Podcasts about united states conference

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Best podcasts about united states conference

Latest podcast episodes about united states conference

Mystery of Parenthood
195 ”This Wonderful Sacrament” - REACTION!

Mystery of Parenthood

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 52:08


On Tuesday, September 27, host Trey Cashion discussed his reaction to a new video, "This Wonderful Sacrament," released by the Diocese of Austin in support of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' call for a Eucharistic Revival. Trey unpacked the different modes of unity that are on display in the Eucharistic sacrifice and, even more so, the unity it effects in us and in the Church. Listen to this important explanation of a key aspect of the Eucharist and use it to help your children develop a better love and appreciation of the Blessed Sacrament. Remember, only God can take the mystery out of parenthood. Pray, parent with a purpose, and prepare for God to amaze you. He will!    

On Mission
Eucharistic Revival: Diocesan Phase

On Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 37:45


In this episode of On Mission, Marilyn Santos, Associate Director of the Secretariat of Evangelization and Catechesis at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, joins Kate Fowler, Chris Pierno, and Fr. Frank Donio, S.A.C. to provide further details about the Diocesan Phase of the Eucharistic Revival and what it means for the Church in the United States and worldwide.Click here to access the Eucharistic Revival's website and to fill out their newsletter.Follow us:The Catholic Apostolate CenterThe Center's podcast websiteInstagramFacebookApple PodcastsSpotify 

The Gloria Purvis Podcast
The bishop leading the ‘Eucharistic Revival' is piercing hearts and slashing budgets

The Gloria Purvis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 38:18


Welcome back to the second season of the Gloria Purvis Podcast! On this episode, Gloria speaks to Bishop Andrew Cozzens, who was appointed by Pope Francis to be bishop of the Diocese of Crookston, Minnesota in 2021. Bishop Cozzens is the chair of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Committee on Evangelization and Catechesis where on behalf of the bishops he is leading a three-year National Eucharistic Revival that began this past June. Gloria and Bishop Cozzens discuss the meaning of the Eucharist, the plans for the Eucharistic Revival and the modern complexities of dealing with political controversies and communion. Bishop Cozzens also shares the importance of continuing transparency and pastoral leadership amid the sexual abuse crisis. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Catholic Apostolate Center Resources
Presentation: Toward Participation: Unpacking Leadership of the Laity in the Church

Catholic Apostolate Center Resources

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 63:44


The Catholic Apostolate Center and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Secretariat for Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth are pleased to announce the fifth webinar in a series surrounding synodality. This webinar, Toward Participation: Unpacking Leadership of the Laity in the Church, explores themes of leadership throughout the Church. Included in this webinar is a discussion of engaging the laity into leadership positions, co-responsibility with priests and the laity, and promoting shared work as part of mission for the Church. The webinar is moderated by Paul Jarzembowski, Associate Director for the Laity for the Secretariat of Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth at the USCCB. This webinar features Bishop Daniel Flores of the Diocese of Brownsville, Mark Erdosy, the Executive Director of Mission Integration at Marian University in Indianapolis, Matthew Manion, the Faculty Director for the Center for Church Management at Villanova University outside of Philadelphia, Helen Osman, President of SIGNIS, an international Catholic communications association, headquartered in Brussels and Rosie Chinea Shawver, the Executive Director of Catholic Association of Latino Leaders (CALL), based in Los Angeles.For more resources on the Synod on Synodality, please visit the Catholic Apostolate Center's Synod on Synodality Resource Page.

Say Yes to Holiness
Episode #139--"A Dynamic Catholic Voice of Joy"--1:1 Conversation with Katie Prejean McGrady, Radio Show Host, Author and Podcaster

Say Yes to Holiness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 40:41


This week's Say Yes to Holiness podcast 1:1 Conversation features Katie Prejean McGrady, Wife, Mom, Radio Host, Author and Podcaster. I had the opportunity to cross paths with Katie at the Given Institute's Women's Leadership Forum back in June, and our conversation centered upon how Katie came to be involved, and then also about her current activities as radio host on the Catholic Channel hosted on Sirius radio as she is living out the joys of being a wife and mom. Katie is an international Catholic speaker, and author of Follow and Room 24, and the coauthor of Lent: One Day at a Time with Catholic Teens. She is the project manager for Ave Explores and the cohost of The Electric Waffle podcast. Prejean McGrady served as one of three delegates for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops to the 2018 Pre-Synod Meeting on Young People, Faith, and Vocational Discernment in Rome. Katie is also a columnist for Catholic News Service and a writer for Blessed Is She, the Grotto Network, Life Teen, and America magazine. She has spoken at a variety of national youth conferences, including the National Catholic Youth Conference, Steubenville Youth conferences, National Conference for Catholic Youth Ministry, Los Angeles Religious Education Congress, and in dioceses and parishes throughout the world. She has appeared on EWTN and CatholicTV, as well as numerous radio stations and podcasts. She has a degree in theology from the University of Dallas and lives in Louisiana with her husband, Tommy, and family. To learn more about Katie, go to: https://www.katieprejeanmcgrady.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sayyestoholiness/message

The Endow Podcast
117. In Our Time (Nostra Aetate): A Conversation with Montse Alvarado

The Endow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 40:35


Welcome to The Endow Podcast! This podcast is a forum for women to foster conversations about the intellectual life and intentional community for the cultivation of the feminine genius.On this episode, Simone Rizkallah, Director of Program Growth, interviews Montse Alvarado on Vatican II's shortest document on the relation of the Church to Non-Christian Religions. Montse joined the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty in 2009 and was named VP & Executive Director in February 2017. With a background in public policy and campaigns, she has led initiatives at Becket in development, communications, strategy and operations that have helped secure religious liberty victories against the contraceptive mandate, protect the rights of churches to choose their leaders, and safeguard the free speech of crisis pregnancy centers and religious groups on campus. She was profiled by the Wall Street Journal's Weekend Edition with the following introduction: “A defender of all religion, on the front lines of America's culture wars.”Montse has a Masters from the George Washington University and a B.A. from Florida International University. She served on the Montgomery County Commission for Women in Maryland and is currently on the board of the Patients' Rights Action Fund, the leading advocate against the legalization of assisted suicide; a lay consultant to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) Religious Liberty Committee; a member of the President's Advisory Counsel of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students; on the advisory council to the Council of Major Superiors of Women Religious (CMSWR) and the GIVEN Institute; and on the Hispanic Affairs Advisory Board for the Philos Project. Although not an attorney, she “plays one on TV” advocating for Becket clients on major television and radio networks including Univision, CNN en Español, Telemundo, Fox Business, and EWTN. Born in Mexico City, she is fluent in Spanish and French and is a competitive jazz and classical vocalist.To access this document: https://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_decl_19651028_nostra-aetate_en.html To read a blog post on the question of "Do Catholics, Jews, and Muslims worship the same God?:" http://shamelesspopery.com/muslims-jews-christians/ To view the study guide page for the Vatican II Dogmatic Constitution on the Church: https://www.endowgroups.org/study-guide-light-of-the-nations-lumen-gentium/ Support the Endow PodcastWhat's on your mind and heart? Let our host, Simone Rizkallah, know by connecting with her and The Endow Team on social media!Facebook at www.facebook.com/endowgroupsInstagram at www.instagram.com/endowgroupsWant to start your own Endow Group? Learn more by visiting our website at www.endowgroups.org or reach out to us at info@endowgroups.org. We look forward to serving you!

Will Wright Catholic
Does Jesus Want us to be Social Justice Warriors?

