Podcasts about EMT

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Latest podcast episodes about EMT

Our Numinous Nature
CAVE RESCUE & JOURNEYS INTO THE UNDERWORLD | Caver | Earl Suitor

Our Numinous Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 134:32


Earl Suitor, formerly a firefighter & EMT, is an avid caver & the current Eastern Region National Cave Rescue Commission Deputy Resource Section Chief in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. We begin with why Appalachia's geology makes for good caving, then ruminate on the inherent mystery of caves, hear about the historical mining of bat guano, learn about fossils & ancient cat scratches, & the reasons behind secrecy in the caving community. In story form, Earl describes how a cave rescue plays out with examples from finding a lost couple in West Virginia to a shocking tragedy in Utah & the famous cave flood in Thailand. Earl then shares harrowing lessons learned from his firefighting & EMT days, opening profound conversations about "burn out," dying, & his interest in world religions. If you'd like to go caving & learn more, reach out to your regional caving club [grotto] through Caves.org. Music provided by Jan Laurenz"First Song on Lyre Harp"Written by Jan LaurenzCourtesy of Jan LaurenzSupport Our Numinous Nature on Patreon.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com

Life's Best Medicine Podcast
Episode 123: Frank Levandowski

Life's Best Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 63:54


Thank you for tuning in for another episode of Life's Best Medicine. At age 17 Frank Levandowski graduated as an EMT to follow in his family's footsteps as a firefighter, but he realized that his urge to help people hadn't been fully realized. At age 20 he joined the Air Force solidifying many of the core values he has instilled into his business integrity, discipline, and an unyielding will to not give up. Frank finally found himself in health care where his talents really shone through. He is the founder of a health care practice specializing in a non-surgical approach to alleviating joint pain through the use of stem cell therapy, plasma rich protein (PRP), and steroid injections. Frank believes that an approach to healing and pain relief that focuses on regenerative health, diet, and exercise has the ability to transform his patients' lives for the better. In their conversation, Brian and Frank talk about Frank's experience as a person who suffers from bipolar disorder, the spectrum of bipolar, bipolar/depression medication and side effects, Post-SSRI Sexual Dysfunction, what it is like to experience hypomania, the brain's ability to hide traumatic memories, how quitting alcohol and following a ketogenic diet can help with bipolar, the variety of different things that can trigger a bipolar episode, mental health stigma, and how a hug can save a life. Life's Best Medicine According to Frank: “I have gained so much empathy because of my struggle with suicidal depression that my life purpose and mission is to help as many people as I can while enjoying this life. Every day I wake up thinking, ‘if I can help one person by sharing my story, or by sharing what's helping me, or by sharing science, that's a pretty good life.'”1 Thank you for listening. Have a blessed day and stay healthy!   Links:   Frank Levandowski: Instagram Twitter Website   Dr. Brian Lenzkes:  Website Low Carb MD Podcast   Simply Snackin'

Sawyer and Tyler 'Splain Life
Episode 140: Skittles vs Tattoo's

Sawyer and Tyler 'Splain Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 69:51


Sawyer and Tyler discuss their bodies fighting back, EMT's, they play would you rather, and review an old sketch. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast and follow us on social media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/SplainLifeC... Twitter: https://twitter.com/splainlifepod Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/M... Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3rnpU0R... #podcast #comedypodcast #comedy

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst
Episode 108: The Lawyer as CEO: Why Law Firm Leaders Need Business Savvy with Attorney and Author, Reza Torkzadeh

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 23:34


What you'll learn in this episode: Why law firm owners need to think of themselves as CEOs The two biggest mistakes law firm owners make that prevent their firms from growing Why law firms need to scale to stay competitive How Reza's past mistakes helped him become a better leader Why knowing your firm's vision and core values is the foundation of success About Reza Torkzadeh: Reza Torkzadeh is a nationally recognized plaintiff's trial attorney who has dedicated his professional career to the pursuit of justice by exclusively representing victims in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Reza has handled numerous high-profile cases in both state and federal courts, and has served in leadership roles in litigation at the national level. He has been featured for legal commentary by the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Daily News, Los Angeles Daily Journal, San Francisco Daily Journal, New York Daily News, Metro News, Christian Science Monitor, KUSI TV, and many other news outlets and publications. Through Reza's leadership, vision and passion for representing the people, TorkLaw has established offices nationwide, in cities throughout California, Arizona, Georgia, Illinois, Nevada, Texas, Washington State, and Washington, D.C. Reza has successfully represented thousands of clients and after more than a decade of practicing law, “Representing the People” continues to be the core foundation and guiding principle of his practice and the firm. Reza is a frequently invited guest speaker and has lectured across the country on the practice of law and the civil justice system. He is a proud Honorary Board Member of the Los Angeles Trial Lawyers Charity, an active member of the Consumer Attorneys Association of Los Angeles, and President's Club Member of the Consumer Attorneys of California. Additional Resources: TorkLaw Reza's LinkedIn Transcript: Whether it's stigma or tradition, law firm owners typically don't call themselves CEOs. But according to Reza Torkzadeh, founder and—you guessed it—CEO of TorkLaw, the most successful law firm owners are the ones that run their firms like any other Fortune 500 company. Reza joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about the importance of creating a strong team and culture; why law firms are really in the business of customer service; and why any firm that wants to succeed the long term needs to scale. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Welcome to the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast. Today, my guest is Reza Torkzadeh. Reza has a successful personal injury firm located in Orange County, California. He recently wrote a book, “The Lawyer as CEO,” which we will hear all about today. Reza, welcome to the program. Reza: Hi, Sharon. Thanks so much. I appreciate the opportunity and for having me on.  Sharon: It's great to have you. Can you tell us about your career path? How did you end up where you are right now? Reza: Oh boy! Well, throughout high school and growing up, I never thought of becoming a lawyer. It was never a career path I envisioned. I originally wanted to go to medical school and be a doctor. That was my study during undergraduate. I worked a summer as an EMT driving around in an ambulance downtown. I was doing all the things you would do if you are going to medical school and you are interested in that career.  In my last year in college, I realized very quickly that the lifestyle of a doctor is one where you need to absolutely love what you're doing. My grandfather is a doctor. My uncle is a doctor. We've got doctors in the family, and I didn't feel like it was something I loved and was passionate enough about to put in those long hours and to be on call and to make those sacrifices. But I knew I loved people, and I knew I wanted to make a difference in people's lives. That's what was driving my initial desire to go to medical school. I wanted to meet patients; I wanted to help patients and treat them. So, that was still there.  The next natural option for me was going to law school. I didn't go to law school with the intention of practicing. I went to law school with the intention of using my law degree in some setting, in some business. During law school I tried a few different areas of the law. I worked at the district attorney's office. I did transactional work. I did international business as a lawyer. After every position I knew what I didn't want to do.  It was right around my third year that I discovered plaintiff's work, representing individuals on a contingency-fee basis, where if you don't win, you don't get paid. That was very attractive to me. How great to be able to provide legal representation to those who couldn't afford a lawyer and to make a meaningful change in their lives? To cut it short for this interview and podcast, that's how I ended up doing plaintiff's work, and I never looked back. Sharon: That's interesting. Most lawyers have wanted to be lawyers since kindergarten, so that's interesting. Tell us about your practice today. Reza: We're exclusively representing plaintiffs. We never represent the defense or insurance carriers, and it's 100% personal injury. We handle a wide spectrum of PI cases. The majority of our cases now, 10 years into it, are catastrophic injury or wrongful death cases, and we handle them nationwide. We've got an office presence and staff in about nine states right now. Sharon: Wow! Had you been thinking about writing your book, “The Lawyer as CEO,” for a long time? Did it come to you because of your entrepreneurial background? What was it? Reza: A great question. I wrote it almost as a way for me to reflect on the last 10 years of the law firm. I had a lot of growing pains, a lot of learning the hard way and experiences where I almost walked away from the practice altogether. I thought to myself, “What would I have wanted if I was first starting out my practice?” I would want a book. I would want to know examples. Every industry has so much support for how to do things, and yet the legal industry doesn't. They don't teach you how to be a business owner in law school. They don't teach you how important the business side is. We are a profession. We're lawyers, so we have to act accordingly; however, every law firm is still a business. You're not going to do anybody any good if you're not running it like a business should be run.  When I looked back on the last 10 years of starting and running TorkLaw, I thought about what I would have wanted on day one. It was really an exercise in vulnerability for me to write the book. I shared many things in there that I think are new to the legal world. We're so used to hearing how wonderful all the lawyers are and their great results, and we're not used to seeing the reality of what it takes to start a law firm. So, for me, it was an exercise in putting my thoughts and my journey down on paper.  It was also a way where I felt I could make a meaningful difference in the lives of all lawyers, not just new and young lawyers. Not a day goes by, Sharon, that I don't get a random email or message from a lawyer that says, “Wow! You really inspired me to take action.” That was the goal from the beginning: to put this out there and share my experiences, my ups and downs, my failures and my successes, and then ultimately my realization that in order to be an effective business owner, in order to be an effective CEO, you need to take a look at yourself. You need to look in the mirror and come to the conclusion that the buck stops with you as a business owner. Sharon: I guess that's why the title of the book stopped me. As someone who spent their professional career marketing lawyers, it's such a different thing than being an entrepreneur. How did the book change how you viewed marketing or client development? Reza: Great question. A question I asked myself before I wrote the book was if I were a CEO of a Fortune 500, publicly traded company, how long would I have lasted in that role? My response was, “Not very long.” I would have been kicked out very quickly. I think as business owners, that's a great way to measure your performance and your accountabilities. When you're at the top and you're leading an organization of 50, 60 or 100 employees, whatever it might be—it might be five employees—it's hard for those folks to be as transparent as you need them to be to hold you accountable. So, I often ask myself the question, “If I were a CEO of a Fortune 500 company, what would my board of directors say to me?” You're absolutely right; I've been practicing for 15 years, and I've never heard a lawyer-business owner call themselves a CEO. Whether it's stigma or tradition or whatever it might be, I think ultimately you have to decide whether you want to be the CEO of your company or not. Every organization, if it's meant to thrive, if it's meant to scale and grow and do meaningful work and make a change in the community, needs an effective CEO. Sharon: Maybe a lawyer wants to be successful but doesn't want to be a CEO. They want to focus on developing clients and marketing, and they say, “I'll leave the CEO to other people,” like you. What do you think about that? Reza: Absolutely. There's absolutely nothing wrong with it. It's every person's own path. They get to choose for themselves. I chose this one because I am more drawn to the business side. I'm more drawn to marketing. I'm more drawn to scaling and the big picture. I've been fortunate enough to find people on my team who are much better lawyers than I am, much better at doing the tasks than I am. So, it works. I don't think there's a right or wrong answer for a lawyer who says, “Look, I just love lawyering, and that's what I want to do for the rest of my life.” I don't think there's anything wrong with that. Sharon: Very early in my own career working with lawyers—I can't even remember who it was—I heard a managing partner or a lawyer say they thought scaling a law firm wasn't feasible. What are your thoughts about that? Reza: I disagree. At our firm, we say we're a customer service business that happens to practice law. We're in competition for the consumer. The consumer is used to a certain level of customer service and experience that you get at Apple or Amazon or Walmart or Starbucks or FedEx and these national brands we all recognize. I think where lawyers and law firms have fallen behind is this element of customer service and customer experience.  I think you can absolutely scale. It's no different than providing a product. You're providing a service, and if you're providing a good enough experience for your clients, there's no reason why you can't replicate that in other markets, in other practice areas. You have to have the right people. You have to have the right tools, the right infrastructure, of course, but if you've discovered a formula that's successful in your own law firm, the only thing that's stopping you from scaling is yourself. I think any CEO or business owner will tell you that if you're not growing, you're going in the wrong direction. When I started practicing law 15 years ago, it was competitive. The personal injury industry has always been competitive, but not as fierce as it is today. There wasn't the amount of dollars being spent on marketing as there is today. Now, you've got hedge funds and banks and venture capital firms that are dumping money into law firm marketing. In order to survive the next 10, 15, 20, 25 years, and in order to be competitive with these behemoths that are spending hundreds of millions of dollars a year on marketing, in a way you have to scale. You have to grow to stay competitive. Sharon: Did the book change how you look at clients, how you market or how you develop your people? Reza: Absolutely. The exercise of the book was itself a reflection. Our lives are so crazy. Oftentimes I describe it as being inside of a tornado. Writing the book allowed me to quiet everything down and put on paper what's in my mind. It made me focus on the things we were doing. If I'm talking about customer service in the book, it made me focus on, “O.K., what are we doing step by step, A through Z, for customer service?”  It's the same thing for marketing. One of the biggest realizations for me—and I included this in the book—was ego-play marketing, which is seeing your face on a billboard or on TV or hearing it on the radio. Just because you see it doesn't necessarily mean it's effective and that there's a positive ROI on it. It made me self-reflect, to go back and dig deeper. Look, I don't have all the answers and I continue to make mistakes, but an important takeaway is that you can always improve. You can always do better; you can always change. We're not the same law firm we were five years ago, and I can promise you something: we're not going to be the same law firm five years from now, either. We're always retooling; we're always changing. We don't have all the answers, but I think there's always a better way to do things. Sharon: Do you think there will be a sequel, a third edition? Reza: I don't know. Not now. This one took me about 18 months to do. It was a massive labor of love. I wanted to create a book that was super easy to read. You could read it in one day. So, I spent a majority of that 18 months cutting back what was in the book and making it as short as possible. I wanted as many people as possible to pick it up and finish it and read it more than once. As of right now, no sequel. This is it. The response has been incredible, and this is not a money maker for me. 100% of the proceeds are donated to charity. Sharon: Writing the book probably brought to the fore a lot of things that lawyers don't do or mistakes they make. What are the top two things that lawyers should do differently or the mistakes they're making? What do you think? Reza: For law firm owners, I will tell you the two biggest mistakes I see—which I made also—is, number one, not focusing on culture, vision and values. That's the first one. Had we not had those things in place, in writing, engrained in everything we do, we would not have been able to scale effectively. Number two is not having a process or procedure for recruitment and retention of teammates. Both mistakes we made and paid for dearly.  I think the most common way we hire is that you put up a job post, you get back hundreds of résumés and you can't tell the difference between one or the other, and then you just pick one that might have some experience or might have worked for a competitor. You bring them in for an interview. You interview them, everyone interviews great, and then you hire them. Six months in, you realize this is the wrong person. This person sucks. I think doing that type of blind hiring is a mistake. I think desperation hiring is a mistake, and not having the culture be part of it and not having the right people is a guaranteed recipe for disaster. Sharon: Do you think if somebody had said that to you when you were just opening your doors, you would have been able to say, “Oh yeah, I didn't do it that way the first time,” or “I don't know what my culture is”?  Reza: Yeah, I'll tell you. This was my experience. It was my own ego for the longest time. I thought we had the best culture. I thought this was the best place to work. That was in my head; it wasn't reality. I was dealing with office drama and turmoil. It was a toxic environment, and I kept telling myself, “This is the greatest place to work.” It really wasn't. If someone early on, in year one, told me to focus on culture and a method to distinguish the players you're bringing onto your team, I don't know if I would have taken that advice. I learned it the hard way. Sharon: I'm not thinking about it as advice. I'm thinking back on when I didn't have business experience, and professors were asking me, “What about this, that and the other thing,” in a business environment. How would people know what their culture is? You could ask. You could say, “My culture is to have the best place to work.” Who knocked you on the side of the head to say it isn't the best place? I'm asking two questions. Reza: It was a one-day event that occurred, but it was an accumulation of the stress I was feeling working in the office. I was doing anything and everything not to go into the office. That's how bad it got. This is a company that was my first baby, that I put my blood, sweat and tears and everything into. Now I was at a point, five years in, where I didn't even like going into the office. I think that was a reality check.  Then losing half of my staff in one day was a reality check. It was an indication of my failures as a leader than it was anything else. All the things I was complaining about, all the things I was struggling with, really started from me. I was not being accountable. I was not the leader I should have been, and for the longest time I assumed I was. When you get to the point when you can take accountability for those things we're all complaining about and see how it was my responsibility to correct them and make different decisions, I looked back and said, “Wow! I was a pretty crappy leader.” I was not making the decisions I should have been making to set an example for the rest of my team. I should have been making those decisions so the people on my team could be proud of who they're working with and for. It took a good five or six years of pain to figure that out. Sharon: My last question is—I have a lot of questions. I'm thinking about all the newbie lawyers, because I hear about them and see them all the time, who say, “I can't work for anybody else. I'm going to hang my own shingle.” If they had read your book, would it have helped them develop the business into a client-focused business? How would it have helped them? Reza: I hope so, Sharon. I think there are some fundamental things in there that every business organization can benefit from, but it's like everything else: what you put in is what you get out. I meet with young lawyers all over the country all the time. I'm telling them what to do, and the majority of them won't do it and don't do it. They continue going along just how they were. I think for those folks, the book could be the spark. I don't think the book is a blueprint on exactly how to start your practice and scale and be efficient, but I do think it's a way to get some inspiration and a spark that will lead you down your own path.  Our core values are going to be different than everybody else's. My vision is going to be different than everybody else's, and the things that are important to me may not be important to everybody else. You've got to figure out your own path, but I think there are foundational things, like having your core values, having your vision very clear, making sure everybody understands what they are. You need to know every single person you bring onto your team, or at least make a best effort to go beyond just posting a job, pulling a résumé and hiring somebody. I say don't make desperate hires and wait for the right person. It may take a while, but you're better off waiting for the right person than bringing the wrong person into your organization. Sharon: It's hard to let go of the wrong person, yes. Reza, thank you so much for being with us today. Reza: Thank you, Sharon. I appreciate it. Sharon: I greatly appreciate it.

