI RELLON (BIONIC GYPSY) - Hiking AT On Prosthetic Leg, Falling 45 ft, Rescued on Katahdin

The Backpacking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 63:47


Niki is the first female to complete the entire Appalachian Trail on a Prosthetic Let. She is a backpacker, author, inspirational speaker, trained chef, trained EMT, boxer and much more Website: BionicGypsy.com Book: "Push On: My Walk to Recovery on the Appalachian Trail" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/backpackingpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/backpackingpodcast/support

Autism Live
Ask Dr. Doreen - Skills, Schools ABA & More!

Autism Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 60:13


This time on Ask Dr. Doreen, viewers write in to ask questions about skills, schools, ABA, Apraxia and much more! Tune in and check it out! TikTok: @AskDrDoreen Instagram: @AskDrDoreen 6:28 I'm 25 and have been fired from about 85% of my jobs or aren't rehireable. I've made money every year since 16, but through a lot of jobs. Sometimes only weeks or months at a time. I became an EMT at 23. I've gone through a few jobs since then. I also have PTSD, Depression, Anxiety, ADHD, sleep issues. Likely Marfans or EDS as well. Waiting on test results. Before I got fired from my last job, I told them about my issues and how it affected my performance and how my boss had really made it difficult for me to succeed. . I even said I thought I had autism. HR lady said "My son has autism". I don't know what she meant by that. I often times miss social cues. I say what I think is acceptable, only to later hear that people don't like me because of it. I ask questions for clarity, and then people hate that. I have a higher-than-average IQ, but I can't seem to really do much with it. If I went to try and get disability, do I need a long history of the diagnosis? I've been in therapy for other stuff for years intermittently. I got diagnosed with autism the day after I got fired. Which was not even a month ago. I'm so mentally exhausted. I don't see how I can keep a job. I only haven't been fired from 3 jobs. 1 was when I was 16 and it was Wendy's and I didn't have it long before we moved. The second was a call center. The third was an EMT job that won't rehire me. Pretty much all my life people disliking me is a huge misunderstanding. They think I am condescending or rude. I try to help and they think I'm lording over and trying to be the boss. Etc. I'm about ready to throw in the towel. Can anyone tell me how hard it is to get the disability and how much they give you? Can you work even if you get the money if you find some place willing to work with you? What if I get the money but have my own business on the side? I want to sell crafts I make with my circuit, what I paint or make. TIA 14:02 Hi , I have a question how parents can learn or benefit through skills program is there a subscription and how can we avail it please let me know 14:51 I have a child on spectrum who once told she does the opposite or do not want to learn the things they are supposed to be done 23:45 Hi Shannon just a update: my 5 yr old nonverbal grandson has been excelling with Aba we found an Autism Academy here in Florida that has ABA on site he gets 35 hours a week he's working w/ Pec cards and pairing along with transitioning into the classroom to school it for anyone in Florida is livingstone's autism Academy he has a person assign to him all day. they also come to the home for parent training thank you guys so much for the content here on YouTube and sharing where and how we can get help 24:41 Thoughts on special needs boarding schools vs daily schools? 27:35 What are your thoughts about brain integration therapy, interactive metronome outcomes to improve focus and attention? Thanks! 37:37  What do you know about studies for pre-K in public schools for kids with autism? I chose to remove my 4 year old because after a month of Pre k he became extremely aggressive. I'm now trying to get him into an aba center since we lost his aba. Aba school vs public school…..thoughts????? 46:51 Thank you for the brief answer, please say something about apraxia how ABA can help with that and who or which specialty of doctor can rule out it is motor planing and processing my son is struggling. 52:14 Following Dr. Doreen in tiktok ❤️. Have you noticed in tiktok theirs so many anti Aba? 55:53 Dr. Granpeesheh, how do you describe autism? 58:56 This week on Autism Live!

Autism Live
Ask Dr. Doreen - Skills, Schools ABA & More!

Autism Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 59:56


This time on Ask Dr. Doreen, viewers write in to ask questions about skills, schools, ABA, Apraxia and much more! Tune in and check it out! TikTok: @AskDrDoreen Instagram: @AskDrDoreen 6:28 I'm 25 and have been fired from about 85% of my jobs or aren't rehireable. I've made money every year since 16, but through a lot of jobs. Sometimes only weeks or months at a time. I became an EMT at 23. I've gone through a few jobs since then. I also have PTSD, Depression, Anxiety, ADHD, sleep issues. Likely Marfans or EDS as well. Waiting on test results. Before I got fired from my last job, I told them about my issues and how it affected my performance and how my boss had really made it difficult for me to succeed. . I even said I thought I had autism. HR lady said "My son has autism". I don't know what she meant by that. I often times miss social cues. I say what I think is acceptable, only to later hear that people don't like me because of it. I ask questions for clarity, and then people hate that. I have a higher-than-average IQ, but I can't seem to really do much with it. If I went to try and get disability, do I need a long history of the diagnosis? I've been in therapy for other stuff for years intermittently. I got diagnosed with autism the day after I got fired. Which was not even a month ago. I'm so mentally exhausted. I don't see how I can keep a job. I only haven't been fired from 3 jobs. 1 was when I was 16 and it was Wendy's and I didn't have it long before we moved. The second was a call center. The third was an EMT job that won't rehire me. Pretty much all my life people disliking me is a huge misunderstanding. They think I am condescending or rude. I try to help and they think I'm lording over and trying to be the boss. Etc. I'm about ready to throw in the towel. Can anyone tell me how hard it is to get the disability and how much they give you? Can you work even if you get the money if you find some place willing to work with you? What if I get the money but have my own business on the side? I want to sell crafts I make with my circuit, what I paint or make. TIA 14:02 Hi , I have a question how parents can learn or benefit through skills program is there a subscription and how can we avail it please let me know 14:51 I have a child on spectrum who once told she does the opposite or do not want to learn the things they are supposed to be done 23:45 Hi Shannon just a update: my 5 yr old nonverbal grandson has been excelling with Aba we found an Autism Academy here in Florida that has ABA on site he gets 35 hours a week he's working w/ Pec cards and pairing along with transitioning into the classroom to school it for anyone in Florida is livingstone's autism Academy he has a person assign to him all day. they also come to the home for parent training thank you guys so much for the content here on YouTube and sharing where and how we can get help 24:41 Thoughts on special needs boarding schools vs daily schools? 27:35 What are your thoughts about brain integration therapy, interactive metronome outcomes to improve focus and attention? Thanks! 37:37  What do you know about studies for pre-K in public schools for kids with autism? I chose to remove my 4 year old because after a month of Pre k he became extremely aggressive. I'm now trying to get him into an aba center since we lost his aba. Aba school vs public school…..thoughts????? 46:51 Thank you for the brief answer, please say something about apraxia how ABA can help with that and who or which specialty of doctor can rule out it is motor planing and processing my son is struggling. 52:14 Following Dr. Doreen in tiktok ❤️. Have you noticed in tiktok theirs so many anti Aba? 55:53 Dr. Granpeesheh, how do you describe autism? 58:56 This week on Autism Live!

D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students

Dermatologist and current Mohs Micrographic Surgery and Cutaneous Oncology Fellow, Dr. Luke Maxfield D.O. joins host Amir Khiabani OMS-IV in an episode for our podcast. Dr. Maxfield attended Pikes Peak Community College which was followed by his time at University of Colorado at Colorado Springs where he received a Bachelor of Science in Biology. He then attended Lake Erie's College of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Maxfield then became a Transitional Rotating Intern at Sampson Regional Medical Center to then achieve his goal of becoming Dermatology Resident at Campbell University. On today's Episode, Dr. Maxfield discusses his journey during his premedical years that ultimately led him to Osteopathic Medicine. He starts his story discussing obstacles he faced during high school and his time at Pike Peak Community College. Dr. Maxfield recounts his experiences as an EMT and journey to osteopathic medicine, ultimately providing premedical students and medical students guidance in their own journeys to medicine. Dr. Maxfield is an active influencer on social media though Instagram and TikTok Platforms sharing premedical advice to students as well as educational content for medical students! @dr.ljmaxfield The team here from D.O. or Do Not Podcast hopes you enjoy this episode!!!

MEMIC Safety Experts
Small Business Safety Leadership - Elise Brown and Brian Schortz

