Podcasts about Clemente

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LEVELS – A Whole New Level
#190 - The difference between health and fitness | Cole Sager & Josh Clemente

LEVELS – A Whole New Level

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 61:12


It's possible to be athletic and physically fit but metabolically unhealthy. Listen as Cole Sager, eight-time CrossFit Games athlete, and Josh Clemente, Co-Founder at Levels, discuss the distinction between physical fitness and holistic metabolic health, and Cole's realization that his health wasn't in great shape according to his bloodwork. Cole shares his experience as a sports enthusiast, Spirit of the Games awardee, and Levels member and his journey toward metabolic health. Cole and Josh talk about determination, consistency, and advocacy for a metabolically healthy future while keeping athletic performance at the forefront. Levels helps you see how food affects your health, empowering you with the tools needed to achieve health goals and improve healthspan. Levels Members gain access to the Levels app and continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), providing real-time feedback on how diet and lifestyle choices impact your metabolic health. Look for multiple new shows per week on A Whole New Level, where we have in-depth conversations about metabolic health and how the Levels startup team builds a wellness movement from the ground up in the health and wellness tech industry.

Urbi et Orbi
52. La Bhagavad Gita

Urbi et Orbi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 62:51


La Bhagavad Gita es un poema filosófico sobre una cosmovisión que hace posible liberar al ser a través de la devoción, el deber y la disciplina. Es el primer texto del hinduísmo que leyó David, uno de los primeros libros que le regaló a María Cristina y uno de los temas favoritos de Octavio. Episodio grabado pocas horas antes del nacimiento de Clemente. 

Descargas predicanet
Episode 918: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) (FIN))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 9:07


   Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).           

The Epstein Chronicles
Murder In Moscow: Former FBI Profiler Jim Clemente Weighs In On The Murders (11/23/22)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 14:39


Jim Clemente, a retired FBI supervisory special agent and criminal behavioral analysis expert had some interesting things to say to Fox news about who this suspect might be and what might have motivated them to commit these horrible murders. In this episode, we take a look at what Mr. Clemente had to say and discuss the profile that he says will likely match the killer. Let's dive in!(commercial at 9:09)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.foxnews.com/us/idaho-coed-killer-fbi-profiler-reveals-suspects-likely-attributes

Baseball History: 101
Roberto "The Great One" Clemente

Baseball History: 101

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 49:16


On this episode, as you can guess, the guys discuss the life and career of a top class right fielder and humanitarian. Roberto Clemente, although having passed away almost fifty years ago is still a household name amongst baseball fans. As always, please like, rate, subscribe and share our podcast with your friends. For topic suggestions, please shoot us a line at baseballhis101@gmail.com

10 min con Jesús - América Latina
La valentía del testimonio (23-11-22)

10 min con Jesús - América Latina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 10:37


P. Juan Carlos (Ecuador)- Jesucristo es Dios verdadero, hecho hombre, nos pide dar testimonio para que muchos se acerquen. Pasar por dificultades y dejarnos llevar por Dios.

Beyond The Horizon
Murder In Moscow: Former FBI Profiler Jim Clemente Weighs In On The Murders (11/23/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 14:39


Jim Clemente, a retired FBI supervisory special agent and criminal behavioral analysis expert had some interesting things to say to Fox news about who this suspect might be and what might have motivated them to commit these horrible murders. In this episode, we take a look at what Mr. Clemente had to say and discuss the profile that he says will likely match the killer. Let's dive in!(commercial at 9:09)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.foxnews.com/us/idaho-coed-killer-fbi-profiler-reveals-suspects-likely-attributes

LEVELS – A Whole New Level
#188 - A lack of communication is a lack of performance | Josh Clemente & Sam Corcos

LEVELS – A Whole New Level

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 56:48


Every team must build trust and confidence with peers, but remote teams face a greater challenge because of the lack of face-to-face interaction. At Levels, we work to assume positive intent of our teammates, which supports our core value of “confidence is earned.” Both values are tied to work performance, and in order to build confidence and trust, a team member must do great work as well as learn how to communicate that work effectively, especially in a remote environment. Listen as Levels founders Sam Corcos and Josh Clemente discuss how confidence and trust need to be earned over time. Levels helps you see how food affects your health, empowering you with the tools you need to achieve your health goals now and in the long term. Levels Members gain access to the Levels app and continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), providing real-time feedback on how diet and lifestyle choices impact your metabolic health. Look for several new shows each week on A Whole New Level, where we have in-depth conversations about metabolic health and how the Levels startup team builds a wellness movement from the ground up.

Radical Audacity in Love & Life with Tiphany Kane
Resilience in Painful Times with Guest Savio P. Clemente

Radical Audacity in Love & Life with Tiphany Kane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 54:42


This weeks guest is no stranger to pain, heartache, and challenges. He survived stage-3  cancer as a young LGBTQ+ man and came to realise that it is his ability to tap into his inner resilience that helped him get through.He is now a #1 Best Selling author, syndicated columnist, board certified wellness coach, and founder of The Human Resolve, LLC. Savio has dedicated his life to coaching cancer survivors to overcome the confusion and gain the clarity needed to get busy living in mind, body, and spirit.  He inspires health and wellness seekers to find meaning in the "why" and to cultivate resilience in their mindset.Read Savio's Interview of me in Authority Magazine: Overcoming the Fear Of Failure You can find Savio:Instagram  @ thehumanresolveTwitter & Linkedin: Savio P. ClementeOther Episodes you will enjoy:Radical Audacity of Scary Decision Making3 Important Lessons Fear Teaches Us5 Ways to Overcome the Fear of FailureContact Tiphany:DM me on IG @tiphanykaneCheck out my website: www.tiphanykane.comLeave Tiphany a Voice Message to have a spotlight on the podcastProduced & Edited by: KaSa Media Productions

The TTMCast Podcast
Sports Artist Ben Caraher, Clemente Lisa and Andrew Raycroft

The TTMCast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 142:22


Hot stuff this week! Ben Caraher, from Sports Card Mosaics stops in to talk about his cool baseball card art mosaics (1:41:46), former Boston Bruin goalie Andrew Raycroft talks hockey with me (1:09:42) and Clemente Lisi joins me to talk World Cup (37:25). We have all our regular features including Bakers Dozen (16:28), Fast Forward Football (1:01:33), Making the Grade (1:18:14), TTMCast Stamp of Approval (1:23:26), Vern Rapp Minute (1:28:18) and TTM Returns (1:32:21). We are giving away a copy of Clemente Lisi's new book. Send email to win at ttmcast@yahoo.com

Inside The War Room
The FIFA World Cup: A History of the Planet's Biggest Sporting Event

Inside The War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 52:22


Links from the show:* The FIFA World Cup: A History of the Planet's Biggest Sporting Event* Playing Through the Pain: Ken Caminiti and the Steroids Confession That Changed Baseball Forever* Listen to the show on your favorite platform* Connect with Clemente on Twitter* Connect with Ryan on Twitter* Subscribe to the newsletterAbout my guest:Affiliate Assistant Professor Clemente Lisi teaches writing and journalism at The King's College. He also co-directs the NYC Semester in Journalism program and acts as an advisor to the student online newspaper/print magazine/video platform, The Empire State Tribune.Lisi has worked as a journalist and editor for over two decades. In that time, he has been an editor at major metropolitan dailies such as the New York Post and the New York Daily News. He also has experience in the digital space, serving as senior editor at ABCNews.com. He worked primarily in the area of breaking news and sports. He has covered some of the biggest stories of this century, including the September 11 attacks and its aftermath as well as the elevation of Timothy Dolan to cardinal at the Vatican in February 2012.Lisi is a graduate of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, and he worked as an adjunct professor at Fordham University. He enjoys coaching and playing soccer, reading books about history, and spending time with his wife and two children. Get full access to Dispatches from the War Room at dispatchesfromthewarroom.substack.com/subscribe

Descargas predicanet
Episode 908: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) ( Así también se dice que))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 9:35


  Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).          