Women World Leaders' Podcast
361. Empowering Lives With Purpose, Interview with Dr. Marina Hoffman

Women World Leaders' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 28:45


Dr. Marina Hofman is a professor at Palm Beach Atlantic, author of an award-winning book, Women In the Bible, and she navigates today's challenging times as a leader with strength, character, and courage.    In today's podcast, Marina shares her miracle message of survival and overcoming debilitating anxieties into a life of serving God.   ***** Kimberly Hobbs   Welcome to Empowering Lives with [urpose. And I'm your host, Kimberly Hobbs. I'm the founder of Women World Leaders. And today I'm so blessed to have our guest with us Dr. Marina Hoffman. Welcome, Marina.  Dr. Marina Hoffman   Oh, Kimberly, it's so great to be with you today and our friends around the world listening and being encouraged in the Lord.  Kimberly Hobbs   Amen. Amen. We're in for a wonderful day, a wonderful afternoon and can't wait to talk to you and let the ladies get to know you further and hear about your story. So ladies, this podcast is for you. And we are here to encourage you and inspire you to walk closer with Jesus. That's what we're all about it women world leaders is just a closer walk with our Savior and King. And there are so many ways just to encourage and strengthen the body of Christ together. And one of them is by sharing our stories and our personal accounts of what we've been through our walks. And many of us have had tumultuous walks, some of us have had a little bit easier walks, but when we share them and share how God moved in our life, through our walks, and storms and trials, and sometimes blessings and wonderful ways to we just see how God moves. And some of us can relate to each other and therefore be encouraged, inspired, have hope. And that's our purpose. So that's what we want to bring to you today. So God is working in you ladies giving you the desire and the power to do what pleases Him. That's Philippians 213. And we just believe that each of us have a purpose. And God is going to lead you to that purpose because he's given you gifts and talents and the power to do what he's equip you to do and his name. So let me tell you a little bit about Dr. Marina Hoffman. She has her PhD and she's a professor at Palm Beach Atlantic University. She is the author of the award winning book, women in the Bible. And we'll talk about more about that later in the podcast. But it's a small group Bible study that she's put together and in beautiful Marina thank you for doing God's work in that way. Marina illuminates the leadership, strength and character and courage of women in the Bible to bring an inspirational message of hope and encouragement to all of us who must navigate today's challenges and uncertain times, right? Because we are all walking through some uncertain times in this world. And today's message is a story is a powerful story. It's a god miracle in marinas life. And we titled this today trust because I asked Marina, what is that word that you can equate to your story and she said trust. So it's trust and from suffering to surrender. So Marina, as we start in to your story, you survived. You are a survivor. So can you tell us and share about what God's miracle was in your life through what happened? In this story you're about to share? Dr. Marina Hoffman   Yes, you know, Kimberly, before it happened, things were going quite well in my life. I had been in school for forever. I finally graduated in September, I got in at Christmas time. I got a job over January. So I was very excited to start work in the fall. And just things were so filled with hope. And I thought, wow, I've spent my whole life in school. Finally, I'm getting out. And I can do something to honor God and to serve others. Well, would you believe we're coming home from a trip up north in the middle of February, and very suddenly, out of nowhere, the car coming toward us? His head drops, and the car plows right toward us. And the setting Kimberley is the word driving about 65 miles an hour. He's driving 60 miles an hour, and the highway is under construction. So it narrows down to one lane and there was nothing Kimberly but a few inches between us. So there was really no options. Everything happened in a split second. And Kimberly I would love to share that my life paths before me but it didn't. I simply thought Oh, I'm dead and I thought that was the end of my story. Thankfully, my husband is a much quicker thinker than I am He responded marvelously. He controlled the car as best he could. And Kimberly when he felt that All was about to fail that he would have no chance of survival. He thought at least he can do his best to save my life. So very kindly, very sacrificially. He throws his body across the, the middle of the car and leans over me and protects me from all the airbags with my own body. And you know, Kimberly, that simple act of sacrifice started off an avalanche of miracles in our lives. So in this car crash, our engine ends up getting pushed into the driver's seat where he should have been, and no one knew how he survived. Three or four days later, the detective comes and says, Sir, I can't put unexplained miracle in my report. How are you alive? And so Larry begins to unravel the story of throwing his body against me and breaking his own rib doing it because if seatbelt was still on, and how his body really wasn't fully in his seat, and that saved his life, although he had many injuries, and for me, the seatbelt gave me four lacerations. So I was you know, Bile is pouring out of my system, I'm about to die. If I had had those airbags Kimberli in a heartbeat, I would have gone on to life with Jesus in eternity. But my husband's body took all the airbags, I also had a very significant brain injury. So it was very close to you know, being a vegetable I couldn't talk I had no memories, I still suffer a bit with those implications. But my husband put my his hand on my head. And I believe Kimberly, that that really prevented me from getting any worse injury, which also could have led to my death. So here I was alive. Um, God just brought, you know, retired firefighter, empty worker EMT workers running around the car to save me to hold me in my place. So I didn't move. I get to the hospital I near dead, and the nurses doing their job. They wanted to pull me through all these tests, and that would have taken two or three hours. Again, Kimberly, another miracle through the life of the surgeon that comes to check on me and says, No, this this girl has minutes to live. We're opening her up right now. And she knew that maybe God spoke to her. She said it was just unexplainable. How she came to check on me out of order, and canceled all the tests opened me up, found all my injuries closed me up. And that was Kimberly, life saving. But I will also share with our friends today that I had a long road ahead of me with severe PTSD, severe anxiety. You know, we've shared before how the beautiful verse have no anxiety, right? We have nothing to fear in the Lord. And yet Kimberly, I feared every single thing all the time, I was shaking around the clock with fear and anxiety after all the trauma that this created in me and my brain being a mess. So I had a long road of recovery. But God was with me every step of the way. Kimberly Hobbs   Amen. He sure was and just seeing that and what gave me goosebumps when we were talking. We had the privilege to have dinner last night together and we're gonna see each other again tomorrow but I'm just hearing more of this miraculous story and you were sharing how when when you were impacted you were forced to stay in your seat and the paramedic that just happened to be in one car that jumped out and then the firefighter like if you would have gotten out of that car the doctor said you would not be alive if you stood up you would have bled out and that would have been it you would have been done and so these miracles I can just blows my mind how God had everything step by step by step plant and ordained to make sure that you were okay. And I we just thank God for that. But yes, you did. You had suffered day to day about the overcoming anxiety and the the debilitating fear that you are constantly feeling like PTSD. And so the Bible tells us to be anxious for nothing. But in everything with prayer and thanksgiving. let your requests be known to God. That's Philippians four, six. Ladies, when you're suffering from fear and anxieties, God wants us to let our prayers and petitions be known to him because he's there to listen. But he says also with thankfulness. So you had a heart of thankfulness. Can you talk right now about overcoming the anxiety and fear in your day to day? Dr. Marina Hoffman   You know, there are so many tips that professionals give us Kimberly and I think there's a place for them all. They were very helpful to me all kinds of techniques that helped me to live to start to live on the path of a normal life and to at least begin to take care of myself again, which itself was a major accomplishment just to get out of bed in the morning seemed impossible with through all that, and alongside all the things that we can do, to help ourselves as human beings, really my anchor was Christ. And I know the only reason I could get up in the morning was because I knew that Jesus Christ had a plan for my life. And I could not see it. And Kimberly, I did not feel it. I did not feel my faith in those weeks. Initially, I didn't even feel my faith really in the hospital and ICU, I thought I was all by myself, I felt utterly alone. I didn't know if my husband was alive. And none of that was true. I was surrounded by family. And they told me over and over, my husband was alive. But in my world, Kimberly, I was so utterly alone. And yet, despite the feelings of feeling isolated as a human, I knew God was with me. And Paul talks about, you know, to live as Christ. And that's my testimony. I remember very little, but I remember hour after hour laying in the bed saying, I know that right now, the power of Jesus Christ is literally pumping through my body in my house. Yes. And it was not the feeling that God had a plan for my life, but the knowledge of it. So I've been a Christian forever. I, you know, from the age of three, I was aware of the Lord, and wanted to commit my life to Him. And all those years of drilling those verses in me on some deep level, Kimberly, I really feel God used that to help me to keep going. Kimberly Hobbs   Yes, yes, God says in His Word, and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus. And that's what you had you had that peace of God, even though yes, you're in the flesh, you experience we all experience these things that we have to go through fears and anxieties and things like that, but but the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, right, it guarded your heart through that time, and it carried you through. So as God led you into, deeper into your life, there was one thing you were told when that surgery was performed, and all of this, and that was that you wouldn't have children, you know, you're impacted so severely Can you talk about that?  Dr. Marina Hoffman   Yeah, the chance of having a child was more or less zero. And of all the things that happened to me, I knew God somehow the way God's Kingdom works is that suffering is never in vain. And we see that in story after story of Scripture. So I knew somehow God would use all my suffering, for His glory, whatever that meant for me. But one thing I could not accept was that someone falls asleep at the wheel. And suddenly, I can't have a family and I can't be a mom. And I just felt that that was so unjust. It was very hard to walk every day I prayed and prayed and prayed in this reality. But there was a point when I was at the doctor, and they showed me this the results of all these tests, and it was way less than, you know, 1%. It was 0.000. And I thought in that moment, you know what, it's no longer about me trying and what I had for dinner last night. And if I did a whole mile of walking or not, I can be as healthy as I can, Kimberly, but this was so major. This was in God's territory. And you know, I had prayed so hard, Kimberly. But in that moment, I felt the burden lifted off me, even the burden of prayer. And I remember on the way home, I said, God, I have prayed so much, I'm actually going to stop praying, I'm just going to leave it with you. And I'm going to leave it with a few of my close friends that promise to continue to pray every day for me. But Kimberly, I couldn't keep living my life, in a sense, obsessing over prayer for this. So I was able to trust God. And you know, there's a verse in Hannah where this happens. she bakes God for a child. And then it says, she got up she ate and drank. And her face was no longer downcast. And that spoke to me so much. I said, that's what I need to do. I need to start living life, and not where the burden of this on my face anymore. And of course, you know, in the way God works, sometimes, sure enough, in a couple of months, I did get pregnant. Kimberly Hobbs   Amen, amen. And I know that Hannah was just a so closely related to your story. And so that became special to you. And even as you wrote about women in the Bible, and you turned it into a Bible study, you know, that was somebody that really stood out to you and wow, God performed miracles in your life miracle upon miracle. So now, let's talk about the miracle that God performed with Willow. Dr. Marina Hoffman   You know, there was so much prayer from my own heart and my husband and my Family But dear friends as well. And I think sometimes God does something really special in those circumstances. And she isn't an ordinary child. And again, um, what an answer to my prayer like Hannah, I believe she's already becoming a leader among others. And you know, Kimberly, she has been an instrument of joy and healing to so many people. And that's even when she was a little, she would say the things that would just pierce people's heart. And I remember one time a dear friend of mine who lost his daughter at 19, he was broken, he couldn't bear with his family to have Christmas up in Canada and their home. So they came down here just to change things and help them through. I remember he held her for two hours, and she slept. And he near wept. Kimberly, there was something he said about the power of healing that touched us very hard just holding her. And that has marked her whole life as well. So sometimes out of our suffering, are come something more beautiful than we could ever have imagined. And for me, as a mom, it is never a day goes by where I take her for granted. Every night, I tell a little story of how I prayed and prayed and prayed. And one day God answered my prayer, and wow, I was pregnant. And it was a girl and we call her Willow. And I say that every night and I remind my own heart, this thing that I prayed for so much, and I suffered so much with to be attuned to what God has to do in my life as a mother and to make sure that my suffering will always have a purpose. And I think that's a beautiful reminder in our lives, Kimberly, the things that we suffered with and through the trials we had, God wants to use for His glory. But I think we also have a role in continuing to be humble, and allow God to use that even if it means opening up and sharing our stories of hurt and suffering with others to bring them healing, as we testify of God's faithfulness. Kimberly Hobbs   Amen. Amen. And there, there are so many stories of pain in purpose, and that God teaches us through those times he he starts to equip us to go forward into the future with these amazing testimonies. And how would we do that? How would we be able to testify to others unless we walked in those steps, you know, and we suffered through it. And now we have these tremendous stories of faith and perseverance, strength, you know, honoring God, no matter what. And I praise God for your story. I praise him that you are testifying and sharing that. And Revelation 1211 says, they overcame him the enemy, he wants to take us all out, he wants to destroy our life. He he wants nothing more than to conquer somebody that is destined for a life of following Jesus. But revelation 1211 says they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, Jesus Christ, and the word of their testimony. So Marina, as you go out into the world, and you continue to share these miracles upon miracles, and the tragedy you went through is horrible, and the suffering you and your husband endured. But the faith that you had the mustard seed faith, brought you to have this precious little girl, and I met Willow and she is beautiful. And she does melt your heart, and says the most amazing things. And I know that she is going to be part of your serving as she grows in your family. And can you tell us about women in the Bible? Because you were talking about the there were certain women in the Bible that stood out to you? And I know Hannah was one of them. But how are you inspired to write this book and turn it into a Bible study? Dr. Marina Hoffman   Yes, so until this acts, and I had been studying women of the Bible academically as a scholar, and publishing articles, and it was lovely. But you know, these stories, took on a whole new meaning after my brain injury. And all this trauma I went through when I read them again, simply for personal encouragement, I felt so lonely, Kimberly, I needed someone to walk alongside me. And I didn't know where to turn. So I opened up my Bible to some of the stories that I had studied academically. And of course, as your listeners will know, I mean, the story of Hannah, she became my friend. She understood my sorrow because she had walked through, and she exemplified what it means to be faithful in the various situations I faced. And I found many women like this had gone through things just like we're going through today. It's incredible, isn't it 1000s of years ago, but we say we face the same challenges, and especially in the last few years, with the change we've undergone and culture and society. These are hard times, and what beautiful friendship and encouragement I found in women of the Bible. And as I spoke to women about it All of them kept asking me to write it down. And so that ended up in the devotional, the small group study women in the Bible. And on my website, there's a free video series where I share really how these women impacted me personally. And that video series is free women in the Bible dot info. And if the for the women who want to dive into these stories and say, what are they really about? What did these woman's struggle for? What Can God speak to me through their lives and their examples? This is a wonderful little book, you can go through it alone, eight studies, or I always say Kimberly, with a friend, because we all need friends, Kimberly Hobbs   That's for sure. Oh, my goodness, I that just like brings joy to my heart, women in the Bible. Because, you know, we all hear about, you know, the top two or three, you know, but there are so many significant women in the Bible that had amazing purpose in their life, and God chose to put them in his word for a purpose. So what you've done Marina by drawing, you know those stories out and unpacking them in a Bible study form is just so special. And I just thank you, I thank you for not balling up in a in, balling up in a ball, curling up in a ball. And just wallowing in your fear and your anxiety. No, you, you walked forward by faith and what you knew and God led you, and then you fulfill this amazing purpose and started writing for him. And I know you you teach at a Christian college at Palm Beach Atlantic, I know you are raising a daughter with such just beauty in the Lord Jesus Christ and how you pour into her. Can you just look at the women that are here on this podcast and speak directly to their heart. And give them something from your heart today that can inspire them to walk in their beautiful purpose, to run after God with all their heart, despite those moments that they're curled up in a ball in their bed, just crying out to God, you know, like, how do they get out of that ball and just go running after God like you did? Dr. Marina Hoffman   You know, there's a time for us to be quiet before the Lord and to just heal and to be one with God and to shut out the world to the point where sometimes we need to silence everything around us to hear from the Lord. But then I think Kimberly, and friends who are listening today as God begins to work in your life, and as Kimberly shared today, there is power when we share our testimony. And to begin with that might be just a few words. But as we begin to share our testimony more and more, and to share the faithfulness God has shown us as we walked through the valley of the shadow of death, and as we struggled, something incredible is released within us. I will say one practical example. You know, I was lonely for two years, you can imagine what two years right, we're all cut off from each other. I was so lonely that it hurt me, not just my heart, but my body was hurting with loneliness. And finally, Kimberly, I was so desperate, I began just to tell people that I'm so lonely. And you know what happened? Friends, I found community because there was all kinds of wonderful women around me who were lonely too. And I boldly invited them to come to my house, which was not the thing to do during those days, you know what they showed up. So even showing the little bit of way that I was suffering, and showing God's faithfulness to me opened up my heart for more healing from God, because I was able to expose my heart and say, Lord, heal me. And the Lord spoke such words of life to me, even from the women I will share with, but I also gained friendships. And you know, I think that happens when we open up our heart to others, to share our sorrows, and to share God's faithfulness, what happens, they open up their hearts back to us, and of course, being wise about who we share with but there are wonderful women of God all around us. And I think it's a worthy prayer to say, Lord, show me who they are. build me up that we can bless each other and grow in you together. Kimberly Hobbs   So beautifully said so beautifully said. Community is so important. Friendships are so important and the correct ones those that love the Lord, surround yourself with those people that are going to lift you up before God that are going to pray over you that are going to speak life into you and not death and that woe is me talk but they are going to lift you up in Jesus and those are the friends that you want. And I'm so thankful that God brought community at a time where you were so just desperate for love and connection and you were just like suffocating because you didn't have it, and God provided those that he knew or not afraid and still reached out to you during that time. So I just thank him for that. I'm thankful that you and I got to meet Marina and that we were able to become friends and this just short amount of time. But when you have abandoned Christ, so deep and you're, you're just connected because of him. Things like this just happened so quickly. And ladies, that's for you to go out, go outside of your doors and reach out there are so many people out there that just want to connect with you that God is going to allow into your paths for his greater purpose, trust Him for it, and ask him for it. So I just want to thank you, Marina for sharing with us today. And how can women reach you if they want to reach out to you if they want to get your book? How can they reach you? Dr. Marina Hoffman   Yes, please visit womenintheBible.info and you'll see my free video series, my email address, if you want to connect my testimony, if you want to share with others, and lots of resources to encourage you, I would love to hear from you. And you can get the first chapter for free as well. Or you could buy the book. It's like I think $13 on Amazon here in the US, but it's distributed internationally. So that's womenintheBible.info. Kimberly Hobbs   That's wonderful. That's wonderful. So thank you for sharing that. Thank you for being a guest today on empowering lives with purpose and also look for Marina more because we are connected here at women, we're leaders and we're just excited to see what God has in these future friendships that are made through this amazing ministry. So ladies, I just want to leave you with the scripture that God tells us to call on me when you're in trouble, and I will receive you and you will give me glory. Oh my goodness, when we call on him, he he just encompasses us with His love, right? And he turns us around and we're going to glorify Him by trusting Him. He is amazing that Psalm 50 Verse five. So ladies, as we close out today, just know that God loves you so much. He has a purpose for your life, a plan for your life, even when things may look dark and dreary. Please don't let the enemy lie to you. God has a plan for you. From his heart to yours. We are women, world leaders all content is copyrighted and cannot be used without expressed written consent. Thou bless you Marina thank you again for sharing today. Dr. Marina Hoffman   Thank you so much. And ladies, just embrace the love of God today. And whatever you're suffering you know, surrender to the Lord and I'm praying that you find community as well as you're willing to share God's faithfulness with others. Kimberly Hobbs   Amen. Amen. We prayed over you today ladies before we even started this podcast. Marina and I and my husband we pray before every podcast and and also you were prayed for today and we will close praying for you too. So God bless you all have a beautiful day.