Will Wright Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 31:18


What are the Seven Themes of Catholic Social Teaching?Human beings are social, by nature; we do not live in isolation. The teachings of the Church regarding good social ordering springs from the heart of Christ. We are called to holiness, but this call requires cooperation with those around us to be authentic followers of Jesus.To understand how we are to order our society, we need to heed Catholic Social Teaching (CST). The U.S bishops offers us seven themes of CST: 1) the Life and Dignity of the Human Person, 2) the Call to Family, Community, and Participation, 3) Rights and Responsibilities, 4) the Option for the Poor and Vulnerable, 5) The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers, 6) Solidarity, and 7) Care for God's Creation. To His disciples, Jesus says, “Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me (Mt 25:40).” And He also says, “… what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me (Mt 25:45).” This implies that there must be action taken by the members of the Body of Christ in each of the seven themes.Does Jesus, therefore, ask us to be social justice warriors? Do we need to take on one of the themes as a project? Or do we need to try to tackle all seven? Some, in the Church, fight for the dignity of life while others focus more on stewardship of the environment. Both are doing these actions out of love of Christ and His creation. However, what I hope we will see in their examination is two things: 1) all seven themes are important and 2) they must be prioritized. 1. The Life and Dignity of the Human PersonHuman life is created in the image and likeness of God. Therefore, each person has dignity and a right to life from the moment of conception in the womb until they draw their final breath. Human life is sacred, which means that it has been set apart. The Church fills out this meaning by calling us to sainthood. Human life is under direct attack from the evils of abortion and euthanasia, which are unacceptable under any circumstance. There is also a threat to the value of human life from embryonic stem cell research, cloning, and the imprudent use of the death penalty. There are unjust wars, acts of terrorism, and acts of violence in our world.Catholic social teaching exhorts nations to find peaceful solutions to disputes whenever possible. However, a nation or an individual has the right and obligation to protect innocent human life when it is threatened. The preservation of innocent human life is a principle contained in this theme of the life and dignity of the human person.2. The Call to Family, Community, and ParticipationIn 1960, the global divorce rate was 12%. Divorce is also a violence to a couple because marriage is a lifelong union. There is no such thing as a clean divorce; someone is always harmed. For this reason, the Church tenderly reaches out to those who have suffered divorce to offer the healing of Christ. A few years ago, the global divorce rate was 44%. In the United States, the rate is 46%, 42% in the United Kingdom, and 38% in Australia. With such high divorce rates, it is not uncommon to see broken families. Catholic social teaching upholds that the person is sacred, but that the person is also social. Our economics, politics, laws, policies, and social institutions must therefore defend marriage and the family. Without the family being at the core, these social institutions will erode and eventually break apart. With crumbling families, the need for community has never been more important. It is our obligation as Catholics to reach out to our fellow man, especially the poor and vulnerable. All are called, regardless of race, religion, or ethnicity to seek the common good.Our participation in our community is not negotiable. We need our brothers and sisters and they need us. Our world has become increasingly isolated which is contrary to God's design for us as individuals and as a society. As a result, rates of mental illness and suicide have skyrocketed. As Catholics, we are called to breathe life into our communities, in Christ, by the power of the Holy Spirit. 3. Rights and Responsibilities For communities to thrive and uphold the dignity of human life, rights must be protected and responsibilities met. Pope St. John XXIII enumerates these rights: “We must speak of man's rights. Man has the right to live.  He has the right to bodily integrity and to the means necessary for the proper development of life, particularly food, clothing, shelter, medical care, rest, and, finally, the necessary social services. In consequence, he has the right to be looked after in the event of ill health; disability stemming from his work; widowhood; old age; enforced unemployment; or whenever through no fault of his own he is deprived of the means of livelihood (Pacem in Terris, 11).”Every natural right begins with the right to life, because without life there are no other rights. The natural rights listed by Pope St. John XXIII lead to the duty of the state and individuals to protect the rights of others. There is also a responsibility to use these rights well in the service of God and man. We are not free to do whatever we please; we are free to choose the good. This is how rights and responsibilities are two sides of the same coin.4. The Option for the Poor and VulnerableIn nations ravaged by communism, there is an ever-widening gap between the super-rich and the ultra-poor. In areas of unfettered capitalism and many types of socialism, there is likewise a disappearing middle class. In other words, societies that do not care for the poor and vulnerable tend to lead to the poor getting poorer and the rich getting richer.The Catholic Church has always upheld the call of Christ Himself to the corporal works of mercy. The needs of the poor and vulnerable must come before our own. This is called the preferential option for the poor. Do I feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, welcome the stranger, clothe the naked, care for the ill, visit the imprisoned, and bury the dead? Notice I said “Do I?” It is not enough for our parish to do these things; in one way or another, we will be individually judged by God on whether we personally contributed to these efforts in service of Christ, according to the circumstances of our own lives.5. The Dignity of Work and the Rights of WorkersWork has dignity because it is a participation in the creation of God. Further, economies exist to serve the people in a society. We do not work simply to make money. If work has dignity, then the rights of workers should be protected. The U.S. bishops summarized the rights of workers very well: “All people have the right to economic initiative, to productive work, to just wages and benefits, to decent working conditions, as well as to organize and join unions or other associations. (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, A Catholic Framework for Economic Life, no. 5).” 6. SolidarityAll of our earthly fathers share in the Fatherhood of God; they are a sort of “icon” of the Father. Our Father in Heaven has called us His own through the waters of Baptism. Therefore, in Christ, we are all brothers and sisters; we have become co-heirs to the kingdom. Beyond our own belonging to the Mystical Body of Christ, we also share in our one Creator. Therefore, we all belong to one human family, regardless of nation, race, ethnicity, economic or ideological differences. Recent technological shifts and globalization have made this reality clearer (while unfortunately undermining solidarity in key ways - but that's a whole other episode). The fact is that we are connected. Our solidarity with our one human family spurs us to pursue true justice and peace. In the midst of sufferings, especially violence and conflict, we are called by the Church to work for peace, in solidarity with one another.7. Care for God's CreationOur Holy Father, Pope Francis, followed suit after Pope St. John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI, and wrote beautifully on the care for our common home in his work: Laudato Si. In this document, he writes, “Once we start to think about the kind of world we are leaving to future generations, we look at things differently; we realize that the world is a gift which we have freely received and must share with others. Since the world has been given to us, we can no longer view reality in a purely utilitarian way, in which efficiency and productivity are entirely geared to our individual benefit (Laudato Si, 159).”Caring for God's Creation is part and parcel of the Catholic life. In our throw away culture, we realize that the environment is impacted by wastefulness and the dignity of human life is impacted by a disregard for the poor. Everything in God's creation is connected, and we must seek to serve God and our fellow man in all things.Applying These Themes in Our LivesSo, how do we actually go about applying these principles to our lives? Over the course of history, there have been hundreds of different cultures, customs, circumstances, political systems, and so forth. It stands to reason that the practical instantiation of these principles will vary due to the tangible situation of a particular time, people, and place. The seven themes of Catholic social teaching fall under the unflinching category of Faith and Morals. Faith and Morals have been infallibly declared by the teaching authority of the Church and they apply to all places, times, peoples, and circumstances. This means that Catholics of good will are not at liberty to disagree on these central teachings of the Church, in principle.The key distinction is: principle vs. application.Catholic political and social engagement, or tangible application of principles, can be called prudential judgment. Prudential judgment is making decisions, in line with the Faith and Morals of the Church, using the virtue of prudence. “Prudence is the virtue that disposes practical reason to discern our true good in every circumstance and to choose the right means of achieving it; ‘the prudent man looks where he is going.' (CCC 1806)”Prudential judgment takes practice, listening to God, and being formed in the principles of Catholic teaching - and the other teachings of Faith and Morals of the Church, of course. The solutions Catholics may take on social welfare systems, minimum wage, and other political issues will and can vary from person to person. Further, what works well in one area of the world may be wholly inappropriate in another locale. Rarely is anything black and white. However, there is usually a solution which borrows from one side and another. This is the perennial Catholic both/and position, and a reminder that we need both “conservative” and “liberal” forces in the application of principles.Need to PrioritizeIn the application of the seven themes of Catholic social teaching, it is important to prioritize. We cannot tackle all seven at once. It really is a team effort. But, we must let the Lord lead the way. We cannot think of any of the seven themes as pet projects. We are a Church of Christ not a church of causes!The trick then becomes: who decides the prioritization? The key principle we need to utilize is subsidiarity.The Principle of SubsidiarityTo make the best decision possible, the Church employs the organizing principle of subsidiarity. Basically, this principle states that the best decisions for a local community are made at the lowest possible level and the highest level necessary. In the hierarchy of the Church, the Pope makes decisions based on the common good of the whole Church on earth, whereas a local bishop makes decisions only in his particular geographical area or diocese. Likewise, a pastor represents his bishop and makes decisions for his own parish and parish boundaries. However, subsidiarity is best shown by the family: the foundational cell of society. Parents make decisions for their family, especially their children, without overreach from the local, state, or federal government. The family then makes decisions with other families at the local community and parish level. If the decision needs broader input, then it might fall to the state or eventually the federal government. Subsidiarity, once again, dictates that if the family has the power to make and implement the decision, then they alone should do so. Practically, an example of something that might take federal reach would be border security or a standing military. These are out of the reach of a smaller level of governance (individual, family, community, or state). If an entity has proper authority and they are the closest to the situation, they ought to make the decision. Pope Pius XI illustrates this principle and safeguards the diversity of humanity and richness of her talents when he says, “… it is gravely wrong to take from individuals what they can accomplish by their own initiative and industry and give it to the community, so also it is an injustice and at the same time a grave evil and disturbance of right order to assign to a greater and higher association what lesser and subordinate organizations can do (QA 79).”The Common GoodSubsidiarity is always ordered to the common good. This means that governments have the solemn responsibility to create the conditions of human flourishing. The proper authorities must be ready to provide the resources and direction necessary to direct the community to the common good. Each individual has something to offer and ought to be engaged in their own welfare as well. Pope Benedict XVI puts it this way:“Subsidiarity respects personal dignity by recognizing in the person a subject who is always capable of giving something to others (CV 57).”  Subsidiarity transcends any political system or political affiliation. This guiding principle represents the great Catholic both/and. We have an obligation to the poor and vulnerable and to maintain the dignity and productivity of all people. In other words, subsidiarity must be linked to the principle of Catholic social teaching of solidarity! If we have subsidiarity without solidarity, society becomes disconnected and privatized to the extreme. If we have solidarity but no subsidiarity, society “gives way to paternalistic social assistance that is demeaning to those in need (CV 58).”A Proper PrioritizingA proper prioritization of Catholic social teaching will, therefore, apply the principle of subsidiarity. If human dignity is under attack by abortion or euthanasia, then that takes first priority. Protecting human dignity is the preeminent issue to address because without life, no other right matters, and it is manifestly opposed to the common good of all. Then, We must shore up the family as the cell of society. Our families must work together to secure the rights of those around us and fulfill our responsibilities to one another, In justice, the virtuous pursuit of rights and responsibilities must have a preferential option for the poor and vulnerable, who must never be forgotten and brought further into the community, Of course, a community needs participation, but specifically in the form of dignified work and the rights of workers which must be protected, Further, our society, now solidly functioning at the local level must never lose sight of our solidarity, our interconnectedness, and, to some extent, this will extend to our state and nation and the whole world, and While accomplishing all of these things, we must do our part to care for God's creation as good stewards.As presented above, the themes of Catholic social teaching are not at odds with one another; they are not pet projects. God may call us to emphasize one or the other more prominently in our own work or ministry. Hopefully from the way I organized it, you can also see what I mean by the importance of prioritizing the themes as well. They build upon one another, like a building.You may think that the themes should be taken all at once, like a “seamless garment,” but this approach does not take into account that a prioritized layering is necessary, nor does it do justice to the necessary principle of subsidiarity. Ultimately, the seamless garment hypothesis does not do justice to Catholic social teaching, in practice. Generally, this idea of the seamless garment is where Catholics, well intentioned as they might be, go off the rails and become SJWs or “Social Justice Warriors.” The Lord calls us to practice justice in society, but it has to be done in a prudent way, respecting the principle of subsidiarity. So, no, we are not called to be social justice warriors. We are called to focus on Jesus Christ and live our lives as His hands and fight, keeping the themes of Catholic Social Teaching in mind and in the proper prioritization.PLEASE CONSIDER SHARING THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY!This post is public so please share it by clicking the blue button below! This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit willwrightcatholic.substack.com

The Thomistic Institute
Love, Friendship, and Heavenly Happiness | Prof. Christopher Kaczor

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 46:50


This lecture was given on April 19, 2022 at the University of Dallas. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Dr. Christopher Kaczor (rhymes with razor) is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University and a member of the James Madison Society of Princeton University. In 2015, he was appointed to the Pontifical Academy for Life of Vatican City, and he serves as a Consultor to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. He graduated from the Honors Program of Boston College and earned a Ph.D. four years later from the University of Notre Dame. A Fulbright Scholar, Dr. Kaczor is a former Federal Chancellor Fellow at the University of Cologne and William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program at Princeton University. He is an award winning author of twelve books including The Gospel of Happiness, The Seven Big Myths about Marriage, A Defense of Dignity, The Seven Big Myths about the Catholic Church, The Ethics of Abortion, Thomas Aquinas on the Cardinal Virtues; Life IssuesMedical Choices; Thomas Aquinas on Faith, Hope, and Love; The Edge of Life, and Proportionalism and the Natural Law Tradition. Dr. Kaczor's views have been in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, Huffington Post, National Review, NPR, BBC, EWTN, ABC, NBC, FOX, CBS, MSNBC, TEDx, and The Today Show.

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer
Dr. Timothy O'Malley Examines What It Means To Be a Eucharistic People

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 14:18


As the American Church embarks on a three-year Eucharistic Revival, Dr. Timothy O'Malley joins the Busted Halo Show to discuss his new book “Becoming Eucharistic People: The Hope and Promise of Parish Life.” O'Malley is a member of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' executive planning team for the Revival, as well as director of education at the McGrath Institute for Church Life and academic director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy.

The Dr. Luis Sandoval Show – Virgin Most Powerful Radio
07 Jul 22 – What Do the Bishops say About Exorcisms?