PARANORMAL
EVIDENCIA PARANORMAL | Invitado: Carlos Clemente - T2 E5

PARANORMAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 102:22


El investigador con mas de 30 años de carrera y 'Skywatcher' Carlos Clemente nos muestra extraordinaria evidencia en video que por diversos motivos se ha mantenido oculta, además de narrarnos sus más extrañas y terroríficas experiencias. INVITADO ESPECIAL: CARLOS CLEMENTE https://www.youtube.com/user/ProyectoVigilantes https://www.youtube.com/c/CarlosClementeSKYWATCHERS https://twitter.com/redskywatchers HOST DEL PODCAST: FEPO https://www.tiktok.com/@fepomx https://instagram.com/fepomx/ INVITADO DEL PRÓLOGO: JULIO MORALES https://www.instagram.com/musicalmente.paranormal/ Recuerda seguirnos en nuestras redes sociales: ► TIKTOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@paranormalpodcast ► FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/podcastparanormal ► INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/podcast_paranormal ► TELEGRAM: https://t.me/podcastparanormal GRUPOS PARA COMPARTIR HISTORIAS, MEMES Y EVIDENCIAS Grupo oficial de Facebook: ► https://www.facebook.com/groups/548487930178860 Grupo oficial de Telegram: ► https://t.me/+vFdn13cseD0zZWUx Todos los enlaces para ver y escuchar el podcast: https://podcastparanormal.com Envía tus evidencias a fepo@podcastparanormal.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podcastparanormal/message

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Religious Literacy in International Affairs

