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American weekly business magazine based in New York City

  • 1,124PODCASTS
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  • Jan 13, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about businessweek

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Latest podcast episodes about businessweek

Untold Stories
Crypto Narrative Drivers for 2022 with Scott Melker

Untold Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 48:26


My guest today is my friend, Scott Melker, the Wolf of All Streets. Scott is a trader, investor, and the host of the popular “The Wolf of All Streets Podcast,” the author of “The Wolf Den” Newsletter, and prolific writer and thought leader in the crypto space. He has been featured on Fox Business, in the New York Times, Forbes, Businessweek, The Wall St. Journal, Coindesk, CoinTelegraph, CNN, and much more. Prior to jumping down the Crypto rabbit hole, Scott Melker, also known as The Melker Project, had a 20-year music career and was a world-renowned producer and DJ. He has played alongside legends from nearly every musical genre, including Enrique Iglesias, Future, Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa, Crosby Stills & Nash, Neyo, Sheryl Crow, T.I., Jason Derulo, Public Enemy, Kanye West, DJ AM, Justin Timberlake, Rihanna, Steve Aoki, A-Trak, Lupe Fiasco, Prince Royce, J Balvin, Joey Montana and more. In our conversation we discuss the larger market conditions, the future of NFTs, growing an audience, and best practices for aspiring crypto traders and investors. We begin our conversation by discussing the broader market conditions. We discuss Bitcoin's current bearish divergence and the impact the Fed's tightening policies may have on the crypto markets. Scott did an excellent job at giving context of the current volatile conditions by asking the listeners to zoom out and understand we are still very early in the adoption curve of digital assets. One of the more important conversation topics was how for the first time crypto is considered by the broader investment community as an established asset class and how that changes the market dynamics for long term investors. Our conversation naturally transitions to advice on how to navigate the volatile market conditions, Scott shares a ton of actionable advice on how to tackle the volatility and why this could be a generational buying opportunity. Our next conversation topic centered around NFTs. Scott's unique experience has given him clear insights on the future applications of NFTs and the impact on creators. Scott emphasizes the need for creators to accrue 1,000 true fans to develop a loyal fan base and how NFTs give creators more ways to accrue those 1,000 true fans. The last portion of our discussion centered around how the digital asset space is evolving and what sectors we believe will be narrative drivers throughout 2022. Scott explains why he believes rollups and layer-2s will dominate the narrative. We also discuss why Bitcoin dominance may continue to decline as the digital asset space continues to mature. This conversation is full of alpha and actionable advice. Please enjoy my conversation with my friend, Scott Melker. -- ParaSwap: If you want to make a swap at the best price across the DeFi market, check out https://untoldstories.link/paraswap. ParaSwap's state-of-the-art algorithm beats the market price across all major DEXs and brings you the most optimized swaps with the best prices, and lowest slippage. -- This podcast is powered by Blockworks. For exclusive content and events that provide insights into the crypto and blockchain space, visit them at https://blockworks.co

The Boardroom Buzz Pest Control Podcast
Episode 79 — An Insider's View on Executive Leadership with John Byrne

The Boardroom Buzz Pest Control Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 86:09


Grab a beverage, and join the Boardroom conversation about boardroom conversations. John Byrne, former editor at both Fast Company and BusinessWeek, goes into detail on the three collaborative works he did with businessmen Morton Mandel, Jack Welch, and John Scully. The conversation kicks off into his immersive work with Mandel in the book “It's All About Who”. It's a book that keeps on giving, or at least gifting. From Paul, that is.  From befriending the books' subjects to his hours spent in the archives, John dives into the process of distilling their success.  He even shares the unquenchable trait he found between Mandel, Welch, Scully, and other successful businesspeople.  This chat pulls in lessons from outside the route-based service industry. From family business to ranking employees to implementing a factbook system, there is a lot to learn from this accomplished author, editor, and entrepreneur.  Co-Produced, Edited, and Mixed by Dylan Seals of Verbell.Ltd

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews
Alex Banayan on Unlocking the “Third Door” to Success

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 67:06


This episode of the podcast is a bit different. That's because in this podcast, I chat with Alex Banayan about his book The Third Door, the journey he went on in the process of writing it, and what he learned along the way. We'll get into the details in the interview, but Alex went on a seven-year quest to interview some of the world's brightest, most successful people in order to learn how they broke through in their respective fields. It all started with the common existential crisis of “what do I want to do with my life” and his research led him down a road filled with life-changing interviews with Bill Gates, Quincy Jones, Steve Wozniak, Lady Gaga, Warren Buffett, Maya Angelou, Steven Spielberg, Jane Goodall, Larry King, and more (and some wild stories). Now if you're wondering why I thought this was worthy of a podcast, many of my followers are entrepreneurs, people who want to succeed more in their careers, or people who want to improve themselves in general. So while this interview isn't directly fitness-related, I think you'll find it interesting and useful. In our discussion, Alex and I talk about . . . How he “hacked” The Price Is Right to raise funds for his book idea How he managed to secure big-time interviews The mindset commonalities he found among famous, successful people The difference between fearlessness and courage Social media and the importance and relativity of money And more . . . If you're not familiar with Alex, The Third Door has made him the youngest bestselling business author in American history, and the book is a number one international bestseller. He's been named to Forbes' 30 Under 30 list and Business Insider's “Most Powerful People Under 30,” and been featured in Fortune, CNBC, Businessweek, The Washington Post, MSNBC, Fox News, and NBC News. So if you want to hear some of Alex's wild stories from his journey and what he learned on his quest to study success, definitely check out this interview! Timestamps: 0:00 - Pre-order my new fitness book now for a chance to win over $13,000 in splendid swag: https://www.muscleforlifebook.com/ 7:07 - What is the premise of the book? 13:01 - How Alex hacked The Price Is Right 15:21 - How did you get interviews with famous people? 17:16 - How successful people treat business 20:14 - The difference between fearlessness and courage 26:12 - What have you found fulfilling and is there anything you thought would be fulfilling that hasn't been? 31:50 - What you think you want and what you really want may not be the same 42:45 - Who is the third door for? 44:05 - Dealing with setbacks 51:48 - The opposite of success isn't failure 53:32 - What types of mistakes are acceptable to you? Mentioned on the Show: Pre-order my new fitness book now for a chance to win over $13,000 in splendid swag: https://www.muscleforlifebook.com/ The Third Door: https://www.amazon.com/Third-Door-Uncover-Successful-Launched/dp/0804136661/?tag=mflweb-20 Alex Banayan's website: https://thirddoorbook.com/ Alex's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alexbanayan/

B-Schooled
Do MBA rankings matter?, part 1 of 2: B-Schooled episode 90

B-Schooled

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 15:50


Do MBA rankings matter? Are there real differences between the "top" schools and the next tier? The Stacy Blackman Consulting team had A LOT of thoughts on these topics, so over the course of two episodes we'll be covering what applicants should keep in mind when considering business school rankings, as well as what's most important to factor in when making decisions on where to apply.

Unlocking Your World of Creativity
Anne Michaud, Journalist and Author of "Why They Stay"

Unlocking Your World of Creativity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 15:11


In this episode, we talk with Anne Michaud, Author of "Why They Stay" As a leading political reporter for the Wall Street Journal, Anne Michaud covered Bill Clinton's 1996 re-election campaign, Anthony Weiner's 2005 mayoral bid, and Eliot Spitzer's rise and fall as New York's governor from 2006 to 2008. Few folks have had the front row seat to the spectacular fall from grace of these politicians and the women who endured the cataclysm with them. Which got her wondering--as so many of us have--why did most of these women stick it out--or stay for as long as they did? Were they simply doing the Stand By Your Man blues, or did they have other motivations? Why They Stay: Sex Scandals, Deals, and Hidden Agenda of Eight Political Wives is the result of her musings and her deeply researched and fascinating analysis. Anne chose to look at eight couples and explore the similarities between them -- how the women responded to the crisis and its aftermath. These women made bold decisions that revealed their own agendas.  · Hillary & Bill Clinton: One masterful decision launched her political career · Jackie & John F. Kennedy: Coping in bed and all the way to the bank · Eleanor & Franklin D. Roosevelt: A lifeless marriage sparks a social champion · Marion Stein & Jeremy Thorpe: Riding out British scandal to provide for her sons · Wendy & David Vitter: Married to the Party versus married to a man · Silda Wall & Elliot Spitzer: Real-life drama spawns TV show The Good Wife · Huma Abedin & Anthony Weiner: How to win against a man and the Media · Melania & Donald Trump: A foreigner's desire to live the American dream Anne found some interesting correlations between all of them and Elizabeth Woodville, the "White Queen" of English history. A widow, she married Edward IV for love, endured his promiscuity to stay and wield power, and ultimately, outlasted him to build the Tudor legacy through engineering her daughter's marriage to Edward's successor. Anne looked at 5 factors in her books­--how deeply are these women committed to being the family emotional caretaker, how patriarchal values drive their actions, how motivated are they about building a family legacy, the degree to which financial and emotional security drives their actions, and do they have a sense of patriotism that inspires them to overlook the misdeeds of their husband for the greater good. She assigned each a "White Queen Quotient" measured against Woodville's iconic role as the ultimate political spouse in the face of scandalous male behavior. While we as spectators can only speculate about what drives them, Why They Stay makes a great case for what causes each of these women to play out their roles as stay-beyond-the-embarrassment wives. If Hillary Clinton had left her marriage, she might only be known as the spurned wife of a retired politician. Instead, she became the first woman to run for U.S. president on a major party ticket, a U.S. Senator and Secretary of State. These political wives aren't powerless pawns. They are shrewder than you expect. Why They Stay pulls back the curtain to reveal why women throughout history stand by their man...for better and for worse. In addition to her reportage at the Wall Street Journal, Anne previously wrote a nationally syndicated op-ed column for Newsday from 2008 to 2018. She has won more than 25 writing and reporting awards and has twice been named "Columnist of the Year," by the New York News Publishers Association and the New York State Associated Press Association. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, Newsweek, BusinessWeek.com, Crain's NY Business, Cincinnati Magazine and more. Anne has appeared on numerous television and radio programs, including WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show, NY1's Reporters' Roundtable, and Fox 5 News WNYW....

Everyday MBA
How Transcender Brands Change the Game

Everyday MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 20:00


Stan Bernard discusses his book "Brands Don't Win" and how today's must successful brands transcend the typical brand game to define new markets and overcome their competition. Stan is a Senior Fellow at The Wharton School and you've seen him in places like the Wall Street Journal and Businessweek.  Host, Kevin Craine Do you want to be a guest?

Earl Stewart on Cars
01.01.2022 - The Best of Earl on Cars w/ Mystery Shop of Braman Mini

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 120:05


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Thunder visits a local Mini dealer to see if he can get a good deal on a new Mini Cooper Clubman. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Earl Stewart on Cars
01.01.2022 - The Best of Earl on Cars w/ Mystery Shop of Braman Mini

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 119:49


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Thunder visits a local Mini dealer to see if he can get a good deal on a new Mini Cooper Clubman. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Geeks Geezers and Googlization Podcast
Modern HR is not about HR

Geeks Geezers and Googlization Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 45:07


Modern HR is not about HR, according to the “father of modern HR,” Dave Ulrich. Dave has eloquently described the major stumbling block in HR's pursuit of change and leadership: HR is not about HR!  For far too long HR has been clamoring that it wants a seat at the table. Dave's response: "If HR isn't at the table [in 2021,] you don't belong in HR!" So then ...what is HR about? Where does it belong? Why should a CEO rely on HR in the first place? Start by asking: What does HR contribute?  HR is about contributing value to the marketplace. It's about making sure you have the right talent in the right places in the right culture. It's about leadership. These are just a few of the highlights you'll hear! Few words were minced and truths were told about why HR is not about HR and what role it must be playing. Grab a pen and paper (or your favorite digital device) because you'll definitely want to jot down a few notes. Then click here for this captivating interview with Thinkers 360 Top 5 HR Global Thought Leader Dave Ulrich. Dave is ranked as the #1 management guru by Business Week, profiled by Fast Company as one of the world's top 10 creative people in business, a top 5 coach in Forbes, and recognized on Thinkers50 as one of the world's leading business thinkers. Dave has written 30 books and over 200 articles. It's no surprise that he's been called the “HR thought leader of the decade.”

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaching the Coding Gates with Anil Dash