The Dr. Luis Sandoval Show – Virgin Most Powerful Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 51:15


Today's Topics: 1, 2, 3,4) The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops answers questions about exorcisms https://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/sacraments-and-sacramentals/sacramentals-blessings/exorcism

Talking Catholic
Religious Freedom Week 2022

Talking Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 55:29


The United States Conference of Catholic Bishop's has established July 22-29 as Religious Freedom Week in the United States. Religious freedom allows the Church, and all religious communities, to live out their faith in public and to serve the good of all. As Catholics, we are encouraged to pray, reflect, and act to promote religious freedom. Joining hosts Jen Mauro and Mike Walsh this week is Father Joseph D. Wallace, Diocese of Camden director of Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs and pastor of Christ the Redeemer Parish, Atco. Fr. Wallace, a columnist of the Catholic Star Herald, has written extensively on religious freedom and the relationship between the Catholic Church and the other world religions. [Producer's note: this episode was recorded before the SCOTUS decision on Dobbs was announced.) To learn more about Religious Freedom Week, check out https://www.usccb.org/committees/religious-liberty/religious-freedom-week To read more from Fr. Wallace, check out all his Catholic Star Herald columns at: https://catholicstarherald.org/author/father-joseph-d-wallace/ Listen to Talking Catholic everywhere podcasts can be found, at https://talking.catholicstarherald.org/show/talking-catholic, or catch us on Domestic Church Media radio Sundays at 11 AM or Mondays at 4 PM domesticchurchmedia.org. Follow us on... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TalkingCatholic Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/talkingcatholic Twitter: https://twitter.com/talkingcatholic

St. Anne's Catholic Media Podcast
Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Homily) - Father Sergio Muñoz Fita

St. Anne's Catholic Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 9:17


In today's homily, I would like to share with everyone the communication from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, regarding the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Two days ago, we experienced a historic day, a day which we will always remember as the beginning of a new stage in the still unfinished journey to create a world in which the threat of abortion disappears forever, and in which each and every unborn child has the necessary protection to be born and to always be received as a gift by their parents and by society. This is the message issued two days ago by Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, chairman of the USCCB's Committee on Pro-Life Activities: “This is a historic day in the life of our country, one that stirs our thoughts, emotions and prayers. For nearly fifty years, America has enforced an unjust law that has permitted some to decide whether others can live or die; this policy has resulted in the deaths of tens of millions of preborn children, generations that were denied the right to even be born. America was founded on the truth that all men and women are created equal, with God-given rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This truth was grievously denied by the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade ruling, which legalized and normalized the taking of innocent human life. We thank God today that the Court has now overturned this decision. We pray that our elected officials will now enact laws and policies that promote and protect the most vulnerable among us. Our first thoughts are with the little ones whose lives have been taken since 1973. We mourn their loss, and we entrust their souls to God, who loved them from before all ages and who will love them for all eternity. Our hearts are also with every woman and man who has suffered grievously from abortion; we pray for their healing, and we pledge our continued compassion and support. As a Church, we need to serve those who face difficult pregnancies and surround them with love. Today's decision is also the fruit of the prayers, sacrifices, and advocacy of countless ordinary Americans from every walk of life. Over these long years, millions of our fellow citizens have worked together peacefully to educate and persuade their neighbors about the injustice of abortion, to offer care and counseling to women, and to work for alternatives to abortion, including adoption, foster care, and public policies that truly support families. We share their joy today and we are grateful to them. Their work for the cause of life reflects all that is good in our democracy, and the pro-life movement deserves to be numbered among the great movements for social change and civil rights in our nation's history. Now is the time to begin the work of building a post-Roe America. It is a time for healing wounds and repairing social divisions; it is a time for reasoned reflection and civil dialogue, and for coming together to build a society and economy that supports marriages and families, and where every woman has the support and resources she needs to bring her child into this world in love. As religious leaders, we pledge ourselves to continue our service to God's great plan of love for the human person, and to work with our fellow citizens to fulfill America's promise to guarantee the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for all people.” St. Paul said in today's second reading: “For the whole law is fulfilled in one statement, namely, You shall love your neighbor as yourself. But if you go on biting and devouring one another, beware that you are not consumed by one another.” Dear brothers and sisters, as we rejoice at what happened on Friday, a decision that means the salvation of millions of defenseless, voiceless human lives, let us pray to God and work so that we will stop biting and devouring one another, and that we live in a world that guarantees always and everywhere the protection of the most innocent and weakest human life, the human life conceived but not yet born.

The Walk Humbly Podcast
Work Camp 2022, Synod of Bishops report, World Meeting of Families and more! #94

The Walk Humbly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:42


On this week's episode, Bishop Burbidge: Interviews young Work Camp 2022 participants about their experience, what made them attend, and why they encourage other young people to volunteer in the future Provides a status update on the upcoming synopsis document for the Synod of Bishops Shares a summary of the recent United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Spring Meeting Highlights this week's World Meeting of Families in Rome and the Loudoun County couple who are providing a keynote address Assures the faithful of his prayers as he and others take a pilgrimage to Philadelphia this weekend (Similar parish pilgrimages are forthcoming!) Bishop also answers questions from the faithful: What does Bishop Burbidge do during his free time? What is the most difficult part about being a bishop? Has he ever witnessed a miracle? What was his faith journey like as a teenager? and several more!

Not Lukewarm Podcast with Deanna Bartalini

Catholics having a revival Yes, we are, starting on June 19, 2022, until July 17, 2024. That is two years to unpack the riches of the Eucharist, grow individually in your personal relationship with the Lord, and change the world! Take a look here at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ National Eucharistic Revival […] The post A Eucharistic Revival appeared first on Ultimate Christian Podcast Radio Network.

InSeitz into the Faith with El Paso Bishop Mark J. Seitz
InSeitz into the Faith for Wednesday, June 15, 2022

InSeitz into the Faith with El Paso Bishop Mark J. Seitz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 26:46


Welcome to InSeitz into the Faith with Bishop Mark Seitz of the Diocese of El Paso. Bishop Mark discusses his meeting in San Diego, California with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, The coming National Pastoral Musicians conference in Louisville, Kentucky where the Director of the Diocesan Choir, Peter Kolar will be honored as the National Pastoral Musician of the Year. Bishop Mark also discusses the gospel message for the coming solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ.

Summer Consortium
Natural Law and Its Role In End of Life Discussions

Summer Consortium

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 40:20


Christendom College held a one-day conference on Catholic bioethics featuring renowned speakers including Francis Cardinal Arinze, Bishop Robert Morlino, Dr. Janet Smith, and Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk. The conference, held on July 9, 2012, drew close to 300 attendees who enjoyed presentations on the full range of life issues–from reproductive health to embryonic stem cell research.Bishop Robert Morlino is the Bishop of Madison, WI. He holds a B.A. in Philosophy from Fordham University, an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Notre Dame, an M.Div. Degree from the Weston School of Theology in Cambridge, MA, and an S.T.D. in Moral Theology from the Gregorian University in Rome, with specialization in fundamental moral theology and bioethics. Bishop Morlino has served as chairman of two committees within the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)–the Bishops' Committee on the Diaconate, and the Ad Hoc Committee on Health Care Issues and the Church. Since 2005, Bishop Morlino has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of The National Catholic Bioethics Center (NCBC), which conducts research, consultation, publishing and education to promote human dignity in health care and the life sciences.

The Endow Podcast
111. Not Just About Survival (Mulieris Dignitatem revisited): A Conversation with Danielle Brown

The Endow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 29:54


Welcome to The Endow Podcast! This podcast is a forum for women to foster conversations about the intellectual life and intentional community for the cultivation of the feminine genius.On this episode, Simone Rizkallah, Director of Program Growth, interviews Danielle Brown on how John Paul II's writings helps us take our hearts, emotions, and happiness seriously. Danielle M. Brown is Associate Director of the ad hoc Committee Against Racism at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. There, amongst other duties, she speaks to dioceses, apostolates, and pastoral associations on various topics related to the Committee's work and its relationship to evangelization. Born and raised in the Archdiocese of Detroit, she is a lawyer licensed in the State of Michigan and a former Michigan Supreme Court appointed Commissioner for the State Bar of Michigan Board of Commissioners. In Lansing, she founded one of the first of Renewal Ministries' I.D.916 chapters, a young adult discipleship model now simply known as I.D. She was a diocesan delegate to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Convocation of Catholic Leaders and the National Black Catholic Congress in 2017. Prior to joining the conference, Brown was a three-time governor appointed appellate administrative law judge in unemployment and workers compensation for the State of Michigan. Before those terms of service, she was an administrative law judge and an assistant deputy legal counsel to the Governor of the State of Michigan.Be Healed by Bob Schuchts: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01NADT6J9/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 Restore the Glory podcast: https://www.restoretheglorypodcast.com Support the Endow PodcastWhat's on your mind and heart? Let our host, Simone Rizkallah, know by connecting with her and The Endow Team on social media!Facebook at www.facebook.com/endowgroupsInstagram at www.instagram.com/endowgroupsWant to start your own Endow Group? Learn more by visiting our website at www.endowgroups.org or reach out to us at info@endowgroups.org. We look forward to serving you!

The EDIFY Podcast
Hot Button Issues: Family, Faith, and Freedom

The EDIFY Podcast

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later May 24, 2022 33:15


Helen Alvare discusses the role of the family and its intersection with faith and law.EP018: Helen AlvareHelen Alvare, a distinguished law professor and author, sits down with Scot to share her previous experience as the spokeswoman for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and her wisdom on how Catholics can be hopeful in the face of unfavorable laws and judicial rulings. Helen shares why she focuses on core issues such as religious freedom, parental rights, healthy feminism, the importance of women and their role in the family and society.Helen's newest book, Religious Freedom after the Sexual Revolution, can be found here. Her first book, Putting Children's Interests First in U.S. Family Law and Policy: With Power Comes Responsibility, can be found here.Please click here for more biographical information on Helen. If you haven't seen Helen's EDIFY video, please watch it at EDIFY.us.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church
Conversation About The Synod On Synodality 5.13.22

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 64:29


Diocese of Charlotte Synod 2021-2023: https://charlottediocese.org/synod2023/ United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Synod on Synodality: https://www.usccb.org/synod Vatican Synod 2021-2023: https://www.synod.va/en.html

Good Morning Greenwich Village
The Atrocities of Hot Jesus and The Power of Forgiveness

Good Morning Greenwich Village

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:04


Joey reviews the Morgan Library and welcomes guests inside his own Gilded Age mansion for cigars, live piano by an underpaid Nicaraguan immigrant, and stories of his end of life wishes to prolong his important philanthropic work made possible by Middle Eastern oil investments. Also: atheist Sundays, unfaithful pastors, awful music, not enough donuts, and how to break your marriage vows without ruining your life (or your marriage). And, an observation about nothing. Don't miss the Vatican's Best Films list, which results in a divine 404 page (are you lost?), an unholy list of Catholic topics, an ominous press release about the Pope, a suspect phone greeting from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops media office, and a contender for most overtly gay homepage in all of Christianity. And, of course, Hell and the new Plague. Today's ad is for a random Japanese place in Midtown. We don't remember the name.

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!
Why Did the Liturgy Change Following the Vatican II?

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 119:59


Today on "Catholic Drive Time" Cameron O'Hearn – Mass of the Ages II- Why Did the Liturgy Change Following the Vatican II? Was Bugnini a Freemason? Why didn't Paul VI Stop the Changes? How Do the Changes Look when Compared Side By Side to the Old? US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 107,000 last year, per the CDC During A National Shortage of Baby Formula, Congress Passes 40bil Bill to Ukraine Democrats Fail to Codify Abortion Into Federal Law Democrats Eat Their Own- "Ruth Sent Us" Protest Nancy Pelosi Day of Prayer & Fasting? - The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) on Tuesday acknowledged that “some abortion advocates are calling for nationwide demonstrations, disruptions of church services, and the personal intimidation of specific Supreme Court justices.” Second Hour: breaking news, saint of the day, Gospel, Plus New Round of the Catholic trivia game show Fear and Trembling!!! Then Stay tuned for the Catholic Drive Time After Show!!!! Starting at 7:30 am where we let our hair down and speak more casually across our live streams. We will field questions from our comment sections. Follow Catholic Drive Time on social media Official Social Media Account IG: @CatholicDriveTime Twitter: @CatholicDrive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CatholicDriv... YouTube: Catholic Drive Time Joe Social Media IG: @TheCatholicHack Twitter: @Catholic_Hack Facebook: Joe McClane YouTube: Joe McClane Adrian Social Media IG: @ffonze Twitter: @AdrianFonze Facebook: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Catholic Conversations Rudy Social Media IG: @ydursolrac Youtube: Glad Trad Podcast https://www.grnonline.com/ Listen in your car on your local GRN station - http://grnonline.com/stations/ Listen online at GRNonline.com Listen on your mobile with our GRN app (both IOS and Android) Listen on Facebook @GRNonline Listen on Twitter @GRNonline Listen on YouTube @GRNonline History of the GRN: Starting with absolutely nothing we placed our trust in the Lord and our Blessed Mother. By August of 1996, we were breaking ground for the construction of the Guadalupe Resource Center where our ministry has flourished. We now operate radio 37 stations that reach a potential listening audience of twenty million souls. The Guadalupe Radio Network is the largest EWTN affiliate in the USA. Visit our website to learn more about us, find a local GRN radio station, a schedule of our programming and so much more. http://grnonline.com/

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!
Will YOU Ever be Able to Buy a Home???