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022


Susan Hayward, associate director of the Religious Literacy and the Professions Initiative at Harvard Divinity School, leads the conversation on religious literacy in international affairs.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to the final session of the Fall 2022 CFR Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to share it with your classmates or colleagues. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Susan Hayward with us to discuss religious literacy in international affairs. Reverend Hayward is the associate director for the Religious Literacy and Professions Initiative at Harvard Divinity School. From 2007 to 2021, she worked for the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), with focus on Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Columbia, and Iraq. And most recently serving as senior advisor for Religion and Inclusive Societies, and as a fellow in Religion and Public Life. During her tenure at USIP, Reverend Hayward also coordinated an initiative exploring the intersection of women, religion, conflict, and peacebuilding, partnership with the Berkley Center at Georgetown University and the World Faith Development Dialogue. And she coedited a book on the topic entitled Women, Religion and Peacebuilding: Illuminating the Unseen. Reverend Hayward has also taught at Georgetown and George Washington Universities and serves as a regular guest lecturer and trainer at the Foreign Service Institute. And she's also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. So, Susan, thank you very much for being with us today. Can you begin by explaining why religious literacy is so important for understanding international affairs? HAYWARD: Yeah, absolutely. Thank you, Irina. And thanks to the Council on Foreign Relations for inviting me to be a part of this webinar. And I really appreciate you and the invitation, and I appreciate all of you who have joined us today, taking time out of what I know is a busy time of year, as we hurdle towards final exams and cramming everything into these last weeks of the semester. So it's great to be with all of you. I am going to be—in answering that broad question that Irina offered, I'm going to be drawing on my work. As Irina said, I worked at the—I work now at Harvard Divinity School's Religion and Public Life Program. And what we seek to do here is to do here is to advance the public understanding of religion in service of a just world at peace. And we do that, in part, by working with professionals in governments and foreign policy, and in the humanitarian sector, as well as working with our students who are seeking to go into vocations in those professional spheres. And then my fourteen years with the Religion and Inclusive Societies Program at the U.S. Institute of Peace. So I'll say a little bit more about both of those as we go along, and those experiences, but I'm also happy to answer any questions about either of those programs when we turn to the Q&A. And I should say that I'm going to be focusing as well—given that a lot of you all who are joining us today are educators yourselves or are students—I'm going to be focusing in particular on how we teach religious literacy within international affairs. So I wanted to begin with the definition of religious literacy, because this is a term that is increasingly employed as part of a rallying cry that's based on a particular diagnosis. And the diagnosis is that there has been insufficient deep consideration of the multiple and complex dimensions of religion and culture that impact international affairs at all levels across the world. And that the result of that lack of a complex understanding of religion in this arena has been the—the hamstringing of the ability of the international system to operate in ways that are effective in bringing justice, peace, democracy, human rights, and development. So I'm going to circle back to that diagnosis in a bit. But first I want to jump to the prescription that's offered, which is to enhance religious literacy using various resources, trainings, courses, and ways that are relevant for foreign policymakers and those working across the international system, as well as those students who are in the schools of international affairs, or other schools and planning to go into this space, into this profession. So the definition that we use here at Harvard Divinity School—and this is one that has been adopted by the American Academy of Religion, which is the scholarly guild for religious studies—defines it in this way: Religious literacy is the—entails the ability to discern and analyze the fundamental intersections of religion and social, political, and cultural life through multiple lenses. So specifically, one who is religious literate will possess a basic understanding of different religious traditions, including sort of fundamental beliefs and practices and contemporary manifestation of different religious traditions, as well as how they arose out of and continue to be shaped by particular social, historical, and cultural contexts. And the ability to discern and explore the religious dimensions of political, social, and cultural expressions across time and space. So this gets broken down in two different ways—three, according to me. But that definition focuses on two in particular. One is often referred to as the confessional approach or the substantive approach. So that's looking at understanding different religious traditions and their manifestations in different places. That's understanding something fundamental about the difference between Theravada Buddhism and Vajrayana Buddhism, for example. Or how Islam is practiced, and dominantly practiced in Nigeria, versus in North America, for example. The second approach is the religious studies approach. Which is sometimes also called the functional approach. So that's the ability to be able to analyze the ways in which religions in complex ways are really intersecting with social, and political, and economic life, even if not explicitly so. But in implicit, embedded ways shaping different kinds of economic systems, social systems, and political systems, and being able to analyze and see that, and so ask particular questions and consider different kinds of policy solutions—diagnoses and solutions that can take that into account. And then finally, I add the religious engagement approach. That particularly comes out of my work when I was at USIP and working with foreign policymakers in the State Department and elsewhere. To some extent, overseas as well, those in the diplomatic sector. Which I understand is determining whether, when, and how to engage with specifically defined religious institutions, actors, and interests, including on issues related, for example, with religious freedom, in ways that are inclusive, just, strategic, and, importantly for the U.S. context, legal. So abiding by the Establishment Clause of the Constitution. Now, all three types of religious literacy defined here depend on three principles or ideas. So the first is that they understand religions as lived, as constituted by humans who are constantly interpreting and reinterpreting their religious traditions. This means that as a result they are internally diverse, sometimes very internally contradictory. They'll have different religious interpretations with respect to particular human rights issues, particular social issues, issues related to gender, and so on and so forth. That they change over time. That that sort of complex interpretive process that is going on within religious traditions also leads to kind of larger normative changes within religious traditions over history in different temporal contexts. And that they're culturally embedded. So as the question I was asking earlier, how is Islam, as it's understood and practiced in Nigeria, different from how it's understood and practiced in North America, for example. There are ways in which the particular religious interpretations and practices of a tradition are always going to be entangled with specific cultural contexts in ways that are near impossible to disentangle at times. And that means that they just manifest differently in different places. And this—these ideas of religion as lived pushes against an understanding of religions as being static or being monolithic. So that then leads us to ensure that there's never—that it's always going to be a problem to make sweeping claims about entire religious traditions because you'll always find somebody or some community within those religious traditions that don't believe or practice according to the claim that you just made about it. And that applies to situations of violent conflict and with respect to human rights, on global issues like climate and migration. This idea, the internal diversity in particular, is what is at play when you hear the phrase “Ambivalence of the Sacred” that was coined by Scott Appleby in his—in this very influential book by the same name. I'll throw in here a quote from Scott Appleby from that book, this idea that religions are always going to show up in ambivalent or contradictory ways across different places, but also sometimes in the very same contexts. So I think we can see that, for example, in the U.S. right now, and that there's no one, let's say, religious position with respect to reproductive rights, for example. There's a great deal of internal plurality and ambivalence that exists across religious traditions and interpretations within the Christian tradition and beyond about that specific issue. Moreover then, what religion is, what is considered religious, what is recognized as religious and what isn't, and how it manifests in different contexts depends on just a complex array of intersecting factors. I'm going to come back to—that's kind of meaty phrase just to throw out there, so I'm going to come back to that in a minute. So the second principle or idea of religious literacy that I want to highlight here is the idea of right-sizing religion. This is a phrase that Peter Mandaville used quite a bit when he was in the State Department's Religion and Global Affairs Office under the Obama administration and has written about. So I'll turn you to that article of his to understand more about it. But the central idea is that we don't want to over nor underemphasize religion's role in any given context. So just by way of a quick example, in looking at the Rohingya crisis or the ethnic cleansing of Rakhine State in Myanmar, one could not say it was all about religion, that it was about Buddhist nationalists who are anti-Muslim wanting to destroy a particular religious community. Nor could you say it had nothing to do with religion, because there were these religious dimensions that were at play in driving the violence towards the Rohingya and the larger communities' acceptance of that violence against the Rohingya community. But if you were to overemphasize the religious roles, the religious dimensions of that crisis, then your policy solutions—you might look at religious freedom tools and resources to be able to address the situation. And that would address the situation in part, but obviously there were other economic and political factors that were at play in leading to the Rohingya crisis. And including certain economic interests with oil pipelines that were being constructed across lands that the Rohingya were living on in Rakhine state, or the political conflict that was taking place between the military and the National League of Democracy, and so on. So addressing the crisis holistically and sustainably requires that we right-size the role that religion is playing in that particular crisis. And that goes across the board, in looking at conflicts and looking at the role of religion in climate, and addressing climate collapse, and so on and so forth. We need to always neither under nor overestimate the role that religion is playing in driving some of these issues and as a solution in addressing some of these issues. OK. So with that definition and principles of religious literacy in mind, I want to go back to the diagnosis that I gave at the—that I mentioned at the top, for which religious literacy is offered as a solution. The diagnosis, if you remember, was that there's been insufficient consideration given to the multiple and complex dimensions of religion and culture that impact international affairs. So I'm going to demonstrate what it means to apply the religious studies approach to religious literacy, or the functional approach to religious literacy, to help us understand why that might be. And remember, the religious studies approach is seeking to discern and explore the religious dimensions of political, social, and cultural expressions and understandings across time and place. So this approach, in trying to answer that question and consider that diagnosis, it would invite us to look historically at the development of the modern international legal and political systems in a particular time and place in Western Europe, during the European Enlightenment. As many of you may well know, this came about in the aftermath of the so-called confessional or religious wars. Those were largely understood to have pitted Protestants against Catholics, though it's more complicated in reality. But broadly, that's the story. And the modern state, on which the international system was built, sought to create a separation between religious and state authority. For the first time in European history, this separation between religious and state authority that became more rigid and enforced over time, in the belief that this was necessary in order to ensure peace and prosperity moving forward, to bring an end to these wars, and to ensure that the state would be better able to deal with the reality of increasing religious pluralism within Europe. So this was essentially the idea of secular political structures that was born in that time and place. And these secular political structures were considered to be areligious or neutral towards religion over time, again. In the process of legitimating this sort of revolutionary new model of the secular modern state, and in the process of creating this demarcated distinction that had not previously existed—at least, not a neat distinction of the secular or the political authority and the religious—the religious authority—there was an assertion as part of that ideologically legitimate and support that. There was an assertion of the secular as rational, ordered, and associated with all of the good stuff of modernity. Meanwhile, the religious was defined in counter-distinction as a threat to the secular. It was irrational, backwards, a threat to the emerging order. A not-subtle presumption in all of this is that the new modern state and the international system would serve as a bulwark against archaic, dangerous, religious, and other traditionally cultural, in particular, worldviews and practices in—it would be a bulwark against that, and a support for this neutral and considered universal international law and system—secular system. Now, I realize I'm making some, like, huge, broad historical sweeps here, given the short amount of time I have. But within that story I just told, there is a lot more complexity that one can dig into. But part of what I seek to do in offering religious literacy in international relations theory and practice to students, and to practitioners in this realm, is to help those operating in the system think through how that historically and contextually derived conception of religion and the co-constitutive conception of secularism continues to operate within and shape how we interpret and respond to global events within the system. And this occurs—I see this happening in two dominant ways. One is, first, in thinking about religion as a distinct sphere of life that can be disentangled entirely from the political, when in reality religion is deeply entangled with the political, and vice versa. And scholars like Talal Asad and Elizabeth Shakman Hurd have done really great work to show how even our understanding of the secular and secular norms and so on is shaped by Protestant Christian commitments and understandings. And saying within that, our understanding of what religion is—like, a focus on belief, for example, which has been codified in a lot of religious freedom law, as part of the international system—again, tends to emphasize Protestant Christian understandings of what religion is and how it functions. So that's the first reason for doing that. And then second, in understanding religion to be a threat to modernity, and sometimes seeing and responding to it as such rather than taking into account its complexity, its ambivalence, the ways in which it has been a powerful force for good, and bad, and everything in between, and in ways that sometimes let the secular off the hook for ways that it has driven forms of violence, colonialism, gender injustice, global inequalities, the climate crisis, and so on. So those are