Window Treatments for Profit with LuAnn Nigara
102: Elliot Laniado: Not Taking No for an Answer

Window Treatments for Profit with LuAnn Nigara

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 60:24


More About Elliot Laniado: Elliot started his window treatment career as a man with a van with samples and today has a storefront in downtown Red Bank, NJ, a fleet of three vehicles, employing 12 people.   His first approach was asking people to give him a chance, and he wouldn't accept no for an answer. He always found a way. Today, he is living his dream to “Work with good people, work with nice people, and run an honest business.”  A turning point in his business happened in 1997 when Elliot became a Window Treatment Consultant through WCAA. This move helped him step into the world of drapery. Since then, Elliot became the ASID Finance Director for two years, gave classes to ASID designers on “How to avoid drapery nightmares” and, even today, continues to teach the Brookdale design program “The History of Window Treatments.” Elliot is a member of Exciting Windows! Since 2006. Elliot has fulfilled his lifelong dream of being a first responder through his volunteer EMT work. He lives in New Jersey with his wife, Nadine. They have three married children and ten grandchildren. Connect with Elliot Laniado Website "How to avoid Drapery Nightmares" What's new with LuAnn Nigara luannuniversity.com http://www.luannnigara.com/cob Get The Goodies! For checklists, resources, and extra goodies from A Well-Designed Business sign up for free here. To Get on LuAnn's Email List, text the word designbiz to 444999! Purchase LuAnn's Books Here: Book 1: The Making of A Well – Designed Business: Turn Inspiration into Action Book 2: A Well-Designed Business – The Power Talk Friday Experts Pre-Order Book 3: A Well-Designed Business – The Power Talk Friday Experts Volume 2 Connect with LuAnn Nigara LuAnn's Website LuAnn's Blog Power Talk Friday Like Us: Facebook | Tweet Us: Twitter | Follow Us: Instagram | Listen Here: Podcast Other Shows Mentioned: #99: Susan Day: How to Maintain Your Sales While Working a Finite Number of Weeks #84: Jessica Harling: Key Steps to Onboard & Train New Employees #67: Jessica Harling: The Art of Decision Making #61: Jessica Harling: The 7 Step Sales Process and 3 Proven Sales Techniques to be More Successful Other Resources Mentioned: Exciting Windows! WCAA IDS ASID Register for our Zoom event!

Christian Heritage Church in Tallahassee Florida - Pastor Steve Dow - Sermons, Teaching and Inspiration from CHC Today!

THE MERCY OF GOD ACTS 2:16 PSALM 136 November 27, 2022 Even though ‘mercy' is never used in Acts, almost every chapter tells the story of God's Mercy extended though Jesus Christ. When God begins to move among a people, mercy is always poured out! ‘Mercy' is used 261 time in 41 books of the Bible. It is a cornerstone characteristic of God! He is rich in Mercy-Ephesians 2:4-5 Who needs Mercy? 1. Those who have sinned and messed up. Psalm 51:1 The one who receives mercy must come humbly before God. Mercy means God does not deal with us according to our sins. 2. Those who are going through tough, difficult times. Psalm 13:1-5 The Mercy of God can turn your situation around. 1 Samuel 2:1-2 3. Those who are facing Satanic attack and opposition. Psalm 59:16-17 Five Miracles that occurred in the high-speed motorcycle crash October 27, 2022. 1. I lived! An ER nurse I met in the Walmart parking lot, after hearing the story said, “We had a name for people like you.... Donors! No one lives through those kinds of wrecks.” 2. No surgery was required! 3. My right leg was NOT broken, after 2 doctors, an EMT and I thought it was! 4. Healing of the Road Rash. 5. Yvonne's story of Holy Spirit speaking to her regarding future motorcycles. Today we declare, What the enemy meant for evil, God meant for good! Genesis 50:20 The Mercy of God will break, scatter, and destroy every evil chain and yoke holding your life, family, and destiny down. Resist every opposition and obstacle to you receiving God's Mercy. God has already invited us to receive His Mercy- Hebrews 4:15-16 declares, “For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin. Heb 4:16 Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need. Come Boldly! +++++++ You can find our service times on our website: https://allnationstallahassee.com/ You can find sermon highlights on Twitter here: https://mobile.twitter.com/allnationstally

This is My Silver Lining
EPISODE 3 REPLAY:  Kindness 9-1-1: Chanda Brodnax-Nino on How Being Laid Off Led to the Start of a Successful Business and Fulfilling a Life-Saving Calling

This is My Silver Lining

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 49:20


In celebration of Thanksgiving, this week we hope you will listen –or re-listen– to one of our first episodes:  an interview with Chanda Brodnax-Nino, someone who is committed to giving.  She gives that extra degree to her students, she gives lifesaving care to her patients, and she gives kindness a priority position on the syllabus for her EMT training classes.  Chanda reminds us how important it is to give a little something extra and to be thankful for those who return the favor.Happy Thanksgiving!Link to Original Episode ShownotesSupport this podcast by subscribing and reviewing it!Music is considered “royalty-free” and discovered on Audio Blocks. Technical Podcast Support by: Jon Keur at Wayfare Recording Co.© 2022 Silver Linings Media LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Break Away from the Rat Race
Why Real Estate is STILL the Best Investment in This Economy with Aaron Chapman

Break Away from the Rat Race

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 32:21


Aaron exited Mining, Heavy Equipment Operation, Welding and long-haul truck driving. Since entering the finance industry in 1997 his clientele has ranged from those purchasing their first home, building their dream home or investing in multiple properties for long term cash flow. His expertise is in the complicated. Presently ranked in the top 1% in an industry of over 1,400,000 licensed loan originators closing in excess of 100 transactions per month. Aaron is that battle-worn partner every real estate entrepreneur needs to walk thru the tough parts of building a real estate business. In addition to a career in real estate finance Aaron is a Published Author with books released and dozens of magazine articles. Very happily married to his wife since 1996 with 4 children. Aaron and his wife both take great pride in watching their children mature and make calculated decisions about their lives with their parents coaching. The hindsight education is openly discussed and both parent and child benefit from such conversation which has led to the creation of a family business where each member (even the 12-year-old) has a say in the family investments and growth of the family assets. Aaron and his wife recently retired from 9 years of service with the Pinal County Sheriff's office volunteer Rescue Unit. Both retired as team leaders. Aaron's specific role within the Unit with designations as EMT (his wife is a Paramedic) was to lead the Technical Rescue unit as well as the Off-road and as well as the Air Rescue Unit's. During those years the team experienced in excess of 50 rescues each year. In many cases, the missions completed received international media attention with lives preserved in extreme circumstances. How to connect with Aaron: Website: https://www.aaronbchapman.com/about/Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AaronChapmanSNMCSocial Media Links: sgoc_aaron

Rescue Swimmer Mindset Podcast
How Rescue Swimmers Deal with Medical Emergencies

Rescue Swimmer Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 93:00


A thorough breakdown of the step-by-step process of approaching and dealing with a real medical emergency by Coast Guard Helicopter Rescue Swimmer, Cody Wright, and Wilderness First Responder, Vince. In this episode you'll learn the full EMT patient assessment, from the scene size-up to the primary assessment and all the way to the patient treatment. Rescue Swimmer Mindset Episode 82 Watch the Full Episode on YouTube HERE Training for Rescue Swimmer School, BUDS, Air Force PJ or any Elite Athletic Training? ALL Courses LIFEGUARD Course Perfect Form Master Class Win the Day Training Program Hold your Breath like a Helicopter Rescue Swimmer Subscribe to: RSM and Wildertainment on YouTube. Instagram:⁣⁣ @RescueSwimmerMindset @Wildertainment ⁣⁣ Tiktok: ⁣⁣ @rescueswimmermindset ⁣⁣ @wildertainment⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ The Rescue Swimmer Mindset is hosted by one current and one veteran Coast Guard Helicopter Rescue Swimmer, Cody & Vince. This show is best suited for those with a physically driven mindset such as Athletes, Helicopter Rescue Swimmers, Olympians, Air Force Pararescue Jumpers, Marine Recons, Army Rangers, Green Berets, Infantry, Navy Seals, Special Forces, individuals preparing for Bootcamp or simply those trying to get into physical shape. This podcast is not associated with the Coast Guard nor the military in any way and does not represent the views nor positions of those organizations. -The RSM Team Be Better.