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 119:59


Today on “Catholic Drive Time,” Paul Holub – Real Estate – Is the American Dream of Home Ownership dead? What is going on in the housing market? Why are prices sky rocketing? Why all of a sudden are their bidding wars? Is corporate purchasing of a 3rd of the inventory to blame? Soaring interest rates? Not enough housing? Are we at a tipping point? Rising interest rates? Growing inventory? Will prices drop? Is the dream of homeownership over? Paul Holub joins us to discuss what is going on in the Real Estate Market? Offices of Oregon Right to Life firebombed with Molotov cocktails Pennsylvania Democratic Sen. Bob Casey, who for a long time has described himself as "pro-life," said Wednesday that he will vote with other Democrats to codify abortion rights. Pro-Life Women's Group Says ‘Leftist' Vandalized, Urinated On Their Office Day of Prayer & Fasting? - The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) on Tuesday acknowledged that “some abortion advocates are calling for nationwide demonstrations, disruptions of church services, and the personal intimidation of specific Supreme Court justices.” Second Hour: breaking news, saint of the day, Gospel, Plus New Round of the Catholic trivia game show Fear and Trembling!!! Then Stay tuned for the Catholic Drive Time After Show!!!! Starting at 7:30 am where we let our hair down and speak more casually across our live streams. We will field questions from our comment sections. Follow Catholic Drive Time on social media Official Social Media Account IG: @CatholicDriveTime Twitter: @CatholicDrive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CatholicDriv... YouTube: Catholic Drive Time Joe Social Media IG: @TheCatholicHack Twitter: @Catholic_Hack Facebook: Joe McClane YouTube: Joe McClane Adrian Social Media IG: @ffonze Twitter: @AdrianFonze Facebook: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Catholic Conversations Rudy Social Media IG: @ydursolrac Youtube: Glad Trad Podcast Twitter: R_Rodcraft https://www.grnonline.com/ Listen in your car on your local GRN station - http://grnonline.com/stations/ Listen online at GRNonline.com Listen on your mobile with our GRN app (both IOS and Android) Listen on Facebook @GRNonline Listen on Twitter @GRNonline Listen on YouTube @GRNonline History of the GRN: Starting with absolutely nothing we placed our trust in the Lord and our Blessed Mother. By August of 1996, we were breaking ground for the construction of the Guadalupe Resource Center where our ministry has flourished. We now operate radio 37 stations that reach a potential listening audience of twenty million souls. The Guadalupe Radio Network is the largest EWTN affiliate in the USA. Visit our website to learn more about us, find a local GRN radio station, a schedule of our programming and so much more. http://grnonline.com/

The Mindset Podcast
How to build a city with Mayor Juan Carlos Bermudez - EP 74

The Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 36:08


Juan Carlos “JC” Bermudez is the founding Mayor of the City of Doral and served in that capacity for the first 9 1/2 years of the city's existence. He was re-elected as Mayor of Doral in 2016. He is currently a member of the Advisory Board of the United States Conference of Mayors, as well as the Vice Chairman of the Miami-Dade County Transportation Planning Organization. Thank you to today's sponsor Popl! Click the link below or head over to www.popl.co and use code MINDSET to get 20% off yours today! https://popl.co/?ref=MINDSET --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/themindsetpodcast/support

Supreme Court of the United States
Biden v. Texas, No. 21-954 [Arg: 04.26.2022]

Supreme Court of the United States

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 107:11


QUESTION PRESENTED Whether 8 U.S.C. § 1225 requires the Department of Homeland Security to continue implementing the Migrant Protection Protocols, a former policy under which certain noncitizens arriving at the southwest border were returned to Mexico during their immigration proceedings; and  whether the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit erred by concluding that the secretary of homeland security's new decision terminating MPP had no legal effect. Date Proceedings and OrdersDec 29 2021 | Petition for a writ of certiorari filed. (Response due January 28, 2022)Jan 18 2022 | Motion to extend the time to file a response from January 28, 2022 to February 28, 2022, submitted to The Clerk.Jan 19 2022 | Response to motion to extend the time to file a response filed.Jan 19 2022 | Motion to extend the time to file a response DENIED.Jan 28 2022 | Waiver of the 14-day waiting period for distribution of the petition for a writ of certiorari pursuant to Rule 15.5 filed.Jan 28 2022 | Brief of respondents Texas, et al. in opposition filed.Feb 02 2022 | DISTRIBUTED for Conference of 2/18/2022.Feb 02 2022 | Reply of petitioners Joseph R. Biden, Jr., President of the United States, et al. filed. (Distributed)Feb 18 2022 | Petition GRANTED. The case will be set for argument in the second week of the April 2022 argument session. Petitioners' brief on the merits is to be filed on or before Monday, March 14, 2022. Respondents' brief on the merits is to be filed on or before Thursday, April 7, 2022. The reply brief is to be filed with the Clerk and served upon opposing counsel on or before 2 p.m., Wednesday, April 20, 2022.Mar 08 2022 | Blanket Consent filed by Petitioner, Joseph R. Biden, Jr., President of the United States, et al.Mar 14 2022 | Blanket Consent filed by Respondent, TexasMar 14 2022 | Brief of petitioners Joseph R. Biden, Jr., President of the United States, et al. filed.Mar 14 2022 | Joint appendix filed.Mar 15 2022 | ARGUMENT SET FOR Tuesday, April 26, 2022.Mar 16 2022 | Record requested from the U.S.C.A. 5th Circuit.Mar 18 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Public Citizen filed.Mar 18 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Professor Benjamin Eidelson filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Bipartisan Former Officials of the Department of Homeland Security and the Immigration and Naturalization Service filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Former DHS Secretary Jeh C. Johnson and Former Ambassador to Mexico Roberta S. Jacobson filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of State of Illinois, et al. filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Center for Immigration Law and Policy, UCLA School of Law filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of The Border Project and the National Immigrant Justice Center filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Administrative Law Professors filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of 61 Immigration Advocacy and Legal Service Organizations filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, et al. filed.Mar 21 2022 | Brief amici curiae of 25 Cities and Counties filed.Mar 23 2022 | Record from the U.S.C.A. 5th Circuit is electronic and located on PACER.Mar 23 2022 | Record received from the U.S.D.C. Northern District of Texas (Amarillo) has been electronically filed.Mar 23 2022 | CIRCULATEDApr 07 2022 | Brief of respondent Texas filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Center for Immigration Studies filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Indiana, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Landmark Legal Foundation filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of America First Legal Foundation filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Immigration Reform Law Institute filed. (Distributed)Apr 14 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Advancing American Freedom filed. (Distributed)Apr 19 2022 | Reply of petitioner Joseph R. Biden, Jr., President of the United States, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 25 2022 | Letter from the Solicitor General noting statistical corrections to reports cited in their petition filed. (Distributed)Apr 26 2022 | Argued. For petitioners: Elizabeth B. Prelogar, Solicitor General, Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. For respondents: Judd E. Stone, II, Solicitor General, Austin, Tex.★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Supreme Court of the United States
Kennedy v. Bremerton School District, No. 21-418 [Arg: 04.25.2022]

Supreme Court of the United States

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 107:52


QUESTION PRESENTED Whether a public-school employee who says a brief, quiet prayer by himself while at school and visible to students is engaged in government speech that lacks any First Amendment protection; and  whether, assuming that such religious expression is private and protected by the free speech and free exercise clauses, the establishment clause nevertheless compels public schools to prohibit it. Date Proceedings and OrdersSep 14 2021 | Petition for a writ of certiorari filed. (Response due October 18, 2021)Sep 16 2021 | Blanket Consent filed by Petitioner, Joseph A. KennedySep 20 2021 | Motion to extend the time to file a response from October 18, 2021 to December 7, 2021, submitted to The Clerk.Sep 21 2021 | Motion to extend the time to file a response is granted and the time is extended to and including December 7, 2021.Sep 27 2021 | Blanket Consent filed by Respondent, Bremerton School DistrictOct 14 2021 | Brief amici curiae of Former Professional Football Players Steve Largent and Chad Hennings filed.Oct 15 2021 | Brief amici curiae of Current State Legislators filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amicus curiae of Coach Tommy Bowden filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amici curiae of Members of Congress filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amicus curiae of Chaplain Alliance For Religious Liberty filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amicus curiae of Galen Black filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amici curiae of The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, et al. filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amicus curiae of Pennsylvania Family Institute filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amici curiae of Twenty-Four States filed.Oct 18 2021 | Brief amici curiae of Advancing American Freedom, et al. filed.Dec 07 2021 | Brief of respondent Bremerton School District in opposition filed.Dec 21 2021 | Reply of petitioner Joseph A. Kennedy filed. (Distributed)Dec 22 2021 | DISTRIBUTED for Conference of 1/7/2022.Jan 10 2022 | DISTRIBUTED for Conference of 1/14/2022.Jan 14 2022 | Petition GRANTED.Jan 21 2022 | Blanket Consent filed by Petitioner, Joseph A. KennedyJan 21 2022 | Blanket Consent filed by Respondent, Bremerton School DistrictFeb 16 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Alabama Center for Law and Liberty filed.Feb 18 2022 | Suggestion of mootness filed by respondent Bremerton School District. (Distributed)Feb 22 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Liberty Justice Center filed.Feb 23 2022 | Brief of petitioner Joseph A. Kennedy filed.Feb 23 2022 | Joint appendix filed (statement of costs filed).Feb 23 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Foundation for Moral Law filed.Feb 24 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of American Constitutionals Rights Union filed.Feb 25 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Darrell Green filed.Feb 25 2022 | Response to Suggestion of mootness filed. (Distributed)Feb 28 2022 | Reply in Support of Suggestion of Mootness filed. (Distributed)Feb 28 2022 | Brief amici curiae of World Faith Foundation, et al. filed.Mar 01 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Thomas More Society filed.Mar 01 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Claremont Institute's Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence filed.Mar 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Mountain States Legal Foundation and Southeastern Legal Foundation filed.Mar 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Family Policy Alliance and State Family Policy Councils filed.Mar 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Current State Legislators filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Coach Tommy Bowden filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Chaplain Alliance For Religious Liberty filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of American Center for Law and Justice filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of The American Cornerstone Institute filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Galen Black filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Members of Congress filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Liberty Counsel filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Former Professional Football Players Steve Largent and Chad Hennings filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Former Attorneys General, Edwin Meese II, et al. filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Kirk Cousins, et al. filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Foundation for Individual Rights in Education filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of America First Legal Foundation filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Jewish Coalition for Religious Liberty, et al. filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of The America First Policy Institute filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Americans for Prosperity Foundation filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of The American Legion filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of The Rutherford Institute filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of United States Conference of Catholic Bishops filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Elisabeth P. DeVos and Defense of Freedom Institute for Policy Studies filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Christian Legal Society filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Advancing American Freedom, Young America's Foundation, and 42 Additional Organizations and Individuals filed (3/18/22 brief and PDF to be corrected and resubmitted.)Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Advancing American Freedom, Young America's Foundation, and 39 Additional Organizations and Individuals filed. (03/24/2022). (Distributed)Mar 02 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Twenty-Seven States filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Notre Dame Law School Religious Liberty Initiative filed.Mar 02 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Protect The First Foundation filed.Mar 15 2022 | ARGUMENT SET FOR Monday, April 25, 2022.Mar 16 2022 | Record requested from the U.S.C.A. 9th Circuit.Mar 17 2022 | The record from the U.S.C.A. 9th Circuit is electronic and located on Pacer.Mar 23 2022 | CIRCULATEDMar 25 2022 | Brief of respondent Bremerton School District filed. (Distributed)Mar 31 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc., et al. filed. (Distributed)Mar 31 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Bremerton Community Members - BHS Football Team Alumnus, Parents, Community Leaders, and Educators filed. (Distributed)Mar 31 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Church-State Scholars filed. (Distributed)Mar 31 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Jo Ann Magistro and Alan Brodman filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Washington State School Directors' Association filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of American Civil Liberties Union and ACLU of Washington filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Forum on the Military Chaplaincy and Former Members of the Military and Military Chaplaincies filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Freedom From Religion Foundation, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of New York, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of AASA, The School Superintendents Association, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Former Professional Football Players Obafemi D. Ayanbadejo, Sr., et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Religious and Denominational Organizations and Bremerton-Area Clergy filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Members of the U.S. House of Representatives filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of American Atheists, Inc. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Washington State Charter Schools Association and California Charter Schools Association filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of California School Boards Association and its Education Legal Alliance filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of Psychology and Neuroscience Scholars filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amicus curiae of Robert D. Kamenshine filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of National Education Association, et al. filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Brief amici curiae of City, county, and local public employer organizations filed. (Distributed)Apr 01 2022 | Motion of City, County, and Local Public Employer Organizations for leave to participate in oral argument as amici curiae and for divided argument filed.Apr 14 2022 | Motion of City, County, and Local Public Employer Organizations for leave to participate in oral argument as amici curiae and for divided argument DENIED.Apr 15 2022 | Reply of petitioner Joseph A. Kennedy filed. (Distributed)Apr 25 2022 | Argued. For petitioner: Paul D. Clement, Washington, D. C. For respondent: Richard B. Katskee, Washington, D. C.★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Grace Midtown Podcast