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:03


About AnilAnil Dash is the CEO of Glitch, the friendly developer community where coders collaborate to create and share millions of web apps. He is a recognized advocate for more ethical tech through his work as an entrepreneur and writer. He serves as a board member for organizations like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the leading nonprofit defending digital privacy and expression, Data & Society Research Institute, which researches the cutting edge of tech's impact on society, and The Markup, the nonprofit investigative newsroom that pushes for tech accountability. Dash was an advisor to the Obama White House's Office of Digital Strategy, served for a decade on the board of Stack Overflow, the world's largest community for coders, and today advises key startups and non-profits including the Lower East Side Girls Club, Medium, The Human Utility, DonorsChoose and Project Include.As a writer and artist, Dash has been a contributing editor and monthly columnist for Wired, written for publications like The Atlantic and Businessweek, co-created one of the first implementations of the blockchain technology now known as NFTs, had his works exhibited in the New Museum of Contemporary Art, and collaborated with Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda on one of the most popular Spotify playlists of 2018. Dash has also been a keynote speaker and guest in a broad range of media ranging from the Obama Foundation Summit to SXSW to Desus and Mero's late-night show.Links: Glitch: https://glitch.com Web.dev: https://web.dev Glitch Twitter: https://twitter.com/glitch Anil Dash Twitter: https://twitter.com/anildash TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is a little bit off the beaten path from the cloud infrastructure types I generally drag, kicking and screaming, onto the show. If we take a look at the ecosystem and where it's going, it's clear that in the future, not everyone who wants to build a business, or a tool, or even an application is going to necessarily spring fully-formed into the world from the forehead of some God, knowing how to code. And oh, “I'm going to go to a boot camp for four months to learn how to do it first,” is increasingly untenable. I don't know if you would call it low-code or not. But that's how it feels. My guest today is Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch. Anil, thank you for joining me.Anil: Thanks so much for having me.Corey: So, let's get the important stuff out of the way first, since I have a long-standing history of mispronouncing the company Twitch as ‘Twetch,' I should probably do the same thing here. So, what is Gletch? And what does it do?Anil: Glitch is, at its simplest, a tool that lets you build a full-stack app in your web browser in about 30 seconds. And, you know, for your community, your audience, it's also this ability to create and deploy code instantly on a full-stack server with no concern for deploy, or DevOps, or provisioning a container, or any of those sort of concerns. And what it is for the users is, honestly, a community. They're like, “I looked at this app that was on Glitch; I thought it was cool; I could do what we call [remixing 00:02:03].” Which is to kind of fork that app, a running app, make a couple edits, and all of a sudden live at a real URL on the web, my app is running with exactly what I built. And that's something that has been—I think, just captured a lot of people's imagination to now where they've built over 12 or 15 million apps on the platform.Corey: You describe it somewhat differently than I would, and given that I tend to assume that people who create and run successful businesses don't generally tend to do it without thought, I'm not quite, I guess, insufferable enough to figure out, “Oh, well, I thought about this for ten seconds, therefore I've solved a business problem that you have been needling at for years.” But when I look at Glitch, I would describe it as something different than the way that you describe it. I would call it a web-based IDE for low-code applications and whatnot, and you never talk about it that way. Everything I can see there describes it talks about friendly creators, and community tied to it. Why is that?Anil: You're not wrong from the conventional technologist's point of view. I—sufficient vintage; I was coding in Visual Basic back in the '90s and if you squint, you can see that influence on Glitch today. And so I don't reject that description, but part of it is about the audience we're speaking to, which is sort of a next generation of creators. And I think importantly, that's not just age, right, but that could be demographic, that can be just sort of culturally, wherever you're at. And what we look at is who's making the most interesting stuff on the internet and in the industry, and they tend to be grounded in broader culture, whether they're on, you know, Instagram, or TikTok, or, you know, whatever kind of influencer, you want to point at—YouTube.And those folks, they think of themselves as creators first and they think of themselves as participating in the community first and then the tool sort of follow. And I think one of the things that's really striking is, if you look at—we'll take YouTube as an example because everyone's pretty familiar with it—they have a YouTube Creator Studio. And it is a very rich and deep tool. It does more than, you know, you would have had iMovie, or Final Cut Pro doing, you know, 10 or 15 years ago, incredibly advanced stuff. And those [unintelligible 00:04:07] use it every day, but nobody goes to YouTube and says, “This is a cloud-based nonlinear editor for video production, and we target cinematographers.” And if they did, they would actually narrow their audience and they would limit what their impact is on the world.And so similarly, I think we look at that for Glitch where the social object, the central thing that people organize around a Glitch is an app, not code. And that's this really kind of deep and profound idea, which is that everybody can understand an app. Everybody has an idea for an app. You know, even the person who's, “Ah, I'm not technical,” or, “I'm not really into technology,” they're like, “But you know what? If I could make an app, I would make this.”And so we think a lot about that creative impulse. And the funny thing is, that is a common thread between somebody that literally just got on the internet for the first time and somebody who has been doing cloud deploys for as long as there's been a cloud to deploy to, or somebody has been coding for decades. No matter who you are, you have that place that is starting from what's the experience I want to build, the app I want to build? And so I think that's where there's that framing. But it's also been really useful, in that if you're trying to make a better IDE in the cloud and a better text editor, and there are multiple trillion-dollar companies that [laugh] are creating products in that category, I don't think you're going to win. On the other hand, if you say, “This is more fun, and cooler, and has a better design, and feels better,” I think we could absolutely win in a walk away compared to trillion-dollar companies trying to be cool.Corey: I think that this is an area that has a few players in it could definitely stand to benefit by having more there. My big fear is not that AWS is going to launch stuff in your space and drive you out of business; I think that is a somewhat naive approach. I'm more concerned that they're going to try to launch something in your space, give it a dumb name, fail that market and appropriately, not understand who it's for and set the entire idea back five years. That is, in some cases, it seems like their modus operandi for an awful lot of new markets.Anil: Yeah, I mean, that's not an uncommon problem in any category that's sort of community driven. So, you know, back in the day, I worked on building blogging tools at the beginning of this, sort of, social media era, and we worried about that a lot. We had built some of the first early tools, Movable Type, and TypePad, and these were what were used to launch, like, Gawker and Huffington Post and all the, sort of, big early sites. And we had been doing it a couple years—and then at that time, major player—AOL came in, and they launched their own AOL blog service, and we were, you know, quaking in our boots. I remember just being kind of like, pit in your stomach, “Oh, my gosh. This is going to devastate the category.”And as it turns out, people were smart, and they have taste, and they can tell. And the domain that we're in is not one that is about raw computing power or raw resources that you can bring to bear so much as it is about can you get people to connect together, collaborate together, and feel like they're in a place where they want to make something and they want to share it with other people? And I mean, we've never done a single bit of advertising for Glitch. There's never been any paid acquisition. There's never done any of those things. And we go up against, broadly in the space, people that have billboards and they buy out all the ads of the airport and, you know, all the other kind of things we see—Corey: And they do the typical enterprise thing where they spend untold millions in acquiring the real estate to advertise on, and then about 50 cents on the message, from the looks of it. It's, wow, you go to all this trouble and expense to get something in front of me, and after all of that to get my attention, you don't have anything interesting to say?Anil: Right.Corey: [crosstalk 00:07:40] inverse of that.Anil: [crosstalk 00:07:41] it doesn't work.Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's brand awareness. I love that game. Ugh.Anil: I was a CIO, and not once in my life did I ever make a purchasing decision based on who was sponsoring a golf tournament. It never happened, right? Like, I never made a call on a database platform because of a poster that was up at, you know, San Jose Airport. And so I think that's this thing that developers in particular, have really good BS filters, and you can sort of see through.Corey: What I have heard about the airport advertising space—and I but a humble cloud economist; I don't know if this is necessarily accurate or not—but if you have a company like Accenture, for example, that advertises on airport billboards, they don't even bother to list their website. If you go to their website, it turns out that there's no shopping cart function. I cannot add ‘one consulting' to my cart and make a purchase.Anil: “Ten pounds of consult, please.”Corey: Right? I feel like the primary purpose there might very well be that when someone presents to your board and says, “All right, we've had this conversation with Accenture.” The response is not, “Who?” It's a brand awareness play, on some level. That said, you say you don't do a bunch traditional advertising, but honestly, I feel like you advertise—more successfully—than I do at The Duckbill Group, just by virtue of having a personality running the company, in your case.Now, your platform is for the moment, slightly larger than mine, but that's okay,k I have ambition and a tenuous grasp of reality and I'm absolutely going to get there one of these days. But there is something to be said for someone who has a track record of doing interesting things and saying interesting things, pulling a, “This is what I do and this is how I do it.” It almost becomes a personality-led marketing effort to some degree, doesn't it?Anil: I'm a little mindful of that, right, where I think—so a little bit of context and history: Glitch as a company is actually 20 years old. The product is only a few years old, but we were formerly called Fog Creek Software, co-founded by Joel Spolsky who a lot of folks will know from back in the day as Joel on Software blog, was extremely influential. And that company, under leadership of Joel and his co-founder Michael Pryor spun out Stack Overflow, they spun out Trello. He had created, you know, countless products over the years so, like, their technical and business acumen is off the charts.And you know, I was on the board of Stack Overflow from, really, those first days and until just recently when they sold, and you know, you get this insight into not just how do you build a developer community that is incredibly valuable, but also has a place in the ecosystem that is unique and persists over time. And I think that's something that was very, very instructive. And so when it came in to lead Glitch I, we had already been a company with a, sort of, visible founder. Joel was as well known as a programmer as it got in the world?Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: And my public visibility is different, right? I, you know, I was a working coder for many years, but I don't think that's what people see me on social media has. And so I think, I've been very mindful where, like, I'm thrilled to use the platform I have to amplify what was created on a Glitch. But what I note is it's always, “This person made this thing. This person made this app and it had this impact, and it got these results, or made this difference for them.”And that's such a different thing than—I don't ever talk about, “We added syntax highlighting in the IDE and the editor in the browser.” It's just never it right. And I think there are people that—I love that work. I mean, I love having that conversation with our team, but I think that's sort of the difference is my enthusiasm is, like, people are making stuff and it's cool. And that sort of is my lens on the whole world.You know, somebody makes whatever a great song, a great film, like, these are all things that are exciting. And the Glitch community's creations sort of feel that way. And also, we have other visible people on the team. I think of our sort of Head of Community, Jenn Schiffer, who's a very well known developer and her right. And you know, tons of people have read her writing and seen her talks over the years.And she and I talk about this stuff; I think she sort of feels the same way, which is, she's like, “If I were, you know, being hired by some cloud platform to show the latest primitives that they've deployed behind an API,” she's like, “I'd be miserable. Like, I don't want to do that in the world.” And I sort of feel the same way. But if you say, “This person who never imagined they would make an app that would have this kind of impact.” And they're going to, I think of just, like, the last couple of weeks, some of the apps we've seen where people are—it could be [unintelligible 00:11:53]. It could be like, “We made a Slack bot that finally gets this reporting into the right channel [laugh] inside our company, but it was easy enough that I could do it myself without asking somebody to create it even though I'm not technically an engineer.” Like, that's incredible.The other extreme, we have people that are PhDs working on machine learning that are like, “At the end of the day, I don't want to be responsible for managing and deploying. [laugh]. I go home, and so the fact that I can do this in create is really great.” I think that energy, I mean, I feel the same way. I still build stuff all the time, and I think that's something where, like, you can't fake that and also, it's bigger than any one person or one public persona or social media profile, or whatever. I think there's this bigger idea. And I mean, to that point, there are millions of developers on Glitch and they've created well over ten million apps. I am not a humble person, but very clearly, that's not me, you know? [laugh].Corey: I have the same challenge to it's, effectively, I have now a 12 employee company and about that again contractors for various specialized functions, and the common perception, I think, is that mostly I do all the stuff that we talk about in public, and the other 11 folks sort of sit around and clap as I do it. Yeah, that is only four of those people's jobs as it turns out. There are more people doing work here. It's challenging, on some level, to get away from the myth of the founder who is the person who has the grand vision and does all the work and sees all these things.Anil: This industry loves the myth of the great man, or the solo legend, or the person in their bedroom is a genius, the lone genius, and it's a lie. It's a lie every time. And I think one of the things that we can do, especially in the work at Glitch, but I think just in my work overall with my whole career is to dismantle that myth. I think that would be incredibly valuable. It just would do a service for everybody.But I mean, that's why Glitch is the way it is. It's a collaboration platform. Our reference points are, you know, we look at Visual Studio and what have you, but we also look at Google Docs. Why is it that people love to just send a link to somebody and say, “Let's edit this thing together and knock out a, you know, a memo together or whatever.” I think that idea we're going to collaborate together, you know, we saw that—like, I think of Figma, which is a tool that I love. You know, I knew Dylan when he was a teenager and watching him build that company has been so inspiring, not least because design was always supposed to be collaborative.And then you think about we're all collaborating together in design every day. We're all collaborating together and writing in Google Docs—or whatever we use—every day. And then coding is still this kind of single-player game. Maybe at best, you throw something over the wall with a pull request, but for the most part, it doesn't feel like you're in there with somebody. Certainly doesn't feel like you're creating together in the same way that when you're jamming on these other creative tools does. And so I think that's what's been liberating for a lot of people is to feel like it's nice to have company when you're making something.Corey: Periodically, I'll talk to people in the AWS ecosystem who for some reason appear to believe that Jeff Barr builds a lot of these services himself then writes blog posts about them. And it's, Amazon does not break out how many of its 1.2 million or so employees work at AWS, but I'm guessing it's more than five people. So yeah, Jeff probably only wrote a dozen of those services himself; the rest are—Anil: That's right. Yeah.Corey: —done by service teams and the rest. It's easy to condense this stuff and I'm as guilty of it as anyone. To my mind, a big company is one that has 200 people in it. That is not apparently something the world agrees with.Anil: Yeah, it's impossible to fathom an organization of hundreds of thousands or a million-plus people, right? Like, our brains just aren't wired to do it. And I think so we reduce things to any given Jeff, whether that's Barr or Bezos, whoever you want to point to.Corey: At one point, I think they had something like more men named Jeff on their board than they did women, which—Anil: Yeah. Mm-hm.Corey: —all right, cool. They've fixed that and now they have a Dave problem.Anil: Yeah [unintelligible 00:15:37] say that my entire career has been trying to weave out of that dynamic, whether it was a Dave, a Mike, or a Jeff. But I think that broader sort of challenge is this—that is related to the idea of there being this lone genius. And I think if we can sort of say, well, creation always happens in community. It always happens influenced by other things. It is always—I mean, this is why we talk about it in Glitch.When you make an app, you don't start from a blank slate, you start from a working app that's already on the platform and you're remix it. And there was a little bit of a ego resistance by some devs years ago when they first encountered that because [unintelligible 00:16:14] like, “No, no, no, I need a blank page, you know, because I have this brilliant idea that nobody's ever thought of before.” And I'm like, “You know, the odds are you'll probably start from something pretty close to something that's built before.” And that enabler of, “There's nothing new under the sun, and you're probably remixing somebody else's thoughts,” I think that sort of changed the tenor of the community. And I think that's something where like, I just see that across the industry.When people are open, collaborative, like even today, a great example is web browsers. The folks making web browsers at Google, Apple, Mozilla are pretty collaborative. They actually do share ideas together. I mean, I get a window into that because they actually all use Glitch to do test cases on different bugs and stuff for them, but you see, one Glitch project will add in folks from Mozilla and folks from Apple and folks from the Chrome team and Google, and they're like working together and you're, like—you kind of let down the pretense of there being this secret genius that's only in this one organization, this one group of people, and you're able to make something great, and the web is greater than all of them. And the proof, you know, for us is that Glitch is not a new idea. Heroku wanted to do what we're doing, you know, a dozen years ago.Corey: Yeah, everyone wants to build Heroku except the company that acquired Heroku, and here we are. And now it's—I was waiting for the next step and it just seemed like it never happened.Anil: But you know when I talked to those folks, they were like, “Well, we didn't have Docker, and we didn't have containerization, and on the client side, we didn't have modern browsers that could do this kind of editing experience, all this kind of thing.” So, they let their editor go by the wayside and became mostly deploy platform. And—but people forget, for the first year or two Heroku had an in-browser editor, and an IDE and, you know, was constrained by the tech at the time. And I think that's something where I'm like, we look at that history, we look at, also, like I said, these browser manufacturers working together were able to get us to a point where we can make something better.