The Professional Brotherhood™
125 - Honoring the Past with MacBoston 18 Truck

The Professional Brotherhood™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 52:51


On todays episode we are joined by Mike France and Bill Purcell from MacBoston 18 Truck.Mike has been a volunteer firefighter for 33 years, is a past chief (2x) and has been an active member fo MacBoston for the last 10 years.  He has been MacBoston's president for the last six.Bill has been a volunteer firefighter for the last 19 years (across three states), is a New York State fire instructor and has been with MacBoston for eight years.  He currently serves as their secretary. About our hosts:Brian Soller has been an active volunteer for the last 30+ years.  He currently serves as assistant chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department and for the past 17 years has been a New York state fire instructor assigned to Sullivan County, NY.  Soller also served as chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department from 2018 - 2020 and chief of the Monticello Fire Department from 2001-2002.Soller has also been a New York State emergency medical technician for the last 25+ years. He speaks extensively on the promotion of professionalism in the volunteer fire service through his podcast and YouTube channel. Follow us on social @professional.brotherhood @chiefsollerOn the web at professionalbrotherhood.comSend future episode suggestions or comments on past episodes to professionalvff@gmail.com.Interested in being a guest on the show?  Please email professionalvff@gmail.com.Kara Judd, is a six year member of the Cazenovia Fire Department where she currently serves as a Lieutenant and Emergency Medical Technician. Kara is also a certified Critical Incident Stress Debriefer as well as an AFAA certified fitness instructor and the owner of Saint Florian Fitness. Her full time career is at the Upstate Medical Hospital in Syracuse, NY where she is a Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention Specialist and Burn Prevention Outreach Educator.On social @st.florianfitness

Your Unconscious Is Showing
Dr. Kristen Casey: The Truth About Sleep and Your Mental Health

Your Unconscious Is Showing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 46:10


In this episode of the HUMAN First podcast, LAST EPISODE OF THE YEAR. Dr. Kristen Casey is clinical psychologist, author, and content creator. She's the founder and owner of a private practice and consultation company. Prior to her psychology career, she was an EMT for 5 years. Her clinical training focused on health psychology, which sparked her interest in sleep, anxiety, and dedication to utilizing modalities that are rooted in science and research. Dr. Casey is most known on social media for providing mental health and wellness content about insomnia, anxiety, and gender/sexuality concerns. Episode Description and Show Notes: In this episode of the HUMAN First podcast, Dr. Courtney discusses: Kristen describes herself as a partner, dog mom, connective, and knows all the presidents in order. Kristen's why for being in the mental health field starts with her career in the ambulance field Defining what sleep is and what our brains do during sleep There are over 70 sleep disorders Answering the question “how much sleep should people get?” and what brain waves are present during sleep? Awakenings are normal, the most “normal” sleeper has about 2 awakenings per night People of color, veterans, and women tend to have more trouble sleeping She specialized in sleep by accident, and ended up falling in love with it. If your soul is tired, sleep won't fix your problem. Privilege plays a huge role in sleeping habits. One tip is waking up at the same time everyday can be really helpful for sleep regulation “Nobody's ever going to take you seriously” and other stigmatizing moments for being a therapist with tattoos Sometimes the best thing you learn from clients is the opposite of what you learn in school The nuances of cultural competency and knowing lived experience is completely different Her purpose in life is to learn as much as she can and connect with people Most common themes when it comes to having insomnia and how likely we are to get it. Being able to rest and being able to sleep is a privilege, and your working on your souls energy is key to better sleep You can find Dr. Kristen Casey online at: IG: https://www.instagram.com/drkristencasey/?hl=en YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAlbIjiVbZ-IzaFN-3FDRWg Twitter: https://twitter.com/drkristencasey TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drkristencasey Learn more about Kristen's offerings at: https://www.drkristencasey.com/ Dr. Courtney Tracy's additional offerings: Instagram: @the.truth.doctor TikTok: @the.truth.doctor Twitter: @_thetruthdoctor Exclusive YouTube Show: The Truth Doctor Show Healing texts: USA & Canada (424) 228-9525 Website: www.thetruthdoctor.com This podcast is not therapy and does not provide personalized clinical advice. The purpose of this podcast is to provide mental health based entertainment and psychoeducation

Heavy Lies the Helmet
Episode 100 - Medical Science Theater 100

Heavy Lies the Helmet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 55:49


It's not clinical. It's not non-clinical, really. Celebrating our 100th full podcast episode, Bryan and Mike sit down in a Mystery Science Theater 3000 format and make fun of our 1st episodes ever. If you're looking for some light-hearted entertainment including a reflection of how far the platform as come, this is the podcast for you. And one last thing... THANK YOU FOR 5 YEARS! Get CE hours for our podcast episodes HERE! -------------------------------------------- Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavyliesthehelmet Instagram @heavyliesthehelmet Website heavyliesthehelmet.com Email contact@heavyliesthehelmet.com Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed on the Heavy Lies the Helmet podcast are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of their employers and their employees. Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any information available for listening on this platform. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform, but it is not a substitute for your local laws, medical direction, or sound judgment. --------------------------------------------  Crystals VIP by From The Dust | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. w/ Kevin Hazzard: American Sirens #FreedomHouse #Pittsburgh

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022


The C.O.W.S. (Context of White Supremacy) Radio Program welcomes Kevin Hazzard. A journalist, TV writer, and former paramedic, Hazzard worked as an EMT on mean streets and crack dens of Atlanta, Georgia. He wrote about this experience in his memoir, A Thousand Naked Strangers. We'll discuss his more recent offering, American Sirens: The Incredible Story Of the Black Men Who Became America's First Paramedics. This book focuses on the mean streets of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - with a splash of Baltimore, Maryland. We hear about the genesis of the EMT and paramedic profession. Hazzard documents the upheaval of the 1960's which included painfully slow efforts to improve ambulance care. A collection of black males were recruited to Pittsburgh's Freedom House to begin intense training to drastically improve the quality of care patients receive during a medical emergency before they reach the hospital. These black males endured all of the typical humiliations, deprivations and White Supremacists abuse, but they were committed to healing the black residents of Pittsburgh's Hill District. After nearly a decade of devoted, nearly unparalleled medical care… they were kicked to the curb, replaced with mostly incompetent white staff, and forgotten. #LenBias #TheHillDistrict #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

The Impossible Life
Bryce Smith - The Invictus Mindset

The Impossible Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 81:47


Bryce Smith is a lead trainer at Invictus Crossfit in San Diego, Ca as well as the host of the Invictus Mindset Podcast. He has competed in multiple CrossFit games and set himself part as an elite trainer that focuses on mentality to help clients reach their full potential.Prior to becoming a coach, Bryce played D1 college basketball as well as playing pro over in Sweden. He holds a BS in Exercise Physiology and numerous CrossFit certifications and is also a certified EMT and Firefighter with the LAFD. In this wide ranging conversation, we discuss the strength of mentality as well as overcoming tragedy, the power of gratitude, and the importance of a curious mind.Follow BryceInstagram - @therealbrycesmithPodcast - The Invictus MindsetGot a show idea or something you'd like us to cover? Please get in touch!Instagram - @theimpossiblelifeYouTube - The Impossible Life PodcastFacebook - @theimpossiblelifepodcastTik Tok - @theimpossiblelifepodcastemail - impossiblelifepodcast@gmail.com

The Professional Brotherhood™
124 - Windshield Time, “PPC and FF Fitness”

The Professional Brotherhood™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 3:19


About our hosts:Brian Soller has been an active volunteer for the last 30+ years.  He currently serves as assistant chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department and for the past 17 years has been a New York state fire instructor assigned to Sullivan County, NY.  Soller also served as chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department from 2018 - 2020 and chief of the Monticello Fire Department from 2001-2002.Soller has also been a New York State emergency medical technician for the last 25+ years. He speaks extensively on the promotion of professionalism in the volunteer fire service through his podcast and YouTube channel. Follow us on social @professional.brotherhood @chiefsollerOn the web at professionalbrotherhood.comSend future episode suggestions or comments on past episodes to professionalvff@gmail.com.Interested in being a guest on the show?  Please email professionalvff@gmail.com.Kara Judd, is a six year member of the Cazenovia Fire Department where she currently serves as a Lieutenant and Emergency Medical Technician. Kara is also a certified Critical Incident Stress Debriefer as well as an AFAA certified fitness instructor and the owner of Saint Florian Fitness. Her full time career is at the Upstate Medical Hospital in Syracuse, NY where she is a Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention Specialist and Burn Prevention Outreach Educator.On social @st.florianfitness

EMT and NREMT Lectures - the Public Safety Guru
NREMT EMT Lecture and Prep - Immunologic Emergencies - Lecture 7 of 7 Medical Block - Season 2

EMT and NREMT Lectures - the Public Safety Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 26:00


Exclusive content and support: https://www.patreon.com/theemttutor The EMT student should have an understanding of the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of hypersensitivity disorders and anaphylactic reactions. Additionally, students will have the knowledge and skills to recognize and allergic and anaphylactic reactions. Knowledge Domains: The EMT student should be able to define the terms allergic reaction and anaphylaxis and know the difference between a local and a systemic response to allergens. The EMT should be able to list the five categories of stimuli that could cause an allergic reaction. Students should know how to conduct a primary assessment for a patient with a systemic allergic or anaphylactic reaction and understand the importance of managing the ABCs of these patients. The EMT student should know the emergency medical care to a patient who is experiencing an allergic reaction including the use of an EPI-Pen. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thepublicsafetyguru/message

Rock & Roll Nightmares
Kelly Garni: From Quiet Riot to Naked Vegas & Adventures In-Between

Rock & Roll Nightmares

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 27:51


Staci interviews Kelly Garni, a founding member of the great California hard rock outfit, Quiet Riot. He formed the band with Randy Rhoads, then went on to pursue other endeavors ranging from EMT to restauranteur. But his most enduring passion is photography and he has a beautiful new coffee table book out called “Naked Vegas: The Highs & Lows of a Photographer's Journey” which is more than just pretty pictures. Through his prose, Kelly sheds light on Sin City from its private boudoirs to its vast desert landscapes. Lastly, Staci shares a paragraph from her work in progress, “Rock & Roll Nightmares: True Stories, Vol 2.”

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Behind the Scenes: Hudson Family Trifecta Awards [RR 797]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 37:29


Get a behind the scenes interview with Kristi and Donnie Hudson on their trifecta award winning year in 2022 as the NAPA AutoCare Shop Owner of the Year, Women in Auto Care Female Shop Owner of the Year and AAPEX Shop Owner of the Year. Jason Rainey and Joelle Pollak from NAPA AutoCare also join the conversation. Watch Full Episode On YouTube HERE Jason Rainey, Vice President, NAPA AutoCare. Jason's previous episodes HERE Joelle Pollak, Director of Sales and Marketing, NAPA AutoCare. Joelle's previous episodes HERE Kristi and Donnie Hudson, Troy Auto Care, Troy, MI. Kristi and Donnie's previous episodes HERE Key Talking Points 2022 NAPA AutoCare Center of the Year 2022 Female Shop of the Year 2022 AAPEX Shop of the Year Mentorship with Joelle has helped Kristi come out of her shell- two way street  NAPA Business Development Group (BDG)- gives fellow shop owners facing the same challenges each and every day to get together and share strengths and weaknesses. Learn from each other with best practices. Save your strength, save your tools, save your funds, and put them into the community that supports you. Kristi was the only female in their BDG group in the beginning. She encouraged the wives to get involved. There are now 7 wives heavily involved in the day to day business of their husband's shop. Donnie and Kristi brought 24 of their leadership members to AAPEX  Kristi's goal is to get into schools, supply kids with the proper equipment Kristi went to vocational school in automotive, graduated and worked as a lube tech at a gas station. She applied to a local community college, and her instructor said, “Sweetheart, you're in the wrong room.” The school counselor and the dean all told her she needed to find a different career. Switched to EMT and firefighting, where she met Donnie, and eventually transitioned to working in the shop on the front counter and now runs her own shop. Troy Auto Care has 7 females that work within the organization and 7 apprentices Connect with the Podcast: Aftermarket Radio Network Subscribe on YouTube Visit us on the Web Follow on Facebook Become an Insider Buy me a coffee Important Books Check out today's partner:

Stories From the Road
Firefighter Paul - "100 Year Flood"

Stories From the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 23:00


“We had to climb over – there was all kinds of debris – we had to climb over what I thought was a desk, and then we came across that, it may have been a pallet full of building materials somewhere along the lines, and when a Coke machine went floating by, I knew it was kind of getting pretty serious.” – Firefighter PaulThere are numerous places a firefighter might expect to use water rescue training but, for Paul, the basement of a hospital wasn't one of them. Yet, when five inches of rain fell swiftly on his community in 2020, Paul and his team found themselves wading through chest-high water in a hospital cafeteria to search for three people who were reportedly trapped. As the mission evolved, first responders realized flooding at the building's lowest point wasn't the only threat, and water damage on all three floors, coupled with the loss of electricity, necessitated a more complex response. Join former firefighter/paramedic and host Phil Klein as he shares the mic with Paul, who has been a firefighter/EMT for 19 of his 27 years in public service. When a 100-year flood caused major damage to an area hospital, Paul found himself relying on lessons from a multitude of trainings to navigate a scene for which there is no specific preparation. He encourages other first responders to take advantage of any training available to them in order to give themselves the best chance at succeeding in an unforeseeable situation. Thank you for your continued support of Stories From the Road! Please take a moment to give us a five-star review on Apple Podcasts or whichever platform you use to listen. If you'd like to be a guest on an upcoming episode, please visit www.storiesfromtheroadpodcast.com to learn more.  Stories From the Road is proud to be sponsored by First Responder Coaching. Please take a minute and visit their site to see how they can support you.Support the show

EMT and NREMT Lectures - the Public Safety Guru
NREMT EMT Lecture Prep - Endocrine and Hematologic Emergencies - Lecture 6 of 7 Medical Block - Season 2

EMT and NREMT Lectures - the Public Safety Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 55:14


Exclusive content and support: https://www.patreon.com/theemttutor The EMT student will have an understanding of diabetes, sickle cell disease, clotting disorders, and the complications associated with each. EMT students should be able to understand the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and be able to list the appropriate steps for assessment and prehospital treatment of diabetic emergencies. Students should also be able to discuss hematologic emergencies, and describe sickle cell disease, hemophilia, thrombophilia, and deep vein thrombosis. Knowledge Domains Describe the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system and its main function in the body and discuss the role of glucose as a major source of energy for the body as well as its relationship to insulin. Define the terms diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia and understand the differences between hypo and hyperglycemia to include the signs and symptoms of both. Understand the interventions for providing emergency medical care to both a conscious and unconscious patient with an altered mental status and a history of diabetes who is having symptomatic hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Identify the steps the EMT should follow when conducting a primary and secondary assessment of a patient with an altered mental status who is a suspected of having diabetes. Know the indications, and contraindications for giving oral glucose to a patient with a decreased level of consciousness who has a history of diabetes. Know the composition and functions of blood as well as describing the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease, complications, and management of sickle cell disease. Describe two types of blood clotting disorders, and the risk factors, characteristics, and management of each. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thepublicsafetyguru/message

All Things Private Practice Podcast
Episode 59: "GRIIT" — Growth, Resilience, Identity, Integrity, & Training [featuring Kelly Lynch]

All Things Private Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 42:47 Transcription Available


Imagine what you could accomplish in your business if you didn't allow impostor syndrome into your life and if you acted in alignment with your values to fully utilize all the amazing skills and knowledge that you already have to create your dream private practice.In this episode, I talk with Kelly Lynch, social worker, life coach, fitness and nutrition coach, and former EMT, about what it takes to be so aligned with your values, really know yourself, have strong resilience and boundaries, and not "feed the imposter syndrome beast" that you, as a therapist, can be a stellar clinician and private practice owner and live as the best version of yourself. Kelly also shares how she broke down all the steps needed to achieve this with her program, GRIIT, and what led up to its creation and success.More about Kelly:Kelly Lynch is an EMT, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Life Coach, Personal Fitness Trainer, and Nutrition Coach. She has been supporting humans through their journeys and challenges for over 20 years, beginning as an EMT in 2002, and moving into the mental health field in 2009. Kelly launched her private practice, Turning Point Wellness, in 2014, and expanded to a group in 2021. Kelly and her group specialize in Acute Stress and Post Traumatic Stress Injuries in EMS professionals.Kelly launched The GRIIT Project in 2022, and offers life and business coaching through her transformational coaching system of GRIIT. With the five pillars of GRIIT – Growth, Resilience, Identity, Integrity, and Training – she teaches individuals how to identify and harness the expertise they've always had, so they can expand into the business and life of their dreams.Kelly's Website: thegriitproject.com-------------------------------------------------------

WPRB News & Culture
Comings and Goings

WPRB News & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 53:20


On 11/11, News and Culture thinks about moments in our day: commutes, routines, junction points, stories from years past and new stories alike. From the archives, Elizabeth Shwe interviews an EMT about a day in the life - saving lives. Henry Moses and Luke Carroll bring us a new story of people at a junction, literally, speaking to folks in the midst of their commutes during rush hour at the Princeton Junction NJ Transit station. We return to the archives to hear a story from Hope Perry, about the path books take in Princeton University's massive Firestone Library, from the circulation desk all the way home. And finally, Anna Hiltner speaks to a farmer at the junction between spirituality and agriculture. The key word? Biodynamics. Produced and hosted by Adam Sanders. Reported, recorded, and produced by Elizabeth Shwe, Henry Moses, Luke Carroll, Hope Perry, Anna Hiltner, Oliver Whang, and Adam Sanders. Theme song: “Montanita” by Ratatat. Included music all under Creative Commons license. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/newsandculture/message

Inside EMS
Why introducing waveform capnography can help EMTs grow

Inside EMS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 17:40


This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visitlexipol.com. Inside EMS cohosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson respond to the social media discussion on a recent EMS1 article: "Should waveform capnography be in the EMT scope of practice?" The comments on the topic were divided: "If you can bag or insert an airway, you should be able to use ETCO2. As others have said, it's a fantastic tool for all levels of clinical practice." "They need to be good at what is already in their scope of practice and most of the aren't. They're just medic dependent." "... Why is this even a question? Absolutely yes." Our cohosts discuss how to train EMTs for this skill and how to make it a reality in the educational process. Chris offers his take on the topic and suggests that nothing needs to be added to the EMT curriculum; instead, he believes it's the responsibility of the agency to teach this skill. 