We would love to invite you to pray with us through the Stations of the Cross — the events leading up to Jesus's death and resurrection. This audio experience is designed to be used in conjunction with our experience on Grace Midtown's campus, but can also be utilized wherever you find the space and time to reflect this Holy Week. Stations and prayers adapted from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (https://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/prayers-and-devotions/stations-of-the-cross/scriptural-stations-of-the-cross) and Incarnation Anglican Church, Arlington, VA (https://www.incarnationanglican.org/stations-of-the-cross). All Scripture quotations are from New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain
073: Architecture, And: Civic Leadership

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 58:38


Episode 073: Architecture, And: Civic Leadership How are individuals using their training in architecture to explore diverse career paths in government and public service? The https://www.micd.org/ (Mayors' Institute on City Design (MICD)) is a leadership initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the United States Conference of Mayors. Since 1986, the Mayors' Institute has helped transform communities through design by preparing mayors to be the chief urban designers of their cities. MICD has hosted over 1,200 mayors representing all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.  This week we'll interview Trinity Simons, the Executive Director of the Mayors' Institute on City Design, and Jake Day, the Mayor of Salisbury, Maryland. Trinity and Mayor Day both started their careers in architecture. We'll interview them to learn more about their current leadership responsibilities, the path from architecture to civic leadership, and how their foundational education informs their work. Guests: Trinity Simons helps local leaders across the nation improve their communities, bringing together her advanced training in architecture and planning with a conviction about the importance of the built environment and respect for the democratic process. For the last decade, she has served as the executive director of the Mayors' Institute on City Design (MICD). At MICD, she works with mayors across the country on the nation's most pressing urban planning and design challenges. During her tenure, she has led the expansion of leadership development and learning opportunities for mayors, building off the successful MICD Institute model, to now include virtual seminars for mayors, advanced technical assistance, and the innovative MICD Just City Mayoral Fellowship. She speaks and writes frequently about the intersection of design and politics, and how design is a tool that can help mayors creatively address numerous challenges simultaneously, including equity, affordability, and sustainability. Under her leadership, in 2021, MICD was awarded the Landscape Architecture Foundation's Founders' Award, its highest honor for organizations. Trinity previously directed the Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship, a prestigious fellowship program for emerging architects and landscape architects to achieve design excellence in affordable housing through work with community development corporations. Trinity has a Bachelor of Architecture from the Fay Jones School at the University of Arkansas and a Master of City Planning with a focus on city design and real estate development from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jake Day is the Mayor of Salisbury, Maryland. Born and raised in Salisbury, he was elected to the City Council at the age of 30 and unanimously elected President. First elected Mayor in 2015, he was reelected in 2019 with 86% of the vote. Under his leadership, Salisbury has established a Housing First program to reduce chronic homelessness, opened its first 2 youth community centers and recreation programs, borne witness to Maryland's fastest declining rate of opioid overdoses, and the fastest dropping crime rate of any US city in the last decade. The renaissance of Downtown Salisbury has helped Salisbury become Maryland's fastest-growing City, America's 7th fastest growing job market, and America's 16th fastest-growing metro area. As Mayor, Jake oversaw the complete reorganization of the Salisbury government; restoring employee morale, customer service, efficiency, and transparency.  Jake earned a bachelor's degree in Architecture from the University of Maryland, a Master's Degree in Urban Design from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Master of Science in Environmental Policy from Oxford University where he graduated with distinction for his dissertation on the American lawn. Jake has spent his career revitalizing downtowns and making them more vibrant, livable places. His work...

Capitol Compass
Catholic Federal Advocacy

Capitol Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 21:44


In episode 13, Gillian chats with Lauren McCormack, Executive Director for the Office of Government Relations at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). We chat about Catholic advocacy on the federal level.  Sign up for the Catholic Action Network (CAN) by going to our website, nyscatholic.org/action-center/, or texting 'CAN' to 50457.Follow us on social media!Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nyscatholicconferenceTwitter: https://twitter.com/NYSCatholicConfInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nyscatholicconf/

Wilson County News
Catholic Daughters Lenten retreat welcomes former Holy Trinity pastor

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 1:07


The Catholic Daughters of the Americas Court St. Genevieve held a Lenten Retreat on Feb. 26, in the Falls City Diner. After registration, attendees ate breakfast and recited several decades of the Holy Rosary. The Rev. John Klak, former pastor of Holy Trinity Catholic Church, served as guest speaker. Rev. John spoke about the document, “The Mystery of the Eucharist in the Life of the Church,” published by The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. He also answered questions from an audience of about 70, which included men and women. The retreat ended with Rev. John promising to return for...Article Link