the consequences of when we don't have that religious literacy, of those potential pitfalls. And, on that second point, of the ways in which religion continues to be defined in ways that can overemphasize its negative aspect at time within the international system, I commend the work of William Cavanaugh in particular and his book, The Myth of Religious Violence to dig into that a little bit more. So what we're seeking to do, in bringing that kind of religious literacy to even thinking about the international system and its norms and how it operates, is to raise the consciousness of what Donna Haraway calls the situatedness of the international system, the embedded agendas and assumptions that inevitably operate within it. And it invites students to be skeptical of any claims to the systems neutrality about religion, how it's defined, and how it's responded to. So I recognize that that approach is very deconstructionist work. It's informed by, post-colonial critical theory, which reflects where religious studies has been for the last couple decades. But importantly, it doesn't, nor shouldn't ideally, lead students to what is sometimes referred to as analysis paralysis, when there's sort of groundedness within hypercritical approaches, only looking at the complexity to a degree that it's hard to understand how to move forward then to respond constructively to these concerns. Rather, the purpose is to ensure that they're more conscious of these underlying embedded norms or assumptions so that they can better operate within the system in just ways, not reproducing forms of Eurocentrism, Christo-centrism, or forms of cultural harm. So the hope is that it helps students to be able to better critique the ways in in which religion and secularism is being—are being discussed, analyzed, or engaged within international affairs, and then be able to enter into those kinds of analysis, policymaking, program development, and so on, in ways that can help disrupt problematic assumptions and ensure that the work of religious literacy or religious engagement is just. So I'm just going to offer one example of how this kind of critical thinking and critical—the way of thinking complexly about religion in this space can be fruitful. And it speaks back to one of the things Irina noted about my biography, the work I had done looking at women and religion and peacebuilding. So while I was at USIP, in that program, we spent several years looking specifically and critically at forms of theory and practice, and this subfield that had emerged of religious peacebuilding. And we were looking at it through the lens of gender justice, asking how religion was being defined in the theory or engaged in the peacebuilding practice and policy in ways that unintentionally reinforced gender injustice. And what we found is that there were assumptions operating about certain authorities—often those at the top of institutions, which tended to be older, well-educated men—representing entire traditions. Assumptions made about their social and political power as well. When in reality, we knew that those of different genders, and ages, and socioeconomic locations were doing their own work of peacebuilding within these religious landscapes, and had different experiences of violence, and so different prescriptions for how to build peace. So we began to ask questions, like whose peace is being built in this field of religious peacebuilding that was emerging? And the work that USIP had been doing in this space of religious peacebuilding? Whose stories were being left out in the dominant analyses or narratives in the media about religious dimensions of certain conflicts, and what are the consequences of that? So these kinds of questions are grounded in the recognition of, again, the internal diversity, the change over time of religious traditions. And they help ensure that analysis and policy actions aren't unintentionally reproducing forms of harm or structural violence. I'm almost done. So please do bring your questions so that we can engage in a discussion with each other. But I wanted to end by offering a couple examples of resources that I think might be helpful to both enhancing your own religious literacy but also as potential pedagogical tools in this work. So first is Religious Peacebuilding Action Guides that were produced by the U.S. Institute of Peace, in partnership with Salam Institute for Peace and Justice, and the Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers. There's four guides. They're all available for free online. Once I close down my PowerPoint, I'm going to throw the links for all of these things I'm mentioning into the chat box so you can all see it. But one of the things—I'm just going to dive in a little bit to the analysis guide, because one of the things that I think is useful in helping, again, to help us think a little bit more complexly about religion, is that it takes you through this process of thinking about the different dimensions of religion as defined here—ideas, community, institutions, symbols and practices, and spirituality. So it's already moving beyond just an idea of religious institutions, for example. And it takes you through doing a conflict assessment, and asking the questions related to religion with respect to the drivers of the conflict and the geographic location and peacebuilding initiatives, to help you craft a peacebuilding—a religious peacebuilding initiative. I have used this framework as a means to help students think through the ambivalence of religion as it manifests in different places. So I have an example there of a question that I have sometimes used that has been fruitful in thinking about how these five different dimensions of religion have manifested in American history in ways that either have advanced forms of racialized violence and injustice or that have served as drivers of peace and justice. And there's lots of examples across all of those dimensions of the ways in which religion has shown up in ambivalent ways in that respect. There's also—USIP's team has produced a lot of amazing things. So I'll put some links to some of their other resources in there too, which includes they're doing religious landscape mappings of conflict-affected states. They have an online course on religious engagement in peacebuilding that's free to take. Another resource is from here, at Harvard Divinity School in the Religion in Public Life Program. And we provide a series of case studies that is for educators. It's primarily created educators in secondary schools and in community colleges, but I think could easily be adapted and used in other kinds of four-year universities or other kinds of professional settings, where you're doing trainings or workshops, or even just holding discussions on religious literacy. So there's a series of kind of short, concise, but dense, case studies that are looking at different religions as they intersect with a host of issues, including peace, climate, human rights, gender issues. And it says something about that case study here—the example that I have here is the conflict in Myanmar, pre-coup, the conflicts that were occurring between religious communities, and particularly between Buddhist communities and Muslim communities. And then there's a set of discussion questions there that really help to unearth some of those lessons about internal diversity and about the ways in which religious intersects with state policies and other kinds of power interests and agendas—political power interests and agendas. And then also, at our program, Religion and Public Life, we have a number of courses that are available online, one that's more on the substantive religious literacy side, looking at different religious traditions through their scriptures. Another course, it's on religion, conflict and peace, all of which are free and I'm going to throw them into the chat box in a moment. And we also have ongoing workshops for educators on religious literacy, a whole network with that. So you're welcome to join that network if you'd like. And then finally, we have a one-year master's of religion and public life program for people in professions—quote/unquote, “secular” professions—who want to come and think about—they're encountering religion in various ways in their work in public health, or in their work in journalism. And so they want to come here for a year and to think deeply about that, and bring something back into their profession. And then the final thing, and then I'm going to be done, and this one is short, is the Transatlantic Policy for Religion and Diplomacy, which brings together point people from—who work on religion across different foreign ministries in North America and Europe. And their website, religionanddiplomacy.org, has a lot of really great resources that—reports on various thematic issues, but also looking at religion in situ in a number of different geographic locations. They have these strategic notes, that's what I have the image of here, that talk about, at a particular time, what are some of the big stories related to religion and international affairs overseas. And they list a number of other religious literacy resources on their website as well. So I commend all of that to. And with that, let me stop share, throw some links into the chat box, and hear responses and questions from folks. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you for that. That was terrific. And we are going to send out—as a follow-up, we'll send out a link to this webinar, maybe a link to your presentation, as well as the resources that you drop into the chat. So if you don't get it here, you will have another bite at the apple, so to speak. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I'm going to go first to the written question from Meredith Coon, who's an undergraduate student at Lewis University: What would be a solution for India to have many different religions live in peace with each other, especially since most religions share a lot of the same core values of how people should live? And how can society prevent the weaponization of religion, while still allowing broad religious freedom? HAYWARD: All right. Thank you for the question, Meredith. And one thing just to note, by way of housekeeping, I'm not sure I can actually share the links with all of the participants. So we'll make sure that you get all of those links in that follow-up note, as Irina said. So, Meredith, I think a couple things. One, I just want to note that one of the assumptions within your question itself is that folks of different religious persuasions are constantly at conflict with one another. And of course, there is a reality of there is increasing religious tensions around the world, communal tensions of many different sorts, ethnic, and religious, and racial, and so on, across the world. And the threat to democracy and increasing authoritarianism has sometimes exacerbated those kinds of tensions. But there's also a lot of examples presently and historically of religiously incredibly diverse communities living in ways that are harmonious, that are just, and so on. So I think it is important—there's a lot of work that supports forms of interfaith dialogue and intra-faith dialogue. And I think that that work is—will always be important, to be able to recognize shared values and shared commitments, and in order to acknowledge and develop respect and appreciation for differences as well on different topics—again, both within religious traditions and across them. But I think that dialogue alone, frankly, is not enough. Because so often these tensions and these conflicts are rooted in structural violence and discrimination and concerns, economic issues, and political issues, and so on. And so I think part of that work, it's not just about building relationships kind of on a horizontal level, but also about ensuring that state policies and practice, economic policies and practices, and so on, are not operating in ways that disadvantage some groups over others, on a religious side, on a gender side, on a racial side, and so on. So it's about ensuring as well inclusive societies and a sense as well of inclusive political systems and inclusive economic systems. And doing that work in kind of integrated ways is going to be critical for ensuring that we're able to address some of these rising forms of violations of religious freedom. Thanks again for the question. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Next question from Clemente Abrokwaa. Clemente, do you want to ask your question? Associate teaching professor of African studies at Pennsylvania State University? I'm going to give you a moment, so we can hear some voices. Q: OK. Thank you very much. Yeah, my question is I'm wondering how peacebuilding, in terms of religious literacy, how would you look at—or, how does it look at those that are termed fundamentalists? How their actions and beliefs, especially their beliefs, those of us—there are those outside who perceive them as being destructive. So then to that person, is their beliefs are good. So they fight for, just like anyone will fight for, what, a freedom fighter or something, or a religious fighter in this case. So I'm just wondering how does religious literacy perceive that in terms of peacebuilding? HAYWARD: Right. Thank you for the question, Professor Abrokwaa. I really appreciate it. So a couple things. One, first of all, with respect to—just going back, again, to the ambivalence of the sacred—recognizing that that exists. That there are particular religious ideas, commitments, groups, practices that are used in order to fuel and legitimate forms of violence. And I use violence in a capacious understanding of it, that includes both direct forms of violence but also structural and cultural forms of violence, to use the framework of Johan Galtung. And so that needs to be addressed as part of the work to build peace, is recognizing religious and nonreligious practices and ideas that are driving those forms of violence. But when it comes to religious literacy to understand that, a couple ways in which the principles apply. One is, first, not assuming that their—that that is the only or exclusive religious interpretation. And I think sometimes well-meaning folks end up reifying this idea that that is the exclusive religious interpretation or understanding when they're—when they're offering sometimes purely nonreligious responses to it. And what I mean by this, for example, let's look at Iran right now. I read some analyses where it's saying that, the Iranian authorities and the Ayatollahs who comprise the Supreme Council and so on, that they—that they define what Islamic law is. And there's not a qualification of that. And in the meantime, the protesters are sort of defined as, like, secular, or they're not—the idea that they could be driven by certain—their own Islamic interpretations that are just as authoritative to them, and motivating them, and shaping them is critical. So being able to recognize the internal plurality and not unintentionally reify that particular interpretation of a religious tradition as exclusive or authoritative. Rather, it's one interpretation of a religious tradition with particular consequences that are harmful for peace. And there are multiple other interpretations of that religious tradition that are operating within that context. And then a second way that the religious literacy would apply would also look at the ways in which sometimes the diagnoses of extremist groups that are operating within a religious frame doesn't right-size the role of religion in that. It sometimes overemphasizes the religious commitments, and drives, and so on. And so, again, we need to right-size. There are religious motivations. And we need to take those seriously. And we need to develop solutions for addressing that. And there are economic interests. And there are political interests. So there's a whole host of factors that are motivating and inspiring and legitimating those groups. And being able to take into account that more holistic picture and ensure that your responses to it are going to be holistic. And then one final thing I want to say that's not with respect to religious literacy as much—or, maybe it is—but it's more just about my experience of work at USIP, is that—and it kind of goes back to the question that Meredith asked before you about religious harmony between multireligious relations and harmony, is that I sometimes finds that engaging with groups that are defining themselves and motivating themselves with a primary grounding in religion, that they're not going to participate generally in interfaith initiatives, and so on, right? And so that's where some of that intra-faith work can be particularly important. I saw this, for example, in Myanmar, when their—when previously the movement that was known as Ma Ba Tha, which was defined by some as a Buddhist nationalist anti-Muslim kind of Buddhist supremacist group. The folks who were most successful in being able to engage in a values-grounded conversation