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I do have a question for you about the nuts and bolts behind the scenes of Glitch and how it works. If I want to remix something on Glitch, I click the button, a couple seconds later it's there and ready for me to start kicking the tires on, which tells me a few things. One, it is certainly not using CloudFormation to provision it because I didn't have time to go and grab a quick snack and take a six hour nap. So, it apparently is running on computers somewhere. I have it on good authority that this is not just run by people who are very fast at assembling packets by hand. What does the infrastructure look like?Anil: It's on AWS. Our first year-plus of prototyping while we were sort of in beta and early stages of Glitch was getting that time to remix to be acceptable. We still wish it were faster; I mean, that's always the way but, you know, when we started, it was like, yeah, you did sit there for a minute and watch your cursor spin. I mean, what's happening behind the scenes, we're provisioning a new container, standing up a full stack, bringing over the code from the Git repo on the previous project, like, we're doing a lot of work, lift behind the scenes, and we went through every possible permutation of what could make that experience be good enough. So, when we start talking about prototyping, we're at five-plus, almost six years ago when we started building the early versions of what became Glitch, and at that time, we were fairly far along in maturity with Docker, but there was not a clear answer about the use case that we're building for.So, we experimented with Docker Swarm. We went pretty far down that road; we spent a good bit of time there, it failed in ways that were both painful and slow to fix. So, that was great. I don't recommend that. In fairness, we have a very unusual use case, right? So, Glitch now, if you talk about ten million containers on Glitch, no two of those apps are the same and nobody builds an orchestration infrastructure assuming that every single machine is a unique snowflake.Corey: Yeah, massively multi-tenant is not really a thing that people know.Anil: No. And also from a security posture Glitch—if you look at it as a security expert—it is a platform allowing anonymous users to execute arbitrary code at scale. That's what we do. That's our job. And so [laugh], you know, so your threat model is very different. It's very different.I mean, literally, like, you can go to Glitch and build an app, running a full-stack app, without even logging in. And the reason we enable that is because we see kids in classrooms, they're learning to code for the first time, they want to be able to remix a project and they don't even have an email address. And so that was about enabling something different, right? And then, similarly, you know, we explored Kubernetes—because of course you do; it's the default choice here—and some of the optimizations, again, if you go back several years ago, being able to suspend a project and then quickly sort of rehydrate it off disk into a running app was not a common use case, and so it was not optimized. And so we couldn't offer that experience because what we do with Glitch is, if you haven't used an app in five minutes, and you're not a paid member, who put that app to sleep. And that's just a reasonable—Corey: Uh, “Put the app to sleep,” as in toddler, or, “Put the app to sleep,” as an ill puppy.Anil: [laugh]. Hopefully, the former, but when we were at our worst and scaling the ladder. But that is that thing; it's like we had that moment that everybody does, which is that, “Oh, no. This worked.” That was a really scary moment where we started seeing app creation ramping up, and number of edits that people were making in those apps, you know, ramping up, which meant deploys for us ramping up because we automatically deploy as you edit on Glitch. And so, you know, we had that moment where just—well, as a startup, you always hope things go up into the right, and then they do and then you're not sleeping for a long time. And we've been able to get it back under control.Corey: Like, “Oh, no, I'm not succeeding.” Followed immediately by, “Oh, no, I'm succeeding.” And it's a good problem to have.Anil: Exactly. Right, right, right. The only thing worse than failing is succeeding sometimes, in terms of stress levels. And organizationally, you go through so much; technically, you go through so much. You know, we were very fortunate to have such thoughtful technical staff to navigate these things.But it was not obvious, and it was not a sort of this is what you do off the shelf. And our architecture was very different because people had looked at—like, I look at one of our inspirations was CodePen, which is a great platform and the community love them. And their front end developers are, you know, always showing off, “Here's this cool CSS thing I figured out, and it's there.” But for the most part, they're publishing static content, so architecturally, they look almost more like a content management system than an app-running platform. And so we couldn't learn anything from them about our scaling our architecture.We could learn from them on community, and they've been an inspiration there, but I think that's been very, very different. And then, conversely, if we looked at the Herokus of the world, or all those sort of easy deploy, I think Amazon has half a dozen different, like, “This will be easier,” kind of deploy tools. And we looked at those, and they were code-centric not app-centric. And that led to fundamentally different assumptions in user experience and optimization.And so, you know, we had to chart our own path and I think it was really only the last year or so that we were able to sort of turn the corner and have high degree of confidence about, we know what people build on Glitch and we know how to support and scale it. And that unlocked this, sort of, wave of creativity where there are things that people want to create on the internet but it had become too hard to do so. And the canonical example I think I was—those of us are old enough to remember FTPing up a website—Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: —right—to Geocities, or whatever your shared web host was, we remember how easy that was and how much creativity was enabled by that.Corey: Yes, “How easy it was,” quote-unquote, for those of us who spent years trying to figure out passive versus active versus ‘what is going on?' As far as FTP transfers. And it turns out that we found ways to solve for that, mostly, but it became something a bit different and a bit weird. But here we are.Anil: Yeah, there was definitely an adjustment period, but at some point, if you'd made an HTML page in notepad on your computer, and you could, you know, hurl it at a server somewhere, it would kind of run. And when you realize, you look at the coding boot camps, or even just to, like, teach kids to code efforts, and they're like, “Day three. Now, you've gotten VS Code and GitHub configured. We can start to make something.” And you're like, “The whole magic of this thing getting it to light up. You put it in your web browser, you're like, ‘That's me. I made this.'” you know, north star for us was almost, like, you go from zero to hello world in a minute. That's huge.Corey: I started participating one of those boot camps a while back to help. Like, the first thing I changed about the curriculum was, “Yeah, we're not spending time teaching people how to use VI in, at that point, the 2010s.” It was, that was a fun bit of hazing for those of us who were becoming Unix admins and knew that wherever we'd go, we'd find VI on a server, but here in the real world, there are better options for that.Anil: This is rank cruelty.Corey: Yeah, I mean, I still use it because 20 years of muscle memory doesn't go away overnight, but I don't inflict that on others.Anil: Yeah. Well, we saw the contrast. Like, we worked with, there's a group called Mouse here in New York City that creates the computer science curriculum for the public schools in the City of New York. And there's a million kids in public school in New York City, right, and they all go through at least some of this CS education. [unintelligible 00:24:49] saw a lot of work, a lot of folks in the tech community here did. It was fantastic.And yet they were still doing this sort of very conceptual, theoretical. Here's how a professional developer would set up their environment. Quote-unquote, “Professional.” And I'm like, you know what really sparks kids' interests? If you tell them, “You can make a page and it'll be live and you can send it to your friend. And you can do it right now.”And once you've sparked that creative impulse, you can't stop them from doing the rest. And I think what was wild was kids followed down that path. Some of the more advanced kids got to high school and realized they want to experiment with, like, AI and ML, right? And they started playing with TensorFlow. And, you know, there's collaboration features in Glitch where you can do real-time editing and a code with this. And they went in the forum and they were asking questions, that kind of stuff. And the people answering their questions were the TensorFlow team at Google. [laugh]. Right?Corey: I remember those days back when everything seemed smaller and more compact, [unintelligible 00:25:42] but almost felt like a balkanization of community—Anil: Yeah.Corey: —where now it's oh, have you joined that Slack team, and I'm looking at this and my machine is screaming for more RAM. It's, like, well, it has 128 gigs in it. Shouldn't that be enough? Not for Slack.Anil: Not for chat. No, no, no. Chat is demanding.Corey: Oh, yeah, that and Chrome are basically trying to out-ram each other. But if you remember the days of volunteering as network staff on Freenode when you could basically gather everyone for a given project in the entire stack on the same IRC network. And that doesn't happen anymore.Anil: And there's something magic about that, right? It's like now the conversations are closed off in a Slack or Discord or what have you, but to have a sort of open forum where people can talk about this stuff, what's wild about that is, for a beginner, a teenage creator who's learning this stuff, the idea that the people who made the AI, I can talk to, they're alive still, you know what I mean? Like, yeah, they're not even that old. But [laugh]. They think of this is something that's been carved in stone for 100 years.And so it's so inspiring to them. And then conversely, talking to the TensorFlow team, they made these JavaScript examples, like, tensorflow.js was so accessible, you know? And they're like, “This is the most heartwarming thing. Like, we think about all these enterprise use cases or whatever. But like, kids wanting to make stuff, like recognize their friends' photo, and all the vision stuff they're doing around [unintelligible 00:26:54] out there,” like, “We didn't know this is why we do it until we saw this is why we do it.”And that part about connecting the creative impulse from both, like, the most experienced, advanced coders at the most august tech companies that exist, as well as the most rank beginners in public schools, who might not even have a computer at home, saying that's there—if you put those two things together, and both of those are saying, “I'm a coder; I'm able to create; I can make something on the internet, and I can share it with somebody and be inspired by it,” like, that is… that's as good as it gets.Corey: There's something magic in being able to reach out to people who built this stuff. And honestly—you shouldn't feel this way, but you do—when I was talking to the folks who wrote the things I was working on, it really inspires you to ask better questions. Like when I'm talking to Dr. Venema, the author of Postfix and I'm trying to figure out how this thing works, well, I know for a fact that I will not be smarter than he is at basically anything in that entire universe, and maybe most beyond that, as well, however, I still want to ask a question in such a way that doesn't make me sound like a colossal dumbass. So, it really inspires you—Anil: It motivates you.Corey: Oh, yeah. It inspires you to raise your question bar up a bit, of, “I am trying to do x. I expect y to happen. Instead, z is happening as opposed to what I find the documentation that”—oh, as I read the documentation, discover exactly what I messed up, and then I delete the whole email. It's amazing how many of those things you never send because when constructing a question the right way, you can help yourself.Anil: Rubber ducking against your heroes.Corey: Exactly.Anil: I mean, early in my career, I'd gone through sort of licensing mishap on a project that later became open-source, and sort of stepped it in and as you do, and unprompted, I got an advice email from Dan Bricklin, who invented the spreadsheet, he invented VisiCalc, and he had advice and he was right. And it was… it was unreal. I was like, this guy's one of my heroes. I grew up reading about his work, and not only is he, like, a living, breathing person, he's somebody that can have the kindness to reach out and say, “Yeah, you know, have you tried this? This might work.”And it's, this isn't, like, a guy who made an app. This is the guy who made the app for which the phrase killer app was invented, right? And, you know, we've since become friends and I think a lot of his inspiration and his work. And I think it's one of the things it's like, again, if you tell somebody starting out, the people who invented the fundamental tools of the digital era, are still active, still building stuff, still have advice to share, and you can connect with them, it feels like a cheat code. It feels like a superpower, right? It feels like this impossible thing.And I think about like, even for me, the early days of the web, view source, which is still buried in our browser somewhere. And you can see the code that makes the page, it felt like getting away with something. “You mean, I can just look under the hood and see how they made this page and then I can do it too?” I think we forget how radical that is—[unintelligible 00:29:48] radical open-source in general is—and you see it when, like, you talk to young creators. I think—you know, I mean, Glitch obviously is used every day by, like, people at Microsoft and Google and the New York Timesor whatever, like, you know, the most down-the-road, enterprise developers, but I think a lot about the new creators and the people who are learning, and what they tell me a lot is the, like, “Oh, so I made this app, but what do I have to do to put it on the internet?”I'm like, “It already is.” Like, as soon as you create it, that URL was live, it all works. And their, like, “But isn't there, like, an app store I have to ask? Isn't there somebody I have to get permission to publish this from? Doesn't somebody have to approve it?”And you realize they've grown up with whether it was the app stores on their phones, or the cartridges in their Nintendo or, you know, whatever it was, they had always had this constraint on technology. It wasn't something you make; it's something that is given to you, you know, handed down from on high. And I think that's the part that animates me and the whole team, the community, is this idea of, like, I geek out about our infrastructure. I love that we're doing deploys constantly, so fast, all the time, and I love that we've taken the complexity away, but the end of the day, the reason why we do it, is you can have somebody just sort of saying, I didn't realize there was a place I could just make something put it in front of, maybe, millions of people all over the world and I don't have to ask anybody permission and my idea can matter as much as the thing that's made by the trillion-dollar company.Corey: It's really neat to see, I guess, the sense of spirit and soul that arises from a smaller, more, shall we say, soulful company. No disparagement meant toward my friends at AWS and other places. It's just, there's something that you lose when you get to a certain point of scale. Like, I don't ever have to have a meeting internally and discuss things, like, “Well, does this thing that we're toying with doing violate antitrust law?” That is never been on my roadmap of things I have to even give the slightest crap about.Anil: Right, right? You know, “What does the investor relations person at a retirement fund think about the feature that we shipped?” Is not a question that we have to answer. There's this joy in also having community that sort of has come along with us, right? So, we talk a lot internally about, like, how do we make sure Glitch stays weird? And, you know, the community sort of supports that.Like, there's no reason logically that our logo should be the emoji of two fish. But that kind of stuff of just, like, it just is. We don't question it anymore. I think that we're very lucky. But also that we are part of an ecosystem. I also am very grateful where, like… yeah, that folks at Google use Glitch as part of their daily work when they're explaining a new feature in Chrome.Like, if you go to web.dev and their dev portal teaches devs how to code, all the embedded examples go to these Glitch apps that are running, showing running code is incredible. When we see the Stripe team building examples of, like, “Do you want to use this new payment API that we made? Well, we have a Glitch for you.” And literally every day, they ship one that sort of goes and says, “Well, if you just want to use this new Stripe feature, you just remix this thing and it's instantly running on Glitch.”I mean, those things are incredible. So like, I'm very grateful that the biggest companies and most influential companies in the industry have embraced it. So, I don't—yeah, I don't disparage them at all, but I think that ability to connect to the person who'd be like, “I just want to do payments. I've never heard of Stripe.”Corey: Oh yeah.Anil: And we have this every day. They come into Glitch, and they're just like, I just wanted to take credit cards. I didn't know there's a tool to do that.Corey: “I was going to build it myself,” and everyone shrieks, “No, no. Don't do that. My God.” Yeah. Use one of their competitors, fine,k but building it yourself is something a lunatic would do.Anil: Exactly. Right, right. And I think we forget that there's only so much attention people can pay, there's only so much knowledge they have.Corey: Everything we say is new to someone. That's why I always go back to assuming no one's ever heard of me, and explain the basics of what I do and how I do it, periodically. It's, no one has done all the mandatory reading. Who knew?Anil: And it's such a healthy exercise to, right, because I think we always have that kind of beginner's mindset about what Glitch is. And in fairness, I understand why. Like, there have been very experienced developers that have said, “Well, Glitch looks too colorful. It looks like a toy.” And that we made a very intentional choice at masking—like, we're doing the work under the hood.And you can drop down into a terminal and you can do—you can run whatever build script you want. You can do all that stuff on Glitch, but that's not what we put up front and I think that's this philosophy about the role of the technology versus the people in the ecosystem.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to, I guess, explain what Glitch is and how you view it. If people want to learn more about it, about your opinions, et cetera. Where can they find you?Anil: Sure. glitch.com is easiest place, and hopefully that's a something you can go and a minute later, you'll have a new app that you built that you want to share. And, you know, we're pretty active on all social media, you know, Twitter especially with Glitch: @glitch. I'm on as @anildash.And one of the things I love is I get to talk to folks like you and learn from the community, and as often as not, that's where most of the inspiration comes from is just sort of being out in all the various channels, talking to people. It's wild to be 20-plus years into this and still never get tired of that.Corey: It's why I love this podcast. Every time I talk to someone, I learn something new. It's hard to remain too ignorant after you have enough people who've shared wisdom with you as long as you can retain it.Anil: That's right.Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Anil: So, glad to be here.Corey: Anil Dash, CEO of Gletch—or Glitch as he insists on calling it. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me how your small team at AWS is going to crush Glitch into the dirt just as soon as they find a name that's dumb enough for the service.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Lock Sportscast
82: Toyota Backpedaling, Thieves with Keys, Another "Unpickable" Lock

The Lock Sportscast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 40:35


Your weekly source for locksport news and sometimes interviews. Full show notes, including links, can be found at http://www.thelocksportscast.com  In this week’s episode: Toyota backpedaling Building automation systems attacked Another unpickable lock candidate Lock Noob in Businessweek Thieves with mailbox keys Toronto auto-theft ring busted Products Sales Giveaways And more Announcements: Newpodcastapps.com The Locky Awards – Locksport Community Awards  Corrections: Bare Bones Lock Picking  News: Toyota 'Reviewing' Key Fob Remote Start Subscription Plan After Massive Blowback Toyota Back-Pedals on Key Fob Subscriptions Lights Out: Cyberattacks Shut Down Building Automation Systems the first unpickable lock that's simple, cheap and easy to make. Community News: Ethical Lock-Pickers Team Up With Manufacturers to Solve Major Security Flaws - Bloomberg Are Lock Picks Illegal? - Stay Safe Videos: [30] My road to Black Belt! Simple Safe Cracking Robot - 1st Open Meetups: Products: Introducing Bare Bones Lock Picking | Lock Picks For Beginners | Australian Company Bare Bones Lock Picking | Comparisons & Cases Bare Bones Lock Picking | Natural Habitat Bare Bones Lock Picking Laminated Steel — MasterLocks.com  LPU Karate Belts: beltranking - lockpicking (reddit.com)  Mentorship Monday 3: The Belt System  2: Breaking Rules and Getting the Belt  All About The Lockpicking Belt Rankings System  Speedlocks: Speedlocks.org  Locksmith Story: Lock Story: Criminals: Arrests made in sophisticated auto-theft probe | Toronto Sun Two arrested by Toronto police in connection with “auto theft ring” | Durham Radio News Arrests made in sophisticated auto-theft probe | Toronto Sun 53 Div. major crime cops nab 2 for overnight local car thefts Thieves are stealing checks from USPS collection boxes across Philly — and trying to get mail carriers’ keys Sales: The Lock Sportscast Sales List  https://bareboneslockpicking.com/  https://www.southord.com/?utm_campaign=privy_3049952 20% off code WELCOME22 https://www.hooligankeys.com/ 15% off, code MAKE2022BETTER https://dalp.com.au/ 20% off code Grinchmass21 https://keydecoder.eu/?p=2078 discounted prices on website https://masterlocks.com/collections/surplus-sale 50% off www.mattslockpit.com picks discounted on site https://www.3dlocksport.com/ 10% off. CODE: LSCAST10 https://makolocks.com/ 15% off with code BUYMAKO Unknown exp https://uklockpickers.co.uk/ 10% off with code GIFT Giveaways and Contests: Panda-Frog (ENG-236) Lockpicking - Giveaway entry for #PickinRick100 and an announcement for a little Contest  CLK Supplies Introducing #Lockboss Free Giveaway! Do you work with Locks & Keys or do Locksmithing?  Executive Producer:  Founding Executive Producers: Panda-Frog Michael Gilchrist Starrylock WilliamsBrain  Dave 2BDCy4D Liibans Locksport Journey Pat from Uncensored Tactical  threeraccoonsinacoat  Chirael Associate Executive Producers: Patty--cakes DoctorHogmaster Clayton Howard (Kewltune) Co-Producers: m0g Jon Lock Ratyoke MrPickur CrankyLockPicker RealTaiter JHPpicking Chief Content Producer: I fisk Content Producers: BandEAtoZ Chirael Correct Jeans DALP Evil Arch Conservative GilliGainz Gumby Joshua Gonzalez Michael Gilchrist Mick777Oz Panda-Frog Pocket Women Rein robert carlsen RubberBanned SiskoSpaceman Tony Virelli Special thanks to: Contact Information: Email: podcast@thelocksportscast.com Twitter https://twitter.com/charlescurrent  Reddit: currentc57 on r/locksport Discord: Lockpickers United as Current, Extraordinary League of Pickers as Current, The Lock Sportscast as Current Join the Discord at http://discord.thelocksportscast.com The Lock Sportscast on Odysee Donate: http://paypal.thelocksportscast.com https://patreon.com/thelocksportscast

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.25.2021 - The Best of Earl on Cars with Mystery Shop of Napleton's Palm Beach Acura

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 119:41


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's mystery shopper, Agent Thunder, visits a local Acura dealer dealer to see if he can get the special lease offer on a new Acura ILX as advertised on their website. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.25.2021 - The Best of Earl on Cars with Mystery Shop of Napleton's Palm Beach Acura

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 119:24


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's mystery shopper, Agent Thunder, visits a local Acura dealer dealer to see if he can get the special lease offer on a new Acura ILX as advertised on their website. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

CFO Thought Leader
762: In Step With the Digital Beat | Tania Secor, CFO, R/GA

CFO Thought Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 45:04


When CFO Tania Secor looks back at the early years of her finance career, she can't help but revisit her decision to accept a position with the McGraw-Hill Companies. For a half-dozen years, Secor had been entrenched in the private equity world, advising portfolio companies on different growth strategies and helping to complete the acquisition of a string of middle-market firms. Her new role at McGraw-Hill would not only leverage her M&A experience but also situate her within the corporate finance rank-and-file, where she grew accustomed to the cadence of tasks performed by the finance function. “I had never done a forecast myself, and I had never been through a rigorous budgeting and planning process at a $10 billion company,” explains Secor, who over the next 8 years would advance into a number of different FP&A roles before being named CFO of the magazine Businessweek, a role that would lead her to become part of a future transaction. “I came back from maternity leave and was asked to work with the leadership team to sell Businessweek,” recalls Secor, who would remain CFO of the media property after it was acquired by Bloomberg LLP. “During the transition, we had to rip our GL out of McGraw-Hill and put it into Bloomberg—and this had to have been one of the most challenging times of my career,” comments Secor, who notes that as the deal neared completion, her finance team lost its controller, which injected even more stress into the transition period.   Looking back, Secor says that she wouldn't want to relive the experience. At the same time, though, she leaves little doubt that ultimately it was the Businessweek transaction that allowed her to plant both feet on the CFO path. –Jack Sweeney  CFOTL: Tell us about R/GA … what type of company is this, what does it do, and what are its offerings today? Secor: R/GA is a digital innovation agency. We design businesses and brands for a more human future. This means that we engage strategists, technologists, creative people, and producers to develop campaigns, websites, mobile applications—any type of digital experience—for our clients, which include world-leading companies like Google, Samsung, Verizon, Nike, and 200 other firms for which we create these digital innovation experiences. We have 14 offices across the world and about 2,000 employees. We are a division of The Interpublic Group of Companies. Interpublic Group has a large portfolio of different types of agencies and PR firms. The niche into which we fall is not necessarily media buying and planning—which is “media brands”—and it doesn't necessarily have anything to do with big standard campaigns for some of what you might consider to be traditional clients. Where we come in is in working with brands that are more innovative or want to complement their campaigns with some more innovative solutions. You might see an R/GA-developed TikTok campaign where the influencer on TikTok is actually engaging with you. We may have used volume capture to take an influencer and create a beautiful digital art campaign that turns into a commercial or a website design or a mobile app. Our services and capabilities run the gamut of the more innovative creative types of digital experiences.

Jewish Philanthropy Podcast
Topic: A Lifetime of Service

Jewish Philanthropy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 51:17


Topic: A LifeTime of Service   Guest: Ambassador Stuart Eizenstat   Bio:    Ambassador Stuart Eizenstat heads the international practice of Covington and Burling.  His work at Covington focuses on resolving international trade problems and business disputes with the US and foreign governments, and international business transactions and regulations on behalf of US companies and others around the world. During a decade and a half of public service in three US administrations, Ambassador Eizenstat has held a number of key senior positions, including chief White House domestic policy adviser to President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981); U.S. Ambassador to the European Union, Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade, Under Secretary of State for Economic, Business and Agricultural Affairs, and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury in the Clinton Administration (1993-2001). Much of the interest in providing belated justice for victims of the Holocaust and other victims of Nazi tyranny during World War II was the result of his leadership of the Clinton Administration as Special Representative of the President and Secretary of State on Holocaust-Era Issues.  He successfully negotiated major agreements with the Swiss, Germans, Austrian and French, and other European countries, covering restitution of property, payment for slave and forced laborers, recovery of looted art, bank accounts, and payment of insurance policies.  His book on these events, Imperfect Justice: Looted Assets, Slave Labor, and the Unfinished Business of World War II, has been favorably received in publications like the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Business Week, and Publisher's Weekly.  It has been translated into German, French, Czech and Hebrew. In this informative episode, we cover: 1. Growing up in the South 2. Relationship with President Carter 3. Carter & Israel 4. Holocaust focus and conviction 5. Role of a US Ambassador 6. Dealing with loss and devotion to family 7. Key friendships & relationships And much more!

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
5 Reasons You Lose Customers with Paula Courtney

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 41:59


5 Reasons You Lose Customers with Paula Courtney Paula Courtney and Joe Lynch discuss 5 reasons you lose customers. Paula is the CEO of The Verde Group, a Customer Experience (CX) research consultancy specializing in measuring, tracking and improving the specific customer experiences statistically linked to growing revenue, market share, and customer life-time value (LTV). About Paula Courtney  A passionate change agent and entrepreneur, she believes that organizations remain competitive and profitable when they are brilliant at the basics of service delivery. As President of The Verde Group, a global market research consultancy specializing in helping companies improve customer retention, Paula leads the development of new research methods for helping companies quantify the financial impact of their customer experience. The Verde Group's Canadian and US retail studies have been published globally in over 35 publications including Business Week, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal and Fortune. A frequent conference presenter, Paula has delivered keynote presentations for various industry and professional associations and is also a regular guest lecturer at the Wharton School of Business. Paula also sits on the board of Covenant House, Canada's largest agency serving youth who are homeless, trafficked or at risk. Paula holds a BSc in Psychology and a post graduate certification in Personnel & Industrial Relations (CPIR) from the University of Toronto. Paula is also fluent in French, Spanish and Portuguese. About The Verde Group The Verde Group is a Customer Experience (CX) research consultancy specializing in measuring, tracking and improving the specific customer experiences statistically linked to growing revenue, market share, and customer life-time value (LTV). Our proprietary experience analysis methodology is known as Revenue@Risk Analysis. Based on decades of social science academic research and practical in-market business application, Revenue@Risk uses dissatisfaction analysis of problem experiences to understand why customers behave in a certain way and what actions to take to alter those behaviours. Verde Group has applied Revenue@Risk successfully for nearly 20 years with Fortune 500 clients in technology, manufacturing, pharmaceutical, retail, and financial services categories. Their practice is roughly 65% B2B and 35% B2C. Key Takeaways: 5 Reasons You Lose Customers Paula Courtney is the President of The Verde Group, a Customer Experience (CX) research consultancy specializing in measuring, tracking and improving the specific customer experiences statistically linked to growing revenue, market share, and customer life-time value (LTV). In the podcast interview, Paula explains the 5 reasons you lose customers. Reason 1 – Lack of customer support. When customers don't receive the customer support that they expect, they may begin looking for alternatives. Poor follow-up, getting the run-around, and being transferred by phone repeatedly without resolution is frustrating and damaging to customer relationships. Reason 2 – Ineffective problem resolution. There are more channels for customers to connect than ever before, however, if the customer is not able to get quick and effective resolution to their problems, they will move on. Reason 3 – Digital tools that are overly complicated or don't meet customer expectations. Technology that is supposed to improve the customer experience can sometimes be overly difficult to use and actually negatively impact the experience. Reason 4 – Lack of consistency across channels. Technology has enabled companies to engage with their customers in multiple channels (website, social media, phone, email, app, etc..) and the policies, procedures, experience, and outcomes must be consistent. When customers have different experiences across different channels, they lose faith in the company. Reason 5 – Lack of proactivity. Customer expectations are always rising and successful companies will always look for ways to deliver more for their customers. Get closer to your customer and find new ways to add value. Key areas associated with revenue growth: Frictionless experience Effective recovery from problems Engagement with customers The Verde Group helps their clients prioritize and tackle the customer experience problems that negatively impact their business. The Verde Group utilizes a unique non-traditional customer dissatisfaction research and social science-based Attitude-Behavior Consistency Model, which enables them to to isolate the most business-critical pain points across the customer journey, financially quantify revenue at risk, and reverse your customers' most damaging experiences. Learn More About 5 Reasons You Lose Customers Paula Courtney LinkedIn The Verde Group Logistics case study HBR Article The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.18.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Napleton Kia

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 118:00


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning revisits the local "bad boy" Kia dealer to see how much over MSRP they will charge a new 2022 Kia Forte XLE. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.18.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Napleton Kia

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 118:00


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning revisits the local "bad boy" Kia dealer to see how much over MSRP they will charge a new 2022 Kia Forte XLE. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Go For Launch — Rocket Fuel for Entrepreneurs
GFL 161: How to Lead with the Power of Truth, Justice and Purpose

Go For Launch — Rocket Fuel for Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 29:27


Ron Carucci is co-founder and managing partner at Navalent, which works with CEOs and executives to enable transformational change for their organizations, leaders and industries. Ron's newest book and passion, To Be Honest: Lead with the Power of Truth, Justice and Purpose, is based on 15 years of research and more than 200 interviews with leaders around the world. To Be Honest explains how four factors—Clear Identity, Accountability, Governance and Cross-Functional Relationships—affect honesty, justice and purpose within a company. When these factors are absent or ineffective, the organizational conditions compel employees to choose dishonesty and self-interest. But when done well, the organization is 16 times more likely to have people tell the truth, behave fairly and serve a greater good. For three decades, Ron has helped some of the world's most influential executives tackle challenges of strategy, organization and leadership. In addition to being a regular contributor to HBR and Forbes, and is a 2-time TEDx speaker and has been featured in Fortune, CEO Magazine, BusinessInsider, MSNBC, Inc, and Business Week.

Sales vs. Marketing
Rand Fishkin, Founder of Moz & Sparktoro, Investor | The Dark Side of Venture Capital and Startups

Sales vs. Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 80:49


➡️ Like The Show? Leave A Rating: https://ratethispodcast.com/successstory ➡️ About The Guest Rand Fishkin is cofounder and CEO of audience research software startup, SparkToro. He's dedicated his professional life to helping people do better marketing through his writing, videos, speaking, and his book, Lost and Founder.  In 2004, he created the SEOmoz blog, which, over the next decade, became the world's most popular community and content resource for search marketers. In 2007, the company (Moz) transitioned from consulting to software and Rand took the role of CEO. Over 7 years as CEO, Rand grew Moz to 130+ employees, $30M+ in revenue, and traffic to 30M+ visitors/year. He raised two rounds of funding, led three acquisitions, and a rebrand. Rand stepped down as CEO in 2014 during a rough bout with depression and left the company 4 years later. Rand was also the co-founder of Inbound.org alongside Dharmesh Shah. The site was sold to Hubspot in 2014. In 2018, Rand founded SparkToro and published, with Penguin/Random House, Lost and Founder: A Painfully Honest Field Guide to the Startup World. Rand previously co-contributed to two books: Art of SEO, and Inbound Marketing & SEO. He's been profiled in the Seattle Times, featured in Puget Sound Business Journal's 40 Under 40, named to BusinessWeek's 30 Under 30, written about in Newsweek, The Next Web, the Inc 500, and hundreds of other publications.  ➡️ Talking Points 00:00 - Rand's story. 04:58 - Arbitraging Pokémon cards. 09:54 - How Rand built Sparktoro. 16:21 - You don't need to raise VC money. 24:18 - Bootstrapping vs. VC money. 40:40 - Product led growth, engagement and recidivism. 56:36 - The issues with startup culture. ➡️ Show Links https://www.linkedin.com/in/randfishkin/ https://twitter.com/randfish ➡️ Podcast Sponsors 1. True Bill—Control Your Subscriptions  https://truebill.com/successstory 2. Express VPN — Protect Your Online Activity https://expressvpn.com/successstory 3. Get Abstract - Summarizes and Rates Thousands of Books https://getab.li/success 4. Hubspot Podcast Network https://hubspot.com/podcastnetwork

Essential Ingredients Podcast
013: All Eyes On Food Waste with Andrew Shakman

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 36:32


“When you work on food waste, you are working on the most important things. You're working on climate, food security and feeding the world.” - Andrew Shakman   Episode Description: The less people see, the less people care.  It's been easy to disregard this urgent issue, because food waste has been placed in a blind spot. But this dangerous situation can no longer be ignored!  What is being done- and what can YOU do- to prevent food loss?       Leanpath is today's leading food waste prevention platform. Its co-founder and CEO, Andrew Shakman is an author, speaker, and internationally-renowned expert in food waste prevention. Andrew is passionate about creating a more sustainable future and supporting companies to create products that make a difference and are resilient through economic cycles.    This week, Justine is joined by a special co-host, Lisa Johnson, an industry powerhouse in food loss.  The duo digs deep with Andrew on effective food loss prevention tactics that both companies and households can apply. It doesn't matter whether it's a company factory or a home kitchen, food is still wasted. In this episode, Andrew shares why food waste is a problem and why prevention is the most important action we can take today. He also addresses the importance of measuring food loss in increasing awareness and initiating intervention. Listen as Lisa and Andrew share tools and strategies that can help you measure, manage, and reduce food loss. Zero food waste is the goal, but without getting a clear picture of the gravity of the situation, this problem will persist. The key is to assign value to food, while we still have it.    Connect with Andrew: Andrew Shakman is the Co-Founder and CEO of Leanpath, the industry's leading food waste prevention platform working with client partners to fight waste around the world. He's been working on the front lines of behavior change and is an internationally renowned expert in food waste prevention.   Andrew is a speaker, author, and expert on global food waste issues. One of the “20 Most Influential” people in the foodservice industry (Foodservice Director Magazine); featured in BusinessWeek, NPR, PBS, Forbes, New Yorker, Fast Company and many food industry publications.    For the love of food, Andrew has been on a journey to end avoidable food waste since 2004. He believes that food connects us to one another and to our natural environment in powerful and profound ways and that it's a tragedy of epic scale that we routinely waste it. This is a tragedy for our planet and its climate, for those in need, for the animals whose lives we take only to discard them, for the workers who invest heart and soul to produce food we ignore, and for our collective conscience as a society.    As a passionate food waste prevention advocate. Preventing food waste at the source is the only route to true reform and yet it's the most overlooked, under-targeted part of the food waste solutions space. Wasting food is simply wrong. Fortunately, this is a solvable problem and he's committed to seeing that solution in his lifetime.   Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Instagram    Connect with Leanpath: Website Facebook   Twitter  LinkedIn  Instagram Youtube     Connect with Lisa:  Lisa Johnson is a leader in food loss and waste - focused on agricultural production. She is a seasoned horticulturist with a broad range of experience in local, organic, sustainable, conventional, and biotech food and agriculture. Lisa's research aims to understand the loss of edible vegetables. Understanding constraints from the growers' perspective have been critical: always encouraging people to incorporate more growers' voices in their work. Lisa is fortunate to be able to work with some of the most forward-thinking specialty crop growers in the country, as well as non-profits, governments, start-ups, industry leaders, and the academy.    Website LinkedIn    Connect with Justine:  Website Facebook Instagram LinkedIn   Connect with NextGenChef: Website  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  YouTube NextGenChef App (Apple) NextGenChef App (Android)    Episode Highlights: 02:59 The Genesis of Leanpath  09:13 Creating Meaningful Impacts  14:09 Measurement IS Intervention 17:22 Food Loss and Farmers 22:01 Leanpath's Mission And Vision 27:12 Food Waste Tracking Technology  31:44 Food Connects Everything 

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.11.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Palm Beach Toyota

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 119:14


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning visits a local Toyota dealer to see how many cars they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new 2022 Toyota Corolla LE. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.11.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Palm Beach Toyota

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 119:14


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning visits a local Toyota dealer to see how many cars they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new 2022 Toyota Corolla LE. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show
EP 1073B - International Financial Expert Jared Dillian

YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021


While we usually focus on physical and mental health on this show, in this episode, we're talking about financial health.While we usually focus on physical and mental health on this show, in this episode, we're talking about financial health. Most of the stress in this country is caused by money and financial woes.So today we're welcoming popular podcast host of Be Smart and bestselling financial author Jared Dillian to the show.In the early 2000s, Jared routinely traded over a billion dollars a day as the head of ETF trading at Lehman Brothers. His memoir covering that period, Street Freak: Money and Madness at Lehman Brothers, was named Businessweek's #1 general business book in 2011. And his first novel, All the Evil of This World, was published in 2016.Today, hundreds of thousands of people regularly read Jared's work, which includes three investment newsletters—The Daily Dirtnap, Street Freak, and ETF 20/20—along with two weekly e-letters, The 10th Man and The Jared Dillian Letter.

The Voice of Retail
Winning on Purpose, Net Promoter Score 3.0 with Fred Reichheld

The Voice of Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 28:04


Welcome to the The Voice of Retail , I'm your host Michael LeBlanc, and this podcast is brought to you in conjunction with Retail Council of Canada For business leaders and marketers from around the world, author and Bain Fellow Fred Reichheld is a household name - even The Economist named him the “high priest” of customer loyalty. Today, I'm thrilled to sit down with the inventor of the Net Promoter Score to peel back the layers of the NPS v3.0, and the new era of customer loyalty in the post-COVID world. We talk about what 80% of marketers are getting wrong with Big NPS, Earned Growth and delve into his latest book “Winning on Purpose”. Thanks for tuning into today's episode of The Voice of Retail.  Be sure to subscribe to the podcast so you don't miss out on the latest episodes, industry news, and insights. If you enjoyed  this episode please consider leaving a rating and review, as it really helps us grow so that we can continue getting amazing guests on the show.I'm your host Michael LeBlanc, President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company, and if you're looking for more content, or want to chat  follow me on LinkedIn, or visit my website meleblanc.co!About FredExpertiseNet Promoter System℠Sales and MarketingNet Promoter® for PeopleFred Reichheld is a Bain Fellow and founder of our Loyalty practice, which helps companies achieve results through customer and employee loyalty. He is the creator of the Net Promoter® system of management.His work in the area of customer and employee retention has quantified the link between loyalty and profits. Fred's books, The Loyalty Effect: The Hidden Force Behind Growth, Profits, and Lasting Value (HBSP 1996); Loyalty Rules! How Today's Leaders Build Lasting Relationships (HBSP 2001); The Ultimate Question: Driving Good Profits and True Growth (HBSP, 2006) and The Ultimate Question 2.0: How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer Driven World (HBR Press) have each become best sellers.In his most recent book, Fred reveals how NPS practitioners including Apple Retail, Philips, Schwab, Allianz, American Express, and Intuit, have used the Net Promoter System (NPS) to generate extraordinary results. He explains how NPS helps companies become truly customer-centric, unleashing profitable growth through systematically converting more customers into promoters and fewer into detractors. Fred is a frequent speaker at major business forums and his work on loyalty has been widely covered in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Financial Times, Fortune, Business Week and The Economist. He is the author of eight Harvard Business Review articles on the subject of loyalty and he is also a LinkedIn Influencer, a member of a group of corporate leaders and public figures who are thought leaders in their respective fields.Consulting Magazine chose Fred as one of the “25 Most Influential Consultants” in its 2003 annual survey. According to The New York Times, "[He] put loyalty economics on the map." The Economist refers to him as the "high priest" of loyalty.Reichheld graduated with Honors both from Harvard College (B.A., 1974) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A., 1978). Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus        Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  and       The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and the all new Conversations with CommerceNext podcast.  Last but not least, check out my new YouTube cooking show, Last Request Barbecue!You can learn more about Michael       here  or on       LinkedIn. 

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.04.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Schumacher Volkswagen

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 118:16


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning visits a local Volkswagen dealer to see what they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new 2022 Volkswagen Tiguan. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Earl Stewart on Cars
12.04.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Schumacher Volkswagen

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 118:16


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning visits a local Volkswagen dealer to see what they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new 2022 Volkswagen Tiguan. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Day Fire Podcast
PADDLESPORTS INDUSTRY & LIFE with Joe Pulliam

Day Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 59:06


This week Clint and Dawson sit down with Joe Pulliam. Joe, is best known as co-founder and long-time CEO of Dagger, Joe began canoeing in the late 1960's, and started building and paddling kayaks in 1973. He entered the outdoor industry full-time in 1982 as director of marketing and sales of Perception. In 1988, with three others he founded Dagger, which became one of the most successful paddlesports businesses in history. Joe led a successful sale of Dagger in 1998, then worked for Watermark Sports, the acquiring company for seven years, as executive vice president, and was deeply involved in several acquisitions made by Watermark. From 2005 until 2017, he was an independent consultant, focused primarily on the outdoor industry, with the final 8 years of that span focused entirely on Jackson Kayak. Joe also co-founded The Whitewater Company, a rafting outfitter on the Pigeon River in Tennessee. He has served on numerous paddlesports boards, including the American Canoe Association, American Whitewater, various national trade organizations and local river-related organizations. He was the recipient of ACA's J Henry Rushton award, the President's award and is in the ACA Paddlesports Hall of Fame. He is in the International Whitewater Hall of Fame, and was named by Paddler Magazine as one of the top 100 American paddlers of the 20thCentury. He was named by Sports Style magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the sporting goods industry, and has been featured in publications including Southern Living, Business Week, the Wall Street Journal, Paddler, Blue Ridge Outdoors, and the American Whitewater Journal. Thanks for listening! Find all our episodes at dayfirepodcast.com This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

#Clockedin with Jordan Edwards
Leigh Steinberg - The Greatest Sports Agent of All Time

#Clockedin with Jordan Edwards

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 67:28


Leigh Steinberg  joins #Clockedin with Jordan Edwards and discusses about his life story of as a sports agent and being a change maker for good. Building on over 46 years of unrivaled success in the sports and entertainment industries, Steinberg Sports and Entertainment is the premier boutique agency for any individual, organization, or entity seeking to add exceptional value to their endeavors.Leigh Steinberg, premier sports agent, entrepreneur, best-selling author, and Chairman of Leigh Steinberg Sports and Entertainment Holdings, is best known for his work building athletes into stand-alone brands. He is often credited as the real-life inspiration for the Oscar-winning film Jerry Maguire. Leigh has represented many of the most successful athletes and coaches in football, basketball, baseball, hockey, boxing, and golf, including the number one overall pick in the NFL draft for an unprecedented eight times in conjunction with 64 total first round picks. With an unrivaled history of record-setting contracts, Leigh has secured over $4 billion for his 300+ pro athlete clients and directed more than $800 million to various charities around the world.Over the course of his career, Leigh has been featured on numerous national television programs, including 60 Minutes, Larry King Live, The Today Show, Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, and many more. He has been profiled in a host of magazines, including Business Week, Sports Illustrated, ESPN the Magazine, People, Forbes, Playboy, GQ, and FHM. Leigh has been rated the #6 Most Powerful Person in the NFL according to “Football Digest” and the #16 Most Powerful Person in Sports according to “Sporting News.” He currently resides in Newport Beach, CA and has three children.To learn more about Leigh:Website: https://www.steinbergsports.com/en/Hope you find value in this. If so please provide a 5-star and drop a review. Complimentary Edwards Consulting Session: https://calendly.com/jordan-555/intro-call

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Closer Consideration: On Art, Illustrating and Political Caricatures – A Conversation With Jason Seiler

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Chances are, you’ve seen Jason Seiler’s art. Publications that have featured his work include, TIME, Business Week, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The Washington Examiner Magazine, MAD magazine, GOLF magazine, KING magazine, Revolver, Guitar Player, The Village Voice, Penguin Group, Disney, and The New York Observer. On this episode, […]

Navigating the Customer Experience
152: Loyalty Redefined! How to Enrich the Lives of Your Customers – The Unbeatable Strategy with Fred Reichheld