Interior Integration for Catholics
Your Well-Being: The Secular Experts Speak

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 79:40


Summary:  Join us as we review how philosophers and modern secular psychologists understand mental health and well-being.  In this episode, we look at the attempts to define what make us happy, from the 4th century BC to the present day.  Arristipus, Aristotle, Descartes, Freud, Seligman, Porges, Schwartz, and two diagnostic systems.  We take a special look at how positive psychology and Internal Family Systems see well-being.   Lead in  In  June of 1991 I was really traumatized Just left a spiritually and psychologically abusive group and I was struggling  How could this have happened  I thought I was giving my life to God -- and then I find out the community I was in was like this --  Had to confront my own behaviors in the community -- manipulation, deception, betrayals of trust -- things like that.   I knew I had to recover.  And so I went on a quest  I was still Catholic, I never lost my faith, but I felt really burned by the Catholic Church  I wanted to learn everything I could about social influence, about group dynamics, about psychological manipulation -- in part so what happened before would never happen again, and also to tap into wisdom that I didn't have access to in my very sheltered community.  In short, I was on a quest to find out the best of what secular psychology had to offer.   I would have gone to a Catholic Graduate  What I was looking for  What I found   Introduction Question may arise, "Why Dr. Peter, since you are a Catholic psychologist, why are you even looking at these secular sources? Why even bother with them?  Don't we have everything we need in Scripture, in the traditions of the Church, in the writings of the Church Fathers and the saints, and in magisterial teaching?  I thought this was a Catholic podcast here.   Let me ask you question in return then -- Let's say you're experiencing serious physical symptoms -- something is wrong medically.  You have intense abdominal pain, right around your navel, your belly is starting to swell, you have a low-grade fever, you've lost your appetite and you're nauseous and you have diarrhea.  How would you react if I were to say to you: "Why are you considering consulting secular medical experts?  What need have you of doctors and a hospital?  Don't you have everything you need in Scripture, in the traditions of the Church, in the writings of the Church Fathers and the saints, and in magisterial teaching?   If I responded to you like that, you might think I'm a crackpot or that I believe in faith healing alone or that I just don't get what you are experiencing. Those are the symptoms of an appendicitis, and that infected appendix could burst 48-72 hours after your first symptoms.  If that happens, bacteria spread infection throughout your abdomen, and that is potentially life-threatening.  You would need surgery to remove the appendix and clean out your abdomen.   Remember that we are embodied beings -- we are composites of a soul and a body. The 17th Century Philosopher Rene Descartes' gave us a lot of great things, including analytic geometry,  but he was wrong splitting the body from the mind in his dualism.   Descartes' mind-body dualism, the idea that the body and the mind operate in separate spheres, and neither can be assimilated into the other which has been so influential in our modern era. In the last several years we are realizing just how much of our mental life and our psychological well-being is linked in various ways to our neurobiology -- the ways that our nervous systems function.  And the relationship between our embodied brain and our minds is reciprocal -- each affects the other in complex ways that we are just beginning to understand.  In other words, brain chemistry affects our emotional states.  And our emotional states and our behaviors affect brain chemistry.  It's not just our minds and it's not just our bodies and it's not just our souls -- it's all of those, all of what makes me who I am, body, mind, soul, spirit, all of it.   And since Scripture, the Early Church Fathers, the Catechism and so on are silent on neurobiology, neurochemistry, neurophysiology and so many other areas that impact our minds and our well-being, as a Catholic psychologist I am going to look elsewhere, I'm going to look into secular sources.  I just don't think it's reasonable to expect the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops or the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Vatican to be experts in these areas -- it's not their calling.  I just don't think anyone is going to find an effective treatment for bulimia by consulting the writings of the Early Church Fathers or in St. Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica.  That is unreasonable .  And it's just as unreasonable, in my opinion, to ignore the body and just try to work with the mind.   I also believe that God works through non-Catholics in many ways -- many non-Catholic researchers and clinicians and theorists are using the light of natural reason to discover important realities that help us understanding well-being, and they are inspired to seek what can be known with good motivations, with good hearts and sharp minds to help and love others.   I am a Catholic with upper-case C, a big C and I am catholic with a lower-case C -- a little C.  Catholic with a little C.  According to my Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus, Third Edition, which I rely on for wordfinding, according to this thesaurus, the synonyms for Catholic with a small c include the following terms:  universal, diverse, broad-based, eclectic, comprehensive, all-encompassing, all-embracing and all-inclusive.  That's what catholic with a small c means.  So I am Catholic with a big C and catholic with a small c.   And a final point about why I look to secular sources -- The Church herself encourages us to look to all branches of knowledge and glean what is best from them.   From the CCC, paragraph 159  "Though faith is above reason, there can never be any real discrepancy between faith and reason. Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth." "Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God. The humble and persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the conserver of all things, who made them what they are." And from the Vatican II document, the Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World, paragraph 62 reads:  In pastoral care, sufficient use must be made not only of theological principles, but also of the findings of the secular sciences, especially of psychology and sociology, so that the faithful may be brought to a more adequate and mature life of faith. Finally, I will say that considering the whole person -- Soul, spirit, mind and body -- all of the person is so much more helpful in the process of recovery that just splitting off the mind and working with it alone, or just trying to work with the mind and the soul but not the body.  So there are pragmatic considerations, practical aspects to this.  I like to practice psychology in ways that actually work.  The fruit that comes from considering the body and working with the body as well the mind and soul is just so much better.  And so we want to work in an integrative way.  That what this podcast Interior Integration for Catholics is all about -- this is episode 90 released on March 7. 2022, titled Your Well-Being:  The Secular Experts Speak and I am  I am clinical psychologist Peter Malinoski, your host and companion today, and also president and Co-Founder of Souls and Hearts at soulsandhearts.com -- our mission in Souls and Hearts is to bring the best of psychology and human formation grounded in a Catholic understanding of the human person to help wounded Catholics rise above our psychological issues and human formation problems which hold us back from embracing love from Jesus, the Holy Spirit, God our Father and Mary our Mother and loving them back with our whole souls and hearts, with all our parts.    Secular Sources The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 -- DSM-5 for short.   From the American Psychiatric Association, which publishes the DSM-5 The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the handbook used by health care professionals in the United States and much of the world as the authoritative guide to the diagnosis of mental disorders. DSM contains descriptions, symptoms, and other criteria for diagnosing mental disorders. It provides a common language for clinicians to communicate about their patients and establishes consistent and reliable diagnoses that can be used in the research of mental disorders. It also provides a common language for researchers to study the criteria for potential future revisions and to aid in the development of medications and other interventions. So you would think, given that glowing description of its prowess and authority that it would tell us what psychological well-being is, it would let us know what mental health is.  But if you thought that, you'd be wrong.   Nowhere in the nearly 1000 pages of this tome is there are definition.  You can't find it.  No definition of mental health or psychological wellbeing.  You get a definition of mental disorder and a couple of descriptions of what is not a mental disorder.  This is a quote from page 20.   Definition of a mental disorder:  A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological, biological, or developmental processes underlying mental functioning. Mental disorders are usually associated with significant distress in social, occupational, or other important activities. An expectable or culturally approved response to a common stressor or loss, such as the death of a loved one, is not a mental disorder. Socially deviant behavior (e.g., political, religious, or sexual) and conflicts that are primarily between the individual and society are not mental disorders unless the deviance or conflict results from a dysfunction in the individual, as described above. But no definition of what optimal functioning, or happiness or well-being or psychological health would look like.  That's a real problem.  How are we supposed to know what psychological disorder is when we don't know what psychological health should entail? Canadian Blogger, author and Christian pastor Tim Challies published a blog titled "Counterfeit Detection" in which he describes how Canadian federal agents are trained to detect counterfeit bills -- they first get very familiar with the real money.  Real bills.  Those Canadian follow what John MacArthur wrote in his book Reckless Faith. "Federal agents don't learn to spot counterfeit money by studying the counterfeits. They study genuine bills until they master the look of the real thing. Then when they see the bogus money they recognize it."  Only then are they equipped to spot the forgeries.   So we need a standard, we need to know what well-being looks like so we can use it as a reference point for contrasting anything which is out of order in our psyches.  We're not going to get that reference point from the DSM-5, so let's turn to history.  Let's go back in time to the philosophers of ancient Greece who wrote about well-being and start there.  Let's see if we can find out from our secular sources what the good life is.  What psychological well-being is, what mental health is.    Hedonic wellbeing -- basically this is about feeling good:     Aristippus, a Greek philosopher in the fourth century BC argued that the primary and ultimate goal in life should be to maximize pleasure.  English philosophers  Thomas Hobbes 17th century and Jeremy Bentham in the 18th century, crossing into the 19th century also embraced Hedonic well being.   Definition:  Hedonic wellbeing "focuses on happiness and defines well-being in terms of pleasure attainment and pain avoidance” Ryan and Deci, 2001 On happiness and human potentials: A review of research on hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Annual Review of Psychology How much pleasure can I get?  How much pain can I avoid -- Hedonic wellbeing.  Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy The term “hedonism,” from the Greek word ἡδονή (hēdonē) for pleasure, refers to several related theories about what is good for us, how we should behave, and what motivates us to behave in the way that we do. All hedonistic theories identify pleasure and pain as the only important elements of whatever phenomena they are designed to describe.   Back to Ryan and Deci “the predominant view among hedonic psychologists is that well-being consists of subjective happiness and concerns the experience of pleasure versus displeasure broadly construed to include all judgments about the good/bad elements of life. Happiness is thus not reducible to physical hedonism, for it can be derived from attainment of goals or valued outcomes in varied realms  Ryan and Deci, 2001 On happiness and human potentials: A review of research on hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Annual Review of Psychology Summary statement:  Hedonic well-being -- maximize the pleasure, minimize the pain.   And that makes sense to us -- we all have some innate attraction to pleasure and some innate avoidance of pain.   Eudaimonic wellbeing "producing happiness," 1856, from Greek eudaimonikos "conducive to happiness," from eudaimonia "happiness," from eu "good" (see eu-) + daimōn "guardian, genius" (see daimon).  In contrast to hedonic wellbeing's focus on pleasure, we have eudaimonic well-being, which focuses on meaning and purpose in life.   Trace this back to Aristotle also in the 4th Century BC, contemporary of Aristippus.  Aristotle argued, especially in his Nichomachean Ethics -- Aristotle argued that the best things are the ones who perform their function to the highest degree.  My son John Malinoski used this example in his senior thesis for Wyoming Catholic college. His thesis was titled Into the Jung-le: Exploring How Modern Psychological Methodology Relates to and Transforms the Classical Understanding of Man's Psyche  and it has this passage which precisely describes how Aristotle saw well-being, using an illustrative  example of a squirrel and then describing what well-being is for us as human persons:   Aristotle begins his quest for the happy man with one of these endoxa: the generally held, plausible truth that the best things are the ones who perform their function to the highest degree. It seems self-evident that we would judge the worth of a squirrel based on how fast that squirrel can run, how high it can leap, or how much food it can find. In other words, the best squirrel is the one that best fulfills its squirrel nature. Correspondingly, the best man must be the man who excels at being a man; he performs the functions of man to the highest degree. While man has many functions which he shares in common with plants and animals--life, growth, sensation, and so on--he has one particular ability which is unique to him: the ability to reason. Since this higher faculty distinguishes and elevates man above the lesser beings below him, Aristotle claims that it must be the most important aspect of his soul, the characteristic function of man: “We posit the work of a human being as a certain life, and this is an activity of soul and actions accompanied by reason.”6 Since “each thing is brought to completion well in accord with the work proper to it,” it follows that “the human good becomes an activity of the soul in accord with virtue, and if there are several virtues, then in accord with the best and most complete one.”7  This is Aristotle's brief summation of the human good, or happiness. In short, the truly virtuous man has ordered his soul to the fullest extent: not only are all his actions ordered towards reason and the good, but all his inclinations point him toward these properly ordered actions as well. Gale and colleagues 2009 article in the Journal of Personality  The eudaimonic perspective of wellbeing – based on Aristotle's view that true happiness comes from doing what is worth doing – focuses on meaning and self-realization, and defines wellbeing largely in terms of ways of thought and behavior that provide fulfillment. Freud Let's fast forward 2400 years now to Freud.  From the 4th century BC to the 20th Century AD.  To Freud  A lot of people believe that Freud was really a hedonist -- in part because of his pleasure principle.  In Freud's psychoanalytic theory of personality, the pleasure principle is that driving impulse of the id -- the id is the most basic, primitive part of the personality driven by instincts, mostly buried deep in the unconscious.  The pleasure principle describes how the id seeks immediate gratification of all its needs, wants, and urges, seeking with force to satiate hunger, quench thirst, discharge anger, and experience sexual pleasure.   "To Love and to Work" -- summarizing in one pithy statement what a healthy man or woman should be able to do well.   “Love and work…work and love, that's all there is…love and work are the cornerstones of our humanness.” -- Civilization and its Discontents  Play:  Freud believed and taught that play was important -- play is a creative activity, play is an adaptive activity, and play is also a therapeutic activity because play generates pleasure through the release of  tension.  Summarize Freud's position on happiness -- the ability to Love, work and play.   Freud in his 1895 book "Studies on Hysteria" coauthored with Josef Breuer.  But you will see for yourself that much has been gained if we succeed in turning your hysterical misery into common unhappiness. With a mental life that has been restored to health, you will be better armed against that unhappiness.” Freud did not promise that his psychoanalytic method would remove "common unhappiness."  He taught that psychoanalysis had its limits.   Which leads us to fast forward 100 years to the late 1990's and the advent of Positive Psychology, which is not satisfied by just accepting common unhappiness.  Positive psychology posits that we can do something about that common unhappiness and make it better -- so it is more ambitious in its goals and promises than Freud ever was.   Positive Psychology:   Definitions:   Peterson 2008  “Positive psychology is the scientific study of what makes life most worth living”  positive psychology is a scientific approach to studying human thoughts, feelings, and behavior, with a focus on strengths instead of weaknesses, building the good in life instead of repairing the bad, and taking the lives of average people up to “great” instead of focusing solely on moving those who are struggling up to “normal”  the scientific study of positive human functioning and flourishing  -- flourishing really is the focus of positive psychology, it's a critical word.  And there's a focus on flourishing in three primary domains.   Flourishing  intrapersonally -- which means within one's own person, within one's own being -- intrapersonally (e.g. biologically, emotionally, cognitively) Flourishing interpersonally (e.g. relationally), in our personal relationships And flourishing collectively (e.g. institutionally, culturally and globally) -- in our culture and society -- flourishing collectively So flourishing is the key word, and the focus is on flourishing intrapersonally, interpersonally, and collectively So what makes the good life according to positive psychologists, according to Martin Seligman? Seligman in his 2002 book Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment details four different forms of what he calls "the good life."  Four different forms or ways of living well, four kinds of well-being.    These are the 1) the pleasant life; 2) a good life; 3) a meaningful life; and 4) a full life.  Repeat them.   We'll go through each one of these starting with the pleasant life.   The pleasant life: according to Martin Seligman, the pleasant life is a simple life, he says "a life that successfully pursues the positive emotions about the present, past and future"  He elaborates, "The pleasant life is wrapped up in the successful pursuit of the positive feelings, supplemented by the skills of amplifying those emotions."  This takes us back to the hedonic wellbeing we discussed earlier, as originally posited by Aristippus, our Greek philosopher in the fourth century BC.  All about the pursuit of good feelings, maximizing positive emotions.  The good life: The good life, according to positive psychology pioneer Martin Seligman means  "using your signature strengths to obtain abundant gratification in the main realms of one's life"  So in this good life, you are able to use your particular talents and unique skills, your special strengths, being true to your own character, being true to your values and virtues, so this sense of "authenticity" is very important in the good life.  So we have the pleasant life, all about positive emotions; and now the good life, in which you have abundant gratification by you doing you, by you being authentic through using your signature qualities in in the world.  The good life is not a permanent state -- we are not always going to be able to use our special talents and qualities in a way that is gratifying to us -- rather, the good life has to be a process of ongoing growth, a process of development.  It's all about continuing to grow.   Then we have the  meaningful life, that's the third form, the meaningful life.  Seligman describes this as "using your signature strengths and virtues in the service of something much larger than you are" In this way of living well, you have a strong bond to "something larger than yourself."  In this way of well-being, it's up to each individual what that "something larger than yourself" is going to be.  So at this point we've covered three of the four kinds of well-being:  we have the pleasant life, all about maximizing your pleasant emotions, we have the good life, which is all about using your signature strength and virtues to be gratified, and we have the third form, the meaningful life, in which we use our signature strengths and virtues in the service of something larger than us.  