with members of the organization were other Buddhist monks, who were able to speak within the language of meaning and to draw attention to, like, different understandings of religious teachings or religious principles with respect to responding to minority groups, and so on. So I think that's in particular, with addressing those groups, that's where that intra-religious work or intra-communal work can be really critical, in addition to some of that cross-communal work. FASKIANOS: Thank you. So we've seen, obviously, the war in Ukraine and how Christian Orthodoxy is being—or, Greek Orthodoxy in Ukraine, and the division. Can you talk a little bit about that and how it's playing out with Russian identity? HAYWARD: Yeah, absolutely. There's been some really good analysis and work out there of the religious dimensions of the Russia-Ukraine conflict. So again, the sort of dominant story that you see, which reflects a reality, is that there are ways in which political and religious actors and interests are aligning on the Russian side in order to advance particular narratives and that legitimate the invasion of Ukraine that—that are about sort of fighting back against an understanding of the West as being counter to traditional and religious values. Those are some of the religious understandings. And then that concern gets linked then to the establishment of an independent or autocephalous Orthodox Church within the Ukraine context. And you see—in particular, what's pointed to often is the relationship between Patriarch Kirill in the Russian Orthodox Church, and Putin, and the ways in which they've sort of reinforced each other's narrative and offered support to it. And there's really great analysis out there and stories that have been done about that. And that needs to be taken into account in responding to the situation and, I would say, that some of the religious literacy principles would then ask us to think about other ways in which religion is showing up within that, that go beyond the institution too. So a lot of the news stories that I've seen, for example, have focused exclusively on—sometimes—exclusively on the clerics within the Orthodox Church and their positions, either in support of or in opposition to the war. But in reality, on the ground there's a lot more complexity that's taken place, and a lot more of the ways in which different individuals and communities on both the Russia and the Ukraine side are responding to the violence, to the displacements, and so on. It paints a more complex and, I think, fascinating story, frankly. And sort of illuminates ways forward in support of peacebuilding. For example, there's ways in which different kinds of ritual practices within Orthodoxy have served as a source of support and constancy to folks who are living in this situation of insecurity and displacement, in ways that have been helpful. There are, of course, other religious traditions that exist within both Ukraine and Russia that are operating and responding in different ways. Like, the Jewish community in Ukraine and the Catholic—the Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine. So looking at those complexities both within Orthodoxy, but there's many different ways that Orthodox Christians are responding in both countries. There's not one story of Orthodox Christianity and the invasion of Ukraine. But also looking at some of the religious diversity within it. And that helps to ensure, like I said, one, that we're developing solutions that are also recognizing the ways in which religion at a very ground level is serving as a source of support, humanitarian relief, social, psychological support to people on the ground, as well as the ways in which it's sort of manifesting ambivalently and complexly in ways that are driving some of the violence as well. And it also helps to push back against any sort of a narrative that this is about a Russian religion—on the Russian side—this is about a religious war against a secular, non-religious West or Ukraine, right? That that goes back to what I was talking about with the historical sort of contingencies that are baked into this system a little bit. And in defining it in that way, Russia's religious and its motivations are religious, Ukraine's not religious, that's both not true—(laughs)—because there's many religious folks within the Ukraine and within the West generally, but also feeds—it feeds the very narrative that Putin and Kirill are giving of a secular West that is anti-religion, that is in opposition to Russian traditional values. FASKIANOS: It seems like there needs to be some training of journalists too to have religious literacy, in the same way that we're talking about media literacy. HAYWARD: Yeah. FASKIANOS: Probably should be introduced as well. (Laughs.) HAYWARD: Yeah, Irina, it's funny, we did—one of my students actually did a kind of mapping and analysis of stories about the Russia-Ukraine conflict and the religious dimensions of it. And she noted that there was—for example, it was—almost always it was male clerics who were being quoted. So there was very little that was coming from other gendered perspectives and experiences on the ground, lay folks and so on. And again, for that—for that very reason it's sort of—because we know so many policymakers and international analysis are depending on these kinds of media stories, I worry that it creates a blinder to potential opportunities for different kinds of ways of addressing needs and partners for addressing needs on the ground. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. I'm going to go next to Liam Wall, an undergraduate student at Loyola Marymount University: With so much diversity within religions itself, how can we avoid the analysis paralysis you mentioned and take in as many unique perspectives as possible, without letting that stand in the way of progress? How does one know that they have enough religious literacy and can now become an effective practitioner? HAYWARD: Well, OK, the bad news is that you will never have enough religious literacy. (Laughs.) This is a process, not an end. There are scholars here at Harvard who have been studying one particular sect of a particular religious tradition for their entire adult lives, and they would still say that they are students of those traditions, because they're so complex. Because so many of these traditions are composed of a billion people or just—just 500 million people. But that means that there's going to be an incredible diversity to explore. And so that's the bad news. But the good news is, one, like, first take the burden off of your shoulders of having to be an expert on any one particular religious tradition, in order to be able to help to develop and enhance your own religious literacy, and those of others, and to operate in ways that reflect the principles of religious literacy, is the good news. As well as there are many different kinds of resources that you can turn to in order to understand, for example if you're going to be working in a particular geographic location, scholarship, people you can speak to in order to begin to understand at least some of the specific manifestations and practices, and some of the disputes and diversity that exists within that particular country or geographic location across religious traditions. But, secondly, I would say, it's almost more important than—like, the substance is important. But what's just as important, if not more important, is understanding what kinds of questions to be asking, and to be curious about these religious questions and their intersection with the political and social. So we sometimes say that religious literacy is about developing habits of mind in how we think about these religious questions, and what kinds of questions we ask about religion. So it's about developing that kind of a reflex to be able to kind of see what's underneath some of the analysis that you're seeing that might be relevant to religion or that might be advancing particularly problematic understandings of religion, or reinforcing binaries like the secular and the religious and so on. And that's just as—just as important. So the extent to which you're continuing to, like, hone those—that way of thinking, and those habits of mind, that will set you up well for then going into this space and being able to ask those particular questions with respect to whatever issues you're focusing on, or whatever geographic location you're looking at. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to go next to Mohamed Bilal, a postgraduate student at the Postgraduate Institute of Management in Sri Lanka. HAYWARD: Yay! FASKIANOS: Yes. How does sectarianism influence our literacy? In turn, if we are influenced by sectarianism, then would we be illiterate of the religion but literate of the sect? Thus, wouldn't such a religious literacy perpetuate sectarianism? HAYWARD: Thank you for the question, Mohamed. It's—I miss Sri Lanka. I have not been there in too long, and I look forward to going back at some point. So I would say sectarianism, in the sense of—so, there's both religious sects, right? There's the existence of different kinds of religious traditions, interpretive bodies, jurisprudential bodies in the case of Islam. And then broader, different schools or denominations. The term that's used depends on the different religious tradition. And that reflects internal diversity. Sectarianism, with the -ism on the end of it, gets back to the same kinds of questions that I think Professor Clemente was asking with respect to fundamentalism. That's about being sort of entrenched in an idea that your particular religious understanding and practice is the normative, authentic, and pure practice, and that all others are false in some ways. That is a devotional claim or—what I mean by a devotional claim, is that is a knowledge claim that is rooted within a particular religious commitment and understanding. And so religious literacy in this case would—again, it's the principles of internal diversity, recognizing that different sects and different bodies of thought and practice are going to exist within religious traditions, but then also ensuring that any claim to be normative or to be orthodox by any of these different interpretive bodies is always a claim that is rooted within that religious tradition that we sometimes say is authentic. It's authentic to those communities and what they believe. But it's not exclusive. It's not the only claim that exists within that religious tradition more broadly. And the concern is about—sects are fine. Different denominations, different interpretative bodies are fine and a good and sort of natural thing, given the breadth and the depth of these religious traditions. The problem is that -ism part of it, when it becomes a source of competition or even potentially violence between groups. And so that's what needs to be interrogated and understood. FASKIANOS: So another question from John Francis, who's the senior associate vice president for academic affairs at the University of Utah: If you were training new diplomats in other countries to be stationed in the United States, where a wide range of religious traditions thrive, how would you prepare them for dealing with such religious variation? HAYWARD: The same way I would—and thank you, again, for the question. The same way that I would with any other diplomats going to any other—the same way I do with foreign service officers at the Foreign Service Institute, who are going to work overseas. I would—I would invite them to think about their own assumptions and their own worldviews and their own understandings of what religion is, based on their own contexts that they grew up in. So how that shapes how they understand what religion is, in the ways I was speaking to before. So for example, in Protestant Christianity, we tend to emphasize belief as the sort of core principle of religious traditions. But other religious traditions might emphasize different forms of practice or community as sort of the central or principal factor. So recognizing your own situatedness and the ways in which you understand and respond to different religious traditions. I would invite those who are coming to work here to read up on the historical developments and reality of different religious communities and nonreligious communities in the U.S. and encourage them to look not just at some of the—what we call the world religions, or the major religions, but also at indigenous traditions and different practices within different immigrant communities. And I would have them look at the historical relationship between the state and different religious communities as well, including the Mormon tradition there in Utah, and how the experience of, for example, the Mormon community has shaped its own relationship with the state, with other religious communities on a whole host of issues as well. And then I would encourage—just as I was saying earlier—no diplomat going to the U.S. is going to become an expert on the religious context in the U.S., because it's incredibly complex, just like anywhere else in the world. But to be able to have sort of a basic understanding to be able to then continue to ask the kinds of questions that are going to help to understand how any political action is taken or response to any policy issues kind of inevitably bumps up against particular religious or cultural commitments and values. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take the next question from Will Carpenter, director of private equity principal investments at the Teacher Retirement System of Texas, and also taking a course at the Harvard Extension School. HAYWARD: Hey! FASKIANOS: I'm going to ask the second part of Will's question. How will the current polarized domestic debate regarding U.S. history, which is often colored by the extremes—as a force for good only versus tainted by a foundation of injustice—impact America's capacity to lead internationally? HAYWARD: Hmm, a lot. (Laughter.) Thank you for the question. I mean, I think the fact of polarization in the U.S. and the increasing difficulty that we're facing in being able to have really deep conversations and frank conversations about historical experiences and perceptions of different communities, not just religiously, not just racially even, but across different—urban-rural, across socioeconomic divides, across educational divides and, of course, across political divides, and so on. I think that—I think that absolutely hampers our ability to engage within the global stage effectively. One, just because of the image that it gives to the rest of the world. So how can we—how can we have an authentic moral voice when we ourselves are having such a hard time engaging with one other in ways that reflect those values and that are grounded within those values? But also because I think get concern—with respect to religion questions in particular—I get concern about the increasing polarization and partisanization of religion in foreign policy and issues of religious freedom, and so on. Which means that we're going to constantly have this sort of swinging back and forth then between Republican and Democratic administrations on how we understand and engage issues related to religion and foreign policy, different religious communities in particular, like Muslim communities worldwide, or on issues of religious freedom. So I think it's incredibly critical—always has been, but is particularly right now at this historical moment—for us to be in the U.S. doing this hard work of having these conversations, and hearing, and listening to one another, and centering and being open about our values and having these conversations on that level of values. To be able to politically here in the U.S., much less overseas, to be able to work in ways that are effective. Irina, you're muted. FASKIANOS: Thank you. (Laughs.) With that, we are at the end of our time. Thank you so much for this. This has been a really important hour of discussion. Again, we will send out the link to the webinar, as well as all the resources that you mentioned, Susan. Sorry we didn't have the chat open so that we could focus on what you were saying and all the questions and comments that came forward. So we appreciate it. And thank you so much, again, for your time, Susan Hayward. And I just want to remind everybody that this is the last webinar of the semester, but we will be announcing the Winter/Spring Academic Webinar lineup in our Academic bulletin. And if you're not already subscribed to that, you can email us at cfracademic@cfr.org. Just as a reminder, you can learn about CFR paid internships for students and fellowships for professors at CFR.org/careers. Follow @CFR_Academic on Twitter and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues. Good luck with your exams. (Laughs.) Grading, taking them, et cetera. Wishing you all a happy Thanksgiving. And we look forward to seeing you again next semester. So, again, thank you to Susan Hayward. HAYWARD: Thank you, everybody. Take care.