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 74:19


According to the US Small business Administration, 99 percent of firms in the US are small business and according to JP Morgan Chase, the vast majority, nearly 88%, have fewer than 20 employees.     At MEMIC, we partner with small business who understand that the health and safety of their employees leads to a more productive and profitable workplace. On this episode of the MEMIC Safety Experts Podcast, I speak with Elise Brown, partner and Executive Vice President at Evergreen Home Performance and Brian Schortz, General Manager at Evergreen Home Performance about developing and leading a safety culture at a small business. Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast, I'm your host, Peter Koch. Small businesses make up the lion's share of the employers across the country, and most large businesses started out as a small business venture where just a few people with a passion for something took their product or service to the people. And while not everyone or every small business will be the next Apple, Exxon or Tesla. Just about everyone, especially if you are or have been a small business owner, can relate to the struggle of building or owning a small company at MEMIC. We see that at the heart of every company that has enjoyed long term success, that there's a correlation between productivity, quality and safety. Of course, we're a safety company, so we would see that. But statistics do show that long term success does come from a balance between those three things. And there's analogies out there about the business [00:01:00] being like a three legged stool where safety, quality and productivity support the success of a company. And without all three of those, the stool is going to fall. Really, what has to happen is there needs to be a balance because you can't have a short leg on the stool and have it function for you, otherwise you will be precariously perched on one of the other legs and that's not going to be functional for anyone's long term success. So safety, we see it as the foundation upon which a business can build production and quality and without people, which is the crux of safety and the right people in place, most businesses will fail and we've all seen this and especially now. And if you're listening to this in 2021 are probably even in 2022. Finding employees is a very challenging part for any business large or small, and it becomes even more challenging when you find an employee, spend the time to train them to make them part of your team, and then they either leave [00:02:00] because they found a better offer someplace else or they get injured and they can no longer work for you. Because when people get hurt or leave because of conditions, your businesses may be unable to fulfill the productivity demands or quality demands. So having a robust workplace safety program and a culture allows an owner or a manager or a supervisor to be flexible around increased productivity and quality demand changes while still keeping a skilled workforce in place. A strong safety culture and program provides those parameters and tools to protect employees while still maintaining a focus on productivity and quality. Now, creating and maintaining that culture and program is a true leadership challenge, and I believe that small businesses can find really elegant and creative solutions to balance productivity and quality on a culture steeped in safety that large businesses can't always or sometimes struggle to find. So today, [00:03:00] to help us look at safety leadership in a small business are Elise Brown and Brian Schortz from Evergreen Home Performance. Elise is a partner and executive vice president, and Brian is the general manager. So, Elise and Brian, welcome to the podcast today. Brian Schortz: [00:03:16] Hi, Peter. Elise Brown: [00:03:17] Good morning, Peter. Thanks so much for having us. Peter Koch: [00:03:20] I'm excited to talk to you guys. You know, we have you and I don't have a long history, but you guys have a fairly long history with MEMIC. We were just talking about this before we started the podcast that you've been with MEMIC for somewhere around 15 years. A colleague of mine, Randy Klatt, is your lost control consultant, and he has spoken very highly of you guys, both as a company overall and as really leaders on the safety aspect. So we wanted to talk to you today, some about who you are. What Evergreen Home Performance is and how do you manage safety in such a, and really, it's a fairly challenging industry that you work in from a safety standpoint. [00:04:00] How do you manage safety and how do you keep it going? So let's find out a little bit about you guys first, Elise, let's start with you first. Why don't you tell me a little bit about you and your history with Evergreen? How does that sound? Elise Brown: [00:04:14] Sure. I come from a background, a varied background. I guess I would say I've been a Jill of all trades. I've worked in construction. I've worked as a boat builder and the basis of my career before coming to Evergreen was in emergency response services. So I've been a professional and a volunteer firefighter and officer in our local volunteer fire department, and I've been an EMT and emergency medical technician as well as an ambulance driver. And currently I'm the emergency management director for the town of Liberty. And so all those prior and current experiences really have me steeped in the whole concept and value of safety. And [00:05:00] so when I joined Evergreen, that was an obvious place for me to put some attention. Peter Koch: [00:05:04] Yeah, sure. All of those really have substantial focus around safety, especially the emergency management part, but construction as well. And then boat building. I didn't realize that you had a boat building background to talk about that offline sometime and see where that goes. That's pretty cool. Brian, how about you? What's your background and how did you come to Evergreen? Brian Schortz: [00:05:27] Thanks, Peter. I have been, you know, with an evergreen for 11 years now and transition to evergreen from a corporate food service world. You know, basically, it was a large international companies that had lots of systems in place. And you know, you didn't have to think about safety. Safety was kind of presented as part of the operating plan. So there was there was not a lot of creativity. There was a plan. If you could follow the [00:06:00] plan, it was put together, you know, for success. So it was more of an implementation rather than kind of. Trying to figure it out for our business. And again, I've been with Evergreen for 11 years. I'm most recently, we've done a little bit of reorganization in the last year or so have taken the safety responsibility for Evergreen as my, one of my primary duties. This was Elise's passion and you know, up until and this is more of a soft handoff, and perhaps it will be handed back to Elise in the future. But nonetheless, we work at it collaboratively. Peter Koch: [00:06:41] Awesome. Elise Brown: [00:06:43] Hey, Peter, just to jump in a little bit here, I kind of started rambling about my safety background, but I didn't talk necessarily about what I'm doing in my role currently with Evergreen is that should I say a couple of sentences about that or Peter Koch: [00:06:56] No, we'll get to that because I was going to bring it back after Brian. So great [00:07:00] lead in, actually. So the background actually in foodservice and I have a background in food service, not that large international corporate, but definitely corporate food service through college and then worked in small restaurants. And then that's actually how I paid for part of my college tuition is working in the cafeteria. So it definitely was a kind of a cookie cutter safety plan. And if you could follow the plan, you could be safe. But it really all depended upon if you wanted to follow the plan. So very, very interesting and neat background. So both of you have some background within safety, corporate emergency management, but let's find out a little bit more about evergreen itself. So Elise, why don't you talk a little bit about what you do for Evergreen? And I think more of an umbrella to like what is evergreen do? What is evergreen home performance about and what's the product that you have out there? Elise Brown: [00:07:54] Sure. Evergreen Home Performance is a contracting company, and we have two locations in Portland [00:08:00] and Rockland. Each location has about 12 people, and within those groups we have a group of salespeople, two or three salespeople and the rest are in production, working in Maine homes, doing retrofit work to make them more energy efficient and comfortable. So the bulk of the work is in cramped spaces like attics and basements. And so, you know, as we think about safety, it's a fairly creative and customized approach in interpreting a lot of the rules. My role in the business has changed over time, but I tend to think about systems and I like in a small business. It's a very creative endeavor to try to make a system first, create it and then keep adjusting and adapting it to suit the businesses need. So currently I'm working on IT System improvements also work on sales processes in terms of how we flow our contracts through [00:09:00] a process and advising Brian on our safety system. Peter Koch: [00:09:05] Awesome. Lots of balls in the air for that, and I think there's kind of going back to the introduction there is an interwoven theme of safety that can be related to each of those systems, whether it's in a sales system. And we'll talk about this, how you know, how our salespeople can actually help or hinder some of the safety processes that we have in place. Our IT systems can certainly support or break down some of those safety systems that we have in our HR systems can certainly be a boon or a challenge to our safety systems. So interesting that you've got all those pieces in there. And really, from a systematic standpoint, it's not what I thought when I saw you as the executive vice president or heard that to think about that would be your focus in developing all those systems. So that's pretty cool. And again, [00:10:00] more of that conceptual piece as a small business leader in keeping safety at the forefront. Awesome. Brian. So as a general manager there? So what are your responsibilities and how do you interact with those systems that that Elise is getting in place for you or fine tuning for you? Brian Schortz: [00:10:22] Well, one of the duties one of my duties is I'm the human resource manager, so we're often talking about safety in use. So you know, our a lot of our work requires wearing respirators and true respirators, not, you know, paper masks. We're talking about respirators with P1, hundreds on them for a lot of the day. So that's a conversation that we're having. You know, all the interview is, you know, talking about the importance of the safety, the culture is that something that would even work for people? Some people do not want to be [00:11:00] saddled with a respirator or the primary thing you see and Elise is doing it is every person who we interview walks in the door with a beard and if you are going to wear a respirator. Unfortunately, that beard is not they're not friends, and the beard has to the beard has to go. So we talked about like, you know, maybe a very tight Elise calls them, you know, a fire fireman's moustache or so. Know things like all this over here has to go. So the seal works and your respirator is actually doing what it's intended to do. So we're talking about it at the very beginning, kind of making sure that we've got candidates and understand that it's super important that we're dealing in really hard work, tough conditions. Places that require respirators, so if it requires a respirator, that means there's something there that you don't want to be ingesting. You know, taking in your body, so you know, it does take [00:12:00] a certain kind of person and a commitment from the employee's standpoint to work, you know, to come to work for a company like that. I work in, the other part of my duty is I'm working directly with, we call our teams that are doing the work, production our production teams. So I manage the group in our Rockland office directly and, you know, have some scheduling input in our southern Maine. But so really just connecting with the people that are doing the work on a daily basis as well, Peter Koch: [00:12:32] Great making sure that they have what they need. And I like that tie in right back from the interview, starting with a safety discussion. Whether you use the word safety right from the beginning or start talking about some of those different exposures that your employees will be exposed to. So the hazards that your employees will be exposed to right at the beginning in the interview, so they understand not only that you take it seriously, but you're aware of it, and there are some expectations around their [00:13:00] interaction and performance around those exposures. Awesome. Brian Schortz: [00:13:03] I think we found early on that we needed to let people know that safety was an important part of working at Evergreen two ways. One is that we take it seriously so that we're often interviewing folks that have worked in small businesses. They're not coming out of a corporate kind of world or a perhaps like DIW, where there are a lot of rules coming from a lot of mom and pop places that are used to operating, you know, sometimes fast and loose. And so, you know, trying to just get people to understand that this is not, that that's not the culture that we're, you know, is this the right fit? Because we do. We're not perfect. But these are some of the, you know, these are this is the culture Peter Koch: [00:13:47] Great set in that expectation right up front. I think that's a good it's a good thought process to have to recognize that not everybody is going to come in with the same habits and understanding of not just [00:14:00] the expectations for performance, but that you do know what the hazards are, and there are some rules around how you interact with them. And not every business recognizes that. And as a small business, I think that's key for anyone listening that it's a great takeaway to know that you have an opportunity when you hire somebody on to reset their expectations. Hopefully for the positive, sometimes for the negative of what they should be doing when they're working here. You have that option as a business owner, as the hirer, or as the supervisor, as the manager. So kudos for, you know, weaving that in and throughout the hiring process and then the interaction as you go forward with those staff to Elise, did you have anything to add to that part because you know, you've been a part of this for a long time as well and putting the systems in place, you need to be able to support just what Brian's been talking about. So how does some of those systems interact and what else do you have to add [00:15:00] to that? Elise Brown: [00:15:01] Yeah. My head is just abuzz with all kinds of ideas. So here's one thing that became apparent to us right out of the get go is, you know, as a contractor, we needed a CRM, a contact resource management tool all the way to a database to track our customers in a way to develop our pricing and get proposals out to customers. And we looked at out of the box solutions we could just purchase. And one of the things we came up against is we could not tailor what we sold to our satisfaction, both from a quality perspective, but from a safety perspective, because for us, no two spaces are the same. And if we were to just sell Widget X for the same standard price in every situation, we would be creating pressures on our teams to execute at that level, even if the space didn't allow for them to do that safely. So we need we built our own pricing tool so that our advisors, our sales [00:16:00] team, when they go in and build a project, they can incorporate safety considerations into the pricing structure so that the cost of almost everything we sell has some safety consideration, the ability to build that into the price. And so from a systems perspective, we had to build that ourselves so that we had the capacity to do it. And from a training perspective, we had to train our sales team and it's an ongoing process and all the things they need to be looking at and thinking about as a designer project and price it out. And so it's this constant evolution of really keeping them in touch with what our production teams are seeing and experiencing so they can properly price a job for them to do it safely. So that's just one example of how the entire business has to think about safety from a systems perspective. Peter Koch: [00:16:55] Yeah, and that could really make or break someone's experience as an employee in the field. [00:17:00] And I love the way you said it before, like, no, no space, no two spaces are the same. And I can just think about that from my experience with my own home, which, you know, is circa 1832. So that can give you an idea of what it looks like on the inside. And then so say my brother in law's house, which was built in the 90s. So a vastly different environment for you to work in. And if it's cookie cutter, you could really set somebody up to end up with the wrong tools to do the job. It's still essentially increasing the performance of the home from an environmental standpoint, from a heating and cooling standpoint. But the tools will be different if you have to go into an older home versus a newer home versus a home that's been remodeled before something else has changed. So interesting the way that works. And Brian, how do you see that enhance performance in the field? So Elise talked about [00:18:00] how the systems are working? And do you see that truly are really functioning for the people who are out there doing the job, doing the work when they get out into the field? Brian Schortz: [00:18:10] I guess what we see is people may not kind of understand what went into the pricing, necessarily the pricing and the thought process, but they may understand that there's less pressure. So I think that we have a metric that, you know, an informal metric of kind of production per day know each group of three when they're working in a house should be able to produce a certain amount of revenue per day. And what I think where I think this connects is that people understand that if the space is very tight or there's just, you know, kind of some very challenging elements to it that that's been factored in to the pricing [00:19:00] so that they have a little more revenue to work with. So they're not under the same kind of constraints to feel like they've just got to really cut corners. So from a customer standpoint, cut corners or even the safety corners that if it would call for normally we would do something. But they're feeling under, you know, under a pressure to get the project done in three days. They may skip that integral step of kind of making sure that they've done the right, the right process to make sure nobody gets hurt. And so I think that's where some of that and some of that is just really communicating what our goals are for the project, kind of some of the some of the challenges per project that we're seeing and getting feedback. You know, I think part of this also is hearing from the folks in the field that, that space was too tight. You know, honestly, it was too it was. If they're going to be like that, we shouldn't. We probably shouldn't do a project like that [00:20:00] because it really was way too physically exhausting, you know, taking it back to Elise and our sales team and just trying to figure out what the minimum space that we're going to work in. And, you know, kind of taking that feedback for real as we do want to keep people safe and employed at Evergreen. They have other needs to go places. If we put them in torture spots every day, the job becomes a lot less enticing. Elise Brown: [00:20:27] Well, so one example is we often work up in attics, and it used to be that we didn't necessarily have a line item to price for the necessity of placing or building out walk boards up in the attic. So before we specked that out and made sure it was part of the work scope, sometimes our production teams would come to an attic and go up and find that they had nothing to stand on. And so if they had come ill prepared and didn't have those materials and we hadn't priced in [00:21:00] enough time for them to build in a safe working platform, you can imagine the pressure they would feel to just do the dance along the floor choice and hope for the best, rather than have it built in and expected that they would take the time to build that walkway and have the materials with which to do it. Peter Koch: [00:21:19] That's a great example, because that takes a long knowing that because that's my attic. There are no walk boards up in the attic, and there's enough blown in insulation up there that you can't see any of the joists. So you're always wondering where you are. So, yeah, building that out takes some time. You got to have materials. And while you were both speaking, it made me think that this is part of that evolutionary process of, you know, how the systems can support the people in the field and how the people in the field can support the system. So there's this ongoing spiraling process of information flow back and forth to [00:22:00] overall balance those three pieces safety, quality and productivity. Because you know, you talked about it, Brian, you need to be able to make enough money to be successful to have