This level of well-being brings us back to Aristotle and his eudaimonic well-being, which focuses on pursuing meaning and purpose in life.   That leaves us with the fourth way, the full life.  Seligman describes the full life as follows: «Finally, a full life consists in experiencing positive emotions about the past and future, savoring positive feelings from pleasures, deriving abundant gratification from your signature strengths, and using these strengths in the service of something larger to obtain meaning»  So what is added to the first three ways of well-being in this last way, the fourth way, the full life is the concept of service.  Here's where he starts to sound a little like Bob Dylan's 1979 song "Gotta Serve Somebody."  In the full life, a  man uses his strengths and abilities in the most optimized way to serve something larger than himself." In the full life, a woman gets outside herself and brings her talents and virtues to serve a greater good in a way that shines.  The full life reflects optimal human functioning.  Seligman thus is very Aristotleian in how  he argues that a person has the best experience of life, the greatest sense of well-being when that person is functioning  optimally, bringing all the particular talents, skills, strengths and virtues to bear in the services of the greater good.  Effort to refocus psychology on wholeness and wellness -- not on illness or disorder or weaknesses or problems Focus on positive aspects A to Z list from Chapter 2 of the book Well-Being, Recovery, and Mental Health by Lindsay Oades and Lara Mossman:  altruism, accomplishment, appreciation of beauty and excellence, authenticity, best possible selves, character strengths, coaching, compassion, courage, coping, creativity, curiosity, emotional intelligence, empathy, flow, forgiveness, goal setting, gratitude, grit, happiness, hope, humor, kindness, leadership, love, meaning, meditation, mindfulness, motivation, optimism, performance, perseverance, positive emotions, positive relationships, post-traumatic growth, psychological capital, purpose, resilience, savoring, self-efficacy, self-regulation, spirituality, the good life, virtues, wisdom and zest.  Origin of Positive Psychology is often attributed to Abraham Maslow's 1954 book "Motivation and Personality."   Really took off in the late 1990's when positive psychology pioneer Martin Seligman became president of the American Psychological Society and was able to effectively popularize positive psychology Increase human strength -- make people more "productive"  Nurturing of genius and fostering greater human potential  Calling for research on human strength and virtue.   How do human being flourish at the individual level, the community level, and at the societal level?   Emphasis on Different interventions that have been found to improve levels of happiness and well-being.   Best possible self -- writing about yourself at your best, remembering yourself at your best Working on forgiveness -- I find this really interesting that forgiveness  -- Robert Enright has done a lot of research in this area, with a focus on letting go of anger, resentment and bitterness toward those who have caused me pain. Getting a more balanced view of the offender  Reducing negative feelings toward the offender and possibly increasing compassion  Relinquishing the right to punish the offender or demand restitution.     Increasing gratitude -- finding things to be thankful for, reflecting on blessings, expressing gratitude in a variety of ways -- Gratitude is the expression of appreciate for what I have.  Research shows many positive psychological benefits to deliberately practicing gratitude Fostering optimism -- the tendency to anticipate favorable outcomes.  Things are going to work out.  The glass is half full.  The idea is that optimism can be learned.  It can be practiced and developed and when it is, people feel better.   Cultivating Mindfulness the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally to the unfolding of experience moment by moment“ (Kabat-Zinn, Reference Kabat-Zinn2003, p. 2) Listening to uplifting music Positive Psychotherapy Savoring (savoring can be past-focused (reminiscing about positive experiences), present-focused (savoring the moment) or future-focused (anticipating positive experiences yet to come) (Smith et al., 2014) Self-compassionate writing -- being gentle with yourself in your journal PDM 2 -- Now completely revised (over 90% new), this is the authoritative diagnostic manual grounded in psychodynamic clinical models and theories. Explicitly oriented toward case formulation and treatment planning, PDM-2 offers practitioners an empirically based, clinically useful alternative or supplement to DSM and ICD categorical diagnoses.  A clinically useful classification of mental disorders must begin with a concept of healthy psychology. Mental health is more than simply the absence of symptoms. Just as healthy cardiac functioning cannot be defined as an absence of chest pain, healthy mental functioning is more than the absence of observable symptoms of psychopathology. p.3 Three major axes: Personality Organization, Mental Functioning, and Symptom Patterns Personality Organization P Axis What level of personality organization does the person have?   4 major categories -- psychotic, borderline, neurotic, and healthy.   What style personality or pattern does one have -- e.g. depressive, hypomanic, masochistic, dependent, anxious-avoidant (aka phobic), obsessive-compulsive, schizoid, somatizing, hysteric/histrionic, narcissistic, paranoid, psychopathic, sadistic, and borderline.  You've got one of these styles.   Mental Functioning -- overall description of mental functioning -- the capacities involved in psychological health or pathology -- looking at the inner mental life of the person Symptom Patterns -- S axis -- looks at emotional states, cognitive processes, bodily experiences, and relational patterns -- looks at the person's personal experience of his or her difficulties Psychodiagnostic Chart-2 by Robert Gordon and Robert Bornstein -- downloadable Use   Breaking it down Personality Organization P Axis -- What level of personality organization does the person have.  4 major categories -- psychotic, borderline, neurotic, and healthy.  What style personality or pattern does one have -- e.g. depressive, hypomanic, masochistic, dependent, anxious-avoidant (aka phobic), obsessive-compulsive, schizoid, somatizing, hysteric/histrionic, narcissistic, paranoid, psychopathic, sadistic, and borderline.  You've got one of these styles.   To be able to understand oneself in complex, stable, and accurate ways To maintain intimate, stable, and satisfying relationships To use more healthy defenses and copings strategies -- anticipation, self-assertion, sublimation, suppression, altruism and humor To appreciate, if not necessarily conform to, conventional notions of what is realistic Life problems rarely get out of hand There is enough flexibility to accommodate to challenging realities Mental Functioning M axis  Cognitive processes capacity to regulate thinking, attention, learning  Capacity to communicate one's thoughts to others   Emotional processes to be able to experience a full range of emotions  To regulate emotions well  To understand one's own emotions  To be able to communicate one's emotions   Identity -- deals with the question, who am I? Capacity for differentiation -- a solid sense of being psychological separate from others -- not fused, or enmeshed or co-dependent  Regulation of self-esteem  Awareness of internal experience   Relationships Capacity for relationships  Capacity for intimacy   Defenses and coping Impulse control -- regulation of impulses   Defensive functioning -- able to use effective coping strategies e.g. extreme denial  vs. humor   Adaptation -- this is a state, reflecting how an individual deals with specific stressors going on in life right now  Resilience -- this is a trait -- general ability  Check out episodes 20, 21, 22, and 23 of this podcast for a four part series on resilience American Psychological Association defines resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress— such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems or workplace and financial stressors. It means "bouncing back" from difficult experiences.”  So resilience is a trait.  Strength   Self-awareness Self-observing capacities -- psychological mindfulness  Self-direction   Capacity to construct and use internal standards and ideal A sense of meaning and purpose in life   Symptom patterns -- S Axis the severity of psychological symptoms   Polyvagal theory -- we spent the last episode, episode 89 titled "Your Body, Your Trauma: Protection vs. Connection discussing Stephen Porges' Polyvagal Theory.   Deb Dana: Polyvagal Exercises for Safety and Connection The ventral vagal system truly powers the journey to well-being Now remember, the ventral vagal system corresponds to  the ventral branch of the vagal nerve-- and the ventral vagal system serves the social engagement system -- remember -- that's the relational connection system. The ventral vagal nerve dampens the body's regularly active state. The ventral vagal nerve allows activation of the autonomic nervous system in a nuanced way, thus offering a different quality than sympathetic activation -- that's how you can being excited and celebrate your favorite sports team score again against their rivals without becoming overwhelmed by a fight or flight response.  What is it like to be in a ventral vagal state?  It's a positive state -- it's not just the absence of being in sympathetic hyperarousal when you are in fight or flight.  It's also not just the absence of being in a dorsal vagal hypoarousal shutdown or freeze state.  It's more than just those two systems being downregulated.  It's the ventral vagal system being activated.  It's an active state with these properties  Physical responses Reduced heart rate  Steady breathing  Relaxed digestion  Rest and recuperation  Vitality  Circulation to extremities  Stress reduction   Psychological responses A sense of calm  A sense of safety  Feeling grounded  Joy  Mindfulness  An ability to be very much in the present moment   Relational responses Desire for connection with others.  A genuine interest in others  Openness and receptivity in relationship  Acceptance and embracing of vulnerability   Empathy and compassion for others Oxytocin is released that stimulates social bonding  Ability to related and to connect with others without anxiety   This state changes the way we look and sound to others -- the tone and rhythm of your voice is more inviting   Story -- I'm in a good place, I can be loved and love, I can connect with others, there is good in the world.  Live is so worth living, and I want to share joy and peace and even sorrow and challenges with other people.   So polyvagal theory is going to focus specifically on the regulation of your nervous system in assessing your well-being.  The more you can be in a ventral vagal state, whether you are resting or excited, the better.  So for those therapists who use polyvagal theory, there is a focus on resetting the autonomic nervous system, helping us in a bodily way to get back to a ventral vagal state.  And we contrast that to the sympathetic fight or flight response and the dorsal vagal shutdown response.   Danger activates the sympathetic system, we are all about survival now  Physical responses Body is mobilized for action.  Ready to run / Efforts to escape  Hypervigilance -- body goes on high alert, pupils dilating, letting more light  Very high levels of energy in this state, adrenaline rush  Muscles get tense  Blood pressure rises  Heart rate accelerates  Adrenaline releases  Extra oxygen is circulated to vital organs  Digestion decreases  Immune response is suppressed   Psychological responses  Emotional Overwhelm usually worry moving to anxiety to fear to panic  Or frustration to irritation to anger to rage confrontational, aggressive   Scanning for threats  Capacity for complex, flexible reasoning is very much reduced -- leads to confusion  No sense of safety, you start missing signs of safety and misreading signs of safety   Relational responses Sense of separation, isolation from others-- cut off from others, no sense of relational connection anymore -- the connection is sacrificed in order to seek greater protection  Disconnection from self, others, world, disconnected spiritually.-- you can't see others, really, except through the lens of danger and safety   If we don't feel safe, there's no way we can provide a sense of safety to others.   Story: The world is unsafe and people are dangerous, unfriendly, scary, falling apart   When the mobilization doesn't bring a resolution to the distress -- then the ANS takes the final step, and shoots the last arrow it has in its quiver.  This is the freeze response. When there is a deep sense that my life is threatened and the sympathetic activation doesn't resolve the perceived threat, then the dorsal vagal system kicks in.  That's the freeze response, that's the collapse into "dorsal vagal lifelessness"  Physical response Heart rate decreases, slows way down  Blood pressure drops  Body temperature decreases  Muscle tone relaxes  Breathing becomes shallow  Immune response drops  Pain threshold increases -- greater pain tolerance because of endorphin release that numbs pain.   Immobilization response -- appearing physically dead  Digestion and metabolism slows way down -- going into conservation mode, like hibernating until the life threat passes.   Psychological response Sense of helplessness  Depression, despondency, lethargy  Numbing out  Disconnection  Thinking become very foggy, fuzzy, unclear  Dissociation, Spacing out, feeling disconnect from the present, untethered, floating, derealization   Feeling trapped Preparing for death Feeling hopeless Shutting down and feeling psychologically inert, paralyzed Feeling a deep sense of shame Relational response Very isolated  Can't listen to others, don't notice them very well, because of how shut down and self-absorbed you are in this state  Can't share very well, difficulty with words  Very little agency  Can't focus   Story:  A story of despair.  I am unlovable, invisible, lost, alone, in desperate straits, about to die.   So polyvagal theory is going to focus specifically on the regulation of your nervous system in assessing your well-being.   According to polyvagal theory if we are in sympathetic arousal, the fight or flight mode, we are focused on the perceived dangers around us and we focus on self-protection.  This leads us to sacrifice connection with others.   If we are in the dorsal vagal shutdown, the freeze response, we hiding from the prospect of imminent death, shutting down into a conservation mode, hoping to survive the perceived imminent lethal danger by becoming immobile.   So for those therapists informed by polyvagal theory, there is a focus on resetting the autonomic nervous system, helping us in a bodily way to get back to a ventral vagal state, to leave the dorsal vagal shutdown state, to leave the sympathetic fight-or-flight state and get back to a peaceful bodily state.  These therapists start with the body, not so much the mind.   Internal Family Systems or IFS-- developed by Richard Schwartz, described in the first edition of Internal Family System Therapy which was published in 1995  IFS brings systems thinking inside -- it conceptualized the human person as a living system.  Richard Schwartz is a family therapist who was trained in family systems work.  He recognized that the inner life of a person mirrored family life, from a systems perspective.  But before we go much further, let's ask the question -- What is a system:  Definition from Ben Lutkevich at techtarget.com Systems thinking is a holistic approach to analysis that focuses on the way that a system's constituent parts interrelate and how systems work over time and within the context of larger systems. The systems thinking approach contrasts with traditional analysis, which studies systems by breaking them down into their separate elements.  Wellbeing according to IFS is when inner system of the person shows certain qualities Balance  -- the degree of influence that each member has in the system on decisions making is appropriate and that the boundaries are balanced and appropriate within the system.   Harmony -- an effort is made to find the role each member desires and and for which he is best suited.  Members of the system work together, cooperatively.  The harmony of the system allows each member to find and pursue his own vision while fitting that member's vision into the broader vision of the system as a whole.  There is cooperation and collaboration among the members of the system.   Leadership --One or more members of the system must have the ability and respect to do the following: Mediate polarizations  Facilitate the flow of information withing the system  Ensure that all members of the system are protected and cared for and that they feel valued and encouraged to pursue their individual vision within the limits of the system's needs  Allocate resources, responsibilities, and influence fairly  Provide a broad perspective and vision for the system as a whole  Represent the system in interaction with other systems  And interpret feedback from other systems honestly   Development -- the members of the system and the system itself can grow -- developing the skills and relationships needed to carry out the vision of the system.   IFS model of the person Person is composed of a body, plus his parts, plus his self -- that's the internal system of a person -- body, parts, and self  This will be a review for many of you who listen to the podcast   Self:  The core of the person, the center of the person.  This is who we sense ourselves to be in our best moments, and when our self is free, and unblended with any of our parts, it governs our whole being as an active, compassionate leader, with a deep sense of recollection on the natural level.  You can also experience being in self as an expansive state of mind   We want to be recollected, we want the self governing all of our parts Like the conductor -- leading the musicians in an orchestra Like the captain -- leading and governing all the sailors on a ship.   When we are recollected, in self, 8 C's -- this is the ideal state Calm  -agitation, frustration, anxious, stressed, angry   Curiosity -- indifferent, disinterested, seeing other parts and seeing other people in two dimensions, one dimension, or no dimensions -- Episode 72 -Y- nuanced vs. reductionistic understandings of ourselves and others.   Compassion -- cold, uncaring, unfriendly, hard, reserved, unsympathetic Confidence -- timid, pessimistic, doubtful and insecure Courage -- fearful, shy, faint-hearted, irresolute Clarity -- confused, muddled inside, things are obscured, dark inside, foggy, sees vague forms moving in a shadow world.   Connectedness  -- internal fragmentation, disjointed, distant, aloof Creativity  -- uninspired, inept, very conventional, repetitive futility, doing the same thing over and over again, with no different results Parts:  Separate, independently operating personalities within us, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in our lives, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has an image of God and also its own approach to sexuality.  Robert Falconer calls them insiders.   IFS has two states Unblended -- this is when one is in a state of self  Unburdened -- this is when our parts are freed from their burndens.   Interpersonal Neurobiology -- pioneered by Daniel Siegel  Definition -- Interpersonal Neurobiology is not a separate discipline -- it's not something that would have its own academic department within a university, for example.  Rather, it is an interdisciplinary framework -- and that means that Interpersonal Neurobiology or IPNB for short, draws from many different disciplines -- many different approaches that have their own individual and unique rigorous approaches to studying phenomena relevant to well-being.   I'm very into IPNB -- taking a Master Class with Daniel Siegel right now.   We're going to get into Interpersonal Neurobiology and it's views on mental health and well being in Episode 92 of this podcast Closing Weekly emails  Special bonus podcast will be coming to you on Friday, March 25, 2022 -- the feast of the Annunciation, with an exciting announcement, this is just an extra podcast about a major effort that we are involved in at Souls and Hearts.  Dr. Gerry Crete will be joining me to discuss this with you.  So tune in then for all the new happenings at Souls and Hearts  Catholic Therapists and Grad Students --  I will be doing a free Zoom webinar at from 7:30 PM to 8:45 PM Eastern time on Saturday March 26, 2022 on Internal Family Systems and loving your neighbor  -- it's all about how understanding myself and others from an IFS perspective can help us love each other  -- any Catholic therapist or grad student in a mental health field is free to attend.  Email Patty Ellenberger, our office manager at admin@soulsandhearts.com for a registration link.   Dr. Gerry's Catholic Journeymen Community has relaunched within Souls and Hearts.  Men -- you are welcome to join a group of faithful Catholic men seeking restoration, wholeness, and integrity in areas of sexuality and relationship with God, self, and others. Catholic Journeymen is a safe space for men to share burdens, receive support, and be nourished by a distinctive program combining behavioral health science and Catholic spirituality. Check that out at soulsandhearts.com/catholic-journeymen.   Conversation Hours You are a listener to this podcast, and in that sense, you are with me.  I am also with you!  Remember, can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time for our regular conversation hours.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  Waiting list is open for The Resilient Catholics Community at Soulsandhearts.com/rcc for our June 2022  So much information there and videos.  Patron and Patroness      