Navigating the Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:13


Fred Reichheld is the creator of the Net Promoter system of management, the founder of Bain & Company's Loyalty practice and the author of five books including The New York Times bestseller, The Ultimate Question 2.0. He is currently a Fellow and Senior Advisory Partner at Bain, where he has worked since 1977. Fred is a frequent speaker at major business forums and his work on customer loyalty has been widely covered in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Financial Times, Fortune, Businessweek and The Economist.   His upcoming article to be published in November marks his 15th contribution to the Harvard Business Review. In 2012, he became one of the original LinkedIn influencers, an invitation only group of corporate leaders and public figures who are thought leaders in their respective fields. In 2003, Consulting Magazine named Fred as one of the world's 25 Most Influential Consultants.   According to The New York Times, he put loyalty economics on the map. The Economist refers to him as the “high priest” of loyalty. Reichheld graduated with honors both from Harvard College (B.A., 1974) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A., 1978). He's based in Cape Cod and Miami.   Questions   Could you share a little bit about your own journey? How is it that you got to where you are today? Could you explain to us what the Net Promoter system is and how companies should really be using it to yield the best results? Could you share with us maybe two or three things that you believe are contributing drivers of loyalty? What are some things that companies should look at in trying to enrich the lives of your customers? Do they need to understand what type of customer they're serving and does the generation matter? Could you share with us what is Customer Capitalism exactly? And how does that impact the consumer? Could you share with us what's the one online resource, tool, website or app that you absolutely cannot live without in your business? Could you also share with us maybe one or two books that have had the biggest impact on you? Could you share with us what's the one thing that's going on in your life right now that you're really excited about? It could be something that you're working on to develop yourself or your people. Where can our listeners find you online? Do you have a quote or a saying that during times of adversity or challenge, you'll tend to revert to this quote, it kind of helps to keep you on track, or at least get you back on track if for any reason you get derailed. Do you have one of those?   Highlights   Fred's Journey   Fred shared that early in his career at Bain & Company, he noticed companies similar to us all, some brand new, some quite mature, but they were all outperforming all of the things he learned at the Harvard. Some were crushing it and a good example was enterprise Rent-A-Car, who started out as a tiny little rental leasing agency in St. Louis, and has grown now to become the largest car rental company on Earth without ever having to tap public equity markets, it's still a private company. And you think, Gosh, what I learned at Harvard was a capital intensive business, low growth industry, low margins, there's no way that you could grow on internally generated cash.   So, when he went to meet with Andy Taylor, their CEO, he said, “Fred, there's no secret, there's only one way to grow a successful business sustainably.” And so, he was listening for this great secret. And he said, “You treat your customers so they come back for more and bring their friends.”   And that basic idea changed his world because that's what he now understands is the key to success. If your customers are coming back for more and bringing their friends, your economic flywheel will crush the competition.   What is the Net Promoter System and How Companies Can Use it to Yield the Best Results   Me: Amazing. So I had an opportunity to get an advanced copy of your book Winning on Purpose: The Unbeatable Strategy of Loving Customer. I really, really love it. I haven't finished reading it as yet, but I've gotten quite far in it. And so, I just wanted you to share with us.   Fred, in the book, especially in the preface and the foreword, you kind of mentioned that you have this net promoter system, but people are not actually using it the way how you created it to be used. Could you explain to us what the Net Promoter system is and how companies should really be using it to yield the best results?   Fred shared that he's long been troubled by the fact that financial accounting is how we run our businesses. And while financial accounting is very good at telling us when we've extracted a million dollars from our customers wallets, it does nothing in helping us understand when we've enriched a million customers lives or when our teams have done work that's meaningful and toward an important purpose.   And Net Promoter was his attempt at helping companies measure that important idea of all the lives you touch, how many are enriched? How many diminished? And that evolved into Net Promoter Score is based on one question, how likely you'd recommend us to a friend, 0 through 10.   And it turns out that when someone gives you a 9, and especially a 10, you've enriched their life, you've lived up to the golden rule of loving your neighbor.   And 0 through 6, you failed, you diminish their life. And so, this notion of Net Promoter Score is just keeping track of all the lives touched, how many enriched, how many diminished, and how many promoters, how many detractors, it's very practical for running a business because your promoters are your assets, who come back for more and bring their friends. But also, it's a little bit inspirational because putting your teams to work, and enriching lives and measuring that outcome and helping them learn how to do better, that's really helping them live the right kind of life.   The Contributing Drivers of Loyalty   Me: So, at the end of the day, we're all trying to build better relationships with our customers. Now, in your book, you also said that loyalty means investing time and resources in relationships.   Do you know maybe could you share with us maybe based on your experience and your research, you've definitely been in the thing way longer than I have; maybe two or three drivers that you think contribute to loyalty.   And this is loyalty in general, which I'm sure impacts business relationships, because I mean, loyalty is something that as human beings, we do link it to a person. For example, if you have an animal, your dog is loyal to you as the owner, in a relationship; you're loyal to the other person that you're in the relationship with, whether it's a personal or professional relationship. So could you share with us maybe two or three things that you believe are contributing drivers of loyalty?   Fred shared that he thinks it's quite poorly understood in this day and age when people are demanding loyalty and trying to get loyalty through gimmicks and marketing, so called loyalty programs. So, he thinks it does make sense to get back to basics.   He thinks loyalty is an investment from you and another person in a relationship. And you think, “Why would I invest in someone else?” Well, it's because they stand for what you believe in you.   You believe that they'll reciprocate and treat you reasonably and not abuse your trust and that you're in a position to actually do something to make their life better. Otherwise, you're just wasting your time.   A lot of people think about loyalty as, “Oh, I want them to be loyal to me.” He thinks the way to start is, “How can I invest in this relationship and love them, make their lives better?”   And that's what great companies' do, that's what great leaders do, they inspire their troops to find ways to enrich the lives of customers sustainably, of course, profitably. But the whole goal in a business is making your customers lives better. Because when you do that, you're investing in the right relationships, they come back for more, they bring their friends, they say great things about you, they become your public relations force, that's how great business works.   And he thinks we get drawn off center a little bit because the larger our company is, the more it's run through financial mindset. It's our accounting numbers that we seem to view as the framework of success, when in fact, no, it's this golden rule ideas, it's love thy neighbor as thyself. And when you do it, you'll see the results because when customers feel the love, they are loyal and that's at the core of loyalty, it's earning loyalty by enriching customers lives. And loyalty from employees, by putting them in a position to earn lives of meaning and purpose, by enriching the lives of customers that they touch.   Me: I like the fact that you mentioned that it's not just about loyalty in terms of you getting the person to be loyal to you, but it has to be earned and it's not something that can be bought. So I'm glad that you mentioned at the beginning that a lot of these loyalty programs and marketing initiatives that organizations have that they dub as loyalty programs are not actually programs that will make or even influence your customers to be loyal to you. So it's good that you identified for us that loyalty is something that is earned.   What Companies Should Look for to Enrich the Lives of Customers   Me: Now, in terms of showing your customers or enriching their lives regardless of the industry that you're in, whether you're a financial company, you sell insurance or you have credit cards, or you're a retail company, what are some things that companies should look at in trying to enrich the lives of your customers? Do they need to understand what type of customer they're serving and does the generation matter?   Fred shared that of course it does. And yet, he finds that the most successful businesses, whether dealing with teenagers today or octogenarians, it's understanding how to communicate effectively, how to always act in your customers best interest, to listen very carefully to how you're doing and what they need. Because at the core, a business is trying to solve the customer's problem, it's trying to turn a frown, into a smile, and the human process of understanding that, he doesn't think that's changed in thousands and thousands of years. Of course, the technologies we use, the innovative approaches, those open up wonderful new opportunities, but the basics, they haven't changed.   One of his colleagues at Bain, they joined about the same year, Scott Cook, who's the founder of Intuit, who has built TurboTax, and other very successful business, huge, huge success.   And he said, “Fred, you want a big business, solve a big problem for your customers.” And that's the right way to think about it, “I am going to be a reliable resource that is going to make a real difference in your life by turning that frown into a smile, and I'm going to measure my success that way.”   Obviously, profits are necessary but those who think of profits as the true objective, they're not going to grow a very big business very long because that's very selfish, “How much money can I extract from your wallet, get away from me, I'm not going to tell you anything about myself for what I need.” If he has someone who actually acts in a loving, caring way, they're a mutually beneficial relationship affair. But that's the kind of person he's willing to actually share his information with and give constructive feedback to because he wants them to succeed, he wants them to succeed in helping him solve problems.   What is Customer Capitalism and How it Impacts the Consumer?   Me: So, while I was reading part of your book as well, I bucked up on a term, Customer Capitalism. Could you share with us what is that exactly? And how does that impact the consumer?   Fred shared that he thinks people have a framework in their heads about capitalism that's just dead wrong, that maximize shareholder value as the underlying concept. Through the years, whether it's Milton Friedman, or Adam Smith, there's an ancient and an out of date framework that people call capitalism, that without giving it this name, it's financial capitalism, because it's based on this idea of profits and shareholder and investor is the king. He thinks that has changed over the last few decades, at least, to where now, there's so much capital in the world; you can raise millions and millions if you have a good idea.   What there's not infinite amounts of are good people with good ideas who are willing to work together in a team framework to serve others.   And the real capital in that system, our customers, all the cash flow comes out of customers' wallets.   So let's keep track of how many customers you have, how many are coming back for more, how many referrals you're getting, that was the basic, those are the keystone metrics in customer capitalism.   And more than anything, it's being clear about the purpose. If the purpose in the old school capitalism was maximizing profits and shareholder value, in customer capitalism, the purpose is to enrich the lives of your customers.   Bain did a survey of a couple 100 Senior Executives around the world, C suite executives and they found that only 10% believe that the primary purpose their business existed was to make customers lives better. They thought it was about profits or great place to work or balance duties to shareholders, stakeholders. He just thinks that is dead wrong. A good business, a sustainable business has to have a primary purpose of making their customers lives better.   Me: Amazing. One of the companies that you mentioned in your book when I was reading was Chick-fil-A and I absolutely love Chick-fil-A, both me and my daughter. But one of the things that I really love about Chick-fil-A was the fact that I remember I traveled a few years ago and my daughter wanted to get something from them on a Sunday and they're actually closed on Sundays and I thought that was awesome, from what I read that was a principle that their organization had and they've lived it up to this day and they've still been very successful even though they're closed on a day when they could be making more profit, as you mentioned.   Fred stated that the purpose of Chick-fil-A is certainly to enrich the lives that it touches. It's interesting, the founder, Truett Cathy was one of his early teachers in his business career, and they're totally different people. He's a Southern, he was a Southern Baptist, very, very conservative point of view. He (Fred) lives up in New England, Unitarian Universalist, you couldn't be more liberal in your religious thinking. And yet they had enormous overlap at the core, he picked a proverb from the Bible, that essentially, it says, “A good name is worth more than silver or gold.” Or in other words, your reputation is everything, which he thinks is so true.   And this notion of net lives enrich and Net Promoter Score, you think about when you enrich a life, you're living up to the golden rule, you're loving a neighbor, when you diminish your life, you're failing.   And so, the reason Chick-fil-A has been very interested and supportive of Net Promoter is because we're trying to achieve the same mission, this is back to Truett Cathy's words, he was inspired to turn frowns into smiles on his customers' faces and that is the purpose of the business.   So, then you mentioned Sunday, he asked him why he closed on Sundays and he said, “It's not a religious thing, Fred.” He's a very religious guy but he's not preachy, their business does not put biblical quotes at the bottom of their cups, and they're not proselytizing in the parking lot. They try to be models; they try to help their people live up to this standard of loving your neighbor. And closing on Sundays, he just knew that you could not run a restaurant and have the manager there 7 days a week, you'll kill yourself. And he said, “Given that, and I definitely want my store operator there running the place not delegating to an assistant.” He said, “We have to close a day and closing Sundays gives this signal that we care about our people, and we care about golden rule.”   As he said, “But you know, Fred, I go to other restaurants on Sunday, it's not like it's wrong to go out and eat at a restaurant on Sunday. It's just wrong for us to try and have our managers running a business 7 days a week.” And he thinks it's brilliant. And it is a signal. He thinks it reminds people that they're different. And you're right, their productivity, they have far higher sales per unit than any of the competitors. And those competitors are open 7 days a week. And it shows you when you get the purpose right; your business can crush the competition.   App, Website or Tool that Fred Absolutely Can't Live Without in His Business   When asked about online resource that he cannot live without in his business, Fred shared that it's a new one for him, he discovered a company through one of his Bain partners, it's called BILT. The reason they were intriguing to him was their goal is to help their customers, their customers tend to be consumer brands, like Weber, who makes grills and place at manufacturers and so on. They try to help them build promoters among their customers, to create more promoters.   And what they've done is just taken one of the most painful steps in every customer's journey episode, which is assembly and first use, using paper instructions, which these paper instructions are horrible, let's be serious, they're written by engineers whose English is certainly their second language and they're just totally unintuitive.   So, BILT takes the 3D CAD drawing from the manufacturer, and then turns it into great little 3D instructions on how to assemble and use your product effectively and it's free to the consumer. So you go to a Home Depot or Costco and you'll start to see BILT on the packaging, and you know that you're going to get that home and you'll be able to put this thing together quickly and you'll feel great about yourself or Home Depot will have their faucets or ceiling fans, things that are really tricky to install, or garage door openers, and you go to BILT and you put the product in it and it downloads up to date information about how to put it together in a very intuitive way where you can zoom in and pinch out and rotate upside down and voice activated to help you guide you through your journey, it's just brilliant.   Me: Nice, very good. They obviously saw a need in the market, as you said, a problem that people were having challenges with and complaining about and created a product that would be applicable to make people's lives easier.   Fred stated that try ordering a bicycle online, you get it back to your driveway and then you try to put it together using paper instructions and he thinks you'll see why BILT is so successful.   Me: Yes, I can just imagine and my coordination of doing things like that are extremely poor, so I'm sure I'd benefit from using BILT.   Books That Have Had the Greatest Impact on Fred   Me: Could you also share with us maybe one or two books that have had the biggest impact on you? I'm sure you have many because you've been around for quite some time and I'm sure you've had to read and engage with a lot of authors over the years that have definitely helped enrich your life and the lives of others. But is there maybe one or two that have definitely had a great impact on you over the years, maybe something you read a long time ago, or even something you read recently?   When asked about books that have had biggest impact, Fred shared that he read a lot of books. Actually, he listens to them now; his eyes are so strained from working at his computer and writing a book, he can't read in a relaxed way so he listens to Audible. Probably the most impactful book in the last 10 years was written by a guy who passed away, Clayton Christensen was a business school professor, who he got to know, he worked briefly at Bain and then worked at an entrepreneurial thing and ended up at Harvard.   He wrote a book called How Will You Measure Your Life? And he (Fred) thinks he's just absolutely right. And the reason that helped him is, he thinks you do need to measure a life carefully, that's what a Net Promoter Score is, of all the lives he touched, how many enriched, how many diminished?   That's how you measure a life. And he thinks Clayton put this in very human terms, and thinking about that, not just in a business sense, but all of your relationships in life, how do you think about investing in those relationships and being loving and loyal in a way that's not just correct in your mind, but you know the other party felt the love, you have to get feedback on how you enrich their life. So, How Will You Measure Your Life is a big one.   There's a recent book by Adam Grant called Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know, that he thinks is quite good. Adam is a guy that they must think along the same lines, because it was an earlier book that he wrote about it's called Give and Take. And he just makes the case that the world is full of people; there are some people who are givers, there are people who are matchers, they want a relationship to be in balance and then there are takers. And he said, one of the keys to life is avoid those takers, they're sociopaths, you can try and change them, but good luck.   And he thinks this is important and living a golden rule existence. Not all people want to be part of a community where people are treated with love and care, they'll abuse that community and he thinks if they can't be fixed, they have to be excluded. And then Think Again, Grant just says, we have these mindsets that are fixed, and he thinks of financial capitalism as a fixed mindset for 90% of the world and he needs to change the way people think about the purpose of business and how to enrich a life.    What Fred is Really Excited About Now!   Fred shared that he got the paperback galley of Winning on Purpose just a week ago and he can't take it off on his desk, but very pleased with the way it's come out. And that's going to be every day of his life for the next probably 90 days is how to get people to see the relevance of this book to their personal lives, not just their business lives because the subtitle of Winning on Purpose is “The Unbeatable Strategy of Loving Customers.” And loving customers, it doesn't sound like it's a business book, he doesn't know what it sounds, just a little flaky but it's not because this notion of loving thy neighbor as thyself is the core, it's the highest standard in human affairs. And what he's arguing and Winning on Purpose is that, that is how you win.   When you enrich lives, you have to do it sustainably, and you have to do it profitably, but that's not the magic, accountants can do the profits for you. The magic is figuring out how using your energy and ingenuity to love your customers and have them come to trust you and come back for more and bring their friends but it goes so far beyond business.   So, the great challenge he's got is getting people to recognize, he wrote this book for his granddaughters, infants who he wants them to see how you live the right life. And it sets out a way of measuring progress that he thinks is consistent with what Truett Cathy had in mind of building a reputation that you'll be proud of, and investing in relationships where you can earn people's loyalty.   It's probably a good rule of thumb anywhere to just don't spend time with a person unless you can figure out a way to make their life better. And by the way, the good news, chapter two and five of the book, demonstrate that companies that do this, they're the ones that get rich.   It's not clear from reading the Wall Street Journal, but every company, every industry, where they look at the Net Promoter Score, versus the competition, measured carefully, correctly, not just some self reported vanity metric, but real apples to apples.   It's the company with the highest Net Promoter Score who is growing faster and delivering better total shareholder value. And that's really good news.   But people are the mindset is fixed, they just don't get it. They say, “Oh, that's just some industries.” No, every time they're finding it, how did Andy Taylor grow to be the biggest car rental company on earth? How did Apple become one of the biggest companies on earth? Because they built a set of customers who are Promoters who are out there buying more stuff, and referring their friends and giving good feedback because they trust you, and making your employees feel special and loved, that's the flywheel that's going on. So, he's trying to convince the world that business works in a very different way than they probably learned in business school, or if they read the Wall Street Journal and The Economist.   Me: And you know, one of the things that kind of came in my head just now when you're speaking in terms of what we were taught in school versus what is reality, the reality is, a business isn't a static thing, it's made up of people and without people in the business, there is no business and people are human beings with feelings and emotions. And you get more out of people when they feel loved, when they feel listened to, when they feel heard, as you said, when you enrich their lives. So, if you really do live that principle, I'm sure you'll win in all aspects of your life.   Fred shared that he's worked at Bain & Company since 1977. So what is that 43 going on 44 years now. And they've been through good and bad times. For the last 10 or 20 years, it's been good times. If you look on Glassdoor, the place that rates businesses as great places to work, Bain, this year, it's the best in the world according to Glassdoor, it's always been one of the top several since Glassdoor started. And Bain hires lots of different kinds of people. But these are really ambitious, talented people. And even with that slice of ambitious people, when you look at what makes a person happy at work at Bain, they want to feel loved; they want to feel like they're a valued member of a team that wins with its customers. So it's an act of service and if you ask, remember he said the typical business person in the world, 10% of them think the reason their business exists is to enrich customer lives, at Bain, if you just ask everybody through the company, you find 60% to 70% of the people think the reason Bain exists is to make their clients more successful.   It's a servant culture where love is at the core, helping people succeed and putting smiles on faces and that's what makes it a great place to work.   And the irony is, he knows what makes, at least he thinks he knows what makes Bain a great place to work, it's that they are dedicated to helping their teams make a difference in their clients success, and be recognized and rewarded and part of a team that helps achieve that.   And it's financially successful but that's not the purpose, the purpose is making their customers lives better. And he thinks most great places to work lists, completely ignore that. They think it's refrigerators full of beer in the break room, pool tables and ping pong and cool fringe benefits, that's the fringe, the core is being on a team where you're playing a valued role at really making a difference in a customer's life.   Where Can We Find Fred Online   Website - https://www.netpromotersystem.com/ LinkedIn – Fred Reichheld   Quote or Saying that During Times of Adversity Fred Uses   When asked about a quote or saying that he tends to revert to, Fred shared that he wished he did. When he's preaching to whether it's at the dinner table or elsewhere, he goes back to this idea of how important loyalty is. You got to understand what your life stands for, what is your purpose as an individual and then the way you live that purpose is to invest in relationships with other people who share that purpose. And it's how you can invest and help those people succeed that he thinks helps you achieve your mission. So, “Choose your loyalties wisely, they guide your life and they define your legacy.”   Me: Love it, choose your loyalties wisely, they guide your life and define your legacy. Amazing. Love it, absolutely love it. And I'm sure every person on the face of this earth that wants to do good, wants to leave a good legacy behind. So the only way to do that, I believe, as you had said was to try and live by doing those actions on a daily basis, do it consistently because that's the only way when you leave this world you'll be able to leave that legacy.   Fred stated that and measure, so many people would say, “Oh, I can't measure love.” And he would say, actually you can, you can get feedback from your customers in a systematic Net Promoter framework and understand how many lives you've enriched and that is your legacy. And then you should be measuring your way toward the kind of life you want to lead.   Please connect with us on Twitter @navigatingcx and also join our Private Facebook Community – Navigating the Customer Experience and listen to our FB Lives weekly with a new guest   Grab the Freebie on Our Website – TOP 10 Online Business Resources for Small Business Owners   Links   The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World by Fred Reichheld Winning on Purpose: The Unbeatable Strategy of Loving Customers by Fred Reichheld How Will You Measure Your Life by Clayton Christensen Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know by Adam Grant   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience   Do you want to pivot your online customer experience and build loyalty - get a copy of “The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience.”   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience provides 26 easy to follow steps and techniques that helps your business to achieve success and build brand loyalty. This Guide to Limitless, Happy and Loyal Customers will help you to strengthen your service delivery, enhance your knowledge and appreciation of the customer experience and provide tips and practical strategies that you can start implementing immediately! This book will develop your customer service skills and sharpen your attention to detail when serving others. Master your customer experience and develop those knock your socks off techniques that will lead to lifetime customers. Your customers will only want to work with your business and it will be your brand differentiator. It will lead to recruiters to seek you out by providing practical examples on how to deliver a winning customer service experience!