Mike Behind the Mic
Mike Behind the Mic: Dr. Steve West

Mike Behind the Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 22:20


In this week's episode of Mike Behind the Mic, Mike Dubberly talks with Bronze Star recipient Dr. Steve West, who now makes his home in Pelham, Alabama. Dr. West is a retired Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, who served as chaplain in the early years of the War in Iraq. Dr. West also served as chaplain to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It was during that time serving in the Pentagon that he, himself, got tested for PTSD and found out he indeed had post-traumatic stress disorder. He realized his years of serving as an EMT and as a counselor for our troops and hearing their horrors, that he carried their traumas inside emotionally.  He's now written a book called The Bronze Scar to help others understand the signs of PTSD and to help loved ones of those suffering from it.

Stories From the Road
Ret. FF/EMT Keith - "Purpose"

Stories From the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 26:52


“And it feels good because when I left the job, I really kinda lost my identity for a while, and I felt like I wasn't able to help people.  And lately, especially, I've sort of gotten some of that back, where I'm giving back to the community I love so much.  I know these men and women who, you know, selflessly go out every day and sacrifice so much.” – Ret. Firefighter/EMT Keith First responders often excel at compartmentalizing the difficult aspects of their job. This may serve as an effective temporary coping mechanism, but the mounting pressure of complex, unprocessed trauma can lead to a deluge of feelings and thoughts that seem insurmountable. While that tipping point varies for everyone, for Keith, it took 17 years and a reunion with one of his colleagues to truly realize the power that one of the worst calls of his career had held over him for all those years. Join former firefighter/paramedic and host Phil Klein as he sits down with retired firefighter and EMT, Keith. Just 18 years old when he joined the fire department, Keith recalls being prepared to see difficult situations but unprepared to deal with the individual and cumulative impact those events would have on his mental health and his life. Now, Keith helps those who are new to or are considering a career as a first responder understand how to break the stigma around asking for help and better prepare for the mental and emotional tolls of public service.Thank you for listening to Stories From the Road! To learn more about the advocacy work Keith is doing for first responders affected by PTSD, please take a moment to check out these links:·        The Sunday Group·        First Responder Coaching·        Keith's YouTube ChannelSupport the show

Called to Queer
Sadi Rogers (she/her)

Called to Queer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 63:54


In this episode, we interview Sadi Rogers. Some things we talk about include:The realities of "leadership roulette" on how church discipline is carried out for queer individualsBeing in a mixed-orientation marriage and then going through a divorceMarrying her now wife and figuring out where she now fits in the churchSadi is a queer woman currently living in Southern California. She was raised LDS and is a wife, mother, substitute teacher, and EMT. She has 3 kids and a really awesome wife. When she's not spending time with family or working she likes being outdoors, playing sports, or scrolling TikTok. Her love languages are taking naps and tacos. She believes that diversity is God's gift to us to become more Christlike and hopes that sharing her story will inspire others to share their stories too. You can connect with her on Facebook or Instagram.For episode transcripts and further resources, please visit our website. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Medic2Medic Podcast
Michael Levy

Medic2Medic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 34:26


Episode 265 is Michael Levy. Michael is the Medical Director for a few fire departments in Anchorage, Alaska, including the Anchorage Fire Department. Michael has served in Alaska for over 30 years, and if you recall the show Northern Exposure, he has a similar path to Alaska that you will hear. Michael talks about his career, passion for EMS, and a few Dr. Marvin Wayne stories that are fun to hear (Dr. Wayne is my Medical Director). We talk about EMS in Alaska, how he became the medical director, and why the topic of resuscitation is a major part of his DNA. 

Art of Emergency Nursing
AOEN: From Prehospital to Primary Care, with Gina

Art of Emergency Nursing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 45:21


In this episode, Kevin has a conversation with Dr. Gina Slobogin, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, NHDP-BC, NEA-BC, PGMT-BC, BC-ADM, TCRN, CEN, CPEN, CFRN, CTRN, PHRN.  Gina has dedicated her career to the care of others.  First as an EMT and now as a nurse practitioner.  Gina shares some of the lessons learned over the years.   You are going to love this episode with the amazing Gina.   Follow us on Social: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Art-of-Emergency-Nursing-276898616569046/ Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJTnz4phtCTjojTIDJo2afA?view_as=subscriber Twitter @AoenPodcast Instagram https://www.instagram.com/artofemergencynursing/ To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help the show and I read each one. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google, and elsewhere. Thanks for joining me this week. Until next time!

MTR Podcasts
Interview with bass-baritone Davóne Tines

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 41:09


Heralded as "[one] of the most powerful voices of our time" by the Los Angeles Times, bass-baritone Davóne Tines has come to international attention as a path-breaking artist whose work not only encompasses a diverse repertoire but also explores the social issues of today. As a Black, gay, classically trained performer at the intersection of many histories, cultures, and aesthetics, Tines is engaged in work that blends opera, art song, contemporary classical music, spirituals, gospel, and songs of protest, as a means to tell a deeply personal story of perseverance that connects to all of humanity. Davóne Tines is Musical America's 2022 Vocalist of the Year. During the 2022-23 season, he continues his role as the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale's first-ever Creative Partner and, beginning in January 2023, he will serve as Brooklyn Academy of Music's first Artist in Residence in more than a decade. In addition to strategic planning, programming, and working within the community, this season Tines curates the “Artist as Human” program, exploring how each artist's subjectivity—be it their race, gender, sexuality, etc.—informs performance, and how these perspectives develop throughout their repertoire. In the fall of 2022, Tines makes a number of important debuts at prominent New York institutions, including the Park Avenue Armory, New York Philharmonic, BAM, and Carnegie Hall, continuing to establish a strong presence in the city's classical scene. He opens his season with the New York premiere of Tyshawn Sorey's Monochromatic Light (Afterlife) at the Park Avenue Armory, also doubling as Tines' Armory debut. Inspired by one of Sorey's most important influences, Morton Feldman and his work Rothko Chapel, Monochromatic Light (Afterlife) takes after Feldman's focus on expansive textures and enveloping sounds, aiming to create an all-immersive experience. Tine's solo part was written specifically for him by Sorey, marking a third collaboration between the pair; Sorey previously created arrangements for Tines' Recital No. 1: MASS and Concerto No. 2: ANTHEM. Peter Sellars directs, with whom Davóne collaborated in John Adam's opera Girls of the Golden West and Kaija Saariaho's Only the Sound Remains. Tines' engagements continue with Everything Rises, an original, evening length staged musical work he created with violinist Jennifer Koh, premiering in New York as part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival. Everything Rises tells the story of Tines' and Koh's artistic journeys and family histories through music, projections, and recorded interviews. As a platform, it also centers the need for artists of color to be seen and heard. Everything Rises premiered in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles in April 2022, with the LA Times commenting, “Koh and Tines' stories have made them what they are, but their art needs to be—and is—great enough to tell us who they are.” This season also has Tines making his New York Philharmonic debut performing in Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, led by Jaap van Zweden. Tines returns to the New York Philharmonic in the spring to sing the Vox Christi in Bach's St. Matthew Passion, also under van Zweden. Tines is a musician who takes full agency of his work, devising performances from conception to performance. His Recital No. 1: MASS program reflects this ethos, combining traditional music with pieces by J.S. Bach, Margaret Bonds, Moses Hogan, Julius Eastman, Caroline Shaw, Tyshawn Sorey, and Tines. This season, he makes his Carnegie Hall recital debut performing MASS at Weill Hall, and later brings the program to the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, Baltimore's Shriver Hall, for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, and as part of Boston's Celebrity Series. Concerto No. 1: SERMON is a similar artistic endeavor, combining pieces including John Adams' El Niño; Vigil, written by Tines and Igée Dieudonné with orchestration by Matthew Aucoin; “You Want the Truth, but You Don't Want to Know,” from Anthony Davis' X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X; and poems from Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, and Maya Angelou into a concert performance. In May 2021, Tines performed Concerto No. 1: SERMON with Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphia Orchestra, and with the BBC Symphony Orchestra. He recently premiered Concerto No. 2: ANTHEM—created by Tines with music by Michael Schachter, Caroline Shaw, Tyshawn Sorey, and text by Mahogany L. Browne—with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. Also this season, Tines performs in El Niño with the Cleveland Orchestra, conducted by composer John Adams; a concert performance of Adams' Girls of the Golden West with the Los Angeles Philharmonic also led by Adams; and a chamber music recital with the New World Symphony.Going beyond the concert hall, Davóne Tines also creates short music films that use powerful visuals to accentuate the social and poetic dimensions of the music. In September 2020, Lincoln Center presented his music film VIGIL, which pays tribute to Breonna Taylor, the EMT and aspiring nurse who was shot and killed by police in her Louisville home, and whose tragic death has fueled an international outcry. Created in collaboration with Igée Dieudonné, and Conor Hanick, the work was subsequently arranged for orchestra by Matthew Aucoin and premiered in a live-stream by Tines and the Louisville Orchestra, conducted by Teddy Abrams. Aucoin's orchestration is also currently part of Tines' Concerto No. 1: SERMON. He also co-created Strange Fruit with Jennifer Koh, a film juxtaposing violence against Asian Americans with Ken Ueno's arrangement of “Strange Fruit” — which the duo perform in Everything Rises — directed by dramaturg Kee-Yoon Nahm. The work premiered virtually as part of Carnegie Hall's “Voices of Hope Series.” Additional music films include FREUDE, an acapella “mashup” of Beethoven with African-American hymns that was shot, produced, and edited by Davóne Tines at his hometown church in Warrenton, Virginia and presented virtually by the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale; EASTMAN, a micro-biographical film highlighting the life and work of composer Julius Eastman; and NATIVE SON, in which Tines sings the Black national anthem, “Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing,” and pays homage to the '60s Civil Rights-era motto “I am a man.” The latter film was created for the fourth annual Native Son Awards, which celebrate Black, gay excellence. Further online highlights include appearances as part of Boston Lyric Opera's new miniseries, desert in, marking his company debut; LA Opera at Home's Living Room Recitals; and the 2020 NEA Human and Civil Rights Awards.Notable performances on the opera stage the world premiere performances of Kaija Saariaho's Only the Sound Remains directed by Peter Sellars at Dutch National Opera, Finnish National Opera, Opéra national de Paris, and Teatro Real (Madrid); the world and European premieres of John Adams and Peter Sellars' Girls of the Golden West at San Francisco Opera and Dutch National Opera, respectively; the title role in a new production of Anthony Davis' X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X with the Detroit Opera (where he was Artist in Residence during the 2021-22 season) and the Boston Modern Opera Project with Odyssey Opera in Boston where it was recorded for future release; the world premiere of Terence Blanchard and Kasi Lemmons' Fire Shut Up In My Bones at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis; the world premiere of Matthew Aucoin's Crossing, directed by Diane Paulus at the Brooklyn Academy of Music; a new production of Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex at Lisbon's Teatro Nacional de São Carlos led by Leo Hussain; and Handel's rarely staged Aci, Galatea, e Polifemo at National Sawdust, presented in a new production by Christopher Alden. As a member of the American Modern Opera Company (AMOC), Tines served as a co-music director of the 2022 Ojai Music Festival, and has performed in Hans Werner Henze's El Cimarrón, John Adams' Nativity Reconsidered, and Were You There in collaboration with composers Matthew Aucoin and Michael Schachter.Davóne Tines is co-creator and co-librettist of The Black Clown, a music theater experience inspired by Langston Hughes' poem of the same name. The work, which was created in collaboration with director Zack Winokur and composer Michael Schachter, expresses a Black man's resilience against America's legacy of oppression—fusing vaudeville, opera, jazz, and spirituals to bring Hughes' verse to life onstage. The world premiere was given by the American Repertory Theater in 2018, and The Black Clown was presented by Lincoln Center in summer 2019.Concert appearances have included John Adams' El Niño with the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin under Vladimir Jurowski, Schumann's Das Paradies und die Peri with Louis Langrée and the Cincinnati Symphony, Kaija Saariaho's True Fire with the Orchestre national de France conducted by Olari Elts, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with Michael Tilson Thomas leading the San Francisco Symphony, Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex with Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Royal Swedish Orchestra, and a program spotlighting music of resistance by George Crumb, Julius Eastman, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Caroline Shaw with conductor Christian Reif and members of the San Francisco Symphony at SoundBox. He also sang works by Caroline Shaw and Kaija Saariaho alongside the Calder Quartet and International Contemporary Ensemble at the Ojai Music Festival. In May 2021, Tines sang in Tulsa Opera's concert Greenwood Overcomes, which honored the resilience of Black Tulsans and Black America one hundred years after the Tulsa Race Massacre. That event featured Tines premiering “There are Many Trails of Tears,” an aria from Anthony Davis' opera-in-progress Fire Across the Tracks: Tulsa 1921.Davóne Tines is a winner of the 2020 Sphinx Medal of Excellence, recognizing extraordinary classical musicians of color who, early in their career, demonstrate artistic excellence, outstanding work ethic, a spirit of determination, and an ongoing commitment to leadership and their communities. In 2019 he was named as one of Time Magazine's Next Generation Leaders. He is also the recipient of the 2018 Emerging Artists Award given by Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and is a graduate of The Juilliard School and Harvard University, where he teaches a semester-length course “How to be a Tool: Storytelling Across Disciplines” in collaboration with director Zack Winokur.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture. To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory. Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★

america music new york black los angeles france voice truth home european artist girls african americans sermon human created baltimore voices excellence sing mass concerts tears adams bass louisville harvard university crossing freude asian americans anthem hughes breonna taylor civil rights bach residence ludwig van beethoven time magazine los angeles times santa barbara anthony davis la times performing arts handel bam malcolm x maya angelou notable lisbon emt vigil black america carnegie hall james baldwin feldman vocalists browne john adams saint louis lincoln center eastman schumann hollywood bowl langston hughes tulsa race massacre juilliard school jaap stravinsky armory koh dav symphony no strange fruit orchestre chorale new york philharmonic zweden native son baritone aci philadelphia orchestra los angeles philharmonic heralded terence blanchard brooklyn academy tines san francisco symphony galatea cleveland orchestra rob lee kasi lemmons new world symphony san francisco opera aucoin das paradies oedipus rex warrenton next generation leaders caroline shaw teatro nacional michael tilson thomas dmitri shostakovich dieudonn la opera concerto no bbc symphony orchestra esa pekka salonen opera theatre peter sellars morton feldman yannick n ninth symphony golden west kaija saariaho tyshawn sorey truefire american repertory theater national sawdust creative partner diane paulus george crumb were you there polifemo julius eastman soundbox louisville orchestra park avenue armory john adam hans werner henze musical america cincinnati symphony rothko chapel mccarter theatre jennifer koh international contemporary ensemble tulsa opera teddy abrams fire across vladimir jurowski moses hogan lift ev next wave festival celebrity series olari elts teatro real madrid
ASCO Daily News
Novel Therapies Targeting KRAS in Lung Cancer & RAS-altered Tumors

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 28:33


Dr. Vamsi Velcheti and Dr. Benjamin Neel, of the NYU Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center, and Dr. John Heymach, of MD Anderson Cancer Center, discuss new therapeutic approaches for KRAS-mutant lung cancers and therapy options for RAS-altered tumors.   TRANSCRIPT Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Hello, I'm Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti, your guest host for the ASCO Daily News podcast today. I'm the medical director of the Thoracic Oncology Program at Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health. I'm delighted to welcome two internationally renowned physician-scientists, Dr. John Heymach, the chair of Thoracic-Head & Neck Medical Oncology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, and my colleague, Dr. Benjamin Neel, the director of the Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health, and professor of Medicine at NYU Grossman School of Medicine. So, we'll be discussing new therapeutic approaches today for KRAS-mutant lung cancers, and we will talk about emerging new targeted therapy options for RAS-altered tumors. Our full disclosures are available in the show notes, and the disclosures of all the guests of the podcast can be found on our transcript at: asco.org/podcast. Dr. Heymach and Dr. Neel, it's such a great pleasure to have you here for the podcast today. Dr. John Heymach: My pleasure to be here. Dr. Benjamin Neel: Same here. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Dr. Neel, let's start off with you. As you know, RAS oncogenes were first discovered nearly four decades ago. Why is RAS such a challenging therapeutic target? Why has it taken so long to develop therapeutic options for these patients? Dr. Benjamin Neel: Well, I think a good analogy is the difference between kinase inhibitors and RAS inhibitors. So, kinase inhibitors basically took advantage of an ATP-binding pocket that's present in all kinases, but is different from kinase to kinase, and can be accessed by small molecule inhibitors. So, the standard approach that one would've thought of taking, would be to go after the GTP-binding pocket. The only problem is that the affinity for binding GTP by KRAS is three to four orders of magnitude higher. So, actually getting inhibitors that are GTP-binding inhibitors is pretty much very difficult. And then, until recently, it was felt that RAS was a very flat molecule and there weren't any surfaces that you could stick a small molecule inhibitor in. So, from a variety of biochemical and medicinal-pharmacological reasons, RAS was thought to be impervious to small molecule development. But as is often the case, a singular and seminal insight from a scientist, Kevan Shokat, really broke the field open, and now there's a whole host of new approaches to trying to drug RAS. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: So, Dr. Neel, can you describe those recent advances in drug design that have enabled these noble new treatments for KRAS-targeted therapies? Dr. Benjamin Neel: So, it starts actually with the recognition that for many years, people were going after the wrong RAS. And by the wrong RAS, the overwhelming majority of the earlier studies on the structure, and for that matter, the function of RAS centered on HRAS or Harvey RAS. We just mutated in some cancers, most prominently, bladder cancer, and head & neck cancer, but not on KRAS, which is the really major player in terms of oncogenes in human cancer. So, first of all, we were studying the wrong RAS. The second thing is that we were sort of thinking that all RAS mutants were the same. And even from the earliest days, back in the late eighties, it was pretty clear that there were different biochemical properties in all different RAS mutants. But this sort of got lost in the cause and in the intervening time, and as a result, people thought all RASes were the same and they were just studying mainly G12V and G12D, which are more difficult to drug. And then, the third and most fundamental insight was the idea of trying to take advantage of a particular mutation in KRAS, which is present in a large fraction of lung cancer patients, which is, KRAS G12C. So, that's a mutation of glycine 12 to cysteine and Kevan's really seminal study was to use a library of covalently adducting drugs, and try to find ways to tether a small molecule in close enough so that it could hit the cysteine. And what was really surprising was when they actually found the earliest hits with this strategy, which was actually based on some early work by Jim Wells at Sunesis in the early part of this century, they found that it was actually occupying the G12C state or the inactive state of RAS. And this actually hearkens back to what I said earlier about all RASes being the same. And in fact, what's been recently re-appreciated is that some RAS mutants, most notably, G12C, although they're impervious to the gap which converts the active form into the inactive form, they still have a certain amount of intrinsic ability to convert from the inactive form. And so, they always cycle into the inactive form at some slow rate, and that allows them to be accessed by these small molecules in the so-called Switch-II Pocket, and that enables them to position a warhead close enough to the cysteine residue to make a covalent adduct and inactivate the protein irreversibly. Scientists at a large number of pharmaceutical companies and also academic labs began to understand how to access various other pockets in RAS, and also even new strategies, taking advantage of presenting molecules to RAS on a chaperone protein. So, there's now a whole host of strategies; you have a sort of an embarrassment of riches from an impoverished environment that we started with prior to 2012. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Thank you, Dr. Neel. So, Dr. Heymach, lung cancer has been a poster child for personalized therapy, and we've had like a lot of FDA-approved agents for several molecularly-defined subsets of lung cancer. How clinically impactful is a recent approval of Sotoracib for patients with metastatic lung cancer? Dr. John Heymach: Yeah. Well, I don't think it's an exaggeration to say this is the biggest advance for targeted therapies for lung cancer since the initial discovery of EGFR inhibitors. And let me talk about that in a little more detail. You know, the way that lung cancer therapy, like a lot of other cancer therapies, has advanced is by targeting specific driver oncogenes. And as Dr. Neel mentioned before, tyrosine kinases are a large percentage of those oncogenes and we've gotten very good at targeting tyrosine kinases developing inhibitors. They all sort of fit into the same ATP pocket, or at least the vast majority of them now. There are some variations on that idea now like allosteric inhibitors. And so, the field has just got better and better. And so, for lung cancer, the field evolved from EGFR to ALK, to ROS1 RET fusions, MEK, and so forth. What they all have in common is, they're all tyrosine kinases. But the biggest oncogene, and it's about twice as big as EGFR mutation, are KRAS mutations. And as you mentioned, this isn't a tyrosine kinase. We never had an inhibitor. And the first one to show that it's targetable, to have the first drug that does this, is really such an important breakthrough. Because once the big breakthrough and the concept is there, the pharmaceutical companies in the field can be really good at improving and modulating that. And that's exactly what we see. So, from that original insight that led to the design of the first G12C inhibitors, now there's dozens, literally dozens of G12C inhibitors and all these other inhibitors based on similar concepts. So, the first one now to go into the clinic and be FDA-approved is Sotoracib. So, this again, as you've heard, is inhibitor G12C, and it's what we call an irreversible inhibitor. So, it fits into this pocket, and it covalently links with G12C. So, when it's linked, it's linked, it's not coming off. Now, the study that led to its FDA approval was called the CodeBreak 100 study. And this was led in part, by my colleague Ferdinandos Skoulidis, and was published in The New England Journal in the past year. And, you know, there they studied 126 patients, and I'll keep just a brief summary, these were all refractory lung cancer patients. They either had first-line therapy, most had both chemo and immunotherapy. The primary endpoint was objective response rate. And for the study, the objective response rate was 37%, the progression-free survival was 6.8 months, the overall survival was 12.5 months. Now you might say, well, 37%, that's not as good as an EGFR inhibitor or the others. Well, this is a much harder thing to inhibit. And you have to remember in this setting, the standard of care was docetaxel chemotherapy. And docetaxel usually has a response rate of about 10 to 13%, progression-free survival of about 3 months. So, to more than double that with a targeted drug and have a longer PFS really is a major advance. But it's clear, we've got to improve on this and I think combinations are going to be incredibly important now. There's a huge number of combination regimens now in testing. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Thank you, Dr. Heymach. So, Dr. Neel, just following up on that, unlike other targeted therapies in lung cancer, like EGFR, ALK, ROS, and RET, the G12C inhibitors appear to have somewhat modest, I mean, though, certainly better than docetaxel that Dr. Heymach was just talking about; why is it so hard to have more effective inhibitor of KRAS here? Is it due to the complex nature of RAS-mutant tumors? Or is it our approach for targeting RAS? Is it a drug-related problem, or is it the disease? Dr. Benjamin Neel: Well, the short answer is I think that's a theoretical discussion at this point and there isn't really good data to tell you, but I suspect it's a combination of those things. We'll see with the new RAS(ON) inhibitors, which seem to have deeper responses, even in animal models, if those actually work better in the clinic, then we'll know at least part of it was that we weren't hitting RAS hard enough, at least with the single agents. But I also think that it's highly likely that since KRAS-mutant tumors are enriched in smokers, and smokers have lots of mutations, that they are much more complex tumours, and therefore there's many more ways for them to escape. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Dr. Heymach, you want to weigh in on that? Dr. John Heymach: Yeah, I think that's right. I guess a couple of different ways to view it is the problem that the current inhibitors are not inhibiting the target well enough, you know, in which case we say we get better and better inhibitors will inhibit it more effectively, or maybe we're inhibiting it, but we're not shutting down all the downstream pathways or the feedback pathways that get turned on in response, in which case the path forward is going to be better combinations. Right now, I think the jury is still out, but I think the data supports that we can do better with better inhibitors, there's room to grow. But it is also going to be really important hitting these compensatory pathways that get turned on. I think it's going to be both, and it seems like KRAS may turn on more compensatory pathways earlier than things like EGFR or ALK2, you know, and I think it's going to be a great scientific question to figure out why that is. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Right. And just following up on that, Dr. Heymach, so, what do we know so far about primary and acquired resistance to KRAS G12C inhibitors? Dr. John Heymach: Yeah. Well, it's a great question, and we're still very early in understanding this. And here, if we decide to call it primary resistance - meaning you never respond in the first place, and acquired - meaning you respond and then become resistant, we're not sure why some tumors do respond and don't respond initially. Now, it's been known for a long time, tumors differ in what we call their KRAS-dependence. And in cell lines and in mouse models, when you study this in the lab, there are some models where if you block KRAS, those cells will die immediately. They are fully dependent. And there's other ones that become sort of independent and they don't really seem to care if you turn down KRAS, they've sort of moved on to other things they're dependent on. One way this can happen is with undergoing EMT where the cell sort of changes its dependencies. And EMT is probably a reason some of these tumors are resistant, to start with. It may also matter what else is mutated along with KRAS, what we call the co-mutations, the additional mutations that occur along with it. For example, it seems like if this gene KEAP1 is mutated, tumors don't respond as well, to begin with. Now, acquired resistance is something we are gaining some experience with. I can say in the beginning, we all knew there'd be resistance, we were all waiting to see it, and what we were really hoping for was the case like with first-generation inhibitors with EGFR, where there was one dominant mechanism. In the first-generation EGFR, we had one mutation; T790M, that was more than half the resistance. And then we could develop drugs for that. But unfortunately, that's not the case. It looks like the resistance mechanisms are very diverse, and lots of different pathways can get turned on. So, for acquired resistance, you can have additional KRAS mutations, like you can have a KRAS G12D or V, or some other allele, or G13, I didn't even realize were commonly mutated, like H95 or Y96 can get mutated as well. So, we might be able to inhibit with better inhibitors. But the more pressing problem is what we call bypass; when these other pathways get turned on. And for bypass, we know that the tumor can turn on MET with MET amplification, NRAS, BRAF, MAP kinase, and we just see a wide variety. So, it's clear to us there isn't going to be a single easy to target solution like there was for EGFR. This is going to be a long-term problem, and we're going to have to work on a lot of different solutions and get smarter about what we're doing. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Yeah. Thank you very much, Dr. Heymach. And Dr. Neel, just following up on that, so, what do you think our strategies should be or should look like while targeting KRAS-mutant tumors? Like, do we focus on better ways to inhibit RAS, or do we focus on personalized combination approaches based on various alterations or other biomarkers? Dr. Benjamin Neel: Yeah. Well, I'd like to step back a second and be provocative, and say that we've been doing targeted therapies, so to speak, for a long time, and it's absolutely clear that targeted therapies never cure. And so, I think we should ask the bigger question, "Why is it that targeted therapies never cure?" And I would start to conceive of an answer to that question by asking which therapies do cure. And the therapies that we know do cure are immune therapies, or it's therapies that generate durable immune response against the tumor. And the other therapies that we know that are therapies in some cases against some tumors, and radiation therapy in some cases against some tumors. Probably the only way that those actually converge on the first mechanism I said that cures tumors, which is generating a durable immune response. And so, the only way, in my view, it is to durably cure an evolving disease, like a cancer, is to have an army that can fight an evolving disease. And the only army I know of is the immune system. So, I think ultimately, what we need to do is understand in detail, how all of these different mutations that lead to cancer affect immune response and create targetable lesions in the immune response, and then how the drugs we'd give affect that. So, in the big picture, the 50,000-foot picture, that what we really need to spend more attention on, is understanding how the drugs we give and the mutations that are there in the first place affect immune response against the tumor, and ultimately try to develop strategies that somehow pick up an immune response against the tumor. Now in the short run, I think there's also lots of combination strategies that we can think of, John, you know, alluded to some of them earlier. I mean one way for the G12C inhibitors, getting better occupancy of the drug, and also blocking this so-called phenomenon of adaptive resistance, where you derepress the expression of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their ligands, and therefore bypass through normal RAS or upregulate G12C into the GTP state more, that can be attacked by combining, for example, with the SHIP2 inhibitor or a SOS inhibitor. Again, the issue there will be therapeutic index. Can we achieve that with a reasonable therapeutic index? Also in some cases, like not so much in lung cancer, but in colon cancer, it appears as if a single dominant receptor tyrosine kinase pathway, the EGF receptor pathway, is often the mechanism of adaptive resistance to RAS inhibitors, and so, combining a RAS inhibitor with an EGF receptor inhibitor is a reasonable strategy. And then of course, some of the strategies they're already getting at, what I just mentioned before, which is to try to combine RAS inhibitors with checkpoint inhibitors. I think that's an expected and understandable approach, but I think we need to get a lot more sophisticated about the tumor microenvironment, and how that's affecting the immune response. And it's not just going to be, you know, in most cases combining with a checkpoint inhibitor. I think we ought to stop using the term immunotherapy to refer to checkpoint inhibitors. Checkpoint inhibitors are one type of immunotherapy. We don't refer to antibiotics when we mean penicillin. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Dr. Heymach, as you know, like, there's a lot of discussion about the role of KRAS G12C inhibitors in the frontline setting. Do you envision these drugs are going to be positioning themselves in the frontline setting as a combination, or like as a single agent? Are there like a subset of patients perhaps where you would consider like a single agent up front? Dr. John Heymach: So, I think there's no question G12C inhibitors are moving to the first-line question. And the question is just how you get there. Now, the simplest and most straightforward approach is to say, “Well, we'll take our standard and one standard might be immunotherapy alone, a PD-1 inhibitor alone, or chemo with the PD-1 inhibitor, and just take the G12C inhibitor and put it right on top.” And that's a classic strategy that's followed. That may not be that simple. It's not obvious that these drugs will always work well together or will be tolerated together. So, I think that's still being worked out. Now, an alternative strategy is you could say, “Well, let's get a foot in a door in the first-line setting by finding where chemotherapy and immunotherapy don't work well, and pick that little subgroup.” There are some studies there using STK11-mutant tumors, and they don't respond well to immunotherapy and chemotherapy and say, “Well, let's pick that first.” And that's another strategy, but that's not to get it for everybody in the first-line setting. That's just to pick a little subgroup. Or we may develop KRAS G12C inhibitor combinations by themselves that are so effective they can beat the standard. So, what I think is going to happen is a couple things; I think they'll first be some little niches where it gets in there first. I think eventually, we'll figure out how to combine them with chemotherapy and immunotherapy so it goes on top. And then I think over time, we'll eventually develop just more effective, targeted combos where we can phase out the chemo, where the chemo goes to the back of the line, and this goes to the front of the line. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: And Dr. Heymach, any thoughts on the perioperative setting and the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting, do you think there's any role for these inhibitors in the future? Dr. John Heymach: Yeah, this is a really exciting space right now. And so that makes this a really challenging question because of how quickly things are moving. I'll just briefly recap for everybody. Until recently, adjuvant therapy was just chemotherapy after you resected a lung cancer. That was it. And it provided about a 5% benefit in terms of five-year disease-free survival. Well, then we had adjuvant immunotherapy, like atezolizumab, approved, then we had neoadjuvant chemo plus immunotherapy approved; that's a CheckMate 816. And just recently, the AEGEAN study, which I'm involved with, was announced to be a positive study. That's neoadjuvant plus adjuvant chemo plus immunotherapy. So now, if you say, well, how are you going to bring a G12C inhibitor in there? Well, you can envision a few different ways; if you can combine with chemo and immunotherapy, you could bring it up front and bring it afterwards, or you could just tack it in on the back, either with immunotherapy or by itself, if you gave neoadjuvant chemo plus immunotherapy first, what we call the CheckMate 816 regimen. So, it could fit in a variety of ways. I'll just say neoadjuvant is more appealing because you can measure the response and see how well it's working, and we in fact have a neoadjuvant study going. But the long-term benefit may really come from keeping the drug going afterwards to suppress microscopic metastatic disease. And that's what I believe is going to happen. I think you're going to need to stay on these drugs for a long while to keep that microscopic disease down. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Dr. Neel, any thoughts on novel agents in development beyond KRAS G12C inhibitors? Are there any agents or combinations that you'd be excited about? Dr. Benjamin Neel: Well, I think that the YAP/TAZ pathway inhibitors, the TEAD inhibitors in particular, are potentially promising. I mean, it seems as if the MAP kinase pathway and the GAPT pathway act in parallel. There's been multiple phases which suggest that YAP/TAZ reactivation can be a mechanism of sort of state-switching resistance. And so, I think those inhibitors are different than the standard PI3 kinase pathway inhibitor, PI3 kinase mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. I also think as we've alluded to a couple of times, the jury's still out in the clinic, of course, but it'll be very exciting to see how this new set of RAS inhibitors works. The sort of Pan-RAS inhibitors, especially the ones that hit the GTP ON state. So, the G12C inhibitors and the initial preclinical G12D inhibitors that have been recorded, they all work by targeting the inactive state of RAS, the RAS-GDP state. And so, they can only work on mutants that cycle, at least somewhat, and they also don't seem to be as potent as targeting the GTP or active state of RAS. And so, at least the Rev meds compounds, which basically use cyclophilin, they basically adapt the mechanism that cyclosporine uses to inhibit calcineurin. They basically use the same kind of a strategy and build new drugs then that bind cyclophilin and present the drug in a way that can inhibit multiple forms of RAS. So, it'll be interesting to see if they are much more efficacious in a clinic as they appear to be in the lab, whether they can be tolerated. So, I think those are things to look out for. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Dr. Heymach? Dr. John Heymach: Yeah, I agree with that. I'm excited to see that set of compounds coming along. One of the interesting observations is that when you inhibit one KRAS allele like G12C, you get these other KRAS alleles commonly popping up. And it's a little -- I just want to pause for a second to comment on this, because this is a little different than EGFR. If you inhibit a classic mutation, you don't get multiple other separate EGFR alleles popping up. You may get a secondary mutation in cyst on the same protein, but you don't get other alleles. So, this is a little different biology, but I think the frequency that we're seeing all these other KRAS alleles pop up tells us, I think we're going to need some pan-KRAS type strategy as a partner for targeting the primary driver. So for example, a G12C inhibitor plus a pan-KRAS strategy to head off these other alleles that can be popping up. So, I think that's going to be probably a minimum building block that you start putting other things around. And by partnering an allele-specific inhibitor where you might be able to inhibit it a little more potently and irreversibly with a pan-KRAS, you may solve some of these problems at the therapeutic window. You can imagine KRAS is so important for so many different cells in your body that if you potently inhibit all KRAS in your body, bad things are likely to happen somewhere. But if you can potently inhibit the mutant allele and then dampen the other KRAS signaling that's popping up, it's more hopeful. Dr. Benjamin Neel: There is a mouse model study from Mariano Barbacid's lab, which suggests that postnatal, KRAS at least, complete inhibition is doable. So, you could take out KRAS postnatally and the mice are okay. Whether that translates to human of course, is not at all clear. And you still have the other RAS alleles, the HRAS, the NRAS that you'd still have to contend with. Dr. John Heymach: Yeah, it's an interesting lesson. We've shied away from a lot of targets we thought weren't feasible. I did a lot of my training with Judah Folkman who pioneered targeting angiogenesis. And I remember hearing this idea of blocking new blood vessels. I said, "Well, everyone is just going to have a heart attack and die." And it turns out you can do it. You have to do it carefully, and in the right way but you can separate malignant or oncogenic signaling from normal signaling in an adult, pretty reasonably in a lot of cases where you don't think you could. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: All right. So, Dr. Neel, and Dr. Heymach, any final closing comments on the field of RAS-targeted therapies, you know, what can we hope for? What can patients hope for, let's say five years from now, what are we looking at? Dr. John Heymach: Well, I'll give my thoughts I guess first, from a clinical perspective, I think we're already seeing the outlines of an absolute explosion in targeting KRAS over the next five years. And I think there's a really good likelihood that this is going to be the major place where we see progress, at least in lung cancer, over these next five years. It's an example of a problem that just seemed insolvable for so long, and here I really want to acknowledge the sustained support for clinical research and laboratory research focused around RAS. You know, the NCI had specific RAS initiatives and we've had big team grants for KRAS, and it shows you it's worth these large-scale efforts because you never know when that breakthrough is going to happen. But sometimes it just takes, you know, opening that door a little bit and everybody can start rushing through. Well, I think for KRAS, the door has been opened and everybody is rushing through at a frantic rate right now. So, it's really exciting, and stay tuned. I think the landscape of RAS-targeting is going to look completely different five years from now. Dr. Benjamin Neel: So, I agree that the landscape will definitely look different five years from now, because it's reflective of stuff that's been in process for the last five years. And it takes about that long to come through. I want to make two comments; one of which is to slightly disagree with my friend, John, about these big initiatives. And I would point out that this RAS breakthrough did not come from a big initiative, it came from one scientist thinking about a problem uniquely in a different way. We need a basic science breakthrough, it almost always comes from a single lab person, thinking about a problem, often in isolation, in his own group. What big initiatives can help with is engineering problems. Once you've opened the door, and you want to know what the best way is to get around the house, then maybe big initiatives help. But I do think that there's been too much focus on the big team initiative and not enough on the individual scientists who often promote the breakthrough. And then in terms of where I see the field going, what I'd really like to see, and I think in some pharmaceutical companies and biotechs, you're seeing this now, and also in academia, but maybe not enough, is that sort of breaking down of the silos between immunotherapy and targeting therapy. Because I agree with what John said, is that targeted therapy, is just sophisticated debulking. If we want to really make progress-- and on the other hand, immunotherapy people don't seem to, you know, often recognize that these oncogenic mutations in the tumor actually affect the immune system. So, I think what we need is a unification of these two semi-disparate areas of therapeutics in a more fulsome haul and that will advance things much quicker. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: Thank you both, Dr. Neel and Dr. Heymach, for sharing all your valuable insights with us today on the ASCO Daily News podcast. We really appreciate it. Thank you so much. Dr. John Heymach: Thanks for asking us. Dr. Benjamin Neel: It's been great having us. Dr. Vamsidhar Velcheti: And thank you all to our listeners, and thanks for joining us today. If you value our insights that you hear on the ASCO Daily News podcast, please take a moment to rate, review and subscribe. Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Follow today's speakers: Dr. Vamsi Velcheti @VamsiVelcheti Dr. Benjamin Neel @DrBenNeel Dr. John Heymach Want more related content? Listen to our podcast on novel therapies in lung cancer.    Advances in Lung Cancer at ASCO 2022 Follow ASCO on social media: @ASCO on Twitter ASCO on Facebook ASCO on LinkedIn Disclosures: Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Honoraria: Honoraria Consulting or Advisory Role: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Foundation Medicine, AstraZeneca/MedImmune, Novartis, Lilly, EMD Serono, GSK, Amgen Research Funding (Inst.): Genentech, Trovagene, Eisai, OncoPlex Diagnostics, Alkermes, NantOmics, Genoptix, Altor BioScience, Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Atreca, Heat Biologics, Leap Therapeutics, RSIP Vision, GlaxoSmithKline Dr. Benjamin Neel: None disclosed Dr. John Heymach: None disclosed    

Blue Ridge Bonfire by Blue Ridge Overland Gear
Overlanding Medical Supplies with Rodney Dewson - Bonfire Show November 2nd, 2022

Blue Ridge Bonfire by Blue Ridge Overland Gear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 26:02


Our friend Rodney talks about what first aid he packs for overlanding, from his perspective as a firefighter/EMT. SHOP NOW: https://www.blueridgeoverlandgear.com/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2TInbINexaZME_0mhW_bnw Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blueridgeoverlandgear/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blueridgeoverlandgear

The Gnar Couch Podcast
Gnar Couch Podshow 88: BJ Broke a Lesbian's Leg, Geometric Twinks, Foreign Object Friday

The Gnar Couch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 88:10


You'll learn so much on this weeks show. Did you know female soccer players only fall into two--possibly three categories: super-hot, lesbian, or super-hot lesbian? The topic of drug-induced geometric twinks cause Cheef to laugh hard enough to almost piss his pants. There is an in-depth conversation about objects EMT and ER personnel find deep within the confines of people's south mouths. Rob packs more stuff for MTB trips than the rest of the field combined. Cheef introduces Jimmy and Sponch to Steel Panther. Join our Patreon to help us pay for this shitshow. Check out the sponsors: Take a Hike Shop Bliz Eyewear (Use code "sponchesmom" for 30% off.) Diet Smoke (Use code "gnar15" for 15% off.) Archer Components Gnar Couch

RoadWorthy Drive Moments
If You Call 911, Will They Come?

RoadWorthy Drive Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 11:00


A sobering fact: 911 emergency services are not deemed essential by a large number of rural communities cities and towns in America.  As a result, the service is funded largely by transport fees, the monies paid when they transport a patient.  This funding methodology has resulted in a plethora of unfortunate outcomes as a result. 

Skull Sessions
Ep. 18 - EMS Systems w/ Dave Leven

Skull Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 34:10


Dave Leven (SMC's Training Center Coordinator & EMT) joins Mike on this episode of Skull Sessions Podcast to discuss the relationship between EMS and Athletic Trainers. Follow SMC on Instagram: @sportsmedicineconcepts Check out the SMC Academy: https://learn.sportsmedicineconcepts.com Visit us on the web: https://www.sportsmedicineconcepts.com

Strokecast
The Truth About the COVID-19 Vaccine and Stroke! Plus, how to do your Research

Strokecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 61:05


More than a million people in the United States have been killed by COVID-19 in the past 3 years. The numbers would be much higher, but the vaccines were developed with amazing speed. Time and again, the vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective. Yet some people persist in claiming the mRNA vaccines are causing an epidemic of stroke. The data is clear. They do not. If you want to reduce your chances of stroke, get the vaccine. The new thing that causes stroke over the past few years is COVID-19 itself. If you want to decrease your chances of having a stroke (or another stroke) don't get a severe COVID-19 infection. And the simplest thing you can do to reduce your chances of getting a severe COVID-19 infection is to get the COVID-19 vaccine. If you do catch COVID-19 despite the vaccine, the data shows it will be much less severe and much less likely to be fatal.  In addition to protecting yourself, you are also helping to protect others who may not be medically eligible to get the vaccine. The COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are saving lives every day. In this episode ... In this episode, I talk with data scientist and epidemiologist Dr. Remle Crowe about the research studies coming out now that show what we already knew from earlier research: the COVID-19 vaccine does not increase your risk stroke. We talk about several studies, and we talk about how you can do your own research on the credibility of these studies and evaluate how well they reflect the scientific reality of our world. In this post, you'll also find links to a bunch of these studies that you can read for yourself. Start by listening to this conversation. If you don't seed the audio player below visit http://Strokecast.com/MSN/vaccine to listen to the whole conversation.   Click here for a machine-generated transcript   I got my Bivalent COVID-19 booster and my 2022 Flu shot on the same day in October. Who is Dr. Remle Crowe? Dr. Remle Crowe is an expert in EMS research and quality improvement. From truck clutches to clinical care, she has shown how research and improvement science work to solve problems across fields. Prior to earning a PhD in Epidemiology, her EMS career began with the Red Cross in Mexico City as a volunteer EMT. She has authored numerous peer-reviewed publications related to prehospital care and the EMS workforce. Now, as a research scientist with ESO, Dr. Crowe routinely uses EMS data to improve community health and safety. Dr. Crowe previously appeared on the Strokecast in episode 132 to discuss the AHORA pneumonic to help Spanish speakers recognize and respond to a stroke. When it comes to stroke, Time is Brain regardless of which language you speak. A Sampling of the Studies When we claim the data indicates that the vaccine doesn't cause an increase in stroke, what data are we talking about? How did "they" analyze it? Who reviewed the studies to ensure they were accurate? Where can you read the details yourself? As Dr. Crowe explained, there are currently a whole bunch of studies that are coming out. That makes sense; it's roughly 18 months since the vaccines against COVID-19 became widely available. To conduct sound research, you need a large pool of people to look at. You need to take some time to see the results. You need to write up those results. Then you need to submit them for publication. Publications will then need to review before publishing them. That brings us to where we are today with all these studies now becoming available. Let's take a look at a few of them, and I encourage you to click through to the details and read them yourself. Click the study titles for more. Surveillance for Adverse Events After COVID-19 mRNA Vaccination This study published in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) looked at nearly 12 million doses of the mRNA vaccine given to more than 6 million people. This is what they learned: "The incidence of events per 1 000 000 person-years during the risk vs comparison intervals for ischemic stroke was 1612 vs 1781 " In other words, the time period at greatest risk for stroke did not see an increased risk. They concluded: "In interim analyses of surveillance of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, incidence of selected serious outcomes was not significantly higher 1 to 21 days postvaccination compared with 22 to 42 days postvaccination. While CIs were wide for many outcomes, surveillance is ongoing." COVID-19 Incidence and Death Rates Among Unvaccinated and Fully Vaccinated Adults with and Without Booster Doses During Periods of Delta and Omicron Variant Emergence — 25 U.S. Jurisdictions, April 4–December 25, 2021 We talked about this report from the CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report during the episode. This study looked at infections and deaths among vaccinated folks and unvaccinated folks. The rate of infection and death from COVID-19 was much higher among unvaccinated folks than among vaccinated or vaccinated and boosted folks. The report says: "Rates of COVID-19 cases were lowest among fully vaccinated persons with a booster dose, compared with fully vaccinated persons without a booster dose, and much lower than rates among unvaccinated persons during October–November (25.0, 87.7, and 347.8 per 100,000 population, respectively) and December 2021 (148.6, 254.8, and 725.6 per 100,000 population, respectively) (Table 2). Similar trends were noted for differences in the mortality rates among these three groups (0.1, 0.6, and 7.8 per 100,000 population, respectively) during October–November." Even though the vaccine does not guarantee a person will avoid COVID-19, it greatly increases their chances of avoiding infection. And if they do become infected, the vaccine greatly increases their chances of survival. Acute ischemic stroke and vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia post COVID-19 vaccination; a systematic review This study in the Journal of Neurological Sciences looked throughout the published literature and found just 43 incidents of stroke following the vaccine administration. "AIS has been reported as a rare complication within 4 weeks post COVID-19 vaccination, particularly with viral vector vaccines. Health care providers should be familiar with this rare consequence of COVID-19 vaccination in particular in the context of VITT to make a timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan." The report specifically called out the risk of “viral vector vaccines” (and, again, it's a shockingly small risk). The most common viral vector COVID-19 vaccines are those from Johnson & Johnson and from Oxford-AstraZeneca. The mRNA vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer are not viral vector vaccines., indicating that those appear to be even safer. The recommendation is not to avoid vaccination. It's an extremely rare complication. The recommendation is to watch for signs of stroke, which is something we should be doing all the time anyway. Association Between Vaccination and Acute Myocardial Infarction and Ischemic Stroke After COVID-19 Infection This article, published in JAMA looked at what happens after a COVID-19 infection for both vaccinated and unvaccinated folks. If someone does get infected and, does their vaccination status reduce the impacts of infection? Yes, it does. In fact, folks who got the vaccine and the got COVID were LESS likely to have a stroke or heart attack after their COVID infection. "This study found that full vaccination against COVID-19 was associated with a reduced risk of AMI [heart attack] and ischemic stroke after COVID-19. The findings support vaccination, especially for those with risk factors for cardiovascular diseases." Risk of thrombocytopenia and thromboembolism after covid-19 vaccination and SARS-CoV-2 positive testing: self-controlled case series study This study in the UK looked at patients who had been infected with COVID-19 or who had received the vaccine. More than 30 million people were part of the study. The conclusions were clear: "Increased risks of haematological and vascular events that led to hospital admission or death were observed for short time intervals after first doses of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and BNT162b2 mRNA vaccines. The risks of most of these events were substantially higher and more prolonged after SARS-CoV-2 infection than after vaccination in the same population." Even if there is a slight risk from vaccination, the risk from the actual disease is much higher. COVID-19 vaccine not linked to increased risk of stroke Not all research becomes available without a subscription. Researchers at Cedars-Sinai have found similar results to other studies though and have come to the same conclusion. "Newly compiled data evaluated by researchers in the Department of Neurology and the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that COVID-19 vaccines do not raise stroke risk--but that severe COVID-19 infection does. Physician-scientists hope this growing body of evidence, highlighted today in an editorial in the peer-reviewed journal Neurology, will ease the minds of individuals still hesitant to be vaccinated." Risk of Myocarditis After Sequential Doses of COVID-19 Vaccine and SARS-CoV-2 Infection by Age and Sex We talked about this study in the conversation with Dr. Crowe. At first glance it is concerning. This is the conclusion: "Overall, the risk of myocarditis is greater after SARS-CoV-2 infection than after COVID-19 vaccination and remains modest after sequential doses including a booster dose of BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. However, the risk of myocarditis after vaccination is higher in younger men, particularly after a second dose of the mRNA-1273 vaccine." That does seem scary for young men, and there are a couple things to keep in mind. First, the number of events was so small that it's tough to draw firm conclusions. When you get down to such low numbers, that stats can do weird things. Second, this was based on the adverse event reporting system. That does not prove causality. It just flags something to look at more closely if there are large numbers. Which there are not. The point of all this research, though, is to learn more and compile more and more evidence. And ultimately to let the body of evidence guide decision making and recommendations. What we know at this point is that the risk of stroke after a COVID-19 infection is much higher than the risk of stroke following a vaccination. And the risk of stroke after COVID-19 infection is much lower in folks that have been vaccinated than it is in those who have not been vaccinated. COVID-19 is not gone. It is still out there in the world infecting people, killing people, and giving people strokes. Billions of vaccinations later, this is what the data tells us. The simplest way to reduce your risk of stroke is to get the vaccine and stay boosted. Do Your Own Research We talked about a bunch of research in the podcast, and we looked at a bunch of reports above. You don't have to just accept my commentary or Dr. Crowe's. You can read the reports yourself and look at the data and see why the vast majority of medical professionals have concluded the vaccines are safe and effective. Dr. Crowe offered a number of tips to help you do your research. You'll find them and more in this list. Tip 1 Search research focused search engines and directories to find studies and resources. Google Scholar and PubMed are great places to start. Tip 2 Look at the Publication that publishes the research. Is it well known for scientific rigor? Does it have a strong requirement for peer review of articles? Or can someone publish in it by simply paying a fee? Tip 3 Search for the publication's Impact Factor. The more other publications that cite its work, the higher the number. A publication with a higher impact factor is likely more credible. Tip 4 When you get to the actual study, look at what type it is. If it was a case study, that's interesting. If it was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on a large scale, that's even better. If it was a systemic review evaluating hundreds of other studies, that's stronger still. Tip 5 Look at how many people were part of the study. A few dozen is interesting. A few million is much more likely to yield credible results. Tip 6 Look at the results of the study, relative to the size of the study. A few results out of a dozen is one thing. A few results out of millions of subjects is another matter altogether. Tip 7 Look at the goal of the study. What were the authors hoping to demonstrate? Did they succeed? Why or why not? Tip 8 Consider confounding. Studies generally deal with a subset of the population -- a limited number of people -- and seek to extrapolate those results and draw conclusions about the broader population.  For those conclusions to be valid, though, the group studied needs to be similar to the group the study extrapolates to. The more different the groups are, the less reliable the results. Tip 9 Finally, does the study demonstrate causality or just coincidence? There's a reason folks will often say, “Correlation does not equal causation.” For example, the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) Public Dashboard is a collection of negative things that happen to a person after they get a vaccine. It's not a list of events caused by the vaccine. If a person gets hit by a bus after getting the vaccine, that can go in the database. It's an adverse event. That doesn't mean the vaccine caused the bus accident. Read the study carefully to see if the authors claim a causal relationship and if that relationship is supported by the evidence in the study. AHORA The last time Dr. Crowe was on the show was to talk about the AHORA messaging to help Spanish speakers recognize and respond to stroke. It's basically the equivalent of the BEFAST messaging we talk about a lot in English. Here is the stroke warning pneumonic device in Spanish. Download it and share it far and wide. Reconocer los signos de un accidente cerebrovascular y responder rápidamente. ¡Llame a una ambulancia si observa estas señales! Let's look at a translation. Letter Abbreviation for Spanish Description In English A Andar Tiene dificultad para andar? Tiene problemas con el equilibrio? Do they have difficulty walking? Do they have problems with balance? H Hablar Tiene dificultad para hablar o entender? Usa palabras que no tienen sentido? Do they have difficulty speaking or understanding language? Do they use words that don't make sense? O Ojos Tiene algün cambio de vista? Tiene visiön doble? Tiene dificultad para ver con ambos ojos? Do they have some change in vision? Do the have double vision? Do they have difficulty seeing with both eyes? R Rostro Tiene la mitad del rostro caido? Tiene un repentino dolor de cabeza como nunca se ha sentido? Do they have one-sided facial droop? Do they suddenly have the worst headache of their life? A Ambos Brazos Tiene dificultad para levantar un brazo o una pierna? Tiene debilidad en un brazo o una pierna? Do they have difficulty lifting an arm or a leg? Do they have weakness in an rm or a leg? And, of course, here is the BE FAST messaging for English speakers. Recognize the signs of a stroke and respond quickly. Call an ambulance if you observe these signs! Both sets of symptoms look for the same thing. The AHORA messaging includes legs and headaches. The BE FAST messaging specifically calls out calling an ambulance. Regardless, the more people that can recognize a stroke as it is happening, the better off we will all be. Pop Culture Moment During the conversation, Remle mentioned she is a big fan of the movie Sliding Doors. It's an examination of how simple moment can change the course of your life. What path lies ahead if we catch that train or miss it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Da-Mizk86AE&ab_channel=Shout%21Factory Or what happens if we turn right instead of turning left? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnzbuU5I7RI&ab_channel=DoctorWho In reflecting on the past, it's easy to get fixated on thing were so much better back then, but it's never that simple, is it? Billy Joel reminds us that: "The good old days weren't always good, and tomorrow ain't as bad as it seems." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph7oZnBH05s&ab_channel=billyjoelVEVO Other Shows Journal Club Remle mentioned her show, PCRF Journal Club, which is a journal review webinar that meets each month. They go deep into looking at the latest research studies that are coming out. The focus is on research around EMS -- the ambulance and transport industry. If you'd like to learn more, check out its site here: https://www.cpc.mednet.ucla.edu/pcrf Successful and Disabled I was also recently featured on another podcast focused on being successful as a person with disabilities. I joined host Christ Mitchell on the Successful and Disabled podcast to share my story and discuss how I use mindset to drive my recovery and other goals in life. Listen to it here. If you don't see the audio player below, visit http://Strokecast.com/MSN/Vaccine to listen to the conversation: Hack of the Week Reading a paper book can be challenging with one functional hand. It's even harder if you try to do that while eating a meal. Why? Because books don't always want to stay open on their own. You have to hold them open, which makes it harder to pick up your cheeseburger. I use my phone to address this problem. I open the book and then lay my phone across the open pages. It's just heavy enough to keep the book from snapping shut so I can enjoy feeding my belly as I also enjoy feeding my mind. Give it a try. Links  Where do we go from here? Check out the links above to learn more about why getting the vaccine is safer than not getting the vaccine Share this episode with someone you know by giving them the link http://Strokecast.com/vaccine Do you have a recent win or victory in your recovery? Share it by calling 321-5 STROKE Get your vaccine and booster to protect against COVID if your doctor advises it Don't get best…get better

EMT and NREMT Lectures - the Public Safety Guru
NREMT EMT Lecture Prep - Cardiovascular Emergencies - Medical Block Lecture 3 of 7 - Season 2

EMT and NREMT Lectures - the Public Safety Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 67:30


Exclusive content and support: https://www.patreon.com/theemttutor After this lecture the student should understand the significance and characteristics of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system; cardiovascular emergencies; the pathophysiology of respiration and perfusion; signs and symptoms of the most common cardiac conditions; the indications, contraindications, and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs); and the general care of a patient experiencing a cardiac emergency. Knowledge Domains: Identify the basic anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system as well as describe the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, assessment, and management of the following cardiac related emergencies: thromboembolism, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, a hypertensive emergency and a aortic aneurysm/dissection. Explain patient assessment procedures for cardiovascular problems and the relationship between airway management and the patient with cardiac compromise. Give the indications and contraindications for the use of aspirin and nitroglycerin. Recognize that many patients will have had cardiac surgery and may have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators. Define cardiac arrest and understand the differences between the fully automated and the semiautomated defibrillator. Describe the different types of AEDs and the indications and contraindications for use of an automated external defibrillator (AED). The EMT should know the reasons for early defibrillation and explain the circumstances that may result in inappropriate shocks from an AED. Describe AED maintenance procedures, continuing education and review. The EMT should know and understand the the emergency medical care for the patient with cardiac arrest and describe the components of care following AED shocks. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thepublicsafetyguru/message

The Redefine
Ep. 52 - HOLY CRAP! Cristy went to EMT School

The Redefine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 15:52


Happy Halloween!! We kick off the show the way we usually end it with Fishbowl Wisdom! Cristy spent 2 weeks in EMT school, Jeremy was sick on his birthday, and It's Halloween weekend so Boo to you! Show sponsored by: Elysium Escape Salon... escape while beautifying! We provide all of your haircare and skincare needs in Tulsa! elysiumescape.com Fishbowl Wisdom sponsored by: Poppy's Garden, Floral Design & Events located in Muskogee and Downtown Tulsa! poppys-garden.com

Wake Up With Patti Katter
TexasCop2.0: Life Behind The Badge, A LEO TikTok Sensation

Wake Up With Patti Katter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 21:12


Join Patti Katter with Texas Cop as they talk about his Life Behind The Badge, A LEO TikTok Sensation. In this episode, Tex shares his story of how he got discovered on Tiktok, his thoughts on embarking on one more mission as a first responder, and the importance of participating in the mission. Behind a massive following on Tiktok, Tex advocates breast cancer awareness by fundraising for a clothing line and donating the proceeds to a breast cancer organization. Here's a breakdown of what to expect in this episode: • Get on TikTok • How Tex Cop end up wanting to work as a first responder • The importance of giving back to the community. • Being a cop on TikTok is hard. • Being a cop on TikTok is hard. • And so much more! ~ About Texas Cop: Chuck, Tex, or TexCop2.0, is a Houston-area cop and Tik Tok star! Monday at 3:00 p.m. on Houston Life, we're introducing you to a Houston-area police officer that's viral on TikTok. He's known as @texascop2.0 on TikTok, with 1.6 million followers and 32.4 million likes. He created his TikTok account last year, and his funny videos are a hit! He'll join us in the studio Monday at 3:00 p.m. on KPRC 2. He started doing TikTok when COVID happened, and everybody was bored at home. Most cops or people in first responders always deal with depression and mental health, and anxiety; some don't know how to take it out. Some of them play video games, or some people might, you know, work too many history jobs to counteract that, but he found himself making videos at the gym whenever he was working out of the gym And then somebody was like, "Man, Get on Tik Tok." And then, as he started posting a video, it just went viral, and it's been a year and a half now, and it's like nonstop. Initially, he is from Nigeria, born and raised; he moved here when he was 14. All he has done in life is be a first responder, and he was doing firefighter EMT when he was 18 years old, for five years, and then he switched to being a police officer. Now five years. So for the past almost ten years, he has made his first response. He tried to use his videos to bring awareness to actual call matters. Like some calls, it could be missing child domestic violence between a male or female, a female, and a male. Just bring his breast cancer has his shirt that he is wearing to bring awareness to breast cancer. Hip Hop people went through breast cancer. ~ You can find Texas Cop on . . . Website: https://texascop.myshopify.com/ or https://linktr.ee/Texascop2.0 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/texascop2.0 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/people/Texascop-Tex/100082281235837 ~ Connect with Patti! Website: https://pattikatter.com/ Instagram: @PattiKatter Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pattikatter/ Resource: www.onemoremission.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wakeupwithpattikatter/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wakeupwithpattikatter/support

The Professional Brotherhood™
123 - Mutual Aid, “My Friends are Turning on Me”

The Professional Brotherhood™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 17:47


**Listener Request**Aaron, who's a volunteer firefighter in the mid-west emailed us and asked the following:"I've decided to throw my name in the hat this year and run for line office.  My friends, who all seemed very supportive in the beginning now seem like they are turning on me in support of the other guy.  What should I do?" Listen in as Brian gives his thoughts on this very common volunteer fire service issue.  About our hosts:Brian Soller has been an active volunteer for the last 30+ years.  He currently serves as assistant chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department and for the past 18 years has been a New York state fire instructor assigned to Sullivan County, NY.  Soller also served as chief of the Rock Hill Fire Department from 2018 - 2020 and chief of the Monticello Fire Department from 2001-2002.Soller has also been a New York State emergency medical technician for the last 25+ years. He speaks extensively on the promotion of professionalism in the volunteer fire service through his podcast and YouTube channel. Follow us on social @professional.brotherhood @chiefsollerOn the web at professionalbrotherhood.comSend future episode suggestions or comments on past episodes to professionalvff@gmail.com.Interested in being a guest on the show?  Please email professionalvff@gmail.com.Kara Judd, is a seven year member of the Cazenovia Fire Department where she currently serves as a Lieutenant and Emergency Medical Technician. Kara is also a certified Critical Incident Stress Debriefer as well as an AFAA certified fitness instructor and the owner of Saint Florian Fitness. Her full time career is at the Upstate Medical Hospital in Syracuse, NY where she is a Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention Specialist and Burn Prevention Outreach Educator.On social @st.florianfitness