MTR Podcasts
Katherine Phillips & William Christian III of Center for Neighborhood Innovation

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 42:14


About the guestsAs Property Management Coordinator, William Christian III is responsible for supporting the Property Management and Development teams with the day-to-day operations of the Hoen Lithographic Campus and other projects while maintaining consistent and seamless hospitality, business support, and technical experience for tenants and guests.  William brings over six years of experience in guest-facing and hospitality along with a background in architecture and real estate. Outside of the professional realm, William is also a self-published author of three and is currently working on his fourth publication. William obtained his Bachelors of Science in Architecture and Environmental Design at Morgan State University and is currently seeking his Masters in Real Estate Development at University of Maryland, College Park.  As Community Manager, Katherine Phillips focuses her attention on the Center for Neighborhood Innovation (CNI) at Hoen. Katherine most recently left the Office of National Collections at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, where she worked on promotional efforts for eight charitable funds. She has a B.A. in Global Sustainability and Religious Studies from the University of Virginia.About Center for Neighborhood Innovation (CNI)The CNI believes that connections drive innovation. By providing access to tailored facilities, shared resources, and interdisciplinary conversations, our shared workspace and innovation hub offers an environment where members can grow and collaborate on the common goal of addressing the primary issues facing distressed communities.At its core, the CNI is a collaborative workspace for mission-driven organizations. The advantage of a large, shared space is that we can gather a diverse community – non-profit and for-profit organizations, educational institutions and design firms, serving scientists and construction apprentices alike. This organizational diversity places the ideas, the capital, the strategic partners, and the technicians needed to solve local/global challenges in the same space.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episode:Hoen & CoTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

Cause for Joy Podcast
S2 E4: Eucharistic Revival with Bishop Robert Gruss

Cause for Joy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 46:32


"The Eucharist is 'the source and summit of the Christian life.'" (CCC 1324) This week we are joined by a very special guest, Bishop Robert Gruss! We ask him about his journey and love for the Eucharist. Bishop Gruss also shares his hopes for the Diocese with the Eucharistic revival that the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops are unfolding. You DON'T want to miss this! Have a topic you'd like us to discuss? Email us at: causeforjoy.official@gmail.com

Am I Not Here
9 Days for Life Novena 2022 - Day 9

Am I Not Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 8:56


As the Church in the United States prepares to commemorate the Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children, the Diocese of Metuchen invites the faithful to join in a prayerful novena for the protection of all life, from conception to natural death, as part of their local participation in the 9 Days for Life Novena. The 9 Days for Life Novena is prayed annually each January for the protection of human life. Each day's intention is accompanied by a short reflection and suggested actions to help build a culture of life. All the faithful of the Diocese of Metuchen are invited to join Jerry Wutkowski, Assistant Director of the Office of Communications and Public Relations and Co-Host of the diocesan podcast ‘Am I Not Here,' in praying this novena for the protection of the gift of life in our state, nation, and world. This resource is generously provided by the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and can be found at www.respectlife.org. Recordings of the novena will be made available daily from January 19 - 27, 2022 at www.diometuchen.org/aminothere.

Am I Not Here
9 Days for Life Novena 2022 - Day 8

Am I Not Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 6:36


As the Church in the United States prepares to commemorate the Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children, the Diocese of Metuchen invites the faithful to join in a prayerful novena for the protection of all life, from conception to natural death, as part of their local participation in the 9 Days for Life Novena.   The 9 Days for Life Novena is prayed annually each January for the protection of human life. Each day's intention is accompanied by a short reflection and suggested actions to help build a culture of life.   All the faithful of the Diocese of Metuchen are invited to join Jerry Wutkowski, Assistant Director of the Office of Communications and Public Relations and Co-Host of the diocesan podcast ‘Am I Not Here,' in praying this novena for the protection of the gift of life in our state, nation, and world.   This resource is generously provided by the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and can be found at www.respectlife.org.   Recordings of the novena will be made available daily from January 19 - 27, 2022 at www.diometuchen.org/aminothere.

Am I Not Here
9 Days for Life Novena 2022 - Day 7

Am I Not Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 7:18


As the Church in the United States prepares to commemorate the Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children, the Diocese of Metuchen invites the faithful to join in a prayerful novena for the protection of all life, from conception to natural death, as part of their local participation in the 9 Days for Life Novena. The 9 Days for Life Novena is prayed annually each January for the protection of human life. Each day's intention is accompanied by a short reflection and suggested actions to help build a culture of life. All the faithful of the Diocese of Metuchen are invited to join Jerry Wutkowski, Assistant Director of the Office of Communications and Public Relations and Co-Host of the diocesan podcast ‘Am I Not Here,' in praying this novena for the protection of the gift of life in our state, nation, and world. This resource is generously provided by the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and can be found at www.respectlife.org. Recordings of the novena will be made available daily from January 19 - 27, 2022 at www.diometuchen.org/aminothere.

Am I Not Here
9 Days for Life Novena 2022 - Day 6

Am I Not Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 6:37


As the Church in the United States prepares to commemorate the Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children, the Diocese of Metuchen invites the faithful to join in a prayerful novena for the protection of all life, from conception to natural death, as part of their local participation in the 9 Days for Life Novena.  The 9 Days for Life Novena is prayed annually each January for the protection of human life. Each day's intention is accompanied by a short reflection and suggested actions to help build a culture of life. All the faithful of the Diocese of Metuchen are invited to join Jerry Wutkowski, Assistant Director of the Office of Communications and Public Relations and Co-Host of the diocesan podcast ‘Am I Not Here,' in praying this novena for the protection of the gift of life in our state, nation, and world.  This resource is generously provided by the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and can be found at www.respectlife.org. Recordings of the novena will be made available daily from January 19 - 27, 2022 at www.diometuchen.org/aminothere.