Redefining Medicine
Redefining Medicine with special guest Dr. Judson Brewer

Redefining Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:05


Jud Brewer MD PhD (“Dr. Jud”) is a New York Times best-selling author and thought leader in the field of habit change and the “science of self-mastery”, having combined over 25 years of experience with mindfulness training with his scientific research therein. He is the Director of Research and Innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in Behavioral and Social Sciences and Psychiatry at the Schools of Public Health & Medicine at Brown University. He is also the executive medical director of behavioral health at Sharecare Inc. and a research affiliate at MIT.   A psychiatrist and internationally known expert in mindfulness training for addictions, Brewer has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including both in-person and app-based treatments for smoking, emotional eating, and anxiety. He has also studied the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness using standard and real-time fMRI and EEG neurofeedback. He has trained US Olympic athletes and coaches, foreign government ministers, and his work has been featured on 60 Minutes, TED (4th most viewed talk of 2016, with 17+ Million views), the New York Times, Time magazine (top 100 new health discoveries of 2013), Forbes, BBC, NPR, Al Jazeera (documentary about his research), Businessweek and others. His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, among others.   Dr. Brewer founded MindSciences (which merged with Sharcecare Inc. in 2020) to move his discoveries of clinical evidence behind mindfulness for anxiety, eating, smoking and other behavior change into the hands of consumers (see www.drjud.com for more information). He is the author of The Craving Mind: from cigarettes to smartphones to love, why we get hooked and how we can break bad habits (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017) and the New York Times best-seller, Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind (Avery/Penguin Random House, 2021). Follow him on twitter @judbrewer.

Earl Stewart on Cars
11.27.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Al Packer Ford

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 117:01


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's mystery shopper, Agent Thunder visits a local Ford dealer to see what they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new 2022 Ford Ranger XLT pickup. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Earl Stewart on Cars
11.27.2021 - Your Calls, Texts, and Mystery Shop of Al Packer Ford

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 117:01


Earl and his team answer various caller questions and responds to incoming text messages. Earl's mystery shopper, Agent Thunder visits a local Ford dealer to see what they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new 2022 Ford Ranger XLT pickup. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Sir John Timpson

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 54:33


To celebrate Family Business Week we are looking back over some of our favourite interviews with UK family businesses. Today's interview is with Sir John Timpson. Timpson's is one of the UK's most recognisable brands and their culture is the envy of most. We hear about how this culture is embedded into the business and reflected across the country by empowered staff. We also hear about Sir John's experience of fostering many children alongside his late wife Alex. As someone who grew up in a home that fostered those less fortunate than me, I can relate to how impactful the experience must have been for them. The link for the Alex Timpson Trust is - https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/donation-web/charity?charityId=1013855&stop_mobi=yes (here) About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinessweek.co.uk (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk) Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - HMG Paints

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 64:01


To celebrate Family Business Week here in the UK we are looking back over some of our favourite interviews with UK family businesses. Today's interview is with Jonathan Falder of HMG Paints. We talk about how their culture is embodied throughout the business with multiple generations of the same families working for HMG. We also hear about Jonathan's experience of coming face to face with an alien! About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinessweek.co.uk (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk) Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

Mindful Millionaire with Leisa Peterson
The Art of Business with Steven Morris

Mindful Millionaire with Leisa Peterson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:38


Today, I'm interviewing my good friend Steven Morris. We're talking about art, business, new paradigms, and ways to think differently about business.  Steven's new book, The Beautiful Business recently came out and I couldn't wait to share more about Steven's reflective approach to capitalism and the future of work with you. Enjoy! Steven Morris is the president of Matter Consulting, Inc. He is a brand and culture advisor, author, and speaker. He works with business leaders to mine, articulate, and activate their driving belief system to create organizational integrity, evolved leaders, connected cultures, and unignorable brands. His upcoming book is entitled The Beautiful Business (which publishes in October of 2021 by Conscious Capitalism Press) that focuses on how businesses of all sizes can build integrity, belonging and magnetism through their brand and cultures. His previous book is The Evolved Brand: Why and How to Build a Brand with Soul and Humanize Your Marketing. Through his widely read blog (25,000+ subscribers) and as a contributing writer to Retail Observer (monthly column), Business Week, Brand Week, Conscious Company Magazine, Communication Arts, HOW Magazine and MarketingProfs, Steve writes about the intersection of brand, culture, business, innovation, and wholehearted living.  Steve is also an artist who shows his paintings in galleries across the US, a long-time surfer, and a beekeeper.  Steven shares with us his insights: - "You know, it's interesting. Meaning comes from struggle. Meaning comes from us, confronting the challenges of life. And as we talked about earlier, there is no going through life without some trauma, without some challenges, without some difficulty. It's how we address those things that defines what meaning we make behind those things. So the leaders that come to me typically in the world of business, they've had that version of awakening. It could be, again, any different versions of it. It could even be a spiritual awakening. And now all of a sudden they want to reclaim a larger version of themselves and they want to actually do what I didn't do in my business, which is put more wholeness into their work and not just do it for themselves. But they're called in some way, shape or form to do it in a broader context and affect the people around them."   - "The way that things used to be is that when we asked the kid, what do you want to be when you grow up? The question really was what profession do you want to be? And, you know, it starts with, I want to be a fireman or policeman, you know, if you're a young man or, you know, whatever, a nurse or a doctor or whatever. But now it's what kind of human do you want to be? And how do you want to contribute to the world? How do you want to live your life? And now all of a sudden our work story, our personal story, our… our spiritual story. All these stories are beginning to meld together. And I think what's beginning to happen is that it's not work first. It's life first or integration first. And we're looking to live a fulfilled life, or what I call would call a beautiful life in a business that we feel like we're a belonging member, a contributing member. Where our full self is invited to show up and shine in that environment, not just the mastery that we have in our vocation, but really the human being that we are. And we raise our hand, we join those people and we contribute towards something greater than ourselves, which is all what we all want to do as human beings contribute to something that's greater than simply us." - "They can ask themselves, what does a beautiful life, what does running, shaping, or working for a beautiful business actually mean to me? I want them to have that first private conversation with themselves that determines what is my value system. What is the greatest expression of my own humanity that can show up in my vocation that is in align with my integrity of the way I am as a human being my personal life. And so what I hope the book does is it really helps individuals and lots of them ideally. Claim their own version of human artistry and think deeply about what matters in my life and how can I utilize my own time on this planet, this precious time in this planet with the greatest acts of imagination that I possibly can to live in to that fullest version of my life."  Learn more about Steven: Website: MatterCo.co LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevenmorris111 Twitter: @StevenMMorris Instagram: @stevenmorrisart

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - The Arbikie Distillery

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:00


To celebrate Family Business Week we are selecting some of our favourite interviews with family businesses here in the UK. Today's interview is with Iain Stirling from Arbikie. We discuss the collaboration that led to them creating the worlds first carbon positive Gin. About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinessweek.co.uk (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk) Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Maurizio Bragagni

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:39


To celebrate Family Business Week here in the UK we are selecting some of our favourite interviews with family businesses here in the UK. This episode is a fantastic discussion with Maurizio Bragagni who is the CEO of Tratos, a multinational, multi-generational family business. We discuss the importance of looking after your local communities and highlight how family business can be a force for good! About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

Insert:Human
Steven Titus Smith on Finding Gravity

Insert:Human

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:38


Steven Titus Smith is the Co-Founder of Gravity and the co-author of Egonomics: What Makes Ego Our Greatest Asset (or Most Expensive Liability). His ten-year research project on innovation and culture forms the basis for his upcoming book I Am Gravity. His past work has been published in 24 languages in more than 50 countries. Steven has been featured on CBS MarketWatch, BusinessWeek, Dallas Morning News, Portfolio, and News and World Report. His work has helped hundreds of thousands of people worldwide, including clients like Microsoft, American Express, Disney, Cox Communications, and State Farm. Steven holds a B.S. and B.A. in Psychology and Management from the University of Utah. Steven joins me today to discuss finding gravity. He reveals how your beliefs affect your behaviors and the core traits of inspirational and innovative people who have an appetite for the truth. He discusses whether beliefs are choices and how the intensity of your gravity affects your awareness of your choices. Steven highlights the benefits of being intensely curious and how this can change the nature of who we are. Steven also discusses shaping the future through human transformation. “Behaviors are like the building blocks of a culture, but mentality is the architect of the building blocks.” - Steven Titus Smith This week on Insert:Human Coding and recoding your beliefs and recognizing what they are causing you to do The confidence continuum and how it affects behavior The core traits required to be innovative, inspirational, or have an appetite for the truth Strengths and counterfeit beliefs and the balance of gravity The principles that drive us and the benefits of retaining genuine and intense curiosity How we all learn that it is ‘not good to not know something' and the negative connotations of this mode of thinking Who Steven wrote the book I Am Gravity for and how he hopes it will shape the future Resources Mentioned: Guide: THE 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY TRANSFORMATIVE LEADERS Book: Egonomics: What Makes Ego Our Greatest Asset (or Most Expensive Liability) by Steven Smith and David Marcum Podcast: 062| FINDING OUR COMPASSION WITH BRYAN WELCH Connect with Steven Titus Smith: Gravity Steven Titus Smith on LinkedIn Insert:Human - For a Better Life & Better World Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Insert:Human. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | GooglePlay | Stitcher | Spotify Be sure to share your favorite episodes on social media to help me reach more seekers and problem-solvers, like you. Join me on Twitter, Instagram, and Linkedin. For more exclusive content and to claim your free copy of the first chapter of my upcoming book, Technology is Dead, visit my website.