the business continue. So that's a given that has to happen, and that's based around a lot about the quality of the work that you do. So not only the quality of the end product, but the quality of the work that's done while the people are there. And I know I've talked to folks that have had a particular construction crew or carpentry crew or remodeling crew come in. And even though the end product was functional, the process to get to that end product was not very functional. It was very conflicted a lot with the homeowner and the process of living and functioning and what was said. And lots of stuff goes on to reduce or increase the perception of quality that the customer might be getting. And it seems like [00:23:00] those systems that you have in place can help support all of that. Elise Brown: [00:23:03] Well, you know, when you look at a job hazard analysis for construction, one of the primary sources of injury is slips, trips and falls. So the easiest way to address that is through simple housekeeping. And so even just in the project set up, you know, taking the time to have a good greeting with the customer, find out which access points work best for them. You know, setting up your hoses and your cords and your workstations in a way that works well for them makes it super efficient for the crew and safe. You know, then you've kind of solved every problem, all in one fell swoop. And so it just makes sense to take the time to do that right at the outset. It makes the day go better for everybody. Peter Koch: [00:23:47] It sure does. It sure does. And it sounds like you set that expectation that that is the expectation of your crews when they get on the job, that they know that they're expected to do that. You don't just leave it to chance that [00:24:00] they're going to bring the habit from another company or their own personal life, that that's how they'll interact with your customers. Brian Schortz: [00:24:06] And they do. They understand that it is part of part of what we're doing here, and we're not selling something that is that is glamorous, that is shiny. And it's not, you know, it's not some trophy counter. It is. Once we're done in the attic, they might pop their head up for five minutes and then they're hopeful they never have to look up there again. So where we have the opportunity to kind of make a strong impression on a customer is, you know, with the people that we bring into their home and the experience. And so that's, it is super important, you know that that aspect of working in someone's home where contracting experiences haven't always been positive. You know, we're kind of we're, you know, we start off, you know, working against people's experiences often. And so we have to be better than, you know, than what they're expecting. Peter Koch: [00:25:00] Now [00:25:00] that's great. So how do you like, how would you quantify, maybe quantify as not the right word, but how do you how do you make sure that you get the buy in from your staff that this is like this is not just the because you can set the expectation, and I think a lot of people listening will have had this experience where you set an expectation and then you go out and look at the performance that's happening in the field or on the shop floor, wherever you are. And the expectations aren't met because the buy in is not there. So how do you make sure that your staff stayed bought into this process? Brian Schortz: [00:25:43] That's the biggest challenge is I think most people buy like verbally and mentally buy in, you know, to the idea because no one wants to fall down the steps. No one wants to fall through a ceiling. And, you know, kind of crack their ribs. People get rushed. People [00:26:00] kind of forget they get, you know, started to develop bad habits. So, you know, our job is to just to continue to be vigilant, to continue to reinforce, you know, kind of the standards most people want to play along. You know, they just develop bad habits over time. And it's just kind of bringing out, you know, kind of refreshing those and making sure they understand how important it is. And it's important to the company success. And most people here understand the correlation between the company's success, their happiness. You know, it's kind of all tied together that they play an important role at Evergreen. And if the people that are doing the work aren't able to do the work, it impacts the company negatively. So if they're out because they've fallen down the stairs, that's a beyond the torture that you know, puts us through and feeling bad about their injury and physically hurts them. [00:27:00] It also hurts the business, and I think everyone understands how it all kind of plays together for evergreen's success. Elise Brown: [00:27:08] One of the things I noticed when I was in the fire service was that it was really at the level of the lieutenants that would make or break a safety culture because they were the ones that would sort of embody whatever the values were that the management was trying to impart at the ground level. And one of the things that I've noticed Brian Schortz do really well in managing his production teams is he really cultivates good relationships with his site supervisors, the project managers, and develops a real culture of safety with them so that they feel free to communicate with him. Concerns of any kind. You know, when a job is especially difficult, when they notice something that feels unsafe to them. So I think a lot of it is really in sort of the HR culture that a [00:28:00] business develops so that the middle the mid-level management feels free to express what they see going on and developing, you know, a work atmosphere that feels friendly and supported, I think creates a receptivity when the management team says, Hey, we really got to work on our safety. You know, people are slipping up a little bit or I noticed you weren't wearing those safety glasses. Let's talk about it. And often there are other issues or concerns that we haven't thought about. And so if you don't have that culture of safety where people can really express what's bugging them or what they really need, then you can do all the preaching you want. But maybe there's not going to be on the buying because they don't feel respected or heard about something else. Peter Koch: [00:28:52] Yeah, it's a really, really great point on both sides for Brian and Elise, you guys. I'm glad you said it because [00:29:00] that's something that I talk often with my policyholders, with the clients that I work with, that, you know, accountability is not just going out and trying to figure out what's somebody doing wrong, but it's the back and forth between your employees, the supervisors, the line staff and make sure making sure that you have all the information to make good decisions and letting them know that they're heard. So I've got a question for you on that particular one. Do you have any examples around like how your employees, maybe they're your middle managers or your line supervisors, or maybe your staff have come up with different ways to be safer in the field and that have been implemented company wide so that they know that they're heard because I think that's an important part because we can talk at all the time. But unless they're really seeing it, they're not going to buy in. So I know you've got some examples out there. So [00:30:00] what might be one that you can relate to our listeners? Elise Brown: [00:30:04] Well, I think we can take the example of hot attics, and we'll each have something to say about it. So I can talk about hot attics from a system perspective. So as we've mentioned, we're a retrofit company. We work often in attics to air, seal and insulate them to help an occupant save energy and be more comfortable. Well, that often means that we're up in the attic doing that work and six months out of the year, those temperatures can be quite elevated. Brian, will talk to you about some of the improvisation that our field technicians figured out to do to cool those spaces. But we also got feedback from our line staff and from our site supervisors that some of the conditions were just unbearable was unsafe. You know, when we did temperature monitoring, we were hitting the heat index. It was unsafe to be in. And so we made a decision [00:31:00] from a management perspective to not schedule some of those projects in the summer and to defer them to cooler months of the year. And that had all kinds of implications for our marketing, for our project scheduling. So we had to implement those from a systems perspective, and I'll let Brian talk about some of the improvisation for how we can continue to work in some attics that we found were acceptable. Brian Schortz: [00:31:26] So working and, you know, when we were less prepared to not work in attics in the warmer months as this was starting to become the concern as an issue, you know, some of our some of our production managers developed systems to help cool the spaces. So ultimately and using, you know, some unique thoughts, they created a way to water roofs to ultimately bring the temperature down, you know, in those, you know, in those spaces and it could be [00:32:00] 10 15 degrees that they would see the difference of, you know, getting these long kind of contraptions that held a hose and a sprinkler up to a roof to safely get it up there and have it attached to the roof and making enough of a difference to make it palatable and safe to work in those environments. You know, during certain points of the day. So, you know, that's just one innovation that the folks have a lot of different fans and air conditioning units. And again, because every space is so different that we work in, it's trying to figure out which tool we have that we'll kind of make little work in that particular environment. So it does require a little bit of, you know, innovation. Each project say, what are the containers? Are there? Are there actual window schematics that windows in them? That's a very convenient, you know, if you've got an attic that has a window and [00:33:00] some power, you know, a small, a small AC unit in there, it might make the difference. No windows, no anything. You know, you're bringing fans tube fans up from the basement because the cold air from the basement, you know, is much different than the summer or the air outside your house in the summer. So, you know, those are a couple of different things that you know that we've kind of put in place to make work happen safely. Peter Koch: [00:33:23] So I guess two questions for follow up on that, and I guess this will tie into the systems as well. But Brian, when your team came up with the watering the roof, which I think is a very innovative plan, it's not something that you would normally think of and it makes scientific sense, but it's not something that your regular attic insulation installer is going to think of right off the top of their head. So how did that go from idea to one of the potential solutions for attic cooling when you're [00:34:00] in those situations? Brian Schortz: [00:34:02] Good question, Peter, and I'm not sure that I can kind of go back to the genesis of this, but we are a building. Elise Brown: [00:34:10] I remember. Brian Schortz: [00:34:11] I'll speak to one aspect and all that Elise up in, you know, part of our business is we adhere to building science concepts. So we're not just a traditional insulation company, you know, we use building science as the backbone of the work that we're doing. And so people that are in the company are exposed to building science concepts so that the concept of, you know, of a roof cooling with water is something that, you know, that perhaps came out of, you know, some of those discussions. Some of the building science discussions and not your normal water cooler talk. Elise Brown: [00:34:52] But I remember one of our I guess I think he was still a technician at the time. Brian Pringle got this concept and he asked, Hey, [00:35:00] do you mind if I make a prototype and try it out? So we said, sure, and he went and bought all the items from Home Depot or the hardware store, and we paid for the materials and he rigged one up and tried it and liked it and took a little video and showed it around and people got interested. So I think we gave him the time and the budget to build a couple more. And then the shop up in Rockland did the same. So it was just a little seed money and a good idea. And the encouragement to do it, Peter Koch: [00:35:30] That part, that encouragement part and giving employees and you had spoken about both of you spoke about this earlier is the having both your managers and your technicians, your line staff, the ability to be heard and then not just being heard in a meeting and then everybody nodding and then going away. And you do the same thing the next day, but actually taking a potential concept that people see value and bringing it to fruition and then installing [00:36:00] it as part of one of the solutions. That's very powerful for an employee to be heard. And it's not just the moneymaking solution, but it's a safety solution. It's a really interesting way of managing a very dangerous exposure for your staff. And it's innovative. That's a fantastic a great story, a really great story. And I think it speaks to some businesses, whether you're a large business, a medium sized business or a small business, we sometimes get roped into all of the solutions have to come from me. And when you have a group of employees that you're training and you're caring for and you're working with a lot of solutions or at least ideas for potential solutions can come from them. And that's a it's a great story. Water on the roof. It's a great story. Brian Schortz: [00:36:53] And I just like to add to at the other end of the business level, from a management owner perspective, [00:37:00] we had to be willing to stop selling certain things. You know, if it was just too hot and too dangerous, we had to be willing to walk away. And so it was it was in conjunction with that concern of hot attics that we started considering adding other services to our business offerings so that we could generate revenue in ways that were safer. And so we started installing windows and doors as another offering that had different safety hazards, of course, but not the same hot attic exposure. Peter Koch: [00:37:34] But again, another really innovative way of seeing an exposure and knowing that no matter what happens, you're still going to have some times where you, you really shouldn't be in the attic. You shouldn't expose employees to that for a multitude of reasons. One is safety. And then Brian said, the other one that, you know, if you continue to expose people to that kind of environment, they might find another place to go. So looking at safety [00:38:00] as the impetus of saying, Hey, here's the boundary that we have to work within. And if we come up against that boundary and it's not going to be functional for us to go beyond that, but it's going to restrict our productivity or our quality, we have to find something else. So again, another great way of looking at safety as being an innovator to move you to different product lines, different ways to make the business grow and stepped you up into a place where, you know, maybe 10 or 15 years ago, you didn't expect to be there. So just another market, another place for you. So let's think about just safety and other ways that as a small business, you are able to move that safety needle because again, you're balancing safety quality. Productivity, you have incorporated safety really into the business, it's not just an add on or something that gets checked [00:39:00] off as a box, but it's something that you live and breathe. You still need to draw on different resources in order to help move that safety needle. So what are some different resources that you draw on a regular basis to help your employees stay safe? Brian Schortz: [00:39:15] Most recently, six months ago, we found that there was another a company that was very similar to Evergreen at one point in their history, a home performance company doing similar work out of New York state. They had received a lot of a lot of funding to really put high level systems together. And so they developed a really incredible library of video safety best practices that were applicable to our industry. So we ended up purchasing kind of their system that group's plan and been very, you know, it's been very beneficial in that in [00:40:00] the past and we had a ladder safety or an electrical safety. It was, you know, could be very some of the videos that went along with it were instructing me, you know, but not they weren't our industry. These videos actually speak to the hazards that folks in this actual industry in similar housing stock are going to encounter on a day to day basis. So we found it really having that resource has been a great tool. You know, it's been much more it's just been much more effective. If you're spending, you know, an hour and you're in a safety training, it's much more targeted and real world, you know, real experiences that these folks are going to encounter on the job. So that's one example. Peter Koch: [00:40:48] That's a great example. Always looking for different resources, which is which is excellent to not just think that you have all the answers yourself, but look outside and see what other organizations can help you with that. Elise Brown: [00:41:00] Well, [00:41:00] when I first started working on building a company safety program, so it was really hard to know where to start because you can look up all the different OSHA regulations and just tear your hair out and trying to interpret how they apply to your business. And that can be maddening. I called upon safety works quite a lot. That's the training and education arm of the Maine Department of Labor. Those consultants were really friendly, helpful. I had them come out and do a number of site visits so they'd come right to the site and we'd just poke around and get all kinds of ideas. But then we also had some really specific questions like we didn't understand what the requirements were for our folks who were applying spray foam product in a space, and we didn't understand what was going to be required in terms of their respiratory protection. So they were able to come in and do some air monitoring for us at no cost. [00:42:00] And that was really helpful because then we took those results and we could develop a safety program tailored to our needs. And after using safety works, you know, then really started developing a close working relationship with Randy Klatt. He's our guy at MEMIC our safety management consultant and using him as a resource, you know, we'd come up against something and not be sure. So we'd ask for his guidance or if we had an accident, you know, just try to reach out to him and have him help us think through how we might do it differently to prevent that happening again. Peter Koch: [00:42:40] That's excellent. And I think safety works is an underutilized resource here in Maine. And I know so there's people across the country listening to this podcast. Just about every state has a safety works within their state, so it's the educational arm of their Department of Labor that will be able to go and do different [00:43:00] things for them, whether it's an exposure, specific training or, like you said, the air quality monitoring or the air monitoring that they're doing and that when we think about respirators and Brian, you talked about that at the very beginning as one of the things you discuss at hire about. Are you willing and able to wear a respirator or shave to wear a respirator, to be able to go back to the data and say this is why we're wearing a respirator, not just because we think you should wear a respirator, but here's the product. Here's the space. Here's the concentration. Here's the type of respirator. Here's the cartridge. Here's the change out schedule. Here's all this stuff that you need goes a long way to make that employee feel comfortable and confident in the methods and the resources that the employer is putting forth. So that's fantastic to tap into a resource like that. And then the resource of your insurance carrier like MEMIC is [00:44:00] relatively unique. But we are not the only insurance carrier that has lost control or safety management consultants out there. So you know, if you're insured with MEMIC, give us a call if you've got a question from a safety standpoint and. If you're not insured with MEMIC, you know, call your carrier and see if you do have some safety resources that you could tap into. You might be surprised of the amount of experience that your carrier can bring to the table for you. Brian Schortz: [00:44:29] To your point earlier about making people feel comfortable and part of our orientation is very it can be a little scary. You know, we're talking about lead. We're talking, you know, exposures to lead, we're talking about potential exposures to asbestos. And, you know, do we find that every day? No, we find it very rarely. But the point being that, you know, when you're telling someone that they may encounter asbestos [00:45:00] and you know, these are, you know, folks are not kind of hardened tradespeople that, you know, have seen this and heard about asbestos their whole lives. These are some, you know, folks that are new to the trade, perhaps. And you know, it's a scary, you say asbestos and that's scary to someone. So if you can let them know that you know they'll be wearing a respirator, that's appropriate so that if there is a discovery and unexpected