Intuitive Revolution in Business Podcast
085 Interview with Savio Clemente

Intuitive Revolution in Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 34:43


Savio Clemente was an IT professional with brilliant prospects. He was even offered a brilliant job in a start up company. He didn't feel it so he refused. A few months later the person who had offered him the job died in 9/11 as the start up had their offices in one of the towers. It is only five years after he was in remission from cancer, though, that he embraced what he believed was his true calling, supporting people in remission from cancer.  Our conversation today was inspirational, fun and exciting. I hope you enjoy it too.  You can find Savio at www.thehumanresolve.com, on Twitter, Instagram and TikTok as @thehumanresolve. 

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
5 Errors of the Early Church Fathers (11-13-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 59:33


Topics: Church History, Church Fathers, Bishops, Pastors, Elders, Presbyters, Priests, Forgive Men Their Sins, Church Offices, Clemente of Rome, Cyprian of Carthage, Covenant Mixture Theologians, Communion, Eucharist, John 20, Matthew 23, 1 Timothy 3:1, Hebrews 7:23 Support the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

The Art of Being Dar - with Dar Dixon
The Savio P. Clemente Experience

The Art of Being Dar - with Dar Dixon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 68:08


Savio P. Clemente coaches cancer survivors to overcome the confusion and gain the clarity needed to get busy living in mind, body, and spirit. He inspires health and wellness seekers to find meaning in the "why" and to cultivate resilience in their mindset. Savio is a Board Certified wellness coach (NBC-HWC, ACC), stage 3 cancer survivor, podcaster, writer, and founder of The Human Resolve LLC. He has been featured on Fox News, and has collaborated with Authority Magazine, Thrive Global, Food Network, WW, and Bloomberg. His mission is to offer clients, listeners, and viewers alike tangible takeaways in living a truly healthy, wealthy, and wise lifestyle. IN THIS EPISODE: 2:15 - Meet Savio P. Clemente 3:15 - Challenging the human experience - Being comfortable in his own body 6:35 - Goa is in the house! 12:10 - How we met 13:57 - "You're a best selling author!" 17:22 - "Something's wrong..." 19:49 - Wi-Fi and Silence - going within 28:49 - His journey into journalism 32:10 - It's not easy, but I do try 38:20 - Coaching is his true love 43:23 - SXSW 2022 50:15 - The Metaverse is going to be a part of everyone's world 59:36 Why NFT's are so important 1:03:30 One of the first truth's in his life LinkedIn Medium Thrive Global The Human Resolve (his website) Substack

Descargas predicanet
Episode 899: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) (Así pues, tengo para mí))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 9:38


Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).         

On the Line
Christian Clemente of Auburn 247 and Chris Gordy of LockedOn SEC talk Bryan Harsin and Auburn

On the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 94:17


Jacob Goins and Carter Byrd are joined by Christian Clemente of Auburn 247 for the entire first hour of the show. The guys get Christian's thoughts on the firing of Bryan Harsin and hear some recruiting horror stories during his tenure at Auburn. Clemente gives his thoughts on the coaching search for Auburn, and tells who he thinks would be the best fit for the Tigers. Chris Gordy, the host of the LockedOn SEC podcast, joins the show to give his thoughts on Bryan Harsin, and also makes his picks for the biggest games in the conference coming up this weekend. All that and more on the Thursday edition of On the Line.

Descargas predicanet
Episode 889: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) (Ahora bien, si hemos citado))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 9:29


  Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).        

The Wolf Of All Streets
On-Chain Wednesday: Why Will Clemente Is Bullish On Bitcoin

The Wolf Of All Streets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 43:36


Will Clemente, a popular on-chain analyst and co-founder of Reflexivity Research, digital asset research & proprietary trading firm, joins me for the On-Chain Wednesday.  Will Clemente https://twitter.com/WClementeIII ►► JOIN THE FREE WOLF DEN NEWSLETTER https://www.getrevue.co/profile/TheWolfDen  GET UP TO A $8,000 BONUS IN USDT AND TRADE ALL SPOT PAIRS ON BITGET FOR ZERO FEES! ►► https://thewolfofallstreets.info/bitget   Follow Scott Melker: Twitter: https://twitter.com/scottmelker  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wolfofallstreets   Web: https://www.thewolfofallstreets.io  Spotify: https://spoti.fi/30N5FDe  Apple podcast: https://apple.co/3FASB2c  #Bitcoin #Crypto #Trading The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own and should in no way be interpreted as financial advice. This video was created for entertainment. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision. I am not a financial advisor. Nothing contained in this video constitutes or shall be construed as an offering of financial instruments or as investment advice or recommendations of an investment strategy or whether or not to "Buy," "Sell," or "Hold" an investment.

The Human Design Podcast
#222 Stepping into Alignment with HD - Amy Clemente

The Human Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 33:21


In this episode, I'm excited to share a conversation with one of my amazing Mastermind members. It's been an incredible journey with her on this Mastermind, in the beginning she was the quiet one in the room, and she's had this incredible transformation.Amy is a 3/5 Pure Generator with Sacral authority, at first she describes how life changing it was just to ‘wait to respond', which led to a thirst for more information and her dive down the rabbit hole of HD. Amy has leaned into her own authenticity through HD and her experiment with her design.I loved this quote from Amy on one of our calls on her Aha Moments - “I never knew it could be so quick And so easy” - This just lights me up, I'm so grateful for the people I get to work with like Amy.Join me as we dive into her HD journey before and during the Mastermind. Such an awesome conversation, enjoy!Big Love, Mxx------MILLIONS OF MILLIONAIRES SPONSORSHIPHeather Ivany's details:Instagram @heather_ivanyWebsite: https://www.heatherivany.com/Unlocking You: https://www.heatherivany.com/unlockHarmonize Retreat: https://www.heatherivany.com/retreatAkashic Readings: https://www.heatherivany.com/akashic-records------HDX Membership: https://www.emmadunwoody.com/membershipHuman Design Panels: https://www.emmadunwoody.com/storeWant to sponsor the podcast? Apply here for the "Millions of Millionaires" project: https://forms.gle/Hs2MGFSuyRrVKJ116Instagram @the_human_design_coachHuman Design FB Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/285696835929546/Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/1386906244772463/Music: Spark Of Inspiration by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com

Descargas predicanet
Episode 879: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) (Ahora bien, si hemos citado))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 9:51


Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).           

Podcast Campamento Krypton
CK#249: 60 años de Spiderman. Cómo conocí a vuestro Spidey.

Podcast Campamento Krypton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 149:47


Thwip! Nuestro querido trepamuros, creado por Stan Lee y Steve Ditko, cumple 60 años y lo celebramos recorriendo su accidentada trayectoria en los cómics de Marvel. Por allí han pasado autores como John Romita, Gerry Conway, Gil Kane, Ross Andru, John Romita Jr, Marcos Martín, Erik Larsen o Dan Slott. ¿Y qué sería de Peter Parker sin Gwen y MJ pero también sin la Tía May o J. Jonah Jameson? ¿Y sin su galería de villanos, la mejor del cómic, con Dr. Octopus, Veneno y Los 6 Siniestros? En los últimos tiempos el Spiderverso ha traído un Spiderman para todo el mundo: desde Miles Morales a Spider-Ham, pasando por SpiderGwen. Pero finalmente, ¿cuáles son nuestros cómics favoritos del personaje? Somos hijos de los ochenta y los noventa, ¿serán los años de McFarlane? Junto a Luigi Benedicto, periodista de El Mundo y gran conocedor de Spidey, Julián Clemente (editor Marvel), Santiago García (veterano traductor del personaje) y David Baldeón (dibujante de un sinfín de héroes arácnidos) os traemos esta carta de amor al lanzarredes. Podcast co-patrocinado por Vodafone, Non ti preoccupare, con Vodafone One Hogar Ilimitable. Date de alta en: https://bit.ly/3qRsBdF Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
The Virtual Shift: Maria Valero de Clemente Asst Professor at Service Research Group

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 27:44


Host Tom Foley invites Maria Valero de Clemente, an assistant professor in the College of Computing and Software Engineering, Department of Information Technology at Kennesaw State University and Director of IoT as Service Research Group. What if blood glucose monitoring could be non invasive and predict your levels for what you are going to eat? Maria's team from Georgia's Kennesaw State University is working on just that. And their current testing notes that the device delivers 90% accuracy in analyzing glucose concentration in blood samples. Tune in to hear more about their research, testing, and timelines to market. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play Healthcare NOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

Narraciones De Un BURRO y Mas
"La estatua de bronce" by Juan Vicente Camacho Clemente

Narraciones De Un BURRO y Mas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 13:51


Debes mantener un compromiso, así este sea una locura? Nos leemos en los comentarios.