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Interview with Josie Morris MBE

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:20


To celebrate Family Business Week we are re-releasing some of our favourite interviews with family businesses here in the UK. In today's episode we revisit the conversation that I had with Josie Morris MBE from WoolCool. We talk about their journey to becoming a Certified B-Corp and Josie's experience of being awarded the MBE. About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Sir James Wates

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:43


On this weeks show I am joined by Sir James Wates as we discuss Family Business Week. Sir James is the Chairman of The Wates Group and also the Institute for Family Business. Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good. We also discuss The Wates Principles. In late 2017, Sir James Wates CBE, was invited by the Government to lead the development of corporate principles for large private companies. The resulting code – now known as the https://www.wates.co.uk/articles/insight/the-wates-principles-report/?hub=who-we-are--corporate-governance (Wates Principles) was launched in December 2018 and provides a framework to help companies to meet legal requirements while promoting long term success. The Wates Principles encourage these companies to adopt a set of key behaviours to secure trust and confidence among stakeholders and benefit the economy and society in general. Follow Family Business Week on Twitter https://gbr01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2FFamilyBizWeek&data=04%7C01%7CRuss%40familybusinesspartnership.com%7Cf666ae09d51e418a5e9808d9a5bf3dc4%7Ced114aa32143426d8a82e3851f091c9a%7C0%7C0%7C637723064551017563%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&sdata=SuI%2Bv1%2BusKJ7gTy2t6ntMBOLFV9F6qA476q3mGEEqfQ%3D&reserved=0 (@FamilyBizWeek) Join the conversation using the hashtags #FamilyBizWeek and #WeSupportFamilyBiz You can read fascinating case studies or download content to share on social media at https://gbr01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.familybusinessweek.co.uk%2F&data=04%7C01%7CRuss%40familybusinesspartnership.com%7Cf666ae09d51e418a5e9808d9a5bf3dc4%7Ced114aa32143426d8a82e3851f091c9a%7C0%7C0%7C637723064551017563%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&sdata=%2FhItrY7UG%2FjdIp3iAbca%2FjBMLXfjpnmLhUnMFBpzctk%3D&reserved=0 (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk). About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at www.familybusinessweek.co.uk Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your... Support this podcast

Coaching for Leaders
555: How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

Coaching for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:45


Sukhinder Singh Cassidy: Choose Possibility Sukhinder Singh Cassidy is a leading technology executive and entrepreneur, board member, and investor with twenty-five years of experience founding and helping to scale companies, including Google, Amazon, and Yodlee. Most recently, she served as president of StubHub, which thrived under her leadership and sold in 2020 right before the pandemic for $4+ billion. She is the founder and chairman of the Boardlist and has been profiled in Fortune, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and The New York Times, among others. She has been named one of Elle's Power Women, one of the Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company, and one of the Top 100 People in the Valley by Business Insider. She is the author of Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)*. In this conversation, Sukhinder and I discuss how to handle a transition in a way that works for both you and the organization you're leaving. We discuss the value of proactive communication and clear timelines — plus some of the hidden costs of transitioning poorly. Finally, we made the invitation to consider transitions in the context of your long-term career goals. Key Points Don't leave before you leave. Putting in maximum effort until you're gone protects your reputation and the impact you've worked to achieve. Beware the cost of lingering. You likely know the right timeframe for your departure — use that to frame your transition. Leave opportunity in your wake. Use remaining time to set the team up for success, provide coaching and mentoring, and make it an easier transition for others. Tie up loose ends before you depart. Leave the team an organization in a place you would want to inherit if you were the new leader coming in. Take small steps, middle steps, and big steps. Avoid fixating on the myth of the single choice. Careers come together with many choices, over time. Resources Mentioned Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)* by Sukhinder Singh Cassidy Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

Earl Stewart on Cars
11.20.2021 - The Best of Earl on Cars - Mystery Shop Toyota of Vero Beach

Earl Stewart on Cars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 118:52


This is a re-broadcast of a previously aired segment of the Earl Stewart on Cars radio program. Earl's female mystery shopper, Agent Lightning visits a local Toyota dealer to see what they have on the lot and how much over sticker they will charge for a new Toyota. Earl Stewart is the owner of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach, Florida, one of the largest Toyota dealerships in the southeastern U.S. He is also a consumer advocate who shares his knowledge spanning 50+ years about the car industry through a weekly newspaper column and radio show. Each week Earl provides his audience with valuable tips that prevent them from "getting ripped off by a car dealer". Earl has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, Business Week, and other major publications. He has also made numerous appearances on CNN, Fox News, CBS, and other news networks. He is frequently called upon by local and national media to comment on major trends and newsworthy events occurring in today's rapidly changing auto industry. You can learn more by going to Earl's videos on www.youtube.com/earloncars, subscribing to his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/earloncars, his tweets at www.twitter.com/earloncars, and reading his blog posts at www.earloncars.com. Sign up to become one of Earl's Vigilantes and help others in your community to avoid getting ripped off by a car dealer. Go to www.earlsvigilantes.com for more information. “Disclosure: Earl Stewart is a Toyota dealer and directly and indirectly competes with the subjects of the Mystery Shopping Reports. He honestly and accurately reports the experiences of the shoppers and does not influence their findings. As a matter of fact, based on the results of the many Mystery Shopping Reports he has conducted, there are more dealers on the Recommended Dealer List than on the Not Recommended List he maintains on www.GoodDealerBadDealerList.com”

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore
845: Corey Rosen founder of National Center for Employee Ownership

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 101:29


Corey Rosen is the founder and an active staff member of the National Center for Employee Ownership, a private, nonprofit membership, information, and research organization in Oakland, CA. The NCEO is widely considered to be the authoritative source on broad-based employee ownership plans. He cofounded the NCEO in 1981 after working five years as a professional staff member in the U.S. Senate, where he helped draft legislation on employee ownership plans. Prior to that, he taught political science at Ripon College. He is the author or co-author of over 100 articles and numerous books on employee ownership, and co-author (with John Case and Martin Staubus) of Equity: Why Employee Ownership is Good for Business (Harvard Business School Press, 2005). He has appeared frequently on CNN, PBS, NPR, MSNBC, and other network programs; and is regularly quoted in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, and other leading publications. He has lectured on employee ownership on six continents. Check out The Great Game Of Business by Jack Stack as recommended in this episode! Show notes… Calls to ACTION!!! Join Restaurant Unstoppable Network and connect with my past guest and a community of superfans. Subscribe to the Restaurant Unstoppable YouTube Channel Join the private Unstoppable Facebook Group Join the email list! (Scroll Down to get the Vendor List!) Favorite success quote or mantra: "Employee ownership is a way to make capitalism work for everybody." In today's episode with Corey Rosen we will discuss: We are talking about ESOPs and Corey's book Equity: Why Employee Ownership Is Good For Business Check out Corey's other books on his author page Today's sponsor: Diageo Bar Academy equips bartenders, servers, managers, and hospitality professionals with the insights, stories, and tools to be better - raising the bar on industry standards. Diageo Bar Academy reaches a diverse audience, with backgrounds and skill levels of all ranges- providing them with skills, knowledge, and the techniques they need to improve their personal and professional lives. 7shifts is a modern labor management platform, designed by restaurateurs, for restaurateurs. Effectively labor management is more important than ever to ensure profitability and restaurant success. Trusted by over 400,000 restaurant professionals, 7shifts gives you the tools you need to streamline labor operations, communicate with your team, and retain your talent. Best of all 7shifts integrates with the POS and Payroll systems you already use and trust (like Toast!) turning labor into a competitive advantage for your business. Restaurant Unstoppable members get 3 months, absolutely free. MarginEdge is completely free for new customers until September. No setup fees. No integration fees. No commitment. Take your back office paperwork down to 2-3 minutes a day while creating real-time financial views to inform your path ahead. Contact info: NCEO.org Email: crosen@nceo.org Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for joining today! Have some feedback you'd like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below! If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, please leave an honest review for the Restaurant Unstoppable Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them. And finally, don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. Huge thanks to Corey Rosen for joining me for another awesome episode. Until next time!   Restaurant Unstoppable is a free podcast. One of the ways I'm able to make it free is by earning a commission when sharing certain products with you. I've made it a core value to only share tools, resources, and services my guest mentors have recommend, first. If you're finding value in my podcast, please use my links!

The Next Chapter with Charlie
#215 Anne Michaud Why They Stay: Sex Scandals and Hidden Agendas of 8 Political Wives

The Next Chapter with Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:58


Podcast Opening   We live in an unprecedented time of total disclosure of the personal lives of our politicians—male and female. But today we will discuss with Anne Michaud the stories of the wives of famous political men involved in serial sex scandals and deeply held personal agendas. The question frequently asked about these women Is “Why do they stay with such philanderers?” Common responses range from weakness to a misguided drive for some sort of personal advantage. Anne Michaud very aptly clarifies the motivations, strategies, and tactics of these women in her truly enormously insightful book Why They Stay: Sex Scandals, Deals, and Hidden Agendas. In today's thought-provoking and marvelously insightful chat Anne offers surprising conclusions on how certain women have dealt with the most difficult of husbands. Anne is a renowned and highly credentialed journalist. A veteran political journalist, Anne Michaud is an editor for Crain's New York. She previously reported for the Wall Street Journal and wrote a nationally syndicated op-ed column for Newsday. Anne has won more than 25 writing and reporting awards and was twice named “Columnist of the Year” by statewide New York journalism associations. Anne covered Bill Clinton's 1996 re-election campaign, Anthony Weiner's 2005 mayoral bid and Eliot Spitzer's rise and fall as New York's governor from 2006 to 2008. Her work has appeared in Ms., the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, Newsweek, BusinessWeek.com, Crain's NY Business, Cincinnati Magazine and more. With that let's bring on Anne Michaud:   with Charlie. Until next, this is Charlie Hedges signing off. Bye for now. For more information on Anne Michaud please visit www.annemichaud.com Please go to Why They Stay to review Anne's book. And go to American Czarina Melania Trump for a copy of her latest book.          

Work @ Home RockStar Podcast
WHR 3.41 : Naresh Vissa

Work @ Home RockStar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 34:43


SHOW NOTES Good Note : In business for 8 1/2 years as work from home stay at home dad. Bad Note: Highly recommed that you get a lawyer to look over your contracts. Practice Makes Progress : Subscribe to newsletters, podcasts, youtube. Constantly living a breathing the craft. Getting Fans : Using fear and psychology to sell. Assembling the Band : Subcontract work overseas to contractors. There are plenty of thing like upwork, fiver and others to find contractors. Establish long term connections with the ones that work well. THE STORY Naresh Vissa is the Founder & CEO of Krish Media & Marketing – a full service e-commerce, technology, development, online, and digital media and marketing agency and solutions provider. He has worked with CNN Radio, Clear Channel Communications, J.P. Morgan Chase, EverBank, The Institute for Energy Research, Houston Rockets, Houston Astros, the American Junior Golf Association, Agora Financial, Agora Publishing, Stansberry Research, and TradeStops. He is the #1 bestselling author of FIFTY SHADES OF MARKETING: Whip Your Business into Shape & Dominate Your Competition, PODCASTNOMICS: The Book of Podcasting… To Make You Millions, THE NEW PR: 21st Century Public Relations Strategies & Resources… To Reach Millions, TRUMPBOOK: How Digital Liberals Silenced a Nation into Making America Hate Again, and the new book FROM NOBODY TO BESTSELLING AUTHOR! How To Write, Publish & Market Your Book. He is the co-host of The Work From Home Show. He has a Master's Degree from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and has been featured on USA Today, Yahoo!, Bloomberg, MSNBC, Huffington Post, Businessweek, MSN Money, Business Insider, India Today, Hindustan Times, and other domestic and international media outlets.

Be Real Show
#372 - Jason Falls gets REAL about Reframing Infuencer Marketing

Be Real Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:50


I've been called a thought leader and an expert, but I've also been called bad names by trolls, so it balances out. My job is leading digital strategy for a kick-ass agency called Cornett in Lexington, Ky. (2021 Ad Age Small Agency Gold Winner in the Southeast Region). My experiences have given me the opportunity to speak at conferences, write three books and be called all sorts of superlatives by Forbes, Business Week, Entrepreneur and others. To serve the small business community, I offer a few select marketing coaching calls each month. Let's connect! https://jasonfalls.com/get-winfluence/ I host a pair of podcast on C-Suite Radio. Digging Deeper - Make Creativity Your Business Advantage is a weekly interview series focused on creativity and marketing. Winfluence - The Influence Marketing Podcast dives deep into experts on influencer marketing and is a supplement to my latest book. I'm also on the Global Influencer Marketing Advisory Board, an industry directional organization founded by Audience2Media, a UK firm. Some people know me from founding SocialMediaExplorer.com, which at one point was one of the top marketing blogs in the world according to AdAge. I've been involved in some really cool projects over the years that have won awards and recognition. I'm particularly proud of helping form the strategy for Wonderopolis, an education effort by the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL) which was called one of the top 50 websites in the world by Time Magazine in 2013. Projects I've been a part of have also won SAMMY Awards, Shorty Awards and dozens of regional ADDY Awards. Some people call me insightful. Some call me funny and engaging. My kids just roll their eyes and call me Dad. I dig bourbon and sports.

The Marketing Book Podcast
357 The Sea We Swim In by Frank Rose

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 83:20


The Sea We Swim In: How Stories Work in a Data-Driven World by Frank Rose About the Book: A practical guide to "narrative thinking," and why it matters in a world defined by data. In The Sea We Swim In, Frank Rose leads us to a new understanding of stories and their role in our lives. For decades, experts from many fields―psychologists, economists, advertising and marketing executives―failed to register the power of narrative. Scientists thought stories were frivolous. Economists were knee-deep in theory. Marketers just wanted to cut to the sales pitch. Yet stories, not reasoning, are the key to persuasion. Whether we're aware of it or not, stories determine how we view the world and our place in it. That means the tools of professional storytellers―character, world, detail, voice―can unlock a way of thinking that's ideal for an age in which we don't passively consume media but actively participate in it. Building on insights from cognitive psychology and neuroscience, Rose shows us how to see the world in narrative terms, not as a thesis to be argued or a pitch to be made but as a story to be told. Leading brands and top entertainment professionals already understand the vast potential of storytelling. From Warby Parker to Mailchimp to The Walking Dead, Rose explains how they use stories to establish their identity and turn ordinary people into fans―and how you can do the same. About the Author: Frank Rose is an author, essayist, and keynote speaker. A senior fellow at the Columbia University School of the Arts, he teaches global business executives as faculty director of its Strategic Storytelling program, presented in partnership with Columbia Business School Executive Education, and serves as awards director of its Digital Storytelling Lab. His previous book, The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories, was hailed by the International Journal of Advertising as "an essential overview" of the fundamental changes affecting media. Before moving to Columbia, Frank spent many years reporting on the impact of technology on media as a contributing editor at Wired and a contributing writer at Fortune before that. His 1989 best-seller West of Eden, about the ouster of Steve Jobs from Apple, was named one of the ten best books of the year by Businessweek. Among his other books is The Agency, an unauthorized history of the oldest and at one time most successful talent agency in Hollywood. And, interesting facts: he is a native of Virginia and graduated from Wash­ington & Lee University with a degree in journalism and moved soon after to New York, where he got his start covering the punk scene at CBGB for The Village Voice, chronicling the emergence of Patti Smith, the Ramones, and Talking Heads. Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/sea-we-swim-in-frank-rose

The Charles Mizrahi Show
The Evolution of Electric Vehicles — Tim Higgins

The Charles Mizrahi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 52:38


It's one of the most fascinating companies of the 21st century … Against huge odds, Tesla was able to pull off one of the most dramatic corporate turnarounds in history and become the world's most valuable automaker. Wall Street Journal reporter Tim Higgins shares the extraordinary inside story in his book, Power Play. And in this episode, he discusses all things Tesla, Elon Musk and electric cars with host Charles Mizrahi. Topics Discussed: An Introduction to Tim Higgins (00:00:00) A Luxurious Customer Experience (00:02:39) The Evolution of Electric Vehicles (00:05:53) Expanding Vehicle Range (00:11:42) Challenging Traditional Automakers (00:19:21) Safety is Key (00:26:54) Selling the Future of Cars (00:32:18) Supporters vs. Skeptics (00:38:38) The Future of Tesla (00:47:12) Guest Bio: Tim Higgins is an award-winning tech and auto reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Before joining the Journal, Higgins worked for Bloomberg News and Businessweek. Today, he covers Tesla, Apple and other tech companies — while regularly serving as an on-air contributor to CNBC. In addition, Higgins is a published author. Power Play details Tesla's journey to developing a luxury electric vehicle and an unrivaled customer experience. Resources Mentioned:  https://www.amazon.com/Power-Play-Tesla-Elon-Century-ebook/dp/B08MQ4KWWR (Power Play: Tesla, Elon Musk, and the Bet of the Century) Transcript: https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/2021/11/09/evolution-of-electric-vehicle-tim-higgins/ (https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/)   Don't Forget To... •  Subscribe to my podcast! •  Download this episode to save for later •  Liked this episode? Leave a kind review!   Subscribe to Charles' Alpha Investor newsletter today: https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1729783 (https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1729783)