discovery that day that they've been protected, you know, they've got the right respirator for the conditions and we're not going to once we find it, you know, that's kind of a job stopper for us. We back out. But the fact that you've had that rescue, you'll be wearing the appropriate respiratory protection really goes a long way and not scaring people away from the job. Peter Koch: [00:45:48] I think that's another underrated tool that small businesses don't take advantage of. And then you said it's orientation, and I've been through many different types [00:46:00] of orientations, been part of presenting an orientations, receiving orientations from the whole, the whole gambit from those that are really just kind of checking the box to make sure that people are quote unquote oriented to the job and others like yourselves that are actually taking the time to let people know what the exposures are, what the hazards are, what the expectations are and then what is going to happen if they do encounter something. So what are these? What are those expectations? And that's a powerful part of the orientation process that we miss. So let me just ask you this question on orientation overall. So when you're orienting a new person, how much time does that new person, how much time do you spend with that new person in orientation from the time that they're hired, to the time that you consider them to be oriented enough to be competent on the job? Elise Brown: [00:46:54] One of the things that I found so interesting is a couple of years ago, we [00:47:00] asked Randy, our safety management consultant, if he could go through our particular data on accidents and injuries and give a report over the years of what had happened for our business. And the amazing thing it was like an inverted bell curve. And so we had the highest number of injuries with new people and then it would go way down. And so our hires who had been with us say from one year to six year years had relatively few injuries. And then the folks who'd been with us a long time started to get more injuries. That was really illuminating for me. And so from an orientation perspective, it became apparent that really the first three months are not about productivity at all. It's really about getting oriented to the safety culture, the safety program and the safety mechanics and habits. And so right at the get go, you know, we're talking about safety as the [00:48:00] primary focus. And for a business like ours where you're in strange spaces, where you're not just standing on a flat floor all day, but you're in attics or crawling in a basement, really just focusing on a presence of mind, you know, really being oriented in time and space is a really critical function in being able to be safe in those environments. So we just kind of start hammering that and we started doing that in a new and a different way. And it was thanks to that graph that really got me fired up to make that such an important part of our beginning with any new employee. Peter Koch: [00:48:37] Yeah, that injury data can be very enlightening and it's something that I think we miss like we don't know many businesses tend to treat the injuries kind of separate from other data that their business takes in to use to evaluate what those steps they need to take to be successful. And I would I would imagine that if [00:49:00] a business decided to pull their injury history for the last, however many years that they would find if they looked at it in the same light that you looked at it from how long someone had been employed with you, that they would find a similar bell curve. We do find statistically overall when we look at MEMIC data aggregated that we do find there's a predominance of new employees being injured, and so that goes depending on the seasonality of your business. That new employee could be, you know, six months in or three years in as a new employee. And then it'll peter off. You know, you won't have so many injuries as people understand the exposures and the controls that are out there. And then you'll see it to start to increase on the other end as people get very comfortable with those exposures. And they forget, I love the way you put it, Elise the presence of mind. When you're in a space, how do you get people to have presence of mind? Can I can [00:50:00] I throw that odd question out at you? Like that's do you have a way to really help people keep their presence of mind when they are in a space where there are different exposures? Elise Brown: [00:50:12] I think it comes back to the work culture. I think it comes back to, you know, creating a work environment that doesn't feel so rushed where people feel cared for, where it's a friendly environment. You know, it's amazing how much those kinds of factors help remove distractions or pressures that take your focus away. And, you know, if people are relatively happy and like the people they're with, they're, you know, they're not going to just be angry and thrashing around or just trying to hurry through the day. So I don't have any magic answer. I really don't know. But like we hear from our folks that they appreciate the friendliness and how accepted [00:51:00] they are just on a very human level. I don't know if that answers your question, but I think it would help. Peter Koch: [00:51:07] Yeah, no, I definitely do. And I think it adds to the comments that you were both making before about the importance of your middle management group because I think that's the group that sets the stage for that presence of mind within the job site, at the job site. So Brian, when you go on to the job site and you, you know, you're working with that management team, you're bringing that presence of mind to them, they're bringing that presence of mind to the staff that are working there. So it's a key thing. I'm not sure that you can teach it, but I think you have to be the example and have people emulate that. Brian Schortz: [00:51:51] We're not creating best practices in the office. We're hearing from the people that are doing the work. And you know, they're often [00:52:00] the people that are innovating for our business. They're innovating, you know, best practices, some of the safety, you know, some of the safety practices that ultimately they want to go home at the end of the day, you know, with what they started with and no more, no less as well, you know, in terms of their bodies. So I mean, you know, we're hearing about things that aren't safe. You know, they'd like to see different, and we also there's an example of this past safety training in our sales team. So we, you know, we'll break up our groups and we'll have different departments and the sales team. We did a ladder safety training and honestly, they use ladders the least of our groups. And so in a little ways, you know, it was an hour's worth of ladder training videos that, you know, they may have felt wasn't, you know, the best use of their time. But I want it to be phrased it in a way that was that they need to understand the company. You know what we do [00:53:00] as a company and what the safety goals of the company is so that if they're out on a job site, they see the ladder is being used inappropriately. They've got the opportunity to be an intervenor. Tap someone on the shoulder and kind of gently say, Let's maybe we should reconfigure this. Not that's not the way that wants to be used. And I actually got feedback from one of the salespeople. He was at a job site this past week. And you know, part of that message was it's your job to say something. It's not like we're teaching you this. It's your responsibility to say something when you see something. And you know, we teach on saying it respectfully and not, you know, we're not the Hammer Company, you know, we really try to say things in an appropriate way. But one of the salespeople came back and said, Well, I was at a job site today and they had us all out and they didn't have to stand for it. So they had it on these rickety, rickety set up. And he said, I went over and said, Rick, I [00:54:00] was told to tell you, this is like, that's not the right way to do this, you know, in our training. And you know, let's can I get you a stand like, what do you need here? Do you need do you need the stand? Where's the stand? You know, I can get. And they hadn't. When they bought the saw, the stand was back ordered, and I think they never they just never end up getting around to it. But it was, you know, it was purposely given to me as, you know, look what I did. I helped, you know, I was listening to you. You know, it really was wasn't about a ladder. It was about something else. And they took it seriously. So it was great. Peter Koch: [00:54:37] I think that's a great example. Elise Brown: [00:54:39] Here's another example of presence of mind, you know, sort of indirectly, Peter, and that is, is that, you know, because Brian and I guess evergreens tried to cultivate, you know, a good relationship with the site supervisors. And we have pretty tight teams that work together frequently. They know one another. And so a site supervisor might call [00:55:00] Brian and say, you know, Joey seems a little off today. He seems distracted or tired or I know he's had a hard time at home, so I'm not putting him on the tough job today. You know, I'm going to have him do something else, and that really is good hazard management because you know, why put a worker, you know, is kind of stressed in a position where something's more likely to go wrong. So those are, you know, some examples of how a workplace culture can really avert something going really wrong just because you know the people and you're not going to just make them do it because they're supposed to Peter Koch: [00:55:34] Right that that trust in the culture that you know the has got your back. My fellow colleague employees got my back, my supervisors got my back. So it's all about it's all about success. And it's not like realization. I bet you if you if you did like a company culture survey that try to ferret out what people's attitudes were around, what you're all working for and you're all working [00:56:00] together for the success of each other and ultimately then the company. So I think as I'm hearing that there's a lot of openness within the culture and at the foundation of that, you know, is safety. It's hard to talk about productivity only productivity and get that openness. But there is that compassionate part of safety where there's a moral part of safety. It's not just checking the box for compliant, but that's a moral component of we all have a responsibility of going back home at the end of the day to our family, our friends and our loved ones. That's awesome. So I got a couple more questions and we're getting right towards the end of it. This is one that I don't know that we've talked about in the past, but you brought up the injury trend. So I wanted to ask you because like you said before, you're not perfect. No companies perfect injuries do happen. And even if a company is going to end, it happens more often [00:57:00] than not with small businesses. So I don't have any injuries. Well, I guarantee you that your employee has gone home, injured and just never told you it's going to happen, whether it's a splinter or it's a strain or a sprain or something more significant. And they just never told you and came back to work the next day. No harm, no foul or. They left work and never came back because they got injured, so when there is an injury at your company. After all, the reporting happens and you care for the employee because I know that's part of your process and you get them the treatment that they need. What do you do around the analysis and trying to prevent that from happening again? What do you do with the information about that injury? Brian Schortz: [00:57:47] Well, you know, unfortunately, we had an injury a month ago and it was not insubstantial. It was, you know, was a fairly painful injury and some lost time. Not significant lost [00:58:00] time, but more pain and more pain and suffering than the last time. But. And you know, this is a struggle, you know, to try to get to, you know, very good at reporting it and staying on top of, you know, requirements and then getting back and figuring out, you know, we do a hazard analysis, you know, we kind of go and do that, do that, dig in. And it's often there's nothing all that, you know, this is not that complicated. We use the wrong tool for the wrong, the wrong job. And we realized it, you know, during the during the job that we just kind of put our head down and kept plowing through it and didn't happen to be a site supervisor, you know, on site that day. And, you know, maybe it might have been different, you know, had there been someone, you know, someone at that level on site. But when you don't take the time you realize you've you don't have the right tool on site that day, the cost of not going back to the shop was significantly less [00:59:00] than the cost of the physical pain. And you know that this person went through by getting hit in the face with a drill that got seized up on a wall. So it's just really getting back to folks and letting them know now that no one had bad intentions there. You know, the intention was they had no, they didn't think anything bad would come of it, but ultimately they also knew that it wasn't the primary tool for the job. So just letting them know that's not the right answer and that we're all here to support. If they're 30 minutes away, they call the office, someone can bring them the right tool if they can't get back there. It's just making sure that they know there are options or not firewalled into just walking straight ahead. Straight ahead all the time. Elise Brown: [00:59:50] One thing I'd like to add to that is as a system oriented person, I always think about, Well, how can we make this different so that it's less [01:00:00] likely to happen? And you know, when you think of human nature, it's so hard to stop, you know, people just want to keep going. So I when an accident like that happens, you know, I really want to understand and help communicate to the crew, you know, the steps they can take to help prevent it. But then I want to take it back, you know, a few steps back in the process and think, how can we make it even less likely that it would even be an option to occur? So, you know, for me, it's like, do we need more of those tools available? Do we need a different packing system? So it's always on the truck? You know, what are those kinds of steps that happen five, six, seven, 10 steps prior to even, you know, being standing at the wall using the drill in the first place? So it does take a willingness to look at a lot of different layers. And that's really hard to do when you're a small business and you're just trying to stay afloat. And sometimes we succeed [01:01:00] and really, you know, digging to the bottom of it and sometimes the best we do is put some ointment and a Band-Aid on and hope. I hope we get the time to really look deeply. A little later on. And that's a hard thing to be honest about. I think sometimes Peter Koch: [01:01:19] You're both right on the money, and I love that you really described a progression that many businesses go through. Some stay at the we've reported it. We've taken care of the employee and it's done. Some take the next step, take that data and bring it back to the employee to recognize that the tool wasn't used correctly. And then there's the next step of looking at it, as there was a decision that was made to not use the tool correctly and then the decision to not go back and get the right tool. And then finally, that that next step or that downstream step of how do you integrate the solution of using [01:02:00] the right tool or having the right tool available or eliminating the decision back to the systems process? And that's a really great progression. And you hit the nail on the head super hard to do and super hard to do. Whether you are a small business, small business owner, a medium business or you're an enormous business, there's just. Different challenges that come up because an enormous business in order to change a system could take an act of Congress where the benefit that you have of a smaller group, you can actually tweak the system in order to make a more reasonable or a reasonable change in a small amount of time. So there is benefits on both sides. One might have more resources and as a small business, you're a lot more agile to make to make better decisions as or change decisions to go forward. So great. Great example, and I appreciate you just taking the time to explain that process to us and be a little vulnerable there. You know, I asked you a [01:03:00] pretty challenging question around, you know, what are your injuries? And it's never easy to admit that, yeah, they happen to us too. But they do. They do happen. All right. So I got one more question and this will go to both of you guys. So what's the one thing that you know now about workplace safety that you wish you would have known when you started out? Brian Schortz: [01:03:23] I was thinking about this earlier today. Not directly, but I was thinking about what makes someone who's in the safety role of an organization potentially successful and assuming a lot of other things being there, is, you know, finding someone who has the passion for safety. You know, I found that when Elise joined Evergreen, she came in, you know, with a zeal, you know, and a concern and a focus, you know, about safety that you know that frankly, I cared about people and I, you know, we had that caring culture, [01:04:00] you know, really wasn't it didn't focus on the safety side of it the same way. And Elise, such a passion and kind of a drive for it that that allows, you know, the business to really to strive in that level. So putting someone, you know, trying to match up a skill set with that, you know, with someone that's in charge of safety that truly has a passion that cares about it. And you know, I think is part of making a program that will be vibrant. Peter Koch: [01:04:31] Yeah, passion is a huge part. And you know, I wish I had recognized that when I was first starting out, that safety is not just all about the data. There's a lot of personal drive and commitment that's going to make it successful. So great. Thank you for that insight, Brian. Elise, what about you? What's the one thing that you wish you had known when you started out about workplace safety? Elise Brown: [01:04:55] Well, I gave my answer away already when I talked about the nice curve [01:05:00] that Randy gave us with our data. But here is another thing, and that is that I wish I had understood better how much mental health is such a critical part of safety. And COVID has just made it altogether clear that workplace safety is every bit as centered around mental health as it is around physical health and safety. I think that would have been beneficial for us had we realized and incorporated that sooner. Peter Koch: [01:05:31] Yeah. So can I follow up on that a little bit? I think we've talked about a number of threads throughout this podcast around that will address mental health. But so what are some of the learnings that COVID has brought up that you've implemented to help employees with that mental health that would pay dividends in safety later on? Elise Brown: [01:05:50] I don't think we have the answers yet. I think this is all pretty new territory. But you know, I think as a small, sort of family oriented [01:06:00] company, we've always understood that, you know, people's personal lives matter and that you kind of bring a certain amount of your mental equilibrium or lack thereof to work on a daily basis. But the stresses of COVID, you know, really brought out that some people have a lot of instability at home and that that can have an effect on the team esprit de corps. It can have an effect on how patient people are and how willing they are to proceed cautiously. You know, it can make people maybe drive more erratically. Who knows? You know, there are all kinds of ways in which mental health stress can make it harder for a company's safety culture to be successful. And so, you know, just kind of trying to create a place where we're much more aware of that and we're kind of got our radar, you know, kind of out to sense how people [01:07:00] are doing from a mental standpoint so that we can maybe talk to the supervisors or help them. I mean, they're not immune, either, you know, it's a big thing and we don't know yet. We're really at the very beginning of learning about this. Brian Schortz: [01:07:15] And that's a whole other podcast. Peter Koch: [01:07:16] Good. All right. We'll talk about that maybe in a few months when we get some learning, but I think the awareness that's a really insightful again, another really insightful part that mental health has a lot to do with the success of your safety program. And when I think about safety is being the foundation of what you build, your productivity and quality on mental health and the ability of the person to really understand the impact of their choices on their safety. And then especially when you're working in a tight space with a couple other team members, somebody else's safety. That's huge. And so recognizing that if my mental health isn't where it needs to be, if [01:08:00] I'm not focused on what my job steps are, I could easily put somebody else at substantial risk for injury, especially working in a tight space and with some of the hazards that you guys have to manage on the job. Elise Brown: [01:08:13]  Here's a quick example. Brian Schortz, you said