Historia de Aragón
Despierta Aragón de 10h a 11h - 20/10/2022

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 54:23


La Aragón Climate Week reúne a un numeroso panel de expertos que debate sobre los retos y oportunidades del Cambio Climático. Charlamos con dos de ellos: Alberto Bernués, director del CITA, y Clemente Álvarez, fundador de Ballena Blanca. Por otro lado, nuestra Unidad Móvil visita la exposición de Botero.

Bonita Radio
MDUM Anuel AA y Frabián Eli dejaron a los Capitanes guindaos

Bonita Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 49:11


#másdeunamilla #bonitadeportes #deporteesmásquejuego A la deriva los Capitanes de Arecibo tras salida de sus apoderados Anuel AA y su ex manejador Frabián Eli | Ganaron los Yankees de Nueva York y pasan a enfrentarse a los Astros de Houston | Joya monticular de Zack Wheeler le da la victoria a los Phillies de Filadelfia en el primer juego de la Serie de Campeonato de la Nacional | Puerto Rico queda fuera de la Super Ronda en el Mundial U23 por formula matemática, le explicamos todo aquí | Las Cangrejeras de Santurce regresan a la ruta ganadora con apretada victoria sobre las Explosivas de Moca en el Clemente #queclasedeswing #periodismodigital #PonloEnLaNevera

El Corito Histórico
Corito Histórico #113 - Lino de Clemente

El Corito Histórico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 37:43


En este Corito Histórico, los muchachos Javier Lara (en Twitter @vzla_apesta) y Doriann Márquez (en Twitter @Hostioso0294) traen a uno de los grandes actores de reparto del proceso independentista. Alguien que pese a no estar en primera fila, siempre logra estar en momentos importantes al menos haciendo acto de presencia, por lo cuál su relevancia es clara en este, como lo fue el Almirante Lino de Clemente. Marino de la Armada Española, se retira tras 15 años de servicio de vuelta a Venezuela, cuando los acontecimientos de la independencia del país lo sorprenden como Síndico Procurador del Cabildo, y luego con la conformación de la Junta Suprema, asume como Secretario de Guerra y Marina, sirviendo así como el primer ministro de la Defensa de la historia de Venezuela. Diputado ante el Congreso Constituyente, es parte junto a José de Sata y Bussi y Francisco de Miranda de la comisión que instituye el tricolor como bandera nacional. Posteriormente tiene una destacada labor como diplomático en Estados Unidos, es comandante de la guarnición del Zulia repetidas veces, y sabe ejercer sus cargos con diligencia hasta el final de su interesante vida. Deja tus preguntas para el Chayanne Se Llama Elmer en: https://chayanne.netlify.app/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coritohistorico/message

Luis Cárdenas
'Propuesta de la diputada María Clemente no es viable'

Luis Cárdenas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 15:14


En entrevista con Luis Cárdenas, Elvira Madrid Romero, presidenta de la Brigada Callejera de Apoyo a la Mujer Elisa Mtz A.C, habló de la confrontación entre trabajadoras sexuales y la diputada María Clemente García.

Luis Cárdenas
Programa Completo Luis Cárdenas 14 Octubre 2022

Luis Cárdenas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 180:17


'Raquel Buenrostro no tiene experiencia en negociaciones internacionales'. 'Propuesta de la diputada María Clemente no es viable'. Alex Jones deberá pagar 965 mdd a las víctimas de Sandy Hook

Descargas predicanet
Episode 869: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) ( Pero además))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 9:31


   Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).           

Rádiofobia Podcast Network
VOZ 0FF 062 - Clemente Drago

Rádiofobia Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 66:15


Saudações, ouvintes apaixonados por locução. Está NO AR o 62º podcast VOZ OFF! Neste episódio Antônio Viviani e Nicola Lauletta conversam com mais uma grande voz do rádio, da TV e da publicidade! Nascido em São Luiz Gonzaga - RS, na fronteira com a Argentina, nosso entrevistado missioneiro começou curiosamente a sua carreira na locução, em Brasília - DF. Morando na Capital Federal, nos primeiros tempos, exercia uma função burocrática na repartição que viria a ser a futura Polícia Federal, quando por acaso junto com um amigo que fora fazer um teste para ser locutor na Estação Rodoviária da cidade, aceitou também participar do teste e foi aprovado. Com a ida da Agência Nacional do Rio de Janeiro para Brasília, aceitou o pedido de um amigo para substituí-lo nas suas férias na Hora do Brasil, e logo em seguida surgiu uma vaga e foi efetivado. Também trabalhou um tempo em TV, junto com dois outros grandes amigos, Breno Fischer e Henrique Regis, e se denominavam Os Três Mosqueteiros, tamanha a amizade e parceria entre eles. Com a ida constante de novas agências de publicidade do Rio e de São Paulo para Brasília, e o surgimento de estúdios de gravação, passou a gravar muitos comerciais para todos, sem exceção, e sempre brincava que poderia ser considerado locutor exclusivo de todas as produtoras. Quem vai nos contar sua história de sucesso no rádio, na TV e na publicidade é Clemente Drago! A conversa aconteceu em setembro de 2022 e você vai saber como começou a ser produzido o programa "A Hora do Brasil" em Brasília e quando foi que ele começou a abrir o jornal com a marcante frase: "Em Brasília, 19 horas!" Com a gente, e pra vocês: CLEMENTE DRAGO! Para seguir nas redes sociais:- Curta a página do podcast Voz Off no Facebook- Siga o @podcastvozoff no Twitter- Curta a página do Antonio Viviani no Facebook- Siga o @antonioviviani no Twitter- Siga o @antonio.viviani no Instagram- Siga o @nicolalauletta no Twitter- Curta a página do Echo's Studio no Facebook- Curta a página do Workshop de Locução Voz A Obra no Facebook- Ouça também o podcast TEXTO SENTIDO com Antônio Viviani Assine o FEED do Voz Off:Para ouvir o Voz Off no seu agregador de podcasts preferido, clique aqui e assine o nosso FEED! Assine e avalie nosso podcast no iTunes:Se você usa o iTunes no seu computador, tablet ou smartphone, assine e avalie nosso podcast clicando aqui! Voz Off no Spotify:Caso prefira ouvir o Voz Off no Spotify, é só clicar aqui e assinar o nosso podcast no serviço de streaming! E-mails:Mande seu feedback pra gente através do e-mail podcastvozoff@gmail.com! Publicidade:Entre em contato e saiba como anunciar sua marca, produto ou serviço em nossos podcasts.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Should Christians Go to Church? (10-9-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 81:54


Topics: Church, Hebrews 10:25, Exodus 20:8, Do Not Forsake the Assembly, Remember the Sabbath, Go to Church, Clemente of Alexandria, Ignatius of Antioch, Cyprian of Carthage, Constantine, Pagan Tradition, Necromancy, Pray to the Saints, Church Buildings, Synagogue, Temple, Churches in Revelation, Sabbath Rest, Colossians 2:16, Romans 14:5, 1 Corinthians 11-14Graced HealthFor women who want simple and grace-filled ways to take care of herself and enjoy a...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Daniel Ramos' Podcast
Episode 363: 10 de Octubre del 2022 - Devoción matutina para Adultos - ¨Nuestro maravilloso Dios¨

Daniel Ramos' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 4:50


================================================== ==SUSCRIBETEhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNpffyr-7_zP1x1lS89ByaQ?sub_confirmation=1================================================== == DEVOCIÓN MATUTINA PARA ADULTOS 2022“NUESTRO MARAVILLOSO DIOS”Narrado por: Roberto NavarroDesde: Chiapas, MéxicoUna cortesía de DR'Ministries y Canaan Seventh-Day Adventist Church 10 DE OCTUBREPARA QUE EL MUNDO SEPA«Ruego a Evodia ya Síntique que sean de un mismo sentir en el Señor. Así mismo te ruego también a ti, compañero fiel, que ayudes a estos que combatieron juntamente conmigo en el evangelio, con Clemente también y los demás colaboradores míos, cuyos nombres están en el libro de la vida». Filipenses 4:1-3¿QUIÉNES ERAN EVODIA Y SÍNTIQUE? Dos mujeres creyentes de Macedonia, probablemente líderes de la iglesia, y de quienes solo sabemos que estaban enemistadas al momento en que Pablo escribe su Epístola a los Filipenses. No sabemos cuál era el motivo del desacuerdo entre Evodia y Síntique, porque el apóstol no lo menciona específicamente, pero suponemos que el conflicto entre estas dos hermanas en Cristo estaba surgiendo a la iglesia entera, y Pablo decidió hacer algo al respecto.¿Qué hace el apóstol para zanjar sus diferencias? En primer lugar, les ruega que pongan fin a sus diferencias, por el bien de toda la congregación. En segundo lugar, pide a otros fieles miembros de la iglesia que intercedan para ayudarlas a reconciliarse. Finalmente, les pide «que sean de un mismo sentir en el Señor» (vers. 1). En otras palabras, las exhorta a vivir en armonía, como hermanas en Cristo, ya perdonarse la una a la otra como el Señor las ha perdonado.Hay en este pequeño incidente una importante lección: hasta el día de la segunda venida de Jesús habrá conflictos entre los miembros de la iglesia, ¡incluso entre los dirigentes! Recordemos que Evodia y Síntique «combatieron» junto al apóstol en favor del evangelio de Cristo. De ellas dice Pablo que sus «nombres están escritos en el libro de la vida». Sin embargo, ¡el apóstol tuvo que intervenir para ayudarlas a reconciliarse!Lo que estamos diciendo aquí es que es normal que se produzcan desacuerdos entre los miembros de una congregación. Lo que es inaceptable es que permitamos que esos desacuerdos nos separen y, peor aún, que dividan a la iglesia.¿Se reconciliaron, finalmente, Evodia y Síntique? Probablemente sí, pero no lo sabemos. Más importante aún es esta otra pregunta: ¿Hay en tu congregación alguien con quien necesites reconciliarte hoy? Cualquiera haya sido la causa de la desavenencia, si el resultado ha sido separación, distanciamiento o división, el deseo de Dios es que esa persona y tú lleguen a ser «de un mismo sentir en el Señor».Recordemos que, para salvarnos, Cristo «se humillo a sí mismo, haciéndose obediente hasta la muerte, y muerte de cruz». Recordemos, además, sus palabras a los discípulos después de anunciar su muerte: «De este modo todos sabrán que son mis discípulos, si se aman los unos a los otros» (Juan 13: 35, NVI).Bendito Jesús, nunca quisiera ser una piedra de tropiezo para mis hermanos en la fe. Ayúdame a conducirme siempre de un modo que promueva la unidad de tu grey. Solo así el mundo sabrá que somos tus discípulos.