KNBR Podcast
Forever Young Foundation: Bay Area Youth EMT Program

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 2:02


The BAY EMT Program was created in 2002 in Oakland, California. The program was originally designed to teach the EMT curriculum to Oakland high school students. Our current recruitment efforts have expanded to include young adults from the inner-cities of all neighboring bay area communities.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Conflict Radio
Episode 136 Demons, Shadow People & Negative Spirits, How To Tell The Difference with June Lundgren

Conflict Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 91:38


June Lundgren is a psychic medium, animal communicator, healer, nurse, demon seer, international paranormal investigator, and author with over 40 years of experience in the paranormal field. As a child she communicated with spirits, animals, and angels.June served in the military where she trained as a nurse and EMT. After returning from the military she continued to work in the medical field as a nurse and is currently the founding member of http://www.ghostsandgirlsparanormal.com/June's Website: https://mysticconnections.org/Join this channel to get access to perks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHzWqM_Xm-EgRfwt2cbBAHQ/joinConflict Radio - Discord Linkhttps://discord.com/invite/MykTtkvDRMConflict Radio - Episode 136 Demons, Shadow People & Negative Spirits, How To Tell The Difference with June Lundgren https://conflictradio.net/

EMS Today
Clinician Versus Technician – Part 1

EMS Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:50


As EMS transitions to a more proactive primary care role in the field, how are we in education creating the context needed for students to succeed?  Greg Johnson joins us for this discussion. He is the EMT/AEMT Coordinator at Columbia State Community College where he leads a highly successful EMT and Advanced EMT program. He is well-versed in didactic, practical, and clinical development of the EMS student and provides a wealth of experience for this discussion.  * Clinicians versus skill junkies * Accreditation Critical Question * Field Start * Clinicians over Technicians * Clinical Early Start * Simulation Training * Avocado Pit Poisoning * Crawl- Walk- Run * Into the Pass Rate Weeds * Building the Autonomous Role in 15- Weeks * Are Textbooks Needed? * Paramilitary Style Approach * Closing Words Resources ET3 Model Don't forget to go to our newly redesigned website at www.emshandoff.com.  Subscribe rate and review the EMS Today Podcast by JEMS and the EMS Handoff YouTube Channel. …and don't forget to go to www.thepursueco.com and find the great EMS Handoff Merchandise. 

The Professional Brotherhood™
108 - The Chase! Who's Responsible? w/ DC Heath Pannell and Lt. Cecil Hunter

The Professional Brotherhood™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:50


Who's responsible for helping to ensure a firefighters success?  Is it on the leadership to follow up and make sure that he/she/they have all the tools necessary and follow up regularly, or is it on the firefighter to chase down the leadership to ensure they own success?Join Brian, Kara and guests deputy chief Heath Pannell and Lt. Cecil Hunter as we discuss this, as well as mentorship, leadership and the retention of members.About our guests:Joining Dry Creek Vol. Fire Department in northeast Mississippi in 1999, Heath Pannell has literally spent nearly half his life at his hometown station. Starting as a cadet  (RAM) and working his way up through the ranks, Chief Pannell has worked hard to provide the community with specialty-trained personnel and state of the art equipment. Heath is a field instructor for the MS Fire Academy, ICS Trained Commander, MS FireFighter II, as well as many other certifications and areas of study.  Chief Pannell visits fire departments in the region teaching “station-building” seminars, as well as instructing new entry-level firefighters. He currently serves Dry Creek Fire & Rescue as Deputy Chief, and will mark 22 years this month. Heath hosts “Meeting Night Podcast,” a show geared towards firefighters and departments in rural areas. Heath is married to a firefighter/nurse, Lt. Amanda Pannell, and they have three children. The family resides on a 90 acre farm in Northern Mississippi. Cecil Hunter has been a volunteer firefighter since 2010.  He currently serves as a lieutenant with the Liberty Fire Department in Sullivan County, NY.  About our hosts:Brian Soller has been an active volunteer for the last 30+ years.  He currently serves as assistant chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department and for the past 17 years has been a New York state fire instructor assigned to Sullivan County, NY.  Soller also served as chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department from 2018 - 2020 and chief of the Monticello Fire Department from 2001-2002.Soller has also been a New York State emergency medical technician for the last 25+ years. He speaks extensively on the promotion of professionalism in the volunteer fire service through his podcast and YouTube channel. Follow us on social @professional.brotherhood @chiefsollerOn the web at professionalbrotherhood.comSend future episode suggestions or comments on past episodes to professionalvff@gmail.com.Interested in being a guest on the show?  Please email professionalvff@gmail.com.Kara Judd, is a six year member of the Cazenovia Fire Department where she currently serves as a Lieutenant and Emergency Medical Technician. Kara is also a certified Critical Incident Stress Debriefer as well as an AFAA certified fitness instructor and the owner of Saint Florian Fitness. Her full time career is at the Upstate Medical Hospital in Syracuse, NY where she is the Data and Burn Prevention Outreach Coordinator. On social @st.florianfitness 

Real Ghost Stories Online
Paranormal EMS | True Ghost Stories

Real Ghost Stories Online

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:35


What happens on the job for one EMS worker is anything but “routine”, its paranormal! Here is a preview of the story.  “I've always been a light sleeper and especially had trouble falling asleep on shift, so, past midnight if I ever did sleep it was fitful at best.  One night, around 2 am, while I was lying awake at the station, I got a call from the dispatcher asking me to come to the dispatch, which was connected to crew quarters at station 3.  When I got there, she was clearly shaken and asked me if there were any other crews there.  I said I hadn't seen or heard any.  She claimed to have looked up and, through the windows separating dispatch from the hall outside, seen a crew member, in uniform, facing away from her, studying the bulletin board.  She had glanced away, not immediately recognizing that anything was out of place, as a crew member being at the main station getting supplies or something was not terribly uncommon even at that time of night.  A moment later when, having realized that the crew member in question was neither my partner nor me, when we were the only crew that had checked in at the station in the last few hours, she looked up and the figure was gone.  She had not heard him leave, though he would have had to walk right past her window, nor had enough time elapsed for him to sneak past.   When I first started working there a few years before, my very first day was a tragic one.  One of the employees had committed suicide the night before.  Though I had not worked with him, I had done clinical ride-outs with the service during EMT school, and he had been one of my preceptors.  Years later the dispatcher, who had not worked there at the time and would not have known this employee, in describing the figure she saw, seemed to be describing the deceased paramedic.  Granted this was done from a brief glance at his back, but she got the hair color and the general build just right.” The day after this happened, my son and his family had to go home.  I was sitting in my favorite spot outside after they left; it was a beautiful sunny day with no wind - and I'd only been sitting there alone for a few minutes when I saw movement out of the corner of my eye - a beautiful white feather was descending to the ground in a circular movement as in a straight down coil, about 3 feet from me - I looked up - there were no birds.  There was no breeze.  there were no trees over me.   But I saw that feather and I felt good.  In my head, I felt the words "thank you."” Watch more at: http://www.realghoststoriesonline.com/ If you have a real ghost story or supernatural event to report, please write into our show or call 1-855-853-4802! If you like the show, please help keep us on the air and support the show by becoming an EPP (Extra Podcast Person). We'll give you a BONUS episode every week as a "Thank You" for your support. Become an EPP here: http://www.ghostpodcast.com/?page_id=118 or at or at http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories

Trust the Journey .today
87: Walking Each other Home – Kiley

Trust the Journey .today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 116:22


In this episode, Jay interviews Kiley as part of our new “Walking Each other Home” series. Kiley is a life coach, EMT, skydiver, paraglider, high liner, and more. Jay and Kiley discuss their friendship and how they met, sexual identity, love, polyamory, and dive deeply into the story of Kiley's friend and lover, Kent. Thank […]

Top Hill Recording
Nikolai Stevens - Music is an Outlet for Self-Reflection and Artistic Expression

Top Hill Recording

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:54


Nikolai Stevens is a folk singer/songwriter from California based out of Nashville, TN. He's worked as a mountain guide and EMT while pursuing music as a means of self-reflection and artistic expression. In 2020 he released his debut EP, "Orchard Ave", a collection of his first songs ranging from fictional stories like "'68 Camaro" to deeper personal cuts like "Prodigal Son". His next album, "Just In Case", is a concept album set to release November 26th, 2021, with single "Velvet Glove" coming out on October 16th, 2021, and single "I Want to Know" coming out November 3rd. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tophillrecording/support

Joni and Friends Ministry Podcast
Finding New Purpose After My Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Diagnosis – Cady Bell

Joni and Friends Ministry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:29


“God wastes nothing, even disability. He has a purpose for you right where you are.”After receiving her EMT certification, Cady Bell was on the path to becoming a doctor to use her skills in service overseas. But when she began experiencing severe pain, seizures, stomach issues, and fainting, her life's plan dramatically changed. As Cady searched for the cause of her symptoms, her intensifying health challenges forced her to drop out of school and quit her job.On the Joni and Friends Ministry Podcast, Cady is sharing her journey to finding a diagnosis for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a rare connective tissue disorder that affects mobility and strength. This invisible disability that has no cure has brought physical and emotional ups and downs, but has also beautifully deepened her relationship with God—something she wouldn't trade for perfect health. Hear how EDS helped Cady discover new joy and purpose and how she's using her struggles to reach other women who might feel hopeless in their hardships. Follow Cady on InstagramGet your copy of Doing Life TogetherSee all podcast resources Questions or comments? Email Crystal at podcast@joniandfriends.orgSupport Joni and Friends to help make this podcast possible. Joni and Friends envisions a world where every person with a disability finds hope, dignity, and their place in the body of Christ. Join us in answering the call in Luke 14:21-23... until his house is full! Founded by author and international disability advocate Joni Eareckson Tada, the ministry provides Christ-centered care that serves needs and transforms hearts through Joni's House, Wheels for the World, and Retreats and Getaways. Joni and Friends also equips individuals and churches with disability ministry training and provides higher education courses and internships through the Christian Institute on Disability. Find more encouragement through Joni's radio podcast, daily devotional, or by following us on Facebook,  Instagram, and YouTube.

Handle with Care:  Empathy at Work
Empathy and Connection for Start-ups: an interview with Selfless.ly

Handle with Care: Empathy at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:39


- Joshua Driver And so it's always been confusing to me why startups don't think about their culture from day one. And because we spend so much of our wake time at work, especially on our stage and the positive vibes or feelings you get out of helping others or contributing to the betterment of your community or society or making a difference for somebody else is such an important experience I think everybody should have,   INTRO   Why aren't we focusing on culture from Day 1?  Today, we look at building connection in the world of start-ups.  My guests are Josh Driver and Zach Rodenbarger from Selfless.ly.  They have a lot to say about how to build connection AND their technology platform is also a platform for companies to give back, so this is like a double-impact interview.    Zach and Josh's origin story begins just before the pandemic, launching their platform with high hopes and ideals into a pretty brutal business environment.    They are talking about how they sustained connection, built their company, and expanded the scope of influence in the midst of the dual pressures of start-up life and a bruising global pandemic.  As a bit of a teaser, you will hear about the importance of taking a walk, how “hangry” can get in the way of communication, and why Nerf guns could be a good idea for your office culture.    Zach and Josh are both tech guys who are from the same Indiana town of Valparaiso.  The met in 2018, committed to the concept of building a platform where companies and individuals can give not just money but time and effort to support causes that matter.  The website describes the platform memorably:  “Selfless.ly is a unique company that was designed by selfless people to help the world become a better place.”     - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I'd love to hear from both of you. Why do you think that that is even an important conversation to be having? And how would you define empathy work to me.   - Zach Rodenbarger There's a few tangible examples.   That is Zach Rodenbarger, the COO of Selfless.ly   - Zach Rodenbarger Sometimes in our interactions, Josh will come in or I'll come in and we'll have something and go back and forth. And then one of us will say, do you need to go for a walk?   - Zach Rodenbarger And I was like.   - Zach Rodenbarger Yes, I need to go for a walk. I need a little fresh air, you. And maybe that's just because we've been at our computers for a couple of hours or longer and need to have take a pause and have a step back. And so we've had that over the year, especially when we're working hard and looking at new timelines and goals and things. And I know I've needed a walk or two here and there.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes We had other good practices. Sometimes it's a walk. I also find that sometimes it's a snack. I have you eaten recent links to a snack?   - Joshua Driver Yes. We've encountered the snack situation as well. Yes. Hunger is a thing so much.   And this is Josh Driver, fellow-hangry sufferer and the Founder of Selfless.ly   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes That was like one of my biggest learning curves early on in my marriage. I I used to think it was just Luke. It's totally both of us be like, Is this really a thing, or am I just really hungry right now? And you can't know until you're no longer hungry, like, you can't even find out.   - Zach Rodenbarger I think that's a good follow up on empathy. It's probably easier to see in other people. And then when do we take that step back and look at ourselves and actually admit that? And I think that is really helpful to business partnership or even as we continue to onboard new employees, you know, thinking through, how am I coming across to others?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But also, do you put yourself in their shoes and how are they feeling and so kind of both well and hearing that it actually takes a foundation of some relationship and trust to be able to take someone suggestion to do something like, go for a walk. I can imagine that a less mature or self aware moments. Somebody being like, maybe even the way it could be delivered. Just go take a walk. Somebody being like, I don't need a walk. You need a walk? No, I'm just making a really good point.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But to be able to be at a place where I imagine it takes some work get to that point.   - Zach Rodenbarger Absolutely.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes A lot of times I find with guests or people I get to work with those that really, like, are doing the work of promoting more human workplaces and more connection at work. There's an element that comes out of their own personal experience. So I would love to hear from both of you a time where meeting that connection and empathy at work was really important in your own personal story, so that could be giving it to someone or a time where you were like, I'm not. Okay. I need some support right now.   - Joshua Driver Yeah. I think when I left the startup space and went into a corporate job, I came into a workplace environment and culture that might have been a little hostile and toxic. Like, there is a big disconnect between the leadership and the teams and the mentality of you're lucky to have a job versus we're lucky to have you as an employee. I wasn't exactly realized yet. And I had noticed when I join the company in my role that there was a lot of hostile communication. People had segregated themselves on one side or another and coming into that since I had been startups for so long and been on the ground for creating that culture.   - Joshua Driver That was very new to me to be in the middle of this disconnect. And it taught me personally about how I want my next company to run and where I think we needed to head and be ego free and transparent and communicate in more of a we're all on the same level here. Like, don't view me as your boss. We're just jumping in together to fix an issue. And I think as far as feeling left out or where I really could have used some support was when my first full time job was as an EMT here, then wished hospital and going through some of the things for the first time and all the trauma there.   - Joshua Driver There's no debrief or support. I think it's better now than it was, but you kind of had to process and cope individually with some of the things that you would see. And so that was really difficult for me to overcome at times when you have to process seeing the such negative things at times.   - Joshua Driver Quite frankly, like volunteering someplace and getting the I feel like I'm making a positive difference outside of the trauma of emergency medicine was a big driving factor. A lot of my coworkers and stuff would turn to substance abuse and other things sometimes, but I was fortunate enough to have a good support system, whether it was my family or friend group to where if things were really getting rough, that somebody would jump in and say, hey, let's catch up or reconnect. And so I was lucky in that regard.   - Joshua Driver But a lot of first responders, unfortunately, don't have that type of network to help them with that.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Thank you for sharing that. And I imagine even as you talk about the importance of volunteering, that there's a through line to some of what you're currently doing.   - Joshua Driver Yeah.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Zach, how about for you?   - Zach Rodenbarger So for me, with thinking through empathy in my past experiences, we can look to even just in the early days of self asleep and thinking about, hey, we both took this leap to start something new. And then about six months later, COVID hits. And so how do we work through this time where everything just radically changed, where we just launched the company? We launched the company in January and February of 2020. And then a month later, radically different thinking through. How is my co founder feeling right now?   - Zach Rodenbarger How do I stay optimistic and pass that along to him and vice versa? We're both kind of feeling these challenges and seeing this real time, right that we had these ideas and projections and we're going to create group, volunteering outdoors, and we're going to invite people to these events and then that's not going to happen. And so how do we really think through and change that strategy? But also, how did I think through, you know, both of us leaving our corporate jobs to do this. And so losing that security and saying, okay, I understand that this is maybe something he's going through right now and the pressure he's going through.   - Zach Rodenbarger So how do I stay optimistic to then pass that along and vice versa? And that was really helpful during those times?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Did you ever have days where you were both just like, really down in the dumps? It wasn't like one person could encourage the other. It was just both low, especially early on in that pandemic.   - Zach Rodenbarger For me, I think for the most part, one or the other would see that and feel that and maybe because we're both high empaths. So if Josh was down, I was like, I can't be or vice versa. He may have a different perspective, but I remember thinking that. And so even though it was a really tough day, this is what it's all about. And so I'll stay positive or vice versa. And he would look at me be like, this is when he needs to step up.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah,   - Joshua Driver I can't remember specifically when we had those times. But I remember even if we were going to be talking to a specific person turning in, saying, I don't have an inmate today to have this conversation. Do you mind just taking this on your own and doing that? I remember a few times where we had that discussion where if we're both feeling challenged, which is actual, we there. See, I think there were a few times where we might have just said, let's just call it a day early and go for a walk or go get a slice of pizza or something and and get out of the office for a little bit or go to the Lake each like, I think within reason we would step up on behalf of each other where we needed to.   - Joshua Driver It was just not the perfect day. Just saying, alright, let's take a break in re energize and come back to it tomorrow.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes That can be so good. And it sounds like really, of course, of course, that would be a good thing to do. But it's amazing how hard sometimes it can feel in the moment, especially with the entrepreneurial churn and pressures and one's own expectations. So I acknowledge how important that can be and how like sometimes it can feel harder to do than it seems is a good job cutting.   - Joshua Driver I like to just get burn myself out trying to work on the issue at hand. Zach, does a really good job of cutting me off for like of a meter and saying, this is all the time we have for this. We need to move on. Otherwise, I'll sit down whatever whatever issue is at hand. So he does a good job of saving my own sanity.   - Zach Rodenbarger I definitely like to break tasks up into the smallest parts and pieces and just get something done for that day or something like that. And Josh definitely wants to power through and accomplish it all in one day.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah, I am that trait, Josh. It makes me think there was a there was a friend that I had in College and we used to kind of like joke about his mindset. We would joke that Ben would break his whole day down into micro goals, and it always allowed him to feel good about himself because he would be like, I'm on even the little things. Like, I'm gonna walk through the quad more efficiently than ever before and talk to two people. And I used to think like, what a funny quirk about how Ben's mind works.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But now I look and I'm like, man, Ben was probably just 15 years ahead of all of us in self awareness of like, oh, that's maybe a key to living like a more bounded and contented existence than the rest of us had a handle on at 22.   - Joshua Driver Yes, Zach is close to that, and I envy that very much because I don't have that level of organization and granularity that see and your friends have.   MUSICAL TRANSITION Building connection at work is important…and it can be hard to know where to start.  What can you do to support the mental health of your people, to care for them and keep them engaged in the midst of all of the pressures and disruption?  You don't have to figure it out on your own; let Handle with Care Consulting help.  With keynote options, certificate programs, and coaching sessions available, we have a solution to meet your needs and budget.  Sign up for a free consultation at lieselmertes.com.  Together, we can put empathy to work.    MUSICAL TRANSITION   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I find in building connections with people, there are times where it feels really easy and natural and times where it's a lot more challenging. What are times in either of you or both of you can answer where building connection at work feels really easy for you. And why.   - Joshua Driver Interesting. I would say that I'm   - Joshua Driver I love to people watch, and I'm always interested in everybody's story. How did you get to where you are today? What experiences have you had? And so it's easy for me to get to know people because I'm just naturally just so curious about everyone's story.   - Zach Rodenbarger I find I have to be maybe a little more intentional to provide that space to connect. And maybe that even goes to our overall topic of empathy to take a second and say, okay, if I was coming in on the first day or the second week, how would I want to be treated? Because I think it's easy for me. And as I mentioned earlier, probably Josh, it's easy for us to just kind of put our heads down and work. And so taking that time and being giving that space as well to make the connection, even if it's at lunch time only or something.   - Zach Rodenbarger But at least you're very focused on allowing that space to chat and providing that because I know for me during the workplace, well, we'll chat later or something, but if you don't provide that space, then obviously it's harder to make that connection, especially in the first week, the first six months, and things like that and thinking, when would I want to have someone reach out to me whether they're a colleague, a boss, or even an intern can be anything.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah. That reminds me of even a slide that I was showing yesterday and a talk that I was doing about imagination and empathy. I hear that a little bit of what you're saying, and although that doesn't always get you exactly to the right place, because you can't ever fully know what another person is wanting or experiencing, it oftentimes will move you closer. What would I want on my first day or first week? And then to be able to act out of that can really close what can sometimes seem like a big distance.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes You both kind of offered some things in your answer, but I'll ask it explicitly as well. What are sometimes we're building connection at work feels difficult.   - Joshua Driver I've started to embrace more of when I am feeling extroverted versus introverted and sometimes when I'm hyper focused on something in the distraction of having to communicate or interact can be frustrating because I need the focused time and especially with new employees coming on. You want to be available and transparent and present. And at our stage right now it's really difficult to be present with everything that we need to get done. And so making sure that I'm not coming off as disinterested is something that I always in the back of my mind.   - Joshua Driver I want to make sure that I'm not conveying because it's not true. But there are some times where I just want to get something done and want to be sequestered for a little bit.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Do you have yourself in moments like that, like needing to actively engage in self talk, even about things. So I'll get my hand like I have to think about my body language and moments like that of being like, oh, I need to show attention and care right now. I'm going to do something different. Like do you do mental pivots like that? And what do they look like?   - Joshua Driver Sometimes Zach and I have been together for so long now. I can tell with his expression where I've crossed the line of of being rational more. So there are certain triggers, I think too. And he'll say, yeah, you need to maybe just spend some time by yourself for a minute and go for a lock so I will replay a situation like that in my mind and try to think through. Alright, what did I say? Did I mean to come off this way or if I don't really came off a different way than I meant to trying to understand?   - Joshua Driver Like how did this person infer that this was what I was trying to say. And so that has been helpful to rethink the experience so that I try not to replicate that. Moving forward. I.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I Imagine there's a line walk between replaying the experience and getting stuck in a never ending loop. How do you thread that needle?   - Joshua Driver Not. Well. I like to solve everything and have closure. So if there's still a difference of opinion, I like to try to really put the pressure on myself to get it resolved. And in some cases I think I don't look at difference of opinion is like who's going to win this fight and get their way? I think it's more from their background and their perspective. Is there some truth to it and allow that was Zach especially? There are some things that he's very passionate about and has a perspective that he really feels strongly.   - Joshua Driver And I'd like to think for the most part if he fully believes in something that I may not be so sure on and wants to go that I just trust him implicitly that it's the right thing and that he's very good at doing his research and looking at different aspects of things.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Well, and out of that foundation of relationship, you know what you can extend to them.   - Joshua Driver Yeah. I think we're a lot of co founders that are state right now. We don't have time to be working on every project together, be on every call together and make decisions together. And so I think if you have a co founder that you don't feel that you feel like you have to micromanage or be a part of every decision, then that's going to be a really difficult culture to scale. It's going to make your company really difficult to grow. And so everybody that we've hired and when Zach joined Selflessly is very clear.   - Joshua Driver I want the empowerment. I want to create the space for them to be empowered to make decisions that are best for a company and feel confident that they are able to execute on whatever task.   - Zach Rodenbarger Is this where I say the complete opposite?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes This is a safe space.   - Zach Rodenbarger I've been trying to obviously likewise empowering each other. And we did used to be on most of the calls and get to feel how each is thinking. And so it did help in the first month to six months to be on a lot of the calls together or as he mentioned, in the same room even. And so I can overhear his call, whether he wants me to or not and understand kind of what he's thinking, the action maybe he would take or his thinking on that his rationalization, right.   - Zach Rodenbarger What would he be thinking in the same spot and so helpful to be able to, you know, have his perspective in in the back of my mind and probably vice versa from sharing that office for the first twelve months and everything. So that's been really good.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I hear a lot of respect and self inquiry in what you both have said. And yet I imagine there's still moments where like on an emotional on a practical on an interpersonal level, you guys have missed and or hurt one another in your journey. What has making meaningful repairs looked like.   - Zach Rodenbarger Nerf guns. Yeah. I think for one of my birthday, Josh got a couple of Nerf guns for me, and so if we need, we can shoot each other, but also part of the startup mentality, right? We wanted to bring a little bit of fun into the office, but if you needed, you could shoot someone from across the room. That's been one way.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes At least I'm totally thinking of my two sons right now, and the moment where Magnus turns to Moses, and he's like, okay, you can just hit me five times in the chest. That's fine. Just don't tell mom.   - Joshua Driver The biggest issue with that is that I'm a bad shot, so I'm not even like to get I like you. I can't make my points in the same way he can, because I tend to miss him completely, whereas he's really good at targeting me. So that was, in hindsight, not a great decision for a birthday gift start.   - Joshua Driver She has to make a lot of lessons learned.   - Joshua Driver Yeah, I would recommend that to other companies unless you're really good at aiming   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes either that or you want to devote part of your work day to target practice.   - Joshua Driver Yes.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Well, maybe you guys would like to expand on the I hear like some fun, some levity, like not taking yourself too seriously. Are there other things that you do to make repairs when you guys have gotten a little bit off?   - Joshua Driver I think that we find out if if we're having a conflict, that taking the time, like taking some space and cooling down is helpful, but also eventually, once we've had time to kind of process that situation. General, I think there was a time where I went and got a Blizzard or a box of dilly bars and dropped them off at the house. His house is like a don't let go of me. Ever don't leave me gift. I'm sorry. I was cantankerous and vice versa where I think we have a cool down moment and then we Zoom out and think about it there's.   - Joshua Driver There's always an apology and then some type of affirmation about the other one.   - Zach Rodenbarger I know I take a little more time sometimes to each person has their kind of respective way to do that and to cool down. And some people want to solve it. Same day some people take the night, take the weekend and so, you know, kind of learning the team, learning the other person and thinking through that, you know, how to talk through that and when and maybe even is more important if it's right away or give some space.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Have you guys ever had misses? Because I hear a little bit. You know, Josh, you said I'm gonna solve it now. Person. And Zach, I need a little bit more time. Did you guys have a learning curve initially and full disclosure. I have had to unlearn in my adult relationships that tendency and belief of like, if I can just say it to you four different times in four different ways, we can figure it out right now. Let's keep trying. And sometimes people are like, no, just shut up.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Hard lesson.   - Joshua Driver I have had to learn that in general, my husband is similar. Where his cool down? He needs to think for a little bit and take a break. I think maybe in our early days I went back to like, don't walk away. Let's figure this out so we can move on. But then realizing that he needs a little bit more time and understanding to from his perspective, like, if he doesn't want to talk about it, it's not going to help for me trying to pull it out of them either.   - Joshua Driver So I've learned to kind of let that go that we're not going to necessarily resolve it today. But I do continue to like to think that I prioritize that moving forward so that we can eventually get through whatever that wall is that hurdle.   - Zach Rodenbarger I think my learning is definitely around witnessing people and then witnessing yourself. But it's very rare to convince someone of your perspective in an argument. And if you're both on one side, an argument is not going to convince the other person to jump on your side. And so where is that our email leading or can you take a step back and then provide the reason why you're thinking this way? The reason why that person is thinking that way. It's just interesting to see how arguments heat up and things, and there's no side switching.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes It's so true. Yeah. It makes me think of even a yet unresolved conversations argument that my husband and I are having and to be like, yeah, nobody ever switches sides in the middle like nobody is in the heat of it or very, very, very, very, very like the 1% does it happen and then usually with a fair degree of resentment.   - Joshua Driver So.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yes, that rings true.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I'm struck that you are like building culture internally, but it selflessly is also like the product itself is something that is hopefully building culture and connection in the workplace. Tell me a little bit about how selflessly and volunteering and thinking outside of yourself is good for people in for workplaces.   - Joshua Driver But I think as we see culture being a normal discussion and given that we're still in a pandemic and becomes such a volatile polarizing environment in the world everywhere.   - Joshua Driver I always try to find, like silver linings or ways to maybe take take a moment to step away from the reality. And for me, my coping mechanism is to help others. And the reason why I've been able to spend that time to help others is because I've been very privileged and had the ability to do that where I understand that's not everybody's story coming out at our platform in understanding from not every company is a Lily or a Salesforce that has massive teams that work on these big the initiatives and have the resources.   - Joshua Driver There are a lot of companies I mean humans are humans, whether you work at a Fortune 50 company or a small startup.   - Joshua Driver And so it's always been confusing to me why startups don't think about their culture from day one. And because we spend so much of our wake time at work, especially on our stage and the positive vibes or feelings you get out of helping others or contributing to the betterment of your community or society or making a difference for somebody else is such an important experience.   - Joshua Driver I think everybody should have, but unfortunately, we work all the time or we have kids or other responsibilities that limit that time. So we set out to build selflessly so that companies didn't have to try to scrape the bottom the barrel to be able to provide purpose or the positive opportunities or the community engagement. We wanted to be a partner, so every company can experience the positive effects of being a crime brand or socially responsible organization, and that for a long time has only been afforded to gigantic organizations.   - Joshua Driver And so we wanted to be be the platform everyone can use. And so we have to be obviously an innovative with the pandemic and all these things that have changed the logistics on the nonprofit side. And unfortunately, a lot of this responsibility falls on nonprofits who are trying to keep their doors open and working on their mission. And so we took on the responsibility of of taking that work off of nonprofits and working on educating companies on how they can integrate philanthropy into normal business practices like employee engagement or team building or culture or heck, even the competitiveness of the sales Department.   - Joshua Driver How do we leverage a philanthropic component while a bunch of type as I go tell each other or something? And I think if there's always even a component of that philanthropic, if there's just even a small piece that goes back or gives back, I think that that's a really great thing to hard wire into a company's culture.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Zach, anything you want to add?   - Zach Rodenbarger Yeah, I think obviously what Josh said, one of my kind of tag lines, even as we reach out to teams and think about them is kind of selfless. Teams make the best teams. And when you're have employees that are thinking about each other and how to help each other and not always just focused on their task, that's obviously going to make a better team and environment and better teamwork. And so by thinking through, how do we make selfless employees that's really part of selflessly is to help those employees encourage those employees, not Joe's employees to find a volunteer opportunity or find a way to give back to support a cause they care about to have those matching donations from the company and actually use those.   - Zach Rodenbarger And so all of these nudges that we want to help create selfless employees that are thinking about others and not just themselves. And so when you think about others that leads to that teamwork, really, everyone creating a better environment. And so putting all that together with what Josh said is exciting, that this is something we get to work on each day.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah. Well, my brain can't help but go to some sociological context. You know, I think in generations before, what you are tapping into is this, like human desire to be a part of something bigger, to be giving back, and that there was a while in the US where that was filled by a Church that was asking for a time, and hopefully they were giving towards meaningful things in that way. But that has become less and less central in American communities. There's still this impulse, but not quite the same.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes You know, there were good and bad things about that prior model, but there's not that same sort of, like regular outlet. And we're also more connected in theory, to the needs of the world. But through the lens of social media, which doesn't often lead to direct action. So, like emotional sensing, selves are out there like feeling all these things. But there's not this bridging, it towards action that feels like it builds up like a physical, real community that we're regularly a part of. And that selflessly kind of helps to bridge some of those, like sociological shifts with a meaningful offering.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah.   - Joshua Driver I think without sounding like a sound bite, I feel philanthropy in the connection between a donor and a nonprofit or a company in its community or wherever this for profit and nonprofit connection is. For decades, we've given money to our Church, to the United Way, these intermediaries to trust that that's been utilized in the best way or is going towards the mission. And I think with technology improving and transparency, we've seen over time organizations that may not have made the best choices with the money that have come in and the the biggest concern is that this person had maybe a bad experience with this organization.   - Joshua Driver Are they going to find another one to support, or are they just going to stop supporting? And that's a big concern. And so now there's this big push for having more control over where people can donate and not necessarily have to be relegated to the confines of somebody's of an organization, agencies or whatever. But what that means is more transparency needs to be done on the nonprofit side. And the nonprofits don't have the resources necessarily to be able to give up regular updates about a campaign or whatever.   - Joshua Driver And so we've set up nonprofits to kind of fail from that regard. And then Conversely, I think we nonprofits. They're always fundraising. I've started my own nonprofit. We're always trying to raise more money so we can continue with our mission. And that leaves people out that may not have the liquidity or the resources to be able to participate financially, and we have to jump in. Or at least we take on some of the responsibility of how do we jump in and equate somebody skills and volunteer time to be worth just as much, if not more than them writing a check.   - Joshua Driver And so I think it's a generational shift about what philanthropy is starting to look like when we launch selflessly as we continue to grow selflessly. There's always people from the charitable sector that have their own perspective. You need to trust. This organization has been around for a century that they're just going to be doing the right thing. But we tend to grow because people want to break out of what the mold of philanthropy has been and want to have more control and be able to make more direct impact by us connecting those two sides and really always innovating on how to keep those two sides connected.   - Joshua Driver That means more resources go to the charitable sector. It just looks a little different. It's not an entry on a bank account. It might look like a donated product or a brainstorming session or some skilled services, but it can be helpful to breaking up some of the foundational infrastructure is a good thing, and I think we're along over you to really start shaking the tree and and changing what is no longer working. And that's a hard thing for people that have been in this space for a long time to necessarily want to accept.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah, something that I heard both of you say as a mark of differentiation that you have cultivated and enjoy is a sense of whimsy, and maybe not taking ourselves too seriously. Tell me how that shows up in selflessly.   - Joshua Driver Well, my office looks like a kid play room. I just have random stuff all over the place, and then we have a Bulldog in the office. But I think the way that we talk to people, the way that we put ourselves out there, we didn't win the virtual background thing when you made those for your background as your company logo and all the strategic stuff. We didn't do that. I put on a background of me standing at the podium on Jeopardy or just keeping it. I'm sure people for first impression at times like, who the hell is this guy?   - Joshua Driver But I think that if we were always trying to display, everything is running great. We don't have any problems. We're constantly growing and just a few months away from being the Jeff Bezos to this is really nobody believes that. First of all, instead of constantly say everything is working. There isn't one company that everything's running smoothly, but I think we personality, my personality. We would probably suppress a lot of who we are individually if we always had to worry about being a highlight reel and being being always on and calculated and putting on this this front.   - Joshua Driver And I think having more real conversations, joking around, making mistakes, owning them and moving on or being open about what we've messed up for, mistakes we've made, I think, is so much more valuable in creating a deeper connection with our staff, which our network, our investors and being open and also accepting of the feedback too.   Joshua Driver We don't want to be a vendor or a tech provider. We want to be a partner. And I think that us being vulnerable and embracing that were not perfect, I think, is important to set that expectation for whom we're interacting with.   - Zach Rodenbarger Absolutely. You want to be able to have fun with your team. You want your team to be able to have fun with customers and on those conversations. And you want people to look forward to having time together, whether it's on a Zoom call or in person, especially for your internal team. But then that customers start to feel that as well and enjoy the conversations with you. And maybe in the software, you start to see certain aspects and certain animations come across the screen or something like that.   - Zach Rodenbarger You're starting to see a little bit of other software as well, but we want to be have that enjoyment, especially if we're looking at company culture and encouraging people to get out and have some enjoyment and purpose and things like that. We want to come through in our mission and our software and allow really customers internal external everyone to start to see that, feel that and really enjoy the software and enjoy working with selflessly and working for selflessly.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes If listeners are intrigued about the platform, the mission, you guys in your story, where can they go to find out more about selflessly and how it can be used to build and increase the sense of connection at work?   - Joshua Driver Yeah.   - Joshua Driver Our website is Selflessly. I and our social media Tags or give selflessly on the Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and our email address the general email for Zach, it is Hello at Selflessly IO.   - Joshua Driver And.   - Joshua Driver We get all kinds of requests companies that want to become B Corps or our favorite messages or hey, I want to. We're a small company and we don't think that we can really make an impact. Can you show us how to do it like those are the things we really enjoy spending time with. Also, I think hearing from people that may want to start their own company or want to brainstorm. Sometimes we make time to have a coffee with a potential entrepreneur or give some feedback, help others where we can.   - Joshua Driver We'd love to hear from anybody who wants to reach out.   MUSICAL TRANSITION   Here are three key takeaways to build connection and care in the workplace…   Fun matters.From Nerf guns to dilly bar deliveries, introducing a little bit of levity, especially in tense and freighted situations, can be a game changer.  Where can you build some fun and some laughter into your office life? There is power in taking a break and thinking the best of the other person.You heard these two threads throughout the interview:  in offering a break or a walk to the other person, hoping and trusting that their moment of overwhelm is not their truest or best self.  This attention to the emotional temperature of a given situation is so important.  And I use it often in both my personal and professional interactions.  One way that people can move through their own disruption and overwhelm is by giving back to others.The act of moving beyond the constraints of your own situation, doing something positive for someone else, has all sorts of positive effects on the health of individuals and organizations.  If what you have heard today piques your interest, I encourage you to look up the good work that is going on at Sefless.ly.  More information about Zach, Josh, and the company can be found in the show notes.    OUTRO   To find out more about the work of Selfless.ly, visit https://selflessly.io

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast
480: The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories (Episode 480) The Story Of Why I Quit Being An EMT

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:34


EMT and first responders see some truly tragic and creepy things. Submit your story to swampdweller.net! Download Swamp Dweller Scary Stories: Itunes: https://apple.co/2L7znZp Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2WUFDG8 Check out the Swamp Dweller Merch store! http://bit.ly/32u2eh5

Heavy Lies the Helmet
Episode 81 - Thyroid Storm Chaser w/Chase Turner

Heavy Lies the Helmet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:51


Thyroid Storm and Thyrotoxicosis are often misdiagnosed due to presenting similarly to many other disease processes. How do we identify this condition? What are the standard treatment options? And how do we treat a patient who is refractory to conventional therapy? Joined by EM pharmacist, Chase Turner, we discuss all things hyperthyroidism in this podcast episode. Get CE hours for our podcast episodes HERE! -------------------------------------------- Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavyliesthehelmet Instagram @heavyliesthehelmet YouTube /heavyliesthehelmet Website heavyliesthehelmet.com Email contact@heavyliesthehelmet.com Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed on the Heavy Lies the Helmet podcast are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of their employers and their employees. Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any information available for listening on this platform. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform, but it is not a substitute for your local laws, medical direction, or sound judgment. --------------------------------------------  Crystals VIP by From The Dust | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

LifePix Relationships
211: Rewire Your Brain for Self Control

LifePix Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 5:29


This might sounds a bit far fetched but because so much of what you do is how you're brain is wired, there's more truth to it when you think about it. Going straight to the solution may very well be a sign of impulsivity. Impulsivity is a cognitive deficiency in the output phase. When you do something without thinking, when you're jumping straight to the conclusion without going thru the process, you're being impulsive. Now there are times you've got to jump straight to the solution (We don't want an EMT standing next to a patient who has blood everywhere and trying to "think about the processes"). However in many situations we think we know what the problem is and how we can fix it without going through the process. That is being impulsive and in this episode we'll start rewiring your brain for self control. To work with ST and rewire your brain, head over to www.lifepixuniversity.com/yourbrainrewired

Money Savage
Health for Life with Meghann Hempel

Money Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:00


LifeBlood BE WELL: We talked about having good health for life, how to think about and approach life's adversities, how to reframe how we think about and interact with food, and some practical tips for eating healthier.   We discussed the many adversities Meghann had to overcome and how they shaped her perspective, how the vast majority of Americans suffer from some kind of metabolic condition, and why it's imperative to think about making major changes as short term pain to get long term happiness. We talked about how beating addiction is very similar to going through the stages of grief, how if you feel you can't afford to eat healthy you can't afford to not, how to begin shifting your perspective on food, whether you're an abstainer or a moderator,  and some tips for mindful eating. We discussed making a shift to asking yourself “if this food helping or hurting me” and how those small shifts can make huge differences with Meghann Hempel, recovering fitness and food addict, a TBI survivor, mother, health and lifestyle coach, Certified Personal Trainer, Certified firefighter, advanced EMT and Primal Health Coach.    Listen to learn why you need to start chasing health instead of thinking about diet and exercise as something that has to be done because health becomes more elusive with every year! For the Difference Making Tip, scan ahead to 16:30. You can learn more about Meghann at BrainBodyAndBeyondLLC.com, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn. Thanks, as always for listening!  If you got some value and enjoyed the show, please leave us a review wherever you listen and subscribe as well.  You can learn more about us at MoneyAlignmentAcademy.com, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube and Facebook or you'd like to be a guest on the show, contact George at Contact@GeorgeGrombacher.com.

Let's Go To Court!
189: The Secret Serial Killer & a Mother

Let's Go To Court!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 143:52


It was the summer of 2004, and Charlie and Teri Brandt needed to get someplace safe. With Hurricane Ivan headed for their home in Big Pine Key, the couple went to Orlando to stay with their niece, Michelle Jones. Michelle was thrilled to have them, but toward what should have been the end of their visit, she stopped returning phone calls. So did Teri and Charlie. Finally, one of Michelle's friends went to the house to check on everyone. She was horrified by what she discovered. Then Kristin tells us about the evening of February 17, 2007. Melissa Lucio was in a panic. Her two-year-old daughter Mariah had fallen asleep, but wasn't waking up. Paramedics arrived at Lucio's apartment, and attempted to revive the little girl. But she remained unresponsive. As moments ticked by, the paramedics grew more and more concerned. The girl's body was covered in bruises. It looked like she'd been badly beaten. Melissa's other children told the EMT's that Mariah had recently fallen down the stairs, but medical personnel feared something much more sinister had occurred.  And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: The documentary, “State of Texas vs. Melissa” Wrongful Conviction podcast episode, “Melissa Lucio” “Divided Federal Appeals Court Reinstates Death Sentence for Texas Mother of Child Who May Have Died in Accidental Fall,” Death Penalty Information Center “Did Melissa Lucio, the First Hispanic Woman on Death Row in Texas, Kill Her Daughter? An Uneven New Documentary Raises More Questions Than Answers.” by Roxanna Asgarian for Texas Monthly “Doctor testifies abuse was ‘worst' he's seen,” by Allen Essex for the Valley Morning Star “Mother found guilty of murder,” by Allen Essex for the Valley Morning Star “Detective testifies in Lucio trial,” by Allen Essex for the Valley Morning Star In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Deadly Obsession” episode 48 Hours “Charlie Brandt Killed His Mom At 13 — Then Walked Free To Butcher His Wife As An Adult” by William DeLong, allthatsinteresting.com “Deadly rage brewed in ‘quiet kid'” by Robert Perez and Melissa Harris, The Orlando Sentinel “Killer tied to '89 death—wife suspected him all along” by Gary Taylor, The Orlando Sentinel YOU'RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We'd offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you'll get 25+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90's style chat room!