Descargas predicanet
Episode 861: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) (SAltaba, efectivamente))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 16:45


  Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).          

LEVELS – A Whole New Level
#178 - Behind the scenes of community building with Members to solve the metabolic health crisis | Cissy Hu & Mercy Clemente

LEVELS – A Whole New Level

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 36:55


Levels strives to build an interactive community of members where people can help one another and share information about metabolic health. Look for multiple new shows per week on A Whole New Level, where we have in-depth conversations about metabolic health and how the Levels startup team builds a wellness movement from the ground up in the health and wellness tech industry.

Noticentro
Diputada transexual María Clemente García ha sido objeto de críticas y señalamientos

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 1:49


•Desalojan plaza comercial Perisur, por posible bomba•Más información en nuestro podcast

Es Cuanto
Diputada de Morena publica video p0rn0, ¿es libre de hacerlo?; Ejército en las calles saca la hipocresía de los políticos

Es Cuanto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 26:33


En el regreso de Es Cuanto, Alfonso Basilio y Juan Pablo de Leo hablan sobre la polémica levantada por la diputada María Clemente al publicar en Twitter un video pornográfico; además, analizan la operación que ha realizado el secretario de Gobernación, Adán Augusto López, en el Senado por la iniciativa para mantener a Fuerzas Armadas en la calle.

Así las cosas con Carlos Loret de Mola
#Entérate con Clemente Castañeda

Así las cosas con Carlos Loret de Mola

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 4:24


Votación sobre Guardia Nacional

SAX IN THE MORNING
10-4-22: Roberto Clemente

SAX IN THE MORNING

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 5:23


Today I talk about one of my favorite players of all time and one of the most important Latin American players to ever play in the big leagues: Roberto Clemente. Clemente was the first Latino voted into the MLB Hall of Fame, he had over 3000 hits, 12 gold gloves and his lifetime average was .317. Most importantly he played with a relentless passion everyday he was on the field and he carried that passion into helping people off the field. Listen to hear more about Clemente's life and the impact he had on baseball and the world. Check out these crazy Roberto Clemente highlights!Visit my website: saxinthemorning.com for merchandise and other links. Follow us on social media: Instagram: @saxinthemorning_podcastYouTube: subscribe and watch shorts here   

Holy Crap It's Sports
Holy Crap It's Sports 491 September 30 2022

Holy Crap It's Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 57:32


Braves vs Mets it's finally here, The Freeze challenges a Dawg, Tua nearly dies as NFL lies, Falcons injury, Ian affecting sports, Saban's thoughts on expanded playoffs, Worst teams in CFB, Lane Kiffin's shirt catches eye of Larry the Cable Guy, Joel Embiid is a true American, Pete's Tweets, This Day in Sports History. Come for reaction to Tua's 2nd concussion in 5 days, stay for my Jamal Anderson demanding money from me story, Clemente's last hit, and the Mets player who ended his and two other Mets careers by hitting into a triple play. petedavis.buzzsprout.com 

May Contain Action
Twitch's Downfall + Clemente Day National Anthem

May Contain Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 62:02 Very Popular


Guess who's back! In this episode of the May Contain Action podcast, Paul and Trevor talk about what's wrong with Twitch, how content has changed a lot recently, and a hilarious Clemente Day National Anthem story.    

Descargas predicanet
Episode 852: SANTOS PADRES: Orígenes (Cantar de los cantares (Libro 3 (2) ( Por esta razón))

Descargas predicanet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 10:32


Alejandría?, h. 185-Tiro, actual Líbano, h. 254) Teólogo y Padre de la Iglesia griega. Nacido en el seno de una familia cristiana (su padre murió martirizado en el 202), sucedió a Clemente de Alejandría al frente de la escuela cristiana de Alejandría, que convirtió en un prestigioso centro de teología. Su rivalidad con el obispo Demetrio, que le reprochó haberse hecho ordenar sacerdote sin su consentimiento, lo llevó a exiliarse en Palestina (231). Es autor de numerosos tratados ascéticos, dogmáticos (De principiis), polémicos (Contra Celso) e importantes obras exegéticas, cuyo comentario de las Escrituras se desarrolla en tres direcciones: literal, moral y mística. Exponente privilegiado de la gnosis ortodoxa, fue el primero en concebir un sistema completo del cristianismo, integrando las teorías neoplatónicas. Sus ideas, recuperadas y sistematizadas en los siglos siguientes por una corriente de pensamiento llamada origenismo, suscitaron vivas controversias y fueron finalmente condenadas en el concilio de Constantinopla (553).         

Así las cosas con Carlos Loret de Mola
#Entérate con Clemente Castañeda

Así las cosas con Carlos Loret de Mola

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 9:10


Votación sobre Guardia Nacional

Nine One Wine Podcast
Napa's Oldest Wine and Fattest Swine feat. Migliavacca Wine Co.

Nine One Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 66:31


Episode 33 is on location at the Migliavacca Mansion with special guests Katie Migliavacca and Vincent Traverso of Migliavacca Wine Company. The May 2022 and May 2016 police logs are analyzed while the group sipped on the 2021 Rosato, 2019 Vermentino and 2019 Sangiovese. Each with its own delicious flavor and deep roots of history. Highlights of the episode include a 600lb pig, taste off between Clemente's and Lawler's ravioli and malfatti, and the rich legacy of Migliavacca Wine Company.  Tune in for an episode full of heart warming restoration and local charm. 

Palabra Libre
Episodio 99 - El bipartidismo muere y Clemente vive

Palabra Libre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 101:22


El paso de la tormenta Fiona, los fondos de recuperación por el huracán María y la ausencia de proyectos, la “multitud” que marchó por la estadidad en Washington, DC, encabezada por José Aponte, Carmelo Ríos y Georgie Navarro, la escasa participación en las elecciones dentro del Partido Nuevo Progresista para escoger un nuevo Senador por el Distrito de San Juan, la pugna por la presidencia del Partido Popular Democrático entre José Luis Dalmau, Jesús Manuel Ortiz, Carmen Maldonado y Juan Zaragoza, la propuesta de tres legisladores del PPD, Connie Varela, Ángel Matos y Cheíto Rivera Madera, para que los puertorriqueños paguen impuestos cuando compren paquetes de vacaciones y estadías en el extranjero y Roberto Clemente y el 50 aniversario del Hit 3000. Conducido por Néstor Duprey Salgado y Eduardo Lalo. Síguenos en las redes: Twitter: @PalabraLibrePR, Facebook: Palabra Libre PR Página web: Palabra Libre – Más allá del bipartidismo (palabralibrepr.com) -- Colaboradores: Librería El Candil (www.libreriaelcandil.com), Música: Cafêzz (www.cafezzmusic.com) y Bambola Juguetes (bambolajuguetes.com)

Seattle Mariners Podcast
No. 799: Clemente

Seattle Mariners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 26:13 Very Popular


We take a look at the series starting with the Angels. Alex Rivera gives us his thoughts on the Mariners. We pay tribute to Roberto Clemente as we talk with Luis Clemente and former teammate Steve Blass. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio
DK's Daily Shot of Pirates: On this Clemente Day ... fire the hitting coach

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 18:27


On this Clemente Day (and really, everyday) ... fire the hitting coach. Hear award-winning columnist Dejan Kovacevic's Daily Shots of Steelers, Penguins and Pirates -- three separate podcasts -- every weekday morning on the DK Pittsburgh Sports podcasting network, available on all platforms: https://linktr.ee